William C. Smith papers, 1924-1927  PDF  XML

Overview of the Collection

Creator
Smith, William Carlson, 1883-
Title
William C. Smith papers
Dates
1924-1927 (inclusive)
Quantity
9 linear feet, (6 containers)  :  6 record storage boxes
Collection Number
Ax 311
Summary
William Carlson Smith (1883-?), educator and sociologist, contributed major research to the Survey of Race Relations, a 1925 study of economic, legal and social relations between whites and Asians on the Pacific Coast and in Hawaii. This research formed part of the basis for Smith's 1939 book Americans in the Making. Perhaps Smith's most widely-known work was his 1953 book The Stepchild, which was the culmination of fifteen years of research and study. Smith did much of the research in Oregon while at Linfield College. The William Carlson Smith collection contains documents related to the Survey of Race Relations, including interviews with and autobiographies of Japanese, Chinese, Mexican, and other immigrants and first-generation Americans. There are also copies of official letters and published items concerning race relations.
Repository
University of Oregon Libraries, Special Collections and University Archives.
UO Libraries--SCUA
1299 University of Oregon
Eugene OR
97403-1299
Telephone: 541-346-3068
spcarref@uoregon.edu
Access Restrictions

Collection is open to the public. Collection must be used in Special Collections and University Archives Reading Room. Collection or parts of collection may be stored offsite. Please contact Special Collections and University Archives in advance of your visit to allow for transportation time.

Additional Reference Guides

See the Current Collection Guide for detailed description and requesting options.

Languages
English
Sponsor
Funding for encoding this finding aid was provided through a grant awarded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.


Historical NoteReturn to Top

William Carlson Smith was born 1883 and graduated in 1907 from Grand Island College, Grand Island Nebraska, where he majored in arts and letters. Smith held various positions in his early career: high school principal, teacher, Red Cross worker, field worker and probation officer. Dr. Smith did educational work in Assam, India under the American Baptist Foreign Mission Society from 1912 to 1915.

Following his return to the United States Smith continued his studies at the University of Southern California and the University of Chicago, majoring in sociology. He went on to hold positions in the sociology departments of various universities.

In the 1920s, Smith worked as a researcher on the Survey of Race Relations, a Canadian-American project whose goal was to investigate "relations between Orientals and whites on the Pacific Coast" ( Tentative Findings of the Survey of Race Relations. Stanford University: 1925). The survey collected demographic and economic data regarding Japanese and Chinese immigrants and their children, and gave particular attention to the impact of race- and immigration-related legislation such as the "anti-alien land" laws. This research formed part of the basis for Smith's book Americans in the Making.

During his tenure at Texas Christian University (1929-1933), Smith became actively involved in a drive to investigate the University's administrative policies through the American Association of University Professors. Smith and his followers charged that nepotism and favoritism combined with poor management of funds had compromised the University to the extent that faculty had no job security and were often dismissed without cause.

Perhaps Smith's most important work was his 1953 book The Stepchild, which was the culmination of fifteen years of research and study. Smith did much of the research in Oregon while at Linfield College. This collection contains a large section of manuscript materials related to The Stepchild.

Other fields investigated by Smith were immigration and second generation Asian Americans in America. These interests are reflected in a number of articles by Smith that are included in the collection.

Content DescriptionReturn to Top

The William Carlson Smith Papers (Ax 311) are the documents assembled by Smith and Robert Ezra Park for a survey of race relations on the Pacific Coast and in Hawaii, 1924-1927, and used by Smith in Americans in the Making. The documents consist of interviews with and autobiographies of Japanese, Chinese, Mexican, and other immigrants and first-generation Americans. Most of the autobiographies were written by school children in California and Hawaii. There are also copies of official letters and published items concerning race relations.

Collection is organized into five series. The first consists of Major Documents relating to the Survey of Race Relations and occupies 62 folders in Box 1; the second holds the Minor Documents relating to the Survey, and is housed in folders 63-80 of Box 1 and Folders 1-8 of Box 2. The third series is a single folder-Folder 9-in Box 2 documenting Conflicts. The fourth is a collection of Life Histories of Students, housed in Box 3, Folders 10-21, all of Box 4, and Box 5, Folders 1-9. The fifth series contains Miscellaneous documents pertaining to the Survey, and can be found in Folders 10-24 of Box 5 and all of Box 6.

Administrative InformationReturn to Top


Detailed Description of the CollectionReturn to Top

Names and SubjectsReturn to Top

Subject Terms

  • Asian Americans
  • Emigration and immigration law--United States
  • Immigrant children--California--Biography
  • Immigrant children--Hawaii--Biography
  • Mexican Americans

Personal Names

  • Park, Robert Ezra, 1864-1944
  • Smith, William Carlson, 1883-
  • Smith, William Carlson, 1883-

Geographical Names

  • Hawaii--Race relations
  • Pacific Coast (U.S.)--Race relations