Jeannette Rankin papers, 1912-1971  PDF  XML

Overview of the Collection

Creator
Rankin, Jeannette, 1880-1973
Title
Jeannette Rankin papers
Dates
1912-1971 (inclusive)
1916-1942 (bulk)
Quantity
6.4 linear feet of shelf space
Collection Number
MC 147 (collection)
Summary
Jeannette Rankin, 1880-1973, was the first woman elected to the U.S. Congress. She served two nonconsecutive terms in the House of Representatives: 1917-1919 and 1941-1943. Rankin was a suffragist, pacifist, and progressive social reformer. As congresswoman she voted against declaration of both world wars. The collection (1912-1972, bulk 1916-1942) consists primarily of correspondence and subject files from Rankin's congressional office. The bulk of materials are from her first term. Some materials from her career as a peace activist are also included, as are scattered personal records.
Repository
Montana Historical Society, Research Center Archives
Montana Historical Society Research Center Archives
225 North Roberts
PO Box 201201
Helena MT
59620-1201
Telephone: 406-444-2681
Fax: 406-444-5297
mhslibrary@mt.gov
Access Restrictions

Collection open for research.

Languages
English
Sponsor
Funding for encoding this finding aid was provided through a grant awarded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.


Biographical NoteReturn to Top

Jeannette Rankin was born on June 11, 1880, to John and Olive Pickering Rankin on the family's Grant Creek Ranch near Missoula, Montana. John Rankin was a successful frontier entrepreneur and the Rankins were among the wealthiest families in Missoula. Jeannette was raised with her younger brother and five sisters in town. Rankin graduated from Montana State University in Missoula in 1902 and from the New York School of Philanthropy in 1903. In 1910 she began work for the Children's Home Society of Spokane, Washington, where she was given the responsibility of finding homes for the wards of the institution. That same year she enrolled in the University of Washington. It was there she first became involved in the women's suffrage movement. When she learned that the Montana legislature might place a women's suffrage referendum before the voters in 1911, she travelled to Helena and addressed the state's Legislative Assembly. The referendum failed, but the National American Woman Suffrage Association recognized Rankin’s political skill and hired her as a field secretary. For the next three years Rankin travelled the country delivering speeches and organizing local grassroots campaigns for suffrage. In 1914 the suffrage movement took her back to to Montana where she directed state-wide suffrage activity. This time her efforts were successful and Montana became the tenth state to give women the vote.

On July 11, 1916, Jeannette Rankin announced her candidacy on the Republican ticket for the U.S. House of Representatives. She was one of eight candidates for Montana's two at-large seats. Her campaign was funded and managed by her younger brother Wellington, a successful lawyer and heir of their late father's considerable fortune. Belle Fligelman of Helena organized and directed the electioneering. Rankin soundly defeated her Republican opponents in the primary, and, though the general election proved to be much closer, Rankin succeeded in becoming the first woman elected to the U.S. Congress.

The 65th Congress convened early in 1917 as a result of the war issue. On April 6, when President Woodrow Wilson's war resolution reached the House, Congresswoman Rankin voted with 55 other members of the House against the war. She was attacked in both the Montana and national press for her stand, although she claimed that her vote reflected the wishes of her constituents. Rankin subsequently supported the war effort while maintaining her principled opposition to war as a method of international relations.

During her first term in Congress Rankin worked for pensions for veterans and their dependents, salary increases for federal employees, aid for economically depressed and drought-stricken Montana farmers, and national prohibition. She opposed the postal zone system for second class mail as a measure which would result in further isolation for many Westerners who relied upon magazines for news. Rankin also introduced a resolution for American recognition of Irish independence. Her most tangible achievement was correcting the violations of the eight-hour day law for federal employees by the Federal Bureau of Printing and Engraving. Rankin also served on the newly established Committee on Women's Suffrage in 1917. On January 10, 1918, the Committee proposed a constitutional amendment that would grant women the right to vote nation-wide. Rankin presented the resolution to the House and delivered a speech in its favor, an unusual honor for a freshman Representative. The resolution passed the House but failed in the Senate. A year later the same resolution passed both chambers of Congress and was eventually ratified as the 19th Amendment on August 18, 1920.

In June of 1917 the Speculator Mine Disaster led to labor unrest in Butte. The newly formed Metal Mine Workers Union turned to Rankin for support. Rankin tried and failed to convince federal officials to intervene and force the powerful Anaconda Copper Mining Company to the negotiating table. A House Joint Resolution authorizing "the President to take over and operate metalliferous mines in certain cases" also failed. Rankin visited Butte to appeal to both parties in person, but this too accomplished little. "The Company" crushed the labor opposition then influenced the Montana Legislature to rezone the state's congressional districts so that Rankin had no path to reelection in 1918.

Realizing she had been outmaneuvered, Rankin ran instead for the U.S. Senate in 1918 but was defeated in the Republican primary by Oscar Lanstrum. In September she announced her candidacy on the Nationalist Party ticket but was soundly defeated in the general election.

Following the election Rankin moved to Georgia, where she bought a small farm. She devoted her time and energy to the peace movement of the 1920s and 1930s, centering her efforts on the Georgia Peace Society, which she founded, and the National Council for Prevention of War. Rankin lobbied Congress on behalf of the NCPW and other organizations during this time and travelled the country using her celebrity as the first female congressmember to advocate for peace.

Rankin retained her legal residence in Montana, although she continued to live primarily in Georgia. In June 1940 she announced her candidacy for a second term in the U.S. House of Representatives from Montana and defeated her opponent Jerry J. O'Connell. Her campaign this time was overtly anti-war, which resonated with many Montanans in 1940. During the early months of her term she worked to defeat President Roosevelt's Lend-Lease and conscription legislation. After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, President Roosevelt called a special session of the 77th Congress for December 8, 1941. Congresswoman Rankin cast the single "no" vote. Unlike in 1917, this vote against war effectively ended her political career. Pearl Harbor had caused a sea-change in public opinion on war, but Rankin characteristically placed her personal ideals above her political career.

Rankin continued to work for her constituents for the remainder of her second term, seeking federal assistance for the financially distressed and keeping families of P.O.W.s in contact with their loved ones. Reelection in 1942, however, was out of the question.

Following her second term Rankin continued her work in pacifism. She traveled the world through the 1950s and 60s and enjoyed a brief resurgence of popularity in connection with the anti-Vietnam War movement in the late 1960s. Rankin remained active and politically engaged until her death on May 18, 1973, at the age of ninety-two.

Content DescriptionReturn to Top

Papers. 1912-1972 (bulk 1916-1942). 6.4 linear feet. The Jeannette Rankin papers are arranged in four subgroups corresponding to her personal life (bulk 1916-1942), first congressional term (1916-1919), peace activities (bulk 1932-1940), and second congressional term (1940-1942). Materials from Rankin's first congressional term make up the bulk of the collection, consisting primarily of correspondence arranged in subject files. While much of the outgoing correspondence is comprised of brief form letters, the incoming correspondence casts light on contemporary state, national, and international sentiment on a wide variety of issues. In addition, there is a large body of correspondence which is the consequence of any congressmember's office routine: appointments to military academies, invitations, requests for government publications, etc. Many of Rankin's speeches are also included, as is a large collection of newspaper clippings.

Materials from Rankin's second term are similarly arranged in subject files, mostly relating to House Resolutions introduced by Rankin. Documentation of her 1940 campaign is also included. The two remaining subgroups contain more scattered materials. Materials include general correspondence, printed ephemera, speeches, and miscellany. Of special note is a correspondence file between Jeannette and Wellington Rankin.

Use of the CollectionReturn to Top

Restrictions on Use

Researchers must use collection in accordance with the policies of the Montana Historical Society. The Society does not necessarily hold copyright to all materials in the collection. In some cases permission for use may require additional authorization from the copyright owners. For more information contact an archivist.

Preferred Citation

Item description and date. Collection Title. Collection Number. Box and Folder numbers. Montana Historical Society Research Center, Archives, Helena, Montana.

Administrative InformationReturn to Top

Arrangement

Materials within each subgroup are arranged in series. Arrangement within series varies. Correspondence is sorted either chronologically or alphabetically by last name. First term subject files are sorted alphabetically by topic, while second term subject files are sorted chronologically. Arrangement of materials within folders is noted with brackets when appropriate. See inventory below for more information.

Location of Collection

7:3

Acquisition Information

Acquisition information available upon request

Processing Note

As multiple biographers have noted, Rankin's considerable talents did not extend to efficient record keeping. Most materials in this collection were received in a disorganized state and considerable custodial intervention was required to render them useable to researchers. Original order is indicated whenever possible by quotation marks on folder titles.

Separated Materials

Maps separated to Library, photographs separated to Photo Archives. See inventory below for more information.

Related Materials

Papers of Jeannette Rankin, 1879-1976 (inclusive), 1916-1973 (bulk) MC 246. Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Jeannette Rankin Papers RBRL/325. Richard B. Russell Library for Political Research and Studies, Athens, Georgia.

Jeannette Rankin Collected Papers, 1917-2011 CDG-A. Swarthmore College Peace Collection, Swarthmore, Pennsylvania.

Wellington Rankin papers, 1904-1969 (bulk date) MC 288. Montana Historical Society Research Center, Archives, Helena, Montana.


Detailed Description of the CollectionReturn to Top

The following section contains a detailed listing of the materials in the collection

Personal records, 1912-1968,   (bulk 1916-1942) Return to Top

Container(s) Description Dates
Correspondence
Box/Folder
1 / 1
Wellington Rankin
1912-1938, undated
1 / 2
Lee Keedrick re: speaking tour
1917-1919
1 / 3-4
Miscellaneous (1-2) (correspondents include Fiorello LaGuardia, Mary Huntington Williams, Elizabeth Armour, Louis E. Larson, Beatrice L. Curry, Lucy Hughes, Joseph W. Martin, the American Civil Liberties Union) [chronological]
1932, 1934, 1938-1940
Financial Records
Box/Folder
1 / 5
Claim against American Railway Express Company
1922
Printed Materials
Box/Folder
1 / 6
National Women's Trade Union League
1914-1916, undated
1 / 7
"Women in Industry: the Eight Hour Day and Rest at Night upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court"
1916
1 / 8
"The Solution of the Money Problem." E.Z. Ernzt
1916
1 / 9
National Woman Suffrage Association Newsletter
1916 December
1 / 10
"The Jews in Nazi Germany: the Factual Record of their persecution by the National Socialists." American Jewish Center
1933
1 / 11
"Social Questions Bulletin"
1940 February
Miscellany
Box/Folder
1 / 12
Calling cards
undated

First congressional term, 1916-1919Return to Top

Container(s) Description Dates
Correspondence
Box/Folder
2 / 1
Harriet "Hattie" Sedman (secretary)
1918
2 / 2
Miscellaneous #1 [chronological] (correspondents include M.E. Skinner; Harry A. Walker; Sam E. Vertreez; E. Shifflet; The Wisconsin Agriculturist; Lillian Welsh; May Stanley)
1916 August-December
2 / 3
Miscellaneous #2 [chronological] (correspondents include Theodore Vermeire; Winifred Wolcott; Henry L. Stimson; Eva C. Smith; A.P. Shane; James T. Sheridan; Mary M. Wiley; Harriet Bishop Waters; Robert Sibley; R.J. Stamps; Margaret Van Slate; W.J. Sullivan; Daniel B. Strong; Social Hygiene; Meta Wellers; Marie Spink; Paul H. Weyranch; The Frank A. Munsey Company; Elizabeth Van Winkle; Morde Smith; Margaret M. Sterling; Dudley D. Sicher; Fannie Wood; Clara Savage; Isaac R. Sherwood; Ellen Walker; Anna F. Stewart; Pattie B. Stoute; A.N. Marquis and Company; Stephen Rimington Whitney; Edna Smith; Henry Wilbert; National Women's Trade Union League of America; Susan Sherry; Marion Whiting; Percy Stone; Emil Vaterlaus; Ruth Springer; W.H. Sears; A.E. McLeish)
1917 January-May
2 / 4
Miscellaneous #3 [chronological] (correspondents include New Willard Hotel; George Welby Van Pelt; George H. Sandison; Agnes K. Wright; Anna Garlin Spencer; H.H. Snell; Red Fox Skiuhusha; June Westwood; George T. Winchester; The Woman's Evening Clinic; Heard Stockslager; F.J. Wynne; Dave Swander; W.H. Stayton; P.A. Speer; Successful Farming; Emily L. Veitch; W.M. Shoemaker; S.A. Wilkins; Fred Snyder; F.F. Hendrickson; Charles B. Smith; Brooke G. White Jr., Martha Summerfield Shuey; James C. Waters Jr., Mary Van Kleeck; Dwight E. Watkins; D.H. Wright)
1917 June-July
2 / 5
Miscellaneous #4 [chronological] (correspondents include Fredrick Stewart; Katharine R. Shay; J.V. White; V.C. Vaiden; J.A. Van Fleet; The Villager; William Mac Williams; D.S.Scott; E.A. Wallace; V. Vlasto; B.K. Wood; Louise Maxwel Williamson; William I. Sirarch; J.A. Young; Edward B. Watson; Jessie E. Shaw; Walton Advertising; H.L. Simms; Alice Page Nelson Waller; J.J. Shoemaker; Charles E. Saltzman; Agnes Shand; William L. Straus Jr., Philip G. Straus; Clarence R. Wagoner; Frank P. Woods; E.N. Springer; W.R. Sawyer; Oscar Warnock)
1917 August-September
2 / 6
Miscellaneous #5 [chronological] (correspondents include Nelson W Spaulding; E.D. Shelton; M.A. Young; Lewis Smith Studio; Frederick Willard; J. Schmitt; L.M. Sniff; Guy Shoemaker; J.S. Snoddy; Esther Zarnele; Addie Wright; Women's Club; Harold Whittemore; Edward A. Storvick; H.C. Schilling; M.M. Yates; Eva M. Vincent; Clark Sloan; Elizabeth Southwick; Bella Neumann-Zilberman; Ada P. Spalding; George S. Sparks; Charles Van Bergen; O.H.P. Shelley; Albert Shaw; R.F. Weakley; E. Simmons; Susan Hunter Walker; Herbert H. Smith; Louise Wilson Schwarz; Minerva V. Scott)
1917 October-December
2 / 7
Miscellaneous #6 [chronological] (correspondents include Western Union; Cortez Wright; Hattie Stein; Red Fox James; Carson W. White; J.C. White; E.A. Tennis; Lillian C. Thompson; Richard W. Winans; Ora Troutman; Mrs. Thomas Vincent; Mich Whraton; T.W. Tresidder; H.J. Titus; Minnich Wackford; Maggie Thompson; W.D. Wolfe; Alice Ward)
1918 January-February
2 / 8
Miscellaneous #7 [chronological] (correspondents include Henry H. Ward; Peter E. Stogoff; M.H. Wilcoxon; Caleb W. VanHamm; Karl F. Blutharsch; Georgia Wright; H.W. Smith; F.J. Werling; David Weaver; Raymond Wilcox; Mary Ogden White; James Boland)
1918 March-April
2 / 9
Miscellaneous #8 [chronological] (correspondents include James Boland; Talbot; William H. Taylor; John Wuchter; John Patrick Marmion; Martin Williams; Rose Waple; peal Lillian Truman; Arthur T. Vance; Frances Wiman; Edna A. Zimman; Walter E. Weyl; Arthur Whitney; Mrs. Falconer; Dr. Voyslav M. Yovanovitch; Marie Wimmel; Elliott Woods; P.E. Tierney; Wilbur F. Wakeman; M.W. Thayer; M.J. Walsh; Victor A. Wakhontoff; Samuel J. Wright; C.V. Vickrey; George M. Veile; Michael Lambrecht; A.M. Todd; Merle Thorpe)
1918 May-1919 January
3 / 1
Miscellaneous #9
undated
Maps and Photographs
Box/Folder
3 / 2
List of maps transferred to the Library and photographs transferred to the Photo Archives
Printed Material
Box/Folder
3 / 3
"An Outline Course in Citizenship." U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Naturalization
1916
3 / 4
"Syllabus of the Naturalization Law." U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Naturalization
1916
3 / 5
"Extending the Right of Suffrage to Women." Hearings before the House Committee on Women Suffrage
1918 January 3-7
3 / 6
H.R. 12231 (re: water power)
1918 May 22
Speeches and Writings
Box/Folder
3 / 7
Untitled. On women and war work.
1917
3 / 8
"Register the Babies" and Untitled. On birth registration and social wellfare
1917
3 / 9
"Statement by miss Jeannette Rankin" on women and war work. Before Senate Committee
1917 April 27
3 / 10
Untitled. On women and food rationing
1917 July 9
3 / 11
Untitled. On Butte mining strike and Government control of mines
1917
3 / 12
Untitled speech on Butte mining strike (draft and final). At the Non-Partisan League Convention
1917 September 20
3 / 13
Untitled. Comments on U.S. declaration of war against Austria-Hungary
1917 December
3 / 14
"Women Suffrage by Federal Amendment." Minority report to accompany H.J. Res. 3
1918 January?
3 / 15-16
Speech before the House on H.J. Res. 200 (women suffrage amendment)
1918 January 10
3 / 17
Untitled speech on women suffrage. At the National American Women Suffrage Association Convention
1918 December 13
3 / 18
Untitled speech on Montana politics
undated
3 / 19
"The Worker with no Tools" on women and war work. For the National Federation of Women's Clubs
undated
3 / 20
"A new Economy for Women." On women and war work
undated
3 / 21
"At the Front with the Women."
undated
3 / 22
Miscellaneous speeches
undated
Subject Files
Box/Folder
4 / 1
Appointment with President Woodrow Wilson
1917
4 / 2
Asiatic Exclusion Act
1917
4 / 3-5
Baer Seed Bills (1-3)
1917-1918
4 / 6
Birth congratulations (sampled)
1918
4 / 7
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
1917-1918
4 / 8-14
Butte mine conditions and strike (1-7)
1916-1918
4 / 15-16
Campaign (House of Representatives, 1916) (1-2)
1916-1917
4 / 17
Campaign (Senate, 1918) (#1)
1916-1918, undated
5 / 1-2
Campaign (Senate, 1918) (2-3)
1916-1918, undated
5 / 3-8
"Circular 1" (response to circular letter) (1-6) regarding women’s reactions to World War 1
1917
5 / 9-10
"Citizenship Legislation" (re American women married to aliens) (1-2)
1917-1918
6 / 1
Eleanor Coit
1917-1918
6 / 2-4
Congratulations (1-3)
1916-1918
6 / 5-9
Congratulations (Election, 1916) (1-5)
1916-1917
6 / 10-12
Congratulations (World War I, "No" vote, from out of state supporters) A-F, (1-3)
1917
6 / 13-14
Conscription (1-2) (regarding Selective Service and draft)
1916-1918
7 / 1-4
Conscription (3-6) (regarding Selective Service and draft)
1916-1918
7 / 5
Dependent Relative Bill (HR 5370)
1917
7 / 6
Equity Petition correspondence (sampled)
1917 February 12-13
7 / 7-8
Exemptions from military service (1-2)
1917
7 / 9-11
"Federal Employees" (regarding salary increases) (1-3)
1917-1918
7 / 12
"Food" (regarding wheat substitutes and U.S. Food Administration)
1917-1918
7 / 13-14
Food Survey Bill (1-2)
1917
7 / 15
Form letters and circulars
1917-1918
7 / 16
"Helen Grey" (Re: White Homesteads on Indian Reservation)
1917
7 / 17-18
Invitations (1-2)
1917-1918
8 / 1-2
Invitations (3-4)
1917-1918
8 / 3
Irish indepedence resolution
1918
8 / 4-5
Legislation (miscellaneous) (1-2)
1917, 1918
8 / 6
Letters of introduction
1917-1918
8 / 7
Madden Bill (regarding Postoffice addresses)
1918
8 / 8
Military allowances and releases
1917
8 / 9
Minimum price for wheat and shipping rates on grain
1917-1919
8 / 10
Missing persons inquiries
1917
8 / 11
New York Evening Post
1917-1918
8 / 12
"Non-Partisan League"
1917
8 / 13
Office decoration
1917
8 / 14
Pension claims
1917
8 / 15
Pension legislation
1917-1918
9 / 1-2
Personal correspondents and topics (1-2)
1917-1918
9 / 3-5
"P.O. Salaries" (regarding salary increase for postal workers) (1-3)
1917-1918, undated
9 / 6-12
"P.O. Salaries" (regarding postal zone clause of War Revenue Bill) (1-7)
1917-1918
10 / 1
"P.O. Salaries" (regarding postal zone clause of War Revenue Bill) (#8)
1917-1918
10 / 2-7
Prohibition (1-6)
1917-1918
10 / 8
"Red Cross Cotton"
1918
10 / 9
"Redpath" (regarding Redpath Lyceum Bureau speaking engagements)
1916-1918
10 / 10
Referrals to other legislators
1917-1918
10 / 11-14
Requests for appointments (1-4)
1917-1918
10 / 15
Requests for appointments to military academies (#1)
1917-1918
11 / 1-6
Requests for appointments to military academies (2-7)
1917-1918
11 / 7-8
Requests for Farmers' Bulletins (1-2)
1917-1919
11 / 9-10
Requests for government documents (1-2)
1917-1919
12 / 1-3
Requests for government documents (3-5)
1917-1919
12 / 4
Requests for general information
1916-1918
12 / 5-8
Requests for seed (1-4)
1917-1918
12 / 9
Requests for speech on government control of mines
1917
12 / 10-11
Resolutions topics (1-2)
1917-1918
13 / 1-2
Speaking engagements (1-2)
1917-1918
13 / 3-5
Speaking engagements (Lee Keedick, manager) (1-3)
1917-1918
13 / 6-9
"Suffrage" (1-4)
1917-1918
13 / 10-11
War effort and hardships (1-2)
1917-1918
13 / 12
"War Legislation" (regarding military personnel, civilians, etc.)
1917-1918
13 / 13
War resolutions (#1)
1917
14 / 1-6
War resolutions (2-7)
1917
14 / 7-8
War Revenue Bills (general) (1-2)
1917-1918
14 / 9
War Revenue Bills (regarding auto tax)
1917
14 / 10
War Revenue Bill (regarding drug and alcohol tax)
1917
14 / 11
War Revenue Bill (regarding musical instruments tax)
1917
14 / 12
War Revenue Bill (regarding stamp tax on checks)
1917
14 / 13
War Revenue Bill (miscellaneous) (#1)
1917
15 / 1
War Revenue Bill (miscellaneous) (#2)
1917
15 / 2-3
"Wheat Sub" (regarding wheat flour substitutes) (1-2)
1917-1918
Clippings
Box/Folder
15 / 4-6
Miscellaneous clippings
1917-1918, undated
Miscellany
Box/Folder
15 / 7
Miscellany
1917-1918, undated

Peace activities, 1929-1971,   (bulk 1932-1940) Return to Top

Container(s) Description Dates
Correspondence
Box/Folder
16 / 1
General (correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt; H.C. Train; Mrs. Frederic Beggs; C.H. Clapp; James A. Frear; Chester M. Kearney; H.C. Ecklund; Fred Maney; William Floyd; Clarinda Richards; L.B. Waters; Mothers of American Sons, Inc) [chronological]
1932-1971 (bulk: 1932-1940)
16 / 2
Lester P. Barlow
1938 February
16 / 3
National Council for Prevention of War
1938-1940
16 / 4
S.E. Farquhar (The Quarry Corp. Publishers)
1938 July-August
Financial Records
Box/Folder
16 / 5
National Council for Prevention of War
1939
Printed Materials
Box/Folder
16 / 6
National Council for Prevention of War: administrative
1934, undated
16 / 7
National Council for Prevention of War: newsletters and pamphlets
1938, undated
16 / 8
National Council for Prevention of War: essays and reports
1940 April-May
16 / 9
Keep America Out of War Congress
1939, undated
16 / 10
Miscellaneous
1935-1940, undated
Speeches and Writings
Box/Folder
16 / 11
"Radio Talk by Jeanette Rankin" on Armistice Day and peace
1936 November 11
16 / 12
Untitled speech on desire for and nature of peace
after 1929
16 / 13
Untitled speech on nature of modern war (multiple drafts)
undated
16 / 14
Untitled radio address on national defense and war
undated
16 / 15
Miscellaneous speeches
circa 1940, after 1946
Subject Files
Box/Folder
16 / 16
American Legion controversy
1934-1940
Clippings
Box/Folder
16 / 17
Clippings
1939, 1963, 1967

Second congressional term, 1940-1942Return to Top

Container(s) Description Dates
1940 Campaign Records
Box/Folder
16 / 18
Correspondence: general (correspondents include Mary A. Wilson, Alex Cunningham, Ross Hargrave, John W. Lyman) [chronological]
1940 October-November
16 / 19
Correspondence: letters of endorsement (A-Y)
1940
16 / 20
Correspondence: mass mailings/advertisements
1940
16 / 21
Correspondence: requests for advertising
1940
16 / 22
Office files: itineraries, voter lists, etc.
1940
16 / 23
Office files: financial
1940
16 / 24
Printed material
1940
Correspondence
Box/Folder
17 / 1
Election congratulations
1940 November
17 / 2
General (correspondents include R. Douglas Stuart Jr., Frederick D. Whisler, Marcus P. Rasmussen, Lyle C. Wilson, M.J. McDonough) [chronological]
1940-1942
Printed Material
Box/Folder
17 / 3
"Our American Government: What is it? How does it function?" USGPO. House Resolutions 1939-1942
1941, 1939-1942
Speeches
Box/Folder
17 / 4
"Democracy and Women" January 16, 1940. "Prepare to the Limit for Defense - Keep our men out of Europe" August 5, 1940. "Some Questions about Pearl Harbor." December 8, 1942.
1940, 1942
Subject Files
Box/Folder
17 / 5
"H.R. 3018 - Fort Missoula Reservation Land Exchange for land owned by Missoula Chamber of Commerce"
1941 February 3
17 / 6
"H. Con. Res. 31 - U.S. Military Policy (not to send armed forces of U.S. to fight outside of Western Hemisphere or possessions)"
1941 May 6
17 / 7
"H.R. 4910 - William Murray (Patent)"
1941 May 28
17 / 8
H.R. 4916 - Statute of Limitations
1941 May 29
17 / 9
"H.R. 4982 - Tsiang Hsi Tseng (immigration case)"
1941 June 5
17 / 10
"H.R. 5315 - Joseph C. Eastland (disability compensation) (cannot be considered. Committee rule)"
1941 July 14
17 / 11
"H.R. 5316 - Dorothy Duncan Krecklow (claim for injuries)"
1941 July 14
17 / 12
"H.R. 5317 - Jessie A. Beechwood (compensation claim for death of son)"
1941 July 14
17 / 13
"H.R. 5318 - Bessie Waldon (compensation claim for death of husband)"
1941 July 14
17 / 14
"H.R. 5808 - Court of claims Confederated Salish and Kootenai Indians of Montana"
1941 October 10
17 / 15
"H.R. 5914 - Passenger Carrier Receipts (passenger transportation)"
1941 October 27
17 / 16
"H.R. 5928 - Foreign Propaganda to be designated (published or broadcast)"
1941 October 30
17 / 17
"H. Con. Res. 59 - War Referendum"
1941 November 28
17 / 18
"H.R. 6152 - Christmas at home for draftees"
1941 December 1
17 / 19
H.R. 6561 - Congressional Pension Bill
1942 March 7
17 / 20
World War II Prisoners of War: correspondence A-W
1942
17 / 21
World War II Prisoners of War: general correspondence and printed material
1942
Clippings
Box/Folder
17 / 22
Lake County newspapers
1941, undated
17 / 23
Lewis and Clark County newspapers
1941, undated
17 / 24
Lincoln County newspapers
1941
17 / 25
Rivalli County newspapers
1941, undated
17 / 26
Miscellaneous
undated

Names and SubjectsReturn to Top

Subject Terms

  • Draft
  • Droughts
  • Farmers
  • Feminism
  • Pacifism
  • Prohibition
  • Women and war
  • Women in politics
  • Women--Suffrage
  • World War, 1914-1918--PUBLIC OPINION
  • World War, 1939-1945--PUBLIC OPINION

Personal Names

  • Rankin, Jeannette, 1880-1973 (creator)
  • Rankin, Wellington Duncan, 1884-1966 (creator)

Geographical Names

  • Butte (Mont.)
  • Washington (D.C.)