Marriner S. Eccles papers, 1910-1985  PDF

Overview of the Collection

Creator
Eccles, Marriner S. (Marriner Stoddard), 1890-1977
Title
Marriner S. Eccles papers
Dates
1910-1985 (inclusive)
Quantity
120 linear feet
Collection Number
Ms0178
Summary
The Marriner S. Eccles papers (1910-1985) chronicles the years when Eccles made his greatest contributions as a national and international fiscal and monetary expert, businessman, and public figure. A portion of these papers have been digitized and are available online through the Federal Reserve Archive.
Repository
University of Utah Libraries, Special Collections.
Special Collections, J. Willard Marriott Library
University of Utah
295 South 1500 East
Salt Lake City, UT
84112-0860
Telephone: 801-581-8863
SPCreference@lists.utah.edu
Access Restrictions

Twenty-four hour advanced notice encouraged. Materials must be used on-site. Access to parts of this collection may be restricted under provisions of state or federal law.

Languages
English


Historical NoteReturn to Top

"Brigham Young was the colonizer; Daniel Jackling the mining giant, and Marriner S. Eccles was Utah's premier financial genius," was the introduction to a 1977 Deseret News review of Eccles' then-recently published biography. The biography, Marriner S. Eccles: Private Entrepreneur and Public Servant, as well as a previously published autobiography, Beckoning Frontiers, detail the life of this remarkable man. He became the "principal economic philosopher of the New Deal," according to James Gardner, a professor in the University of Utah's College of Management. Another review of Eccles' biography stated, "The political and institutional principles he advocated and laid down as head of the 'Fed' are the very armature of the legislative structure under which US business and finance now operates."

Marriner Eccles, born 9 eptember 1890, to David Eccles and his second wife, Ellen Stoddard, was the oldest of nine children. David Eccles, a leading Utah entrepreneur and a Mormon polygamist, also had twelve children by his first wife, Bertha Maria Jensen. To distinguish between the two families, Bertha and her children were known as the Ogden Eccleses; Ellen and her children as the Logan Eccleses. The significance of these geographical distinctions was later diminished when Marriner Eccles moved to Ogden and centered his business pursuits there during the 1920s.

Ellen Eccles and her children lived alternately in Baker, Oregon, and in Logan, Utah, because of her husband's business interests in both places. Sidney Hyman, author of Eccles' biography, speculates that because of her uncertain status as a plural wife (the Mormon church declared an end to polygamy in 1890), and thus a diminished sense of financial security, Ellen Eccles instilled in her sons a strong work ethic and the drive to become successful. She reasoned that their success would ensure her security, as was to be the case.

David Eccles, reputed to be the largest tithe payer in the Mormon church, died unexpectedly and intestate in 1912 at the age of 65. Although all of his children from both families shared equally in their father's estate, there was only one legally recognized widow--Bertha Eccles. The Logan Eccleses were left with a two-sevenths share, and the Ogden Eccleses with five-sevenths of the multi-million dollar estate.

Marriner Eccles attended Brigham Young College in Logan, Utah, which functioned more as a high school than a college. He left school in June 1909 at the age of 18; this was to be the end of his formal education. His father, whose schooling was limited, did not believe an extended education was necessary for success in business, and Marriner proved him correct. As the oldest son in his family, the responsibility for the welfare of his mother and his eight brothers and sisters, as well as the administration of the estate left them by their father, was thrust upon him.

In the meantime, he did what most other young Mormon men did-he served a mission for his church. From 1910 to 1912 he was in Scotland, the country his father left as a penniless youth. While in Schotland he met May Campbell Young (Maysie), his wife-to-be. On his return to Utah they corresponded, she joined him in Utah, and they were married in 1913.

His marriage and business career began at the same time. He first became president of the Hyrum State Bank, and a director and officer of the Thatcher Brothers Bank in Logan, two institutions in which his father had held significant interests. In 1916 he organized the Eccles Investment Company, a holding company, to manage the inheritance left to the Logan Eccleses. This holding company would exist for the next sixty years. Throughout the 1920s he built his business base in Utah. He assumed control of the First National Bank and First Savings Bank of Ogden. Eccles was also able to assume control of or take a leading role in the direction of several companies in which his father had held interests. These companies included Stoddard Lumber, Sego Milk, Eccles Hotel Company, Anderson Lumber, Mountain States Implement, Utah Home Fire Insurance Company, Utah Construction, and Amalgamated Sugar.

David Eccles was described by Leonard Arrington, Utah historian, as being a "man of vision, an analyst, an independent thinker, a fashioner of strong organizations and strong policies." While Marriner Eccles inherited these qualities from his father, they seemed lacking in the Ogden Eccleses. Their share of David Eccles' estate was much larger than that of the Logan Eccleses', but it dwindled considerably over the years. The inheritance of the Logan Eccleses, on the other hand, under Marriner's sound management, grew handsomely. According to Hyman, "The Ogden Eccleses would in time virtually disintegrate as a family while the Logan Eccleses, with Marriner in control, were held together over the passing decades despite many internal strains."

By 1918, Marriner and Maysie Eccles were the parents of three children: Campbell, Eleanor, and John (a fourth child died at an early age). During the next decade Eccles acquired, seemingly without conscious design, interests in additional banks. This led to the formation of the First Security Corporation in 1928 with Marriner serving as president and his brother George as a vice president. The corporation is believed to have been the nation's first bank holding company. At the end of the 1920s, Marriner Eccles had achieved a full measure of success.

The next decade would tell a different story. By 1930, the nation was in the grip of the Great Depression, and Eccles stood to lose much of what he had worked for during the previous eighteen years. As he reflected on the dynamics of the national economy and the responsibilities of business and government toward society, he decided that "hard work and thrift as a means of pulling us out of the depression is unsound economically. True hard work means more production, but thrift and economy means less consumption." Since these two forces were difficult to reconcile, his answer was that of controlled deficit financing on the part of government. Eccles was often asked to address local groups about his fiscal and monetary views. One group particularly interested in his ideas was an organization of Ogden businessmen called the Freidenkers. German for free-thinkers, they were also known phonetically as the "free-drinkers." Eccles was a member of this group. Another member was Robert Hinckley, who later served in the Roosevelt administration. Hinckley was a nephew of Senator William H. King, a Utah Democrat, who was a member of the Senate Finance Committee. The committee had been directed to determine the causes of the depression and to suggest legislative remedies. Hinckley recommended to Senator King that Eccles should be invited to testify before the committee.

Eccles' ideas about the need for government intervention in the economy and deficit financing directly contradicted the testimony offered by others. However, because of his testimony and subsequent meetings with men close to President Franklin D. Roosevelt, he was asked to join the administration as an assistant to Secretary of the Treasury Henry Morgenthau, Jr. He accepted and began his duties in February 1934. In November of that year he was nominated by Roosevelt to head the Federal Reserve System; the Senate approved this appointment 25 April 1935. In 1936 he was appointed as chairman of the board of governors of the newly restructured Federal Reserve System created by the Banking Act of 1935.

Eccles has been given credit as being the architect of the Federal Housing Act of 1934 and the Banking Act of 1935. He continued in Washington for seventeen years as head of the nation's banking system, and provided strong leadership during the turbulent years of the depression and World War II. He often disagreed with the secretaries of the Treasury and both presidents under whom he served. These disagreements are well documented; Eccles was not a man to conceal his feelings about monetary and fiscal policies. After his initial successes in the mid-thirties, he turned his attention to two other issues. The first was the unification of the country's banking system, and in this endeavor he was not successful. He based his acceptance of reappointment to the board of governors in 1944 on Roosevelt's implied endorsement of the Eccles Unification Plan. It was not until the mid-1970s that this was accomplished, however, under then-Federal Reserve chairman Arthur Burns. The second issue involved a long-standing disagreement with the Treasury Department and both secretaries, Morgenthau and Snyder, about the best way to handle the inflationary pressures building as a result of World War II. Eccles was more successful with this issue, and saw most of his ideas realized by the Accord of 1951.

While Eccles was in Washington he was fortunate to have able men in Utah to maintain his business interests. In particular, his brother George profitably managed the First Security Corporation. Marriner did not completely remove himself from his Utah interests, however, for he assumed the position of chairman of the board of both Utah Construction and Amalgamated Sugar in the 1940s. Although his professional career was flourishing, his relationship with his wife Maysie deteriorated. They were divorced in 1950, after thirty-seven years of marriage.

The early 1950s marked several changes in Marriner Eccles' life. In 1948, because he disagreed with President Harry S. Truman's economic policies, Truman did not reappoint him as chairman of the Federal Reserve Board. Eccles was, however, still a governor of the board, as these appointments are made for fourteen years. Because he was no longer chairman, he felt that he could speak more openly about his disagreements with the administration, As his Washington career was winding down, he began writing his autobiography and retained Sidney Hyman to assist him. The book, Beckoning Frontiers, was published in 1951, the same year he resigned from the Federal Reserve Board and the same year he remarried. His new wife, Sara (Sallie) Madison Glassie, was socially prominent in Washington, D.C.

Although Eccles returned to Utah, he did not think of it as a permanent move. He mounted a brief campaign to wrest the Republican senatorial nomination from the incumbent, Arthur Watkins. Even though he was unsuccessful and he was in his early sixties, an age when most men think of retirement, Eccles was not one to retire and live on memories. Instead, he resumed active participation in his numerous business interests, primarily Amalgamated Sugar and First Security Corporation in Utah, and Utah Construction and Mining based in San Francisco. He divided his time between Salt Lake City, where he and Mrs. Eccles maintained an apartment at the Hotel Utah, and San Francisco, where they also maintained an apartment. On occasion they visited their cottage at the Eldorado Country Club in Palm Springs, California. Golf was Eccles' favorite pastime and over the years he belonged to the Burning Tree and Chevy Chase Country Clubs in Washington, D.C., as well as various other clubs.

Eccles' prime objective for the past four decades of his life was to "help lay the foundations for a stable economic order at home and in the world areas," and he felt compelled to share his concerns and solutions with every possible audience. Whereas during the 1950s he had devoted himself primarily to his business interests, in the 1960s he became more active in speaking and writing about issues of public concern.

The specific issues of critical interest to him were those of world over-population, the war in Vietnam, and to a lesser extent, the need for US recognition of Red China. He felt these problems were responsible for a great deal of instability in the world and prevented the realization of the stable economic order he had worked so hard to achieve. He wrote and spoke often about these issues to a wide variety of audiences, ranging from the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco, of which he was a member, to the Brigham Young University student body and his own family reunion (encompassing his father's large progeny), to whom he lectured on the importance of birth control. He also spoke at small meetings, such as the Unitarian Church in Salt Lake City. From all of these audiences he usually received mixed reviews.

In 1972 he delivered his last public speech before the World Trade Club in San Francisco, who presented him with their International Achievement Award. Eccles' ideas and opinions over the years had often been controversial and in many cases ahead of their time, but by 1972 many of his concepts were more widely accepted, and the Trade Club members applauded him enthusiastically.

Although his public role had increased significantly in the 1960s, his role in business had not diminished. The early 1970s, however, witnessed a winding down of his business commitments, and the lines of succession were arranged. Utah Construction and Mining became Utah International in 1971. That same year he stepped down from his active board chairmanship and became honorary chairman of the board. In 1975 he also stepped aside as his brother George became chairman of the board of the First Security Corporation.

Eccles Investment Company, which had been formed some sixty years earlier in an attempt to further the inheritance of the Logan Eccleses, was now disbanded. Over the years much of its stock had been distributed to its stockholders, and in 1970 its affairs were so arranged that all its assets were sold, except the stock in Utah Construction. The proceeds from these sales were then used to buy stock in that firm. Eccles Investment Company was liquidated, leaving its stockholders with only Utah Construction stock, which then became Utah International.

In December 1976, Utah International merged with General Electric, constituting the largest corporate merger in US history to that time. Details of the merger were worked out by Edmund Littlefield, who had succeeded Eccles as Utah International's chairman. The effect of this merger was to greatly increase the value of the stock previously held in Utah International. An example of the increased stock value was demonstrated by the holdings of Eccles's long-time secretary, Va Lois Egbert, whose personal investments had been handled by Eccles. When her will was probated in 1978, following her death in November 1976, her estate was valued at approximately $4 million, instead of the anticipated sum of $250,000-largely due to the increased value of the Utah International stock. The University of Utah Medical Center was the recipient of the bulk of her estate, receiving $3.6 million dollars, the largest single donation ever made to the institution to that time.

In addition to the time he gave to his public concerns and business interests, Eccles found time to serve on a few special committees and select groups. Notable among these was the board of the American Assembly sponsored by Columbia University. The group met yearly and sponsored publications regarding issues of public concern. Many of these books and publications can be found in the Marriner S. Eccles Library of Political Economy, a part of the Eccles collection.

After Eccles finalized arrangements for both his business and personal affairs, he initiated "bequests designed to encourage the emergence of young leaders of the future who could recognize, as he did, 'that the good of the individual, the family, and the community was indivisible with the good of the larger national and world society." One form these bequests took was a series of contributions to the University of Utah for fellowships. He also established the Marriner S. Eccles Library of Political Economy, and created the Marriner S. Eccles Foundation. The Foundation funds various causes within Utah, encompassing private, non-governmental, charitable, scientific, and educational organizations for the benefit of the citizens of the state. Eccles also established the Marriner S. Eccles Professorship of Public and Private Management at the Stanford University School of Business in 1973.

During 1977, Eccles' health worsened, and he stopped traveling between San Francisco and Salt Lake City. He died in Salt Lake City on 18 December 1977. Eccles' funeral service was held 22 December 1977, in Salt Lake City and was described as "brief" by the Deseret News. Edmund Littlefield and Joe Quinney spoke movingly about his character and the qualities which set him apart from most other men. R. H. Burton, who presided at the service, summed up the meaning of those remarks when he noted that, "rarely has an individual affected the lives of so many." Eccles is well remembered by many. His descendants and other family members continue to contribute generously to Utah institutions. From time to time his name appears in a newspaper article, and in 1982 the main Federal Reserve Building in Washington, D. C., was named in his honor.

A more personal tribute is contained in a letter written to Eccles in June 1977, shortly before his death. In it his brother-in-law, Joe Quinney, referred to the biography that Sidney Hyman had been writing: "I must tell you I feel the author did not reveal the whole MSE to the extent I would have recommended. You were and are more than a mere technician and manipulator. There is also that MSE who is tempestuous in battle; argumentative and insistent in debate; tough-even hard-boiled in business relations; yet honest, judicious as you saw justice; companionable with your friends, especially your good old friends with whom you are mellow, kind and considerate; who can dish it out and take it in good humor; whose family relationship, though strange at times has an underlying affection and compassion all strange but true."

Content DescriptionReturn to Top

The Marriner S. Eccles papers (1910-1985) chronicles the years when Eccles made his greatest contributions as a national and international fiscal and monetary expert, businessman, and public figure.

There are four distinct periods in the life of Marriner S. Eccles. The first period, his formative years, dates from his birth in 1890 to the death of his father, David Eccles, in 1912. The second period is from 1912 until 1934 when, following in the footsteps of his father, he became the most successful entrepreneur in Utah. During this time he assumed control of several western companies and created the First Security Corporation, the largest bank system in the Intermountain area. Neither of these periods is well documented by his papers, but each is covered by two books: Beckoning Frontiers, his autobiography completed with the assistance of Sidney Hyman in 1951, and his later biography, Marriner S. Eccles: Private Entrepreneur and Public Servant, written by Hyman and published just prior to Eccles' death in 1977.

Background Information

The most significant section of the collection, the Washington Years, boxes 2-112, provides insight into Eccles' activities during the third period in his life, 1934-1951. During these years he served for a brief period in 1934 at the United States Treasury Department in Washington, D. C., and then as both governor and chairman of the nation's bank regulatory agency, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. His papers from the Federal Reserve section of his collection, his library, and the accompanying ephemera substantiate the importance of his role in Washington during the New Deal period, World War II, the postwar recovery, and the beginning of the Cold War.

The last period of his life, 1951-1977, is documented under the heading Businessman and Public Figure, boxes 113-240. This section of his papers reflects his role as an international businessman and an outspoken critic of many of the country's economic, social, and foreign policies.

The Federal Reserve papers were originally organized in loose-leaf binders by Va Lois Egbert, secretary to Eccles for almost three decades. Her apparent intention was to place material in order of its apparent subject importance. Correspondence to and from the White House were thus placed first in the collection in chronological order. Several years before the Marriott Library received the material, Eccles permitted Dean May, then a graduate student and now a member of the history faculty at the University of Utah, to microfilm the material in the binders. After the library received the collection and some initial processing had taken place, the decision was made to remove the material from the binders and place it in folders in document boxes. Although some reordering of the material was done, much of the original arrangement has been retained. The original order may be seen by viewing both the microfilm reels and the photocopies of May's "Guide to Marriner S. Eccles Washington Papers," found in box 234.

Box 1, containing Eccles' biographical material, begins the Federal Reserve section. It is followed by six boxes of correspondence between Eccles and Presidents Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman and their staffs. Federal Reserve Board reorganization materials, 1934-1950, including reports from the Hoover Commission and the Commission on the Organization of the Executive Branch, are found in box 8. Many of the experiences Eccles had with the Treasury Department, 1934-1951, are documented in boxes 9-12. The letters, memoranda, and reports in this section reveal some of the friction between the Federal Reserve Board and the Treasury which resulted in the Accord of 1951. See boxes 61-62. Materials found in boxes 13-16 describe the drafting and passage of the Banking Act of 1935. Removing control from the Federal Reserve Banks across the country and placing it in the Federal Reserve Board in Washington, this act changed the name and structure of the Board and centralized the power of the Federal Reserve System. Eccles believed the act, for which he was chiefly responsible, was his major accomplishment in Washington. Boxes 17-23 contain additional material about the Banking Act of 1935 and the effect it had on bank-holding companies, including Transamerica, the holding company for Bank of America. Reports published in 1948 speculated that the Giannini family, who controlled Bank of America, may have been responsible for Eccles' demotion as chairman of the Federal Reserve Board. During the depression, the chief concern was how to raise sufficient revenues from a still-depressed economy; by the 1940s, the major issue was how best to generate sufficient revenues for national defense and still protect the economy from the inflationary pressures resulting from enormous war-time spending. Reports, memoranda, studies, and other items pertaining to taxation policies, 1934-1951, prepared mostly by Board staff members, are included in boxes 24-26.

One of Eccles' major accomplishments during the early 1930s was to successfully establish the Federal Housing Authority (FHA). Boxes 27-29 feature material on housing related issues, 1934-1951, but contain little material about the creation of the FHA.

Economic stabilization during and following World War II was a matter of grave concern to Eccles. He felt that the Truman administration had not taken the measures necessary to combat postwar inflation. Boxes 30-38 contain material about strategies for dealing with the postwar world. Included is some material from the Bretton Woods Conference Eccles attended in 1944.

The next part of the collection, boxes 39-56, represents many issues of importance. Some of the materials include correspondence and addresses, confidential correspondence, the Eccles-Byrd controversy, gold and capital issues, and other miscellaneous correspondence. Correspondence with members of Congress is found in boxes 56-57; information about prospective members of the Federal Reserve Board is located in boxes 58-60; material about the 1951 Accord, when the Board finally asserted its independence from the Treasury, is found in boxes 61-62; Eccles' testimonies, some of which are duplicated in his scrapbooks, are found in boxes 63-71; and Lauchlin Currie memoranda, 1934-1939, are in boxes 72-73. Currie, for whom Eccles had great respect, was long associated with the Board in a staff position. Speeches for the years 1925-1951, some of which is duplicated in Eccles' scrapbooks, are found in boxes 74-86. An abundance of miscellaneous material is contained in boxes 87-112.

Businessman and Public Figure Papers

The second section of the papers, boxes 113-240, covers the fourth period of Eccles' life, from 1951 when he left Washington, D.C., until his death in December 1977. During that period he divided his time between Salt Lake City, where he resumed control of the First Security banking system, and San Francisco, where Utah Construction was headquartered. Eccles was chairman of the board of Utah Construction, a company with world-wide interests in mining and construction. The Stewart Library at Weber State College has Utah Construction records, 1906-1961. His papers do not directly document his role as a businessman, but rather are reflective of his role as a public figure speaking out often against the foreign policy of the US government. He was particularly opposed to its policies in Southeast Asia, where Utah Construction had many interests. Eccles also took a strong stand against over-poplation and was a supporter of groups such as Zero Population and Planned Parenthood.

Personal correspondence and public speeches arranged chronologically from 1951 to May 1972, when Eccles gave his last public address, are located in boxes 113-133. During the early 1950s he usually spoke on monetary and fiscal topics. By 1957 he had begun to question US Cold War policies and believed the United States should recognize Red China. By 1959 over-population was an issue which Eccles addressed often. His next area of interest and the one about which he spoke most vociferously was the involvement of the United States in Vietnam. Speeches on this topic are accompanied by related correspondence. Box 133, folder 1, provides an index to Eccles' speeches, statements, and testimonies.

Eccles' interest in politics continued, and he corresponded frequently with political figures; boxes 134-147 contain material which cover these topics. Boxes 134-135 feature material from Eccles' unsuccessful campaign for the Utah Republican senatorial nomination against incumbent Arthur Watkins in 1952. United States foreign policy, vis-a-vis China, is the topic of material in boxes 146-147, although correspondence with members of Congress is held in boxes 193-196.

The issue of population control, during the 1950s through the 1970s, is the subject matter of boxes 148-159. Included are addresses by Eccles and others, correspondence, reports, and a sampling of published items from various organizations concerned with the problem of over-population.

Eccles was one of the first members of the business community to protest US involvement in Vietnam. Boxes 160-167 contain articles, speeches, newsclippings, reports, publications, and correspondence of Eccles and others who inveighed against America's Asian policy.

The American Assembly, the Commission on Money and Credit, the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions, the Atlantic Council, and the Hall of Fame are all organizations with which Eccles was associated in the last two decades of his life. Material reflecting his involvement is found in boxes 168-179.

The largest correspondence section of the collection is located in boxes 180-211. General correspondence is arranged alphabetically in boxes 180-192. Boxes 193-196 hold correspondence with members of Congress; box 197 with Federal Reserve Board members and bank officers; box 198 with universities; boxes 199-203 related to his autobiography and biography. Boxes 204-208 contain invitations; boxes 209-210, Christmas greetings, 1934-1974; and, in box 211, are condolences to Mrs. Sallie Eccles upon the death of her husband.

Most of the materials dealing with corporate interests are found in boxes 212-220. Included are limited correspondence and annual reports from Pet Milk Company, Utah International (formerly Utah Construction), Amalgamated Sugar, and the First Security Corporation. In view of the extent of Eccles' participation in these companies, there is little substantive material.

The final general heading for this section is Miscellanea. Included are manuscripts of Eccles' biography and autobiography and manuscripts of other works related to his career. Journal articles written by and about Eccles are in boxes 228-230. In some cases these duplicate the Eccles scrapbooks retained in the Eccles Room, as well as material found in boxes 90-91.

Papers about Eccles from other repositories-the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, the Harry S. Truman Library, the Library of Congress, the University of Virginia Library, and the National Archives-are found in boxes 231-233.

The final part of this section, boxes 234-240, includes the microfilm by Dean May of the Washington files, cassette and reel-to-reel tape recordings, daybooks from 1966-1977, and materials that have become available since the collection was initially processed.

A second component of the collection is the Eccles library, which consists of approximately 1000 books pertaining to his interests, career, the New Deal, and the 1940s. Government documents relating to the time he spent in Washington, D.C., as well as a number of indexed, bound volumes prepared by Va Lois Egbert, complete the library.

The Eccles Library contains volumes on banking and finance, economic treatises, the Roosevelt years, and a large number of books from the American Assembly series. The library is based on Eccles' original, private collection, which was augmented before the collection was received by the Manuscripts Division. The book collection provides background material for researchers interested not only in Eccles' career, but also the economic and political events occuring during the 1930s and 1940s.

The government documents section of the Eccles Library contains bound copies of the Federal Open Market Committee Minutes, 1936-1975; Federal Reserve Bulletin, 1966-present; annual reports from the Federal Reserve Board and other government agencies; soft-cover reports from the 1940s dealing with post-war recovery; and Proceedings from the Bretton Woods Conference, 1944.

Of the bound volumes of scrapbooks containing newsclippings, magazine articles, testimonies, cartoons, and other items organized by Miss Egbert, the most useful may be the set of newsclippings. The articles begin in 1922, but only ten are dated prior to 1933. These clippings originated from Utah, Washington, D. C., New York, and points between. They provide extensive coverage of Eccles' career from 1933 forward-the period covered by his papers. To ensure their long-term preservation, these clippings were photocopied and placed in archival folders and boxes.

Other scrapbooks include printed copies of Eccles' addresses, 1925-1975; testimonies, 1933-1951; cartoons, 1935-1951; invitations, 1934-1951; magazine articles by and about Eccles; day books, 1937-1951; and miscellaneous memoranda and letters and other assorted material.

Summary

The Marriner S. Eccles collection provides substantial research material about the Federal Reserve System during the third and fourth decades of the twentieth century. It also provides insight into some of the public issues of the 1960s and 1970s with which Eccles was concerned-over-population and US foreign policy, particularly as it applied to Asia. The collection offers little information about his role in the development of banking in the Intermountain West, or his many other business interests, other than minimal correspondence and annual reports from companies with which he was associated. Some of the correspondence with members of Congress, public figures, friends, and acquaintances reveals his views about issues and events in his life. Because there is almost no family correspondence, it is through his general correspondence that part of Eccles' personal life emerges.

Marriner Stoddard Eccles, intelligent, complex, and ambitious, seemed determined to make his mark in the world, and probably succeeded beyond all his expectations. Although his views were often unpopular, time usually proved them to be correct. Unfortunately, these papers do not convey the full measure of the man, but they are an invaluable source of information about the monetary and fiscal systems of the United States during the 1930s and 1940s, and document the significant financial role Eccles played during these turbulent decades.

Use of the CollectionReturn to Top

Restrictions on Use

The library does not claim to control copyright for all materials in the collection. An individual depicted in a reproduction has privacy rights as outlined in Title 45 CFR, part 46 (Protection of Human Subjects). For further information, please review the J. Willard Marriott Library’s Use Agreement and Reproduction Request forms.

Preferred Citation

Initial Citation: Marriner S. Eccles papers, Ms 178, Box [ ]. Special Collections and Archives. University of Utah, J. Willard Marriott. Salt Lake City, Utah.

Following Citations: Ms 178.

Administrative InformationReturn to Top


Detailed Description of the CollectionReturn to Top

I:  Background InformationReturn to Top

A portion of these papers have been digitized and are available online through the Federal Reserve Archive. This section contains biographical information of Eccles; correspondence concerning his Senate confirmation as a governor and later as chairman of the Federal Reserve Board; his correspondence with biographers; and some miscellaneous personal items.

Container(s) Description Dates
I: Biographical Material
Box
1
Biographers
This section contains biographical information of Eccles; correspondence concerning his Senate confirmation as a governor and later as chairman of the Federal Reserve Board; his correspondence with biographers; and some miscellaneous personal items.
1910-1951
Box Folder
1 1-3
Life Sketches
Several magazine articles, a radio address transcript, and a doctoral thesis.
1934-1950
1 4-7
Confirmation Correspondence
Correspondence on the Senate confirmation of Eccles as a governor of the Federal Reserve Board.
1934-1944
1 8-13
Biographical Correspondence
Eccles' correspondence with publishers of biographical encyclopedias.
1934-1951
1 14-17
Biographical Correspondence
Eccles' correspondence with writers and others seeking biographical information.
1935-1951
1 18
Eccles' LDS Mission Correspondence
Photocopied correspondence with Eccles' family during his mission in Scotland and a letter from Mormon apostle Heber J. Grant.
1910-1912
1 19
Brigham Young Memorabilia
Eccles' personal items, including a photograph and autograph of Brigham Young.
1840-1879

II:  The Washington YearsReturn to Top

This part of the collection contains materials from Eccles' service in Washington, D. C., 1934-1951. It is divided into two sections: White House Paper, boxes 2-7; and Federal Reserve Papers, boxes 8-12. Materials in both sections are arranged categorically, then chronologically or alphabetically within each category.

Container(s) Description Dates
II: White House Papers
A portion of these papers have been digitized and are available online through the Federal Reserve Archive. Documents in this section pertain to White House activities during Eccles' tenure in Washington, D. C. Most of these materials are correspondence and include only items that actually passed through the White House.
Box
2
White House Correspondence
White House correspondence, concerning the Federal Reserve Board and other miscellaneous issues, with the exception of folders 1 and 2. Folders 1 and 2 contain personal material not related to White House correspondence. This box is kept in the Manuscripts safe.
1910-1951
Box Folder
2 1
Mission Correspondence
Correspondence with Eccles' family during his mission in Scotland and a letter from Mormon church apostle Heber J. Grant. Photocopies of this material are in Box 1, Folder 18.
1910-1912
2 2
Brigham Young Memorabilia
Eccles' personal items, including a photograph and autograph of Brigham Young. Photocopies of this material are in Box 1, Folder 19.
1840-1879
2 3-20
Roosevelt Correspondence
Federal Reserve Board correspondence and addresses about World War II.
1934-1944
2 21-25
Truman Correspondence
Federal Reserve Board correspondence.
1945-1951
3
Federal Reserve Board Appointments
President Roosevelt's correspondence concerning Federal Reserve Board appointments and subsequent correspondence with those who were eventually appointed. Many of these items are duplicates of the original correspondence in Box 2.
1935-1951
Box Folder
3 1-8
Federal Reserve Board Appointement
Letters and memoranda concerning candidates for the board of governors and bank officers of the Federal Reserve. These materials include correspondence concerning Eccles' reappointment and resignation. Originals are in Box 2.
1935-1951
3 9-12
Miscellaneous White House
Miscellaneous correspondence with Federal Reserve Board members.
1935-1945
4
White House Banking Policy
Items relating to White House and Federal Reserve Board activities including banking, government fiscal agencies, and post-war inflation topics.
1934-1948
5
Council of Economic Advisors
Reports and memoranda of the Council of Economic Advisers and the Federal Reserve Board that give insight into Eccles' general economic theories and the philosophy of the New Deal.
1934-1951
Box Folder
5 1-3
Council of Economic Advisers
Includes quarterly reports submitted to the Federal Reserve Board for comments and suggestions.
1947-1951
5 4-13
Federal Reserve Board
Reports and memoranda prepared for presidents Roosevelt and Truman and their staffs concerning the Federal Reserve Board's role in the New Deal.
1934-1947
6
The New Deal
Correspondence and reports concerning various aspects of the New Deal. Only materials to or from the White House are included.
1934-1943
Box Folder
6 1-4
National Resources Planning Board
1938-1943
6 5
Fiscal and Monetary Committee
1934-1939
6 6-8
Program to Increase National Income
1939
6 9-10
Income Certificate Plan for Agriculture
1940
6 11-12
Economy, Debts, and Business
1940
7
White House Correspondence
Eccles' responses to correspondence received at the White House and referred to the Federal Reserve Board for reply, as well as speeches, reports, and memoranda he released.
1935-1948
Box Folder
7 1-7
White House Correspondence for Eccles' Attention
1936-1940
7 8-12
Political Materials Furnished by Eccles
1935-1948
III: Federal Reserve Papers
A portion of these papers have been digitized and are available online through the Federal Reserve Archive. These documents relate to Eccles' activities before, during, and after his tenure as chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve. Topics include the Federal Reserve reorganization, activities, and banking and monetary policy.
Box
8
Federal Reserve Reorganization
Items dated from 1934-1942 include bank bills and reorganization bills. Items dated after 1946 include bills on the streamlining of government banking agencies, the Hoover Commission Report, and reports of the Commission on the Organization of the Executive Branch. The Federal Reserve Board wrote summaries and analyses of these bills and reports.
1934-1950
Box Folder
8 1-9
Memoranda
1934-1949
8 10
Letters
1937-1950
8 11-12
Documents
1937-1950
9
Treasury
1934-1938
Box Folder
9 1-4
Eccles' Work at the Treasury
Subjects include bank operation and regulation, inflation and governmental control, ownership of Federal Reserve banks, and the composition and powers of the Federal Reserve Board.
1934
9 5-9
Treasury and Federal Reserve Board
Reports and correspondence generated jointly by the Treasury and the Federal Reserve Board concerning the management of money to stimulate the economy during the depression. Some of the documents reveal the developing friction between the two government entities.
1934-1938
10
Treasury War Efforts
Reports and correspondence that emphasize shifts in the Treasury's efforts from attempting to stimulate a depressed economy to that of raising money to finance U.S. participation in World War II. They especially reflect the government's plan to curb inflation through personal and corporate savings and excess-profits taxes. Eccles argued for these measures to prevent post-war inflation, and his insistence frequently brought him into conflict with the Treasury.
1939-1943
11
Treasury War Efforts
Reports and correspondence that emphasize shifts in the Treasury's efforts from attempting to stimulate a depressed economy to that of raising money to finance U.S. participation in World War II. They especially reflect the government's plan to curb inflation through personal and corporate savings and excess-profits taxes. Eccles argued for these measures to prevent post-war inflation, and his insistence frequently brought him into conflict with the Treasury.
1944-1947
12
Treasury
Memoranda prepared by the Federal Reserve Board's staff for Eccles' use in his Tuesday meetings with the Treasury, and correspondence with the Treasury concerning savings bond drives.
1936-1950
Box Folder
12 1-2
Tuesday Meeting Memoranda
Subjects include reserves, securities markets, foreign exchange, gold flow, and commodity prices.
1936-1937
12 3-10
Savings Bond Drives
Communications between the Federal Reserve Board and the Treasury, and correspondence from individuals and corporations concerning wartime matters.
1941-1950
13
Banking Act of 1935
Drafts, testimonies, and correspondence concerning the Banking Bill of 1935. Passage of the bill changed the name and structure of the Federal Reserve system and centralized its power in Washington, D.C., removing it from the control of the Federal Reserve Banks. Eccles believed the act, for which he was chiefly responsible, was his major accomplishment in Washington.
Box Volume
13 1
Draft of the Banking Bill of 1935
Folder
13 1-4
Drafts and Testimonies of the Banking Bill of 1935
13 5-7
Bills and Reports of the Banking Bill of 1935
14
Banking Act of 1935
Memoranda of the Federal Reserve Board and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation concerning the Banking Bill of 1935, prior to its passage.
1934-1935
Box Folder
14 1-7
Federal Reserve Board Documents
Memoranda and statements concerning Title II amendments to the banking bill.
1935
14 8
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Documents
Memoranda and statements concerning Title I amendments.
1934-1935
15
Banking Act of 1935
Statements, drafts, summaries, and memoranda concerning the Banking Bill of 1935 and Title II and III amendments.
16
Banking Act of 1935
Statements, press releases, and correspondence concerning the Banking Bill of 1935.
17
Bank Holding Companies
Statements, drafts, and correspondence relating to bank holding company legislation, initially aimed at preventing a monopoly by the Bank of America, a holding company of the Transamerica Corporation. After the bank's rapid expansion in the western United States, lawmakers introduced several bills to limit its growth, but none passed. The Bank of America was not restrained until a 1947 investigation prompted by the Federal Reserve board of governors. Some news accounts reported that Eccles' involvement in the matter was what moved Truman to ask for his resignation as chairman of the board in 1948.
1937-1947
18
Bank Holding Companies
Statements, drafts, and correspondence relating to bank holding company legislation, initially aimed at preventing a monopoly by the Bank of America, a holding company of the Transamerica Corporation. After the bank's rapid expansion in the western United States, lawmakers introduced several bills to limit its growth, but none passed. The Bank of America was not restrained until a 1947 investigation prompted by the Federal Reserve board of governors. Some news accounts reported that Eccles' involvement in the matter was what moved Truman to ask for his resignation as chairman of the board in 1948.
1948-1950
19
Transamerica Corporation
Correspondence concerning the Transamerica Corporation, owned by the Giannini family of California, and the attempts of U.S. government agencies to prevent further expansion of the Bank of America. This box also contains some material relating to the Federal Reserve Board hearings on Transamerica and Bank of America; for more materials on the hearings, see Box 21.
1936-1950
Box Folder
19 1-6
U.S. Government Agency Correspondence
1936-1950
19 7
Comptroller of the Currency Correspondence
Correspondence of Preston Delano, comptroller of the currency for the United States, proposing a settlement with Bank of America executives for greater capitalization and resources for the bank.
1939-1940
19 8
State Bank Conversion Documents
Materials relating to the attempts of Amadeo P. Giannini and his associates to convert the Bank of America from a national bank to a state bank. Their efforts were aimed at thwarting federal interference.
1940
20
Transamerica Corporation
Correspondence concerning the Transamerica Corporation, owned by the Giannini family of California, and the attempts of U.S. government agencies to prevent further expansion of the Bank of America. This box also contains some material relating to the Federal Reserve Board hearings on Transamerica and Bank of America; for more materials on the hearings, see Box 21.
1935-1943
Box Folder
20 1-5
Chairman's Reference File
Letters and reports sent to Eccles, mainly from Comptroller Preston Delano and the Gianninis. These materials document the difficulties between the Federal Reserve Board and the comptroller, and between government banking agencies and the Gianninis. Most of the Federal Reserve documents are in response to Delano's actions.
1938-1943
20 6-8
Federal Reserve Board Papers
Materials related to the Federal Reserve Board's interest in Transamerica, Bank of America, and the Gianninis. Chief correspondents are Amadeo P. Giannini, Eccles, and Lawrence Clayton, assistant to Eccles.
1935-1943
20 A
Transamerica Corporation
Correspondence between the Federal Reserve Board and the Gianninis concerning U.S. government attempts to prevent a Bank of America monopoly. These materials were taken from the files of Lawrence Clayton, a Utah associate of Eccles, Eccles' assistant at the Federal Reserve Board from 1934-1945, and a governor of the board from 1947 until his death in 1949. Eccles probably had these files in his possession because of the charges brought against Clayton by the Gianninis during the Transamerica hearings. These materials are especially useful in understanding the personality of Amadeo P. Giannini.
1929-1945
21
Transamerica Hearings
Appendixes A-E contain documents relating to the hearings before the Federal Reserve Board to determine if Transamerica Corporation's western U.S. bank takeovers were in violation of Section 7 of the Clayton Act.
1945-1951
Box Folder
21 1
Appendix A
Transcript of the Transamerica hearing, "Proposed Findings and Conclusions Submitted to Hearing Officer [R. M.] Evans on Behalf of Respondent, Transamerica Corporation."
1951
21 2
Appendix B
Transcript of the Transamerica hearing, "Proposed Rebuttal Findings and Conclusions Submitted to Hearing Officer [R. M.] Evans on Behalf of Respondent, Transamerica Corporation."
1950
21 3
Appendix C
Transcript of the recommended decision in the matter of Transamerica Corporation before the Federal Reserve Board. The company was eventually ordered to divest itself fully of all capital stock in most of the western banks it had recently acquired.
1951
21 4
Appendix D
"A Digest of the Testimony of M. S. Eccles in the Hearings upon the Complaint Issued Pursuant to the Clayton Act by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System in the Matter of Transamerica Corporation Given at Washington, D.C."
1949
21 5
Appendix E
Memorandum prepared by Preston Delano, comptroller of the currency, "Bank of America National Trust and Savings Association-Branch Applications."
1945
22
Transamerica Hearings
Transcripts of briefs and other materials related to Transamerica hearings, institued by the Federal Reserve Board, to determine if the practices of Transamerica were in violation of Section 7 of the Clayton Act. The hearings began in June 1948 and concluded in June 1951. Transamerica was ultimately ordered to divest itself of twenty-six banks in California, sixteen in Oregon, three in Nevada, and one each in Arizona and Washington. These materials also include documents relating to Transamerica's efforts to disqualify Governors Eccles and Clayton in 1948, and the Federal Reserve Board's efforts to prevent Transamerica from acquiring banks while the hearings were in progress.
1948-1951
23
Transamerica Hearings
Six volumes of Eccles' testimony before the Federal Reserve Board in the Transamerica hearings. Cross-examiners attempted to establish parallels between Federal Reserve branch banks and Transamerica, and to indicate personal hostility of Eccles toward the Gianninis.
1949
24
Taxation
Memoranda, reports, and studies on taxation, most of which were prepared by the Federal Reserve Board. The letters are principally from representatives of various governmental agencies and citizens' groups, either offering advice or asking for relief. Subjects covered in these document include raising revenues for the still-depressed economy, tax on undistributed corporate profits, raising revenues for defense and for combating inflation, excess profits taxes, and mandatory joint returns for married couples.
1935-1940
25
Randolph Paul Taxation Papers
Documents relating to taxation in regard to Randolph Paul, member of the New York law firm of Lord, Day & Lord, lecturer on tax law at Yale and Harvard universities, and one-time adviser to the secretary of the Treasury and to President Roosevelt. Paul wrote a paper at Roosevelt's request on possible changes in the tax law.
1939-1942
Box Folder
25 1-9
Proposed Tax Law Changes
Paul's paper on possible changes in U. S. tax law and the Federal Reserve Board's comments on it.
1939-1942
25 10-13
Treasury Papers
Letters and reports from the period Paul served the Treasury, first as assistant to the secretary, and then as general counsel. The principal tax concerns reflected in these documents are the raising of revenues to finance World War II, and of combating inflation.
1942
26
Taxation
Materials relating to the "pay-as-you-go" taxation plan and the Treasury's tax bill questionnaire. Major concerns documented are post-war planning and inflation.
Box Folder
26 1-2
Pay-As-You-Go Taxation Plan
Materials regarding the tax withholding plan devised by Beardsley Ruml, chairman of the New York Federal Reserve Bank and treasurer of Macy's department store. The plan was intended to ease the taxpayer's burden by making collection current.
1942-1943
26 3-13
Treasury Taxation Questionnaire
Materials related to a comprehensive questionnaire written by the Treasury to elicit information for a new tax bill.
1943-1951
27
Housing
Reports, memoranda, and drafts of housing legislation prepared by the Federal Reserve Board. Most of these are the work of J. M. Daiger, a mortgage-guarantee businessman from Baltimore, Maryland, and special assistant to the chairman of the board. Daiger was later appointed financial adviser to the Federal Housing Administration and deputy housing administrator. The issues documented here are modernization of substandard housing, slum clearance, bank investment in low-cost housing, the eighty-percent mortgage, housing subsidies, the escalating cost of labor and materials, and defense housing. Also documented is Eccles' advocacy of strict credit controls to offset the inflation created by postwar housing shortages. Eccles became involved with housing concerns while chairing a Treasury committee in 1934. Legislation from the committee created the Federal Housing Administration. Eccles retained interest in housing while he served on the Federal Reserve Board because he believed recovery of the building industry was essential to industrial recovery in general.
1934-1936
28
Housing
Reports, memoranda, and drafts of housing legislation prepared by the Federal Reserve Board. Most of these are the work of J. M. Daiger, a mortgage-guarantee businessman from Baltimore, Maryland, and special assistant to the chairman of the board. Daiger was later appointed financial adviser to the Federal Housing Administration and deputy housing administrator. The issues documented here are modernization of substandard housing, slum clearance, bank investment in low-cost housing, the eighty-percent mortgage, housing subsidies, the escalating cost of labor and materials, and defense housing. Also documented is Eccles' advocacy of strict credit controls to offset the inflation created by postwar housing shortages. Eccles became involved with housing concerns while chairing a Treasury committee in 1934. Legislation from the committee created the Federal Housing Administration. Eccles retained interest in housing while he served on the Federal Reserve Board because he believed recovery of the building industry was essential to industrial recovery in general.
1937-1938
29
Housing
Reports, memoranda, and drafts of housing legislation prepared by the Federal Reserve Board. Most of these are the work of J. M. Daiger, a mortgage-guarantee businessman from Baltimore, Maryland, and special assistant to the chairman of the board. Daiger was later appointed financial adviser to the Federal Housing Administration and deputy housing administrator. The issues documented here are modernization of substandard housing, slum clearance, bank investment in low-cost housing, the eighty-percent mortgage, housing subsidies, the escalating cost of labor and materials, and defense housing. Also documented is Eccles' advocacy of strict credit controls to offset the inflation created by postwar housing shortages. Eccles became involved with housing concerns while chairing a Treasury committee in 1934. Legislation from the committee created the Federal Housing Administration. Eccles retained interest in housing while he served on the Federal Reserve Board because he believed recovery of the building industry was essential to industrial recovery in general.
1939-1950
30
Small Business and Labor Issues
Papers relating to the policy concerning small business, labor, unemployment, the wage-price relationship, and Social Security.
1935-1950
Box Folder
30 1-2
Small Business
Documents from 1935, 1949, and 1950 only, relating to small business policy, particularly in regard to the Small Business Act (O' Mahoney bill), which Congress passed in 1950.
1935-1950
30 3-9
Labor Issues
Correspondence and reports concerning labor issues. Primary topics for the papers covering 1936-1940 are the wage-price relationship, working hours, and the Fair Labor Standards Act. Those covering the war years, 1940-1945, relate to wage-price controls and their effect on inflation. Papers from 1945-1950 discuss the Murray Full Employment Bill, the Taft-Hartley Act, and the employee conflict at the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
1936-1950
30 10-13
Social Security
Reports and memoranda on the Social Security system. The Federal Reserve Board was concerned about the large reserves held by Social Security for pensions and about the 1939 proposal to increase the Social Security tax.
1936-1950
31
Economic Stabilization
Federal Reserve Board reports and memoranda relating to foreign and domestic economic stabilization.
1942-1950
Box Folder
31 1-2
Foreign Economic Stabilization
Reports and memoranda relating to postwar economic policy for Germany, Italy, and Belgium; policy for technical assistance to foreign countries; and general foreign economic matters.
1944-1950
31 3-4
Office of Economic Stabilization
Memoranda, reports, and correspondence concerning the work of the Economic Stabilization Board, created by executive order on October 3, 1942.
1942
31 5-12
Correspondence
Letters and memoranda between the Federal Reserve Board and various governmental and economic leaders on the subject of stabilization.
1942-1944
32
Domestic Economic Stabilization
1945-1946
Box Folder
32 1-14
Domestic Economic Stabilization
Reports and memoranda.
1945-1946
32 15-22
Postwar Economic Stabilization
Papers concerning post-World War II domestic economic planning.
1938-1943
33
Post-War Economic Stabilization
Papers concerning post-World War II domestic economic planning.
1941-1944
34
International Fund
Correspondence concerning the International Fund, a worldwide monetary order established after World War II to prevent international financial chaos. The United States and Great Britain each put forward an economic plan, but the participating countries had difficulty in setting a date for a meeting because of the need for domestic debate. Consequently, the Bretton Woods Conference in 1944 was referred to as "a meeting of technical experts."The legislation that created the International Fund was drawn up at the conference and is therefore called the Bretton Woods Agreement Act, but the name of the international organization varies. In the planning stages it was called the United and Associated Nations Stabilization Fund; later it became the International Bank and International Monetary Fund. Finally, two organizations were created under the United Nations: the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD). The latter is now known as the World Bank.Eccles was an adviser to the U. S. delegation to the Bretton Woods Conference, and an alternate for the director, Treasury Secretary John W. Snyder. Much of the work at the Federal Reserve Board on this subject was the responsibility of M. S. Symczak, Walter R. Gardner, and J. Burke Knapp. Knapp, after serving at the State Department, was a director of the World Bank for twenty years.
1942-1945
35
International Fund
Correspondence concerning the International Fund, a worldwide monetary order established after World War II to prevent international financial chaos. The United States and Great Britain each put forward an economic plan, but the participating countries had difficulty in setting a date for a meeting because of the need for domestic debate. Consequently, the Bretton Woods Conference in 1944 was referred to as "a meeting of technical experts."The legislation that created the International Fund was drawn up at the conference and is therefore called the Bretton Woods Agreement Act, but the name of the international organization varies. In the planning stages it was called the United and Associated Nations Stabilization Fund; later it became the International Bank and International Monetary Fund. Finally, two organizations were created under the United Nations: the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD). The latter is now known as the World Bank.Eccles was an adviser to the U. S. delegation to the Bretton Woods Conference, and an alternate for the director, Treasury Secretary John W. Snyder. Much of the work at the Federal Reserve Board on this subject was the responsibility of M. S. Symczak, Walter R. Gardner, and J. Burke Knapp. Knapp, after serving at the State Department, was a director of the World Bank for twenty years.
1946-1950
35 A
International Fund
Materials from the first annual meeting of the board of governors of the International Bank and International Monetary Fund, held September 27 through October 5, 1946.
1946
36
International Economic Stabilization
Materials related to the "U.S.-U.K. Top Committee," and the Bretton Woods Conference.
1942-1947
Box Folder
36 1-10
U. S.-U. K. Top Committee
Papers concerning activities of the U. S.-U. K. Top Committee, a group comprised of members of the twelve Federal Reserve districts, enlisted by the Federal Reserve Board to educate the public about a $3.75 billion loan to Britain. Although the U. S. government strongly supported the loan as a means of British and international economic recovery, there was some public opposition.
1942-1947
36 11-18
Bretton Woods Conference
Documents relating to the Bretton Woods Conference, where forty-four nations met to initiate international postwar financial cooperation. See boxes 34 and 35 for more information on the conference.
1944-1946
37
National Advisory Council
1945-1948
Box Folder
37 1-6
Memoranda
1945-1946
37 7-9
Letters
1946
37 10-14
Memoranda
1947
37 15
Letters
1947
37 16-18
Memoranda
1948
37 19
Letter
1948
38
Miscellaneous Activities
Materials relating to the Monetary and Fiscal Policy Committee, the Export-Import Bank, the Inter-America Bank, the United Nations Investment Committee, and enemy alien evacuation.
1937-1948
Box Folder
38 1-10
Monetary and Fiscal Policy Committee
Papers concerning economic recovery policy involving the revitalization of the housing and railroad industries.
1937-1939
38 11
Export-Import Bank
Papers regarding the legislative progress of the Import-Export Bank Bill.
1945-1947
38 12-14
Inter-America Bank
Papers regarding the Inter-America Bank as a prototype for the World Bank.
1939-1942
38 15-16
United Nations Investment Committee
Materials mainly reflecting Eccles' representation on the committee.
1947-1948
38 17-19
Enemy Alien Evacuation
Letters, reports, and memoranda concerning the Federal Reserve System role in the 1942 evacuation of Japanese and Japanese-Americans from the West Coast. The Federal Reserve was charged "to assist the evacuee in the liquidation of his property" and to protect him from unscrupulous creditors. Governor Matthew Szymczak and his assistant, W. B. Pollard, were sent to the West Coast to represent the Federal Reserve Board. These materials include their reports, including their evaluation of Tom C. Clark, chief of civilian staff of the Western Defense Command.
1942
39
Canada
Correspondence between the Bank of Canada and the Federal Reserve Board, and papers from the Canadian-American Joint Economic meetings of 1941 and 1944. Eccles admired Canadian financing, and the Bank of Canada and the Federal Reserve Board had a close relationship.
1939-1951
Box Folder
39 1-9
Bank of Canada Correspondence
1939-1951
39 10
Canadian-American Joint Economic Meetings
1941-1944
40
Eccles-Byrd Controversy
Materials documenting the conflict between Eccles and Senator Harry F. Byrd of Virginia over economic policy during the New Deal years. Eccles advocated deficit spending during times of high unemployment to stimulate business and provide for the needy. Byrd believed the economic solutions should have included a balanced budget and reductions in taxes and social programs. The controversy became a matter of public interest after Eccles, in a public letter dated December 23, 1938, accused Byrd of distorting his ideas in a speech in Boston. Byrd and Eccles continued the public argument in radio addresses during January 1939. These materials include Eccles' public letter, the radio addresses, and public response.
1938-1939
41
Consumer Credit
Documents relating to consumer credit control, particularly Regulation W, which was implemented by executive order in 1941. The measure gave the Federal Reserve Board authority to control consumer credit. Despite pressure from the Federal Reserve Board and others to keep Regulation W in effect, Congress allowed it to expire on June 30, 1949. In September 1950, however, President Truman reinstated it by executive order. These documents reflect Eccles' support of the regulation and his economic philosophy in general.
1934-1951
Box Folder
41 1
Government Documents
1947-1950
41 2-14
Correspondence, Drafts, and Statements
1934-1951
42
Randolph Burgess
Correspondence with Burgess, vice president of the New York Federal Reserve Bank, 1920-1938; vice chairman of the National City Bank in New York, 1938-1952; undersecretary of the Treasury, 1953-1957; and U.S. ambassador to NATO, 1957-1961. Correspondence between Burgess and Eccles appears frequently in other parts of the collection. Letters here are not relevant to other subject divisions.
1936-1947
43
Confidential Correspondence
Correspondence and other materials involving Lauchlin Currie, Chester C. Davis, J.P. Dreibelbis, William T. Nardin, General Robert E. Wood, and Ralph Flinders.
1934-1950
Box Folder
43 1-3
Lauchlin Currie
Letters written during Currie's years as a member of the Federal Reserve Board, at the White House, and after he moved to Colombia. An ardent Keynesian, Currie was a senior analyst for the Treasury when Eccles was assistant to Secretary Morgenthau. In 1934, he left the Treasury with Eccles and served on the Federal Reserve Board. He took a leave of absence from the board in 1939 to becomean administrative assistant for Roosevelt, serving several foreign economic missions. After the war, he became chief of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development. After being accused of being a communist, he accepted a commission from the Colombian government in 1950 to set up a "little Hoover Commission," and took Colombian citizenship.
1934-1950
43 4-7
Chester C. Davis
Correspondence written mostly after Davis left Washington and copies of his speeches on agricultural affairs. Davis was appointed as a governor of the Federal Reserve Board in 1936, representing agricultural interests. In 1940 he was reappointed to a fourteen-year term, but resigned in 1941 to become president of the St. Louis Federal Reserve Bank, a war-time food administrator, and a member of the National Defense Council. In 1951 he became assistant director of the Ford Foundation. Davis and Eccles were close friends.
1939-1950
43 8
J.P. Dreibelbis
Correspondence with Dreibelbis, principally regarding problems in the Federal Reserve Board's legal division and Dreibelbis' recommendations for improvement. He joined the legal department of the Federal Reserve Board in 1935.
1938-1943
43 9
William T. Nardin
Correspondence and a speech by Nardin, a Federal Reserve agent, chairman of the board of the St. Louis Federal Reserve Bank, and Eccles' friend. Nardin was president of the Pet Milk Company, of which Eccles was a director.
1937-1943
43 10-11
General Robert E. Wood
Letters concerning the price and inflow of gold and a copy of Wood's speech, "Our Foreign Policy," given before the Council on Foreign Relations. In 1936, Wood, then president of Sears, Roebuck & Company, was appointed a class C director and deputy chairman of the board of the Chicago Federal Reserve Bank.
1935-1941
43 12-13
Ralph Flanders Correspondence
Correspondence with Flanders, president of Jones and Lamson Machine Company in Vermont. Flanders began his correspondence with Eccles and Elliott Thurston in July 1937 when he submitted portions of the manuscript, Towards Full Employment, to the Federal Reserve Board for criticism. He served as chairman of the research committee of the Committee for Economic Development, and in 1944 was appointed president of the Boston Federal Reserve Bank. In 1946, he won his election bid for the U.S. Senate from Vermont as a Republican. Flanders and Eccles' economic views were fairly compatible, and because of his interests and acquaintances, Flanders did much proselytizing for Federal Reserve positions.
1937-1946
43 14-15
Ralph Flanders Speeches
1937-1945
44
Correspondence and Addresses
Letters and speeches of Orval Adams, Lewis H. Brown, Stuart Chase, J. I. Craig, James H. R. Cromwell, Cyrus S. Eaton, William Trufant Foster, Rudolph Hecht, B. E. Hutchinson, R. C. Leffingwell, Walter Lippmann, Thomas I. Parkinson, J. David Stern, and Robert P. Vanderpoel. These materials discuss economic ideas. The catalysts for many of the letters are often books, articles, or speeches.
1934-1951
Box Folder
44 1
Orval Adams Correspondence
Correspondence with Adams, vice president of the Utah State National Bank in Salt Lake City, and president of the American Bankers Association. Adams worked with Eccles in one of Eccles' banks for ten years. Though the two had very different economic philosophies, they were longtime friends.
1934-1951
44 2
Orval Adams Speeches
1935-1938
44 3
Lewis H. Brown
Correspondence and a speech by Brown, chairman of the board of Johns-Manville Corporation and a member of the board of directors New York Federal Reserve Bank.
1947-1950
44 4-5
Stuart Chase
Correspondence with Chase, a writer for the Twentieth Century Fund and author of many articles on economics. Chase frequently sent advance copies of his publications to Eccles for criticism.
1940-1945
44 6
J.I. Craig
Correspondence concerning international monetary affairs. Craig, commissioner for customs at the Ministry of Finance in Cairo, Egypt, first met Eccles at the Bretton Woods Conference.
1944-1948
44 7
James H. R. Cromwell Correspondence
Correspondence concerning money and taxation. Cromwell was appointed minister to Canada in January 1940, then resigned in April to enter the election for a U.S. Senate seat for New Jersey, which he lost.
1936-1940
44 8
James H.R. Cromwell Election Addresses and Papers
1938-1939
44 9
Cyrus S. Eaton
Correspondence with Eaton, a mid-western industrialist, concerning financing by New York interests.
1939-1944
44 10
William Trufant Foster
Letters and addresses by Foster, director of the Pollak Foundation for Economic Research. Foster knew Eccles before Eccles went to Washington.
1936
44 11
Rudolph Hecht
Correspondence concerning controversies over the Banking Bill of 1935, and a presidential report of the Bankers Association implying that Eccles was in favor of absolute governmental control of banking.
1935
44 12
B.E. Hutchinson
Friendly and often sarcastic correspondence with Hutchinson, chairman of the Chrysler Corporation's finance committee, regarding current issues of the National Manufacturers Association platform, high wages, and union power.
1944-1947
44 13-14
R.C. Leffingwell
Correspondence and speeches by Leffingwell, chairman of the board of the J.P. Morgan Company, regarding the Federal Reserve Board's role in the 1937-1938 recession, a sensitive subject to Eccles.
1946-1951
44 15
Walter Lippmann
Correspondence with Lippmann, columnist for the New York Herald Tribune, focusing on the Banking Bill of 1935. Lippmann and Eccles respected one another's economic views.
1935-1941
44 16
Thomas I. Parkinson
Correspondence between Parkinson, president of the Equitable Life Assurance Society in New York, and Allan Sproul, president of the New York Federal Reserve Bank, and between Eccles and Harold G. Brown, vice president of Shenandoah National Bank in Virginia. Parkison was critical of Federal Reserve policy, and Brown was critical of Parkinson's public pronouncements.
1945-1948
44 17
J. David Stern
Correspondence with Stern, publisher of the New York Post and the Philadelphia Record, and class C director of the Philadelphia Federal Reserve Bank. Stern supported the New Deal but had an uneasy relationship with Eccles. He resigned his directorship in December 1936 to concentrate on publishing.
1935-1937
44 18-19
Robert P. Vanderpoel
Correspondence with Vanderpoel, financial editor of the , the , and a strong supporter of the New Deal. He and Eccles were close friends.
1937-1951
45
Banking Correspondence
Miscellaneous Federal Reserve banking correspondence.
1935-1951
Box Folder
45 1-4
Bankers' Letters
Letters containing stockholder reports, sent either as a courtesy or for evaluation.
1935-1951
45 5-7
New York Federal Reserve Bank Memoranda
Materials from George Harrison's tenure as president of the bank.
1936-1938
46
Federal Reserve Board Staff
Miscellaneous memoranda and other correspondence of the Federal Reserve Board and its staff, covering such topics as a WPA white-collar project,sanctions against Italy and Ethiopia, a disagreement between Chairman McCabe and the six governors, and the salaries of the board of governors and their staffs.
1934-1951
47
Administrative Correspondence
Materials relating to the construction of an annex between the Federal Reserve Board Building and the War Department Building; Federal Reserve Board correspondence; and the function and organization of various Federal Reserve entities.
1935-1951
Box Folder
47 1
Annex
1940-1941
47 2-5
Federal Reserve Board Correspondence
Letters to Eccles in Ogden, Utah, from board members and staff.
1935-1950
47 6-10
District Correspondence
Letters from members of Federal Reserve Districts concerning Eccles' visits to their districts.
1935-1951
47 11-18
Federal Reserve Correspondence
Documents describing the function and organization of the board of governors and departments of the Federal Reserve, as well as special projects of the Division of Research and Statistics.
1935-1949
48
James K. Vardaman, Jr.
1946-1951
Box Folder
48 1
Letters of Recommendation
1936
48 2-3
Vardaman Memoranda
1947-1951
48 4-10
Eccles Correspondence
Eccles' correspondence with Federal Reserve banks regarding Vardaman.
1946-1947
48 11-14
Federal Reserve Board File
The Federal Reserve Board file on Vardaman's use of board facilities and services.
1947-1951
49
Gold and Capital Issues
Memoranda pertaining to gold, and documents on capital issues.
1935-1950
Box Folder
49 11-15
Gold
Memoranda that reflect a change of interest from the economy of gold and capital inflow during the depression-recovery years, to speculation in gold and its use by foreign countries during the war and postwar years.
1935-1950
49 16-19
Capital Issues
Documents reflecting the issues of corporate taxation, taxation of undistributed earnings, and the effect of the Securities Act of 1933 on the formation of new capital.
1935-1950
50
Allan Sproul
Correspondence and other materials mostly by Sproul, president of the New York Federal Reserve Bank 1942-1948, concerning the Federal Open Market Committee, of which Eccles was the chairman and Sproul the vice chairman. These materials relate to the issuing of government bonds and the setting of rates and reserves.
1935-1957
Box Folder
50 1-3
New York Federal Reserve Bank
1942-1948
50 4-21
Government Financing
1935-1951
51
Miscellaneous
Private letters and documents of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and the Reconstruction Finance Corporation.
1935-1951
Box Folder
51 1-3
Confidential Documents
1936-1951
51 4-11
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
Documents concerning the retirement of FDIC capital stock and the doubling of deposit insurance liability.
1935-1951
51 12-13
Reconstruction Finance Corporation Small Business Loans
Papers relating to the Reconstruction Finance Corporation's role in making loans available to small businesses during the war.
1938-1945
51 14-16
Reconstruction Finance Corporation Liquidation
Materials regarding RFC liquidation and the scandal associated with the corporation's lending policies.
1946-1951
52
Japan and Official Courtesies
Correspondence between Eccles and foreign banks, government officials, prominent people, and friends. These materials also include an unrelated military report on Japan.
1935-1951
Box Folder
52 1
Post-War Japan
U.S. Army report, "The Japanese Recovery Program."
1948
52 2-3
Miscellaneous Documents
1945-1950
52 4-9
Foreign Banks
Correspondence with national and commercial foreign banks and the embassies of Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Britain, Ceylon, Chile, Colombia, Finland, France, India, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, South Africa, South Rhodesia, Sweden, and Switzerland.
1935-1951
52 10-15
Courtesy Correspondence
Semi-official correspondence between Eccles and prominent people, including Adolph A. Berle, Jr.; Chester Bowles; Dean Brimhall; Stewart Cosgriff; Harry Hopkins; Cordell Hull; Robert La Follette, Jr.; John L. Lewis; David E. Lilenthal; Louis B. Mayer; Adolphe Menjou; Harold Stassen; Edward R. Stettinius; Gerard Swope; Henry Wallace; Sumner Welles; and Wendell L. Willkie.
1935-1951
53
Congratulations and Requests
Eccles' letters of congratulations to various government officials, and letters from commercial journals asking Eccles to submit articles.
1936-1951
Box Folder
53 1-7
Letters of Congratulation
Correspondence from Eccles to others, exchanging official courtesies for new appointments and retirements. Most of the correspondents are government officials, including Dean Acheson, W. Randolph Burgess, James F. Byrnes, Thomas G. Corcoran, Joseph E. Davies, Paul H. Douglas, William O. Douglas, Stephen Early, Charles Edison, James V. Forrestal, W. Averell Harriman, Harry Hopkins, Eugene Mayer, Abe Murdock, Drew Pearson, Paul A. Porter, Charles Ross, Rexford G. Tugwell, and Fred M. Vinson.
1936-1951
53 8-12
Requests for Articles
1936-1951
54
Miscellaneous Letters
Excerpts of Eccles' letters and semi-official correspondence.
1933-1951
Box Folder
54 1-2
Excerpts from Letters
Various excerpts as compiled by Eccles' secretary, Va Lois Egbert.
1933-1951
54 3-9
Semi-Official Correspondence
Letters in which Eccles asks questions or advice, or makes complaints.
1935-1951
55
Comments and Speeches and Articles
Correspondence detailing Eccles' opinions on the speeches and articles of others.
1934-1951
Box Folder
55 1-5
Comments on Speeches
1934-1950
55 6-16
Comments on Articles
1937-1951
56
Senators and Representatives
Correspondence between Eccles and members of Congress.
1933-1942
Box Folder
56 1
Lists of Testimonies
Lists of testimonies given by Eccles before Congress. They are neither complete nor chronological. For more of Eccles' congressional testimonies, see boxes 63-69.
1933-1948
56 2
Testimony Requests
Letters asking Eccles to testify before the House Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds, and asking the Federal Reserve Board to prepare materials for proposed amendments to the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946.
1944
56 3
Senator Carter Glass
Documents quoting from speeches by Glass, the senator responsible for the original Federal Reserve Act in 1913.
56 4-18
Senators and Representatives
Correspondence.
1933-1942
57
Senators and Representatives
1943-1951
58
Board Candidates, A-Ma
Materials on those who applied or were recommended for membership on the Federal Reserve Board. The Banking Act of 1935 changed the composition of the board and the requirements for appointment as a governor, and Eccles and Governor Szymczak were the only holdover members. Therefore, there were more candidates for the board during 1935-1936 than at any other time. Materials are arranged alphabetically.
1934-1936
59
Board Candidates, Mi-W
Materials on those who applied or were recommended for membership on the Federal Reserve Board. The Banking Act of 1935 changed the composition of the board and the requirements for appointment as a governor, and Eccles and Governor Szymczak were the only holdover members. Therefore, there were more candidates for the board during 1935-1936 than at any other time. Materials are arranged alphabetically.
1935-1936
60
Miscellaneous Board Candidates
Materials containing brief information on some of the 1935-1936 Federal Reserve Board candidates, and miscellaneous documents on the legal requirements for candidacy.
1935-1942
Box Folder
60 1-3
Miscellaneous Candidates
1935-1936
60 4
Miscellaneous Board Information
Information concerning the board, and memoranda regarding the legal requirements for membership.
1935-1942
60 5
Letters
Letters about board candidates and the requirements for candidacy.
1935-1936
61
Treasury-Board Controversy
Materials documenting the controversy between the Federal Reserve Board and the Treasury. The conflict was resolved by the actions of Eccles leading to the 1951 Accord between the Treasury and the Board.
1951
62
Treasury-Board Controversy
1951
63
Testimonies
Eccles' testimony before congressional committees concerning various economic issues, including the Banking Act of 1935; his nomination to the Federal Reserve Board; the Frazier-Lemke Farmers' Relief Act; legislation to permit direct obligations of the United States to be used as collateral; amendments to the National Housing Act; the Patman Bill for government ownership of the twelve Federal Reserve banks; and unemployment and relief issues. These materials also include Eccles' letters published in the Congressional Record or made public through the press.
1933-1938
64
Testimonies
Eccles' testimony before congressional committees concerning various economic issues, including the abolition of the Federal Reserve System (the Vandenberg letter); his conflict with Senator Harry F. Byrd over government spending (see box 40); capital aid to small industry and business; the Federal Home Loan Act; and the Patman Bill (non-interest bonds). These materials also include Eccles' letters published in the or made public through the press.
1938-1941
65
Testimonies
Eccles' testimony before congressional committees concerning various economic issues, including tax proposals; a bill to amend the Federal Reserve Act; silver; bank holding companies; industrial loans; changes in bank reserve requirements; and capital gains. These materials also include Eccles' letters published in the or made public through the press.
1941-1945
66
Testimonies
Eccles' testimony before congressional committees concerning various economic issues, including the Price Control Bill; amendments to the Emergency Price Control Bill of 1942; contract termination loans; loans to industry; and extension of the Office of Price Administration. These materials also include Eccles' letters published in the or made public through the press.
1941-1946
67
Testimonies
Eccles' testimony before congressional committees concerning various economic issues, including small business; the Murray Full-Employment Bill; the Reorganization Act; the International Fund and Bank; the Housing Act; the Anglo-American Loan; and the Export-Import Bank. These materials also include Eccles' letters published in the or made public through the press.
1945-1947
68
Testimonies
Eccles' testimony before congressional committees concerning various economic issues, including bank holding companies; small business loans; Regulation W (consumer credit controls); the Reconstruction Finance Corporation; housing mortgages; and a bill to curb inflation. These materials also include Eccles' letters published in the or made public through the press.
1947-1948
69
Testimonies
Eccles' testimony before congressional committees concerning various economic issues, including bank credit; reserve requirements; and the housing bill. These materials also include Eccles' letters published in the or made public through the press.
1947-1948
70
Testimonies
Testimonies, reports, published articles, and correspondence to and from Eccles concerning the work of the subcommittee on Monetary, Credit, and Fiscal Policies of the Joint Committee on the Economy report. The committee, under the chairmanship of Senator Paul Douglas, Democrat from Illinois, studied the controversy between the Treasury and Federal Reserve Board to try to determine their respective roles in formulating monetary policy. The committee report recommended that Congress restore the supremacy of the Federal Reserve System over the nation's credit structure, but it was not acted upon. The Treasury-Board controversy was finally settled by the actions of Eccles leading to the 1951 Accord. See boxes 61 and 62 and the scrapbook of newsclippings.
1949-1950
71
Testimonies
Eccles' testimony before congressional committees concerning various economic issues, including the bill to amend the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946; the "packing" of the board of governors; housing; Treasury reorganization; social security; and the abolition of the Reconstruction Finance Corporation. These materials also include Eccles' letters published in the or made public through the press.
1950-1951
72
Lauchlin Currie
Memoranda with Currie. See description for Box 43, Folders 1-3, for a brief sketch of Currie's involvement with the Federal Reserve Board and other governmental entities.
1934-1937
73
Lauchlin Currie
Memoranda with Currie. See description for Box 43, Folders 1-3, for a brief sketch of Currie's involvement with the Federal Reserve Board and other governmental entities.
1937-1939
74
Addresses
Eccles' speeches while he was a Utah banker. They reflect his gradual change from a conventional banker to a radical economist, whose congressional testimony brought him national attention and an appointment at the Treasury in January 1935. He was appointed to the Federal Reserve Board later that year.
1925-1935
75
Addresses
Speeches concerning the Banking Act of 1935, and the correspondence they generated.
1935-1936
76
Addresses
Speeches concerning the recession of 1937-1938.
1936-1938
77
Addresses
Speeches concerning economic problems in the United States during Hitler's threat of overrunning Europe. In these speeches, Eccles speaks in defense of capitalistic democracy.
1938-1939
78
Addresses
Speeches concerning economic problems in the United States during Hitler's threat of overrunning Europe. In these speeches, Eccles speaks in defense of capitalistic democracy.
1939-1940
79
Addresses
Speeches covering the war years, when the initial hardships of wartime controls turned into hope for plans of the postwar world. These plans, coupled with the frustration of inflation and the emergence of Soviet influence in Europe, gave rise to debate over the proper role of the United States in world affairs.
1940-1942
80
Addresses
Speeches covering the war years, when the initial hardships of wartime controls turned into hope for plans of the postwar world. These plans, coupled with the frustration of inflation and the emergence of Soviet influence in Europe, gave rise to debate over the proper role of the United States in world affairs.
1943-1944
81
Addresses
Speeches primarily about postwar financial adjustment needs and policies. Eccles made these addresses prior to his demotion from the chairmanship of the board in 1948.
1945-1948
82
Addresses
Speeches from 1949 until his resignation from the board in 1951. Eccles was often openly critical of U.S. economic policy, and his strong enunciation of these beliefs led to a public breach with President Truman and John W. Snyder, secretary of the Treasury.
1949-1951
83
Radio and Television Broadcasts
Transcripts of Eccles' statements, addresses, and interviews on radio and television. These materials also include correspondence elicited by the broadcasts. There is no transcript of Eccles' 1949 television interview.
1935-1951
84
Extemporaneous Addresses
Correspondence, notes, drafts, and transcriptions related to Eccles' frequent extemporaneous speeches. Because most of the speeches did not have titles, they are arranged by date, location, and name of the group addressed. In 1948, after his demotion from the chairmanship of the Federal Reserve Board, Eccles accepted more speaking engagements.
1935-1942
85
Extemporaneous Addresses
Correspondence, notes, drafts, and transcriptions related to Eccles' frequent extemporaneous speeches. Because most of the speeches did not have titles, they are arranged by date, location, and name of the group addressed. In 1948, after his demotion from the chairmanship of the Federal Reserve Board, Eccles accepted more speaking engagements.
1943-1948
86
Extemporaneous Addresses
Correspondence, notes, drafts, and transcriptions related to Eccles' frequent extemporaneous speeches. Because most of the speeches did not have titles, they are arranged by date, location, and name of the group addressed. In 1948, after his demotion from the chairmanship of the Federal Reserve Board, Eccles accepted more speaking engagements.
1949-1951
87
Declined Speech Invitations
Correspondence pertaining to speaking invitations that Eccles declined. The number of invitations received in 1935 from Federal Reserve banks and state banking organizations reflect the national interest in the Banking Act of 1935. A number of invitations were received from prestigious universities in 1939, reflecting increased interest in economic theory.
1934-1937
88
Declined Speech Invitations
Correspondence pertaining to speaking invitations that Eccles declined. The number of invitations received in 1935 from Federal Reserve banks and state banking organizations reflect the national interest in the Banking Act of 1935. A number of invitations were received from prestigious universities in 1939, reflecting increased interest in economic theory.
1937-1942
89
Declined Speech Invitations
Correspondence pertaining to speaking invitations that Eccles declined. The number of invitations received in 1935 from Federal Reserve banks and state banking organizations reflect the national interest in the Banking Act of 1935. A number of invitations were received from prestigious universities in 1939, reflecting increased interest in economic theory.
1943-1951
90
Articles by Eccles
Prints, galleys, and drafts of Eccles' published articles, as well as correspondence with editors and letters of comment from the public. Eccles generally avoided publishing articles in commercial journals and did so only when he felt a critical issue needed that particular forum.
1935-1942
91
Articles by Eccles
Prints, galleys, and drafts of Eccles' published articles, as well as correspondence with editors and letters of comment from the public. Eccles generally avoided publishing articles in commercial journals and did so only when he felt a critical issue needed that particular forum.
1943-1951
92
Press Releases
Various statements Eccles issued to the press.
1932-1944
93
Press Releases
Various statements Eccles issued to the press.
1945-1950
94
Appointments and Invitations
Invitations to Eccles for luncheons, dinners, and meetings, and requests for appointments and introductions. Eccles rarely refused invitations from student groups, or from U.S. and foreign bankers and officials.
1934-1936
95
Appointments and Invitations
Invitations to Eccles for luncheons, dinners, and meetings, and requests for appointments and introductions. Eccles rarely refused invitations from student groups, or from U.S. and foreign bankers and officials.
1937-1939
96
Appointments and Invitations
Invitations to Eccles for luncheons, dinners, and meetings, and requests for appointments and introductions. Eccles rarely refused invitations from student groups, or from U.S. and foreign bankers and officials.
1940-1944
97
Appointments and Invitations
Invitations to Eccles for luncheons, dinners, and meetings, and requests for appointments and introductions. Eccles rarely refused invitations from student groups, or from U.S. and foreign bankers and officials.
1945-1948
98
Appointments and Invitations
Invitations to Eccles for luncheons, dinners, and meetings, and requests for appointments and introductions. Eccles rarely refused invitations from student groups, or from U.S. and foreign bankers and officials.
1949-1951
99
Reports
Miscellaneous reports from various Federal Reserve Board staff members.
1934-1938
Box Folder
99 1-4
Henry Edmiston Reports
Reports by Edmiston written when he and Eccles were at the Treasury. Edmiston went to the Federal Reserve Board with Eccles in November 1934.
1934
99 5-23
Reports
Reports by Federal Reserve staff members, including Lewis L. Baxter, J. M. Daiger, E. A. Goldenweisser, Woodlief Thomas, Mordecai Ezekial, and Alan R. Sweezy.
1934-1938
100
Reports
Reports by Federal Reserve staff members, including Alan R. Sweezy, Mordecai Ezekiel, Emile Despres, and Alvin Hansen.
1939-1940
101
Reports
Reports by Federal Reserve staff members, including Alan R. Sweezy, Mordecai Ezekiel, Emile Despres, and Alvin Hansen.
1941-1950
102
Employment Correspondence
Letters from those seeking jobs in the Federal Reserve System or with other government agencies. Many of the letters are from Eccles' Utah acquaintances. The correspondence is peripheral to the operation of the board, but is of interest because it reflects social and economic conditions of the years 1934-1947.
1934
103
Employment Correspondence
Letters from those seeking jobs in the Federal Reserve System or with other government agencies. Many of the letters are from Eccles' Utah acquaintances. The correspondence is peripheral to the operation of the board, but is of interest because it reflects social and economic conditions of the years 1934-1947.
1935-1937
104
Employment Correspondence
Letters from those seeking jobs in the Federal Reserve System or with other government agencies. Many of the letters are from Eccles' Utah acquaintances. The correspondence is peripheral to the operation of the board, but is of interest because it reflects social and economic conditions of the years 1934-1947.
1938-1947
105
Personal Correspondence
Correspondence of a personal nature, added to the Eccles collection in March 1981, after receipt of the main body of documents.
1933-1940
106
Personal Correspondence
Correspondence of a personal nature, added to the Eccles collection in March 1981, after receipt of the main body of documents.
1941-1947
107
Personal Correspondence
Correspondence of a personal nature, added to the Eccles collection in March 1981, after receipt of the main body of documents.
1948-1951
107A
Personal Correspondence
Correspondence of a personal nature from Eccles' years at the Treasury, added to the collection as an addendum in 1981.
1934-1935
108
Social Events Guest List
This box contains Eccles' guest lists for parties, dinners, and dances, as well as letters of response and thanks.
1937-1951
109
Collection Addendum
Miscellaneous items, received in 1981 as an addendum to the Eccles collection. These materials contain correspondence regarding the Geneva Steel Works in Provo, Utah, and a file of hostile articles by Leslie Gould, financial editor of the New York Journal American.
1935-1951
110
Articles and Testimonies
This box contains articles and testimonies on the Federal Reserve System, and articles by members of the board.
1943-1977
111
John Maynard Keynes
A file on Keynes that Eccles maintained. Although Eccles' own economic theories differed in many aspects from those of Keynes, he was nevertheless interested in Keynes' ideas.
1932-1951
112
Others' Articles and Addresses
Articles and speeches by others, including Allan Sproul, Chester C. Davis, and Chester Bowles.
1933-1951

Businessman and Public FigureReturn to Top

Container(s): Series III

Container(s) Description Dates
IV: Speeches and Correspondence-Economic and Political
This section contains speeches and related correspondence on various topics that absorbed Eccles' attention in his later life. Most of these materials pertain to Eccles' views on U.S. economic policy, military involvement in Vietnam, and the world population explosion. Also included in these materials are various media interviews and statements to the press.
Box
113
Economic Speeches and Correspondence
Speeches and related correspondence pertaining to economic subjects, often reflecting the national concern over monolithic communism, which Eccles proposed to combat by ensuring a sound American economy. Although he made these addresses while he was running against Arthur V. Watkins for the U.S. Senate in 1952, the speeches are not directly related to his campaign.
1951-1953
114
Economic Speeches and Correspondence
Speeches and related correspondence concerning economic topics. These materials include Eccles' first speech in which he urges recognition of Communist China and warns against American involvement in Indochina.
1954-1956
115
Economic Speeches and Correspondence
Speeches and a great deal of related correspondence concerning economic and political topics. Included is one of his most important speeches, delivered December 10, 1957, in which he questions the necessity of the Cold War.
1957-1958
116
Economic Speeches and Correspondence
Speeches, related correspondence, and Eccles' testimony before the Senate Finance Committee.
1958
117
Speeches and Correspondence
Speeches, statements, and related correspondence. These materials include Eccles' first addresses in which he criticizes the demands of labor unions, and discusses overpopulation as the great threat to world economic and political stability.
1959
118
Overpopulation Speeches
1961-1962
119
Overpopulation Speeches
Speeches pertaining to the consequences of the population explosion on world economy.
1963-1964
120
Overpopulation and Vietnam Speeches and Correspondence
Speeches and correspondence in which Eccles warns against world overpopulation and U.S. involvement in the Vietnam conflict.
1965
Box Folder
120 1-7
World Overpopulation
Addresses and related correspondence.
1965
120 8
Statement on the Vietnam Conflict
Statement concerning U.S. intervention in Vietnam. Eccles had the distinction of being one of the first U.S. businessmen to speak against American involvement in Southeast Asia.
1965
120 9
List of Vietnam Statement Recipients
Those to whom Eccles sent his statement.
1965
120 10-14
Correspondence, A-C
Correspondence concerning Eccles' statement on U.S. involvement in the Vietnam conflict. These materials are arranged alphabetically.
121
Vietnam Correspondence, D-L
Correspondence concerning Eccles' statement on U.S. involvement in the Vietnam conflict. These materials are arranged alphabetically.
1965
122
Vietnam Correspondence, M-Z
Correspondence concerning Eccles' statement on U.S. involvement in the Vietnam conflict. These materials are arranged alphabetically.
1965
123
Vietnam Speeches and Correspondence
The speech, "Tight Money-Higher Interest Rates-Causes and Effects," which Eccles gave to various professional and civic organizations, and related correspondence. The speech includes a comprehensive account of the U.S. economy and an evaluation of the effects of the Vietnam conflict on the economy.
1966
124
Vietnam Speeches and Correspondence
Speeches and related correspondence and press clippings. These materials include "Vietnam-Its Effects on the Nation," a speech that includes a comprehensive account of the U.S. economy and an evaluation of it in light of the effects of the Vietnam conflict.
1967
125
Vietnam Speech Correspondence, A-L
Correspondence elicited by Eccles' speech, "Vietnam-Its Effect on the Nation." The correspondence is arranged alphabetically.
1967
Box Folder
125 1
List of Vietnam Speech Recipients
List of those to whom Eccles sent copies of his Vietnam speech.
1967
125 2-25
Vietnam Correspondence, A-L
1967
126
Vietnam Correspondence, M-Z
Correspondence elicited by Eccles' speech, "Vietnam-Its Effect on the Nation." The correspondence is arranged alphabetically.
1967
127
Vietnam Speeches and Correspondence
Speeches, a February 1968 interview in Forbes magazine, and the correspondence it elicited. These materials are arranged alphabetically and include revised versions of Eccles' speech, "Vietnam-Its Effect on the Nation."
1968
Box Folder
127 1
Interview in Forbes
magazine interview of Eccles titled, "As I See It."
1968
127 2-8
Correspondence
Correspondence regarding the interview, arranged alphabetically.
1968
127 9
Revised Vietnam Speech
1968
128
Vietnam Speeches and Correspondence
An introductory speech for Robert F. Kennedy, U.S. senator from Massachusetts and presidential candidate; and a new speech on the Vietnam conflict. These materials include correspondence regarding both addresses.
1968
Box Folder
128 1
Introduction of Senator Robert F. Kennedy
Eccles' March 27 introduction of Kennedy at a Salt Lake City political meeting and a list of those to whom Eccles sent copies. Although Eccles was not a supporter of Kennedy, nor even a registered Democrat, he agreed to introduce the senator because it gave him an opporunity to speak on the Vietnam conflict.
1968
128 2-4
Correspondence Regarding the Kennedy Introduction
Correspondence regarding Eccles' introduction of Kennedy. These materials are arranged alphabetically.
1968
128 5
Vietnam Speech--Denver
Eccles' address, "Vietnam: Politics and Hypocrisy--A Tragedy of Errors," given April 27 before the Business Executives Move for Vietnam Peace in Denver; and a list of those to whom Eccles sent the speech.
1968
128 6-9
Correspondence Regarding Eccles' Vietnam Speech in Denver
Correspondence pertaining to Eccles speech against US involvement in the Vietnam conflict. Thses materials are arranged alphabetically by correspondent.
1968
128 10
Vietnam Speech--Salt Lake City
Eccles' address, "Vietnam: Politics and Hypocrisy--A Tragedy of Errors," given before the Town Club in Salt Lake City.
1968
128 11
Vietnam Speech--Detroit, Chicago, and New York
Eccles' address, "Vietnam: Politics and Hypocrisy--A Tragedy of Errors," given June 25-27 in Detroit, Chicago, and New York.
1968
128 12-16
Correspondence Regarding Eccles' Speeches on Vietnam
Correspondence pertaining to Eccles' addresses in Detroit, Chicago, and New York, in which he spoke against US involvement in Vietnam. These materials are arranged alphabetically.
1968
129
Vietnam Speeches and Correspondence
Two of Eccles' speeches on U.S. involvement in Vietnam, "Vietnam: Politics and Hypocrisy-A Tragedy of Errors," and "The U.S. and the World Today," which he first gave in September 1970. These materials also include correspondence and media reports pertaining to the speech, as well as an interview with Dun's Review.
1968-1970
Box Folder
129 1-6
Speeches, Magazine Articles, and Correspondence
Addresses and Statements made to the print media, mostly concerning US involvement in Vietnam, and related correspondence and notes.
1968-1970
129 7
Vietnam Speech--Salt Lake City
Eccles' speech, "The US and the World Today," given 1 September 1970 to the Salt Lake City Rotary Club.
1970
129 8
Dun's Review Interview
Eccles' interview for Dun's Review titled, "Don't Blame the Fed."
1970
129 9-11
Correspondence
Correspondence regarding Eccles' speech, "The US and the World Today." Letters are arranged alphabetically.
1970
130
Speeches and Correspondence
Eccles' last major addresses and related correspondence. Included are his speech given in 1971 upon his retirement as chairman of the board of the Utah Construction and Mining Company, and his address after receiving the World Trade Club Award in May of 1972
1970-1972
131
Extemporaneous Speeches
Correspondence relating to Eccles' frequent extemporaneous speeches. Eccles had an agency, Clark H. Getts, Inc., which secured speaking engagements for him. Because Eccles made extemporaneous speeches after 1957 of which there are no records, it is possible that his association with Getts was during the 1951-1957 period.
1951-1957
132
Declined Speech Invitations
Correspondence pertaining to speaking invitations that Eccles declined.
1951-1957
133
Speech Index and Others' Speeches
Incomplete index of Eccles' speeches, statements, and testimonies; and several copies of others' speeches that Eccles kept.
1957-1972
Box Folder
133 1
Speech Index
Incomplete index to Eccles' speeches, statements, and testimonies.
1925-1972
133 2-6
Others' Speeches
1957-1961
V: Political Files
This section contains documents pertaining to political issues of particular interest to Eccles. Included are Eccles' campaign materials from his U. S. Senate election bid; correspondence relating to his campaign, as well as other national and local candidates he endorsed; correspondence with ranking political figures; and a file on various political organizations.
Box
134
Senate Campaign Materials
Endorsements, press reports, and campaign materials regarding Eccles' 1952 U. S. Senate campaign. When he left Washington to return to Utah in July 1951, there was speculation that he would seek the Senate seat of Arthur V. Watkins. He did not announce his decision to run until just before the Republican state convention, however, leaving only six weeks to prepare for the primary, which he lost.While Eccles attributed his loss to the brevity of his campaign, another possible cause for his defeat was his strong identification with the New Deal. But his public break with President Truman over monetary policy seemed to Eccles to preclude his running as a Democrat.
1952
135
Senate Campaign Correspondence
Correspondence related to Eccles' 1952 Senate campaign.
1952
Box Folder
135 1
Candidacy Announcement
Letter from Eccles to Republican party delegates, announcing his candidacy for the U. S. Senate.
1952
135 2
Candidacy Congratulations
Letters of congratulation to Eccles on his candidacy, and offers and requests to help in securing delegate votes at the Republican state convention.
1952
135 3-15
Primary Election Correspondence
Correspondence relating to the primary election. These materials are arranged alphabetically.
1952
135 16
Campaign Thank-You Letters
Thank-you letters from Eccles to his campaign workers.
1952
136
Presidential Campaigns
Correspondence concerning Eccles' endorsement of candidates in presidential campaigns. After Eccles' defeat for a Senate seat in 1952, he continued to support the Republican party, but then backed Democrat Adlai Stevenson in 1956. In 1964, Eccles backed Lyndon Johnson, but became disillusioned with him as the Vietnam conflict escalated. In 1968, he looked at both parties for strong anti-war candidates and was consequently disappointed with the choice between Nixon and Humphrey, although he eventually voted for Humphrey. In 1972, Eccles supported George McGovern for president, and gave most of his financial support to strong anti-war senatorial candidates from both parties.
1956-1972
137
Other Political Campaigns, A-L
Correspondence related to the campaigns of others, mostly for national offices, but also from local elections, particularly in Utah and California. During the years of the Vietnam conflict, Eccles contributed a great deal of money to the re-election campaigns of anti-war candidates and persuaded family members and friends to contribute also. These materials are arranged alphabetically, usually by candidate, but occasionally by author.
138
Other Political Campaigns, M-Z
Correspondence related to the campaigns of others, mostly for national offices, but also from local elections, particularly in Utah and California. During the years of the Vietnam conflict, Eccles contributed a great deal of money to the re-election campaigns of anti-war candidates and persuaded family members and friends to contribute also. These materials are arranged alphabetically, usually by candidate, but occasionally by author.
139
Political and Government Figures
Correspondence with Arthur F. Burns and David M. Kennedy, both of whom served as chairman of the Federal Reserve Board; William McChesney Martin, Secretary of the Treasury; and Mitchell Melich, a solicitor for the Department of the Interior. These materials also include documents related to the Roosevelt Library and other Roosevelt memorials.
1962-1977
Box Folder
139 1-2
Arthur F. Burns
1969-1977
139 3
David M. Kennedy
1965-1975
139 4
William McChesney Martin
1964-1974
139 5-6
Mitchell Melich
1962-1973
139 7
Franklin D. Roosevelt Library
1939
139 8-9
Franklin D. Roosevelt Memorials
1947-1977
140
Political Subjects, A-B
Various political statements, articles, pamphlets, and newsletters arranged alphabetically according to Eccles' designated subject titles.
1954-1968
Box Folder
140 1
Agriculture
1959-1968
140 2
Arms Control
1954-1961
140 3-9
Balance of International Payments
1961-1968
141
Political Subjects, C-E
Various political statements, articles, pamphlets, and newsletters arranged alphabetically according to Eccles' designated subject titles.
1940-1973
Box Folder
141 1
Conflict of Interest
1973
141 2-4
Education
1955-1969
141 5
Employment
1940-1958
141 6
Energy Crisis
1973
142
Political Subjects, F-I
Various political statements, articles, pamphlets, and newsletters arranged alphabetically according to Eccles' designated subject titles.
1956-1969
Box Folder
142 1-4
Foreign Policy
1956-1969
142 5-8
Gold
1959-1963
142 9-10
Inflation and Deflation
1957-1965
142 11
Interest Rates
1968-1969
142 12
Speech Material
143
Political Subjects, I-S
Various political statements, articles, pamphlets, and newsletters arranged alphabetically according to Eccles' designated subject titles.
1957-1972
Box Folder
143 1
Internal Revenue Service
1963
143 2
Joint Economic Committee
1957-1960
143 3-5
Labor
1958-1965
143 6
Monetary and Fiscal Policy
1959-1963
143 7
Nuclear Test Ban
1972
143 8
Oil and Metal Taxes
1965
143 9
Panhandle and Golden Gateway Routes
1966
143 10
Senate Finance Committee
1958
143 11
Space Program
1969
143 12
Speech Materials
1957-1966
143 13
State of Utah
1965
144
U.S.-China Relations
Materials from the National Committee on United States-China Relations, Inc., a group that Eccles supported. Eccles favored recognition of the People's Republic of China and its admission to the United Nations as early as 1951. These materials also include several articles on the Chinese cultural revolution.
1957-1968
145
U.S.-China Relations
Materials from the National Committee on United States-China Relations, Inc., a group that Eccles supported. Eccles favored recognition of the People's Republic of China and its admission to the United Nations as early as 1951. These materials also include several articles on the Chinese cultural revolution.
1969-1975
146
Miscellaneous Organizations
Materials from various political organizations, arranged alphabetically. Eccles had great interest in some of these organizations and only minimal interest in others to which he simply lent his name.
1957-1976
Box Folder
146 1-4
Americans for Democratic Action
1967-1975
146 5
American Good Government Society
1968
146 6
Business Committee for Tax Reduction in 1963
146 7-10
Canadian-American Committee
1957-1959
146 11-13
The Center for Study of Causes of War and the Conditions for Peace (Utah State University)
1966-1970
147
Miscellaneous Organizations
Materials from various political organizations, arranged alphabetically. Eccles had great interest in some of these organizations and only minimal interest in others to which he simply lent his name.
1947-1977
Box Folder
147 1-3
Committee for Economic Development
1960-1977
147 4
Democratic National Committee Advisory Council
1957-1960
147 5
Foreign Policy Association
1967
147 6
Institute of International Labor Research, Inc.
1960
147 7
John Birch Society
1962-1963
147 8
National Citizens Committee Concerned About Deployment of the ABM (Anti-Ballistic Missiles)
1969
147 9-11
National Committee for International Development
1965-1966
147 12-14
National Planning Association
1955-1968
147 15-16
United Nations
1966-1975
VI: Population Files
This section contains documents and publications reflecting Eccles' interest and activism regarding world overpopulation. Highly involved in the Planned Parenthood Federation of America-World Population Emergency Campaign and the Planned Parenthood Association of Utah, Eccles felt one of the answers to solving world economic and political crises was through widespread use of contraception.
Box
148
Hugh Moore Fund
1955-1971
149
Planned Parenthood Association
Correspondence and newsletters in regard to the Planned Parenthood Association of Utah. Eccles became a nominal member of the organization in 1963 and contributed considerable financial support. But he was not in agreement with Planned Parenthood's philosophy of "every child a wanted child." Instead, he thought people should want fewer children.
1963-1979
150
World Population Emergency Campaign
Correspondence concerning the World Population Emergency Campaign (WPEC). In 1960, Eccles sponsored two fund-raising luncheons for the organization in California, an assignment he apparently did not enjoy. The WPEC merged with Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA) in 1962.
1960-1969
151
PPFA-WPEC Correspondence
Correspondence concerning the Planned Parenthood Federation of America-World Population Emergency Campaign. When the two organizations merged in 1962, their combined fund-raising abilities were ambitious. Eccles was a generous supporter of PPFA-WPEC, although when he began supporting Planned Parenthood Association of Utah, he reduced his national contribution.
1963-1976
152
PPFA-WPEC Publications
Newsletters, reports, and other publications of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America-World Population Emergency Campaign.
1964-1978
153
Population Crisis Committee
Records and documents of the Population Crisis Committee, which was organized to watch, coordinate, and report on government activity on population control. Eccles declined membership on the committee, but lent his name to some of its projects and received the committee's reports, including one on the 1974 World Population Conference in Bucharest.
1965-1976
154
Population Reference Bureau Inc.
Correspondence and reports of the Population Reference Bureau, Inc., one of the oldest organizations formed to address population matters. The bureau's main purpose is educational.
1959-1974
155
Population Reference Bureau Inc., Publications
Pamphlets, press releases, and other publications of the Population Reference Bureau, Inc.
1959-1976
156
Miscellaneous Organizations
Correspondence with the Association for Voluntary Sterilization, the U.S. Congress, and the Worldwide Planned Parenthood Federation, concerning population issues.
1958-1970
Box Folder
156 1-2
Association for Voluntary Sterilization
1965-1971
156 3-6
U.S. Congress
1961-1970
156 7
International Planned Parenthood Federation
1958
157
Miscellaneous Documents
1961-1976
158
Miscellaneous Publications, A-F
Publications pertaining to population problems, published by organizations other than those represented in boxes 148-156. The materials are arranged alphabetically by the issuing agency.S
1962-1977
Box Folder
158 1
Agency for International Development
1962-1968
158 2
Alan Guttmacher Institute
1977
158 3
Center for Family Planning Program Development
1973
158 4
Center for International Economic Growth
1962
158 5
Commission on Population Growth and the American Future
1971
158 6
Dag Hammarskjold Foundation
1971
158 7
Draper World Population Fund
1975-1977
158 8
Executive Office of the President, Office of Science and Technology
1969
158 9
Ford Foundation
1968
158 10
Foreign Policy Association
1971
159
Miscellaneous Publications, I-W
1961-1977
Box Folder
159 1
The (Aspen) Institute for Humanistic Studies
1973
159 2
International Planned Parenthood Federation
1961-1968
159 3
National Planning Association
1969
159 4
President's Committee on Population and Family Planning
1968
159 5
SRI International
1977
159 6
United Nations Fund for Population Activities
1972
159 7
United Nations Association of the United States of America
1969
159 8
United States Department of the Interior
1967
159 9
W. E. Upjohn Institute
1967
159 10
World Affairs Council of Northern California
1965
159 11
Worldwatch Institute
1976
VII: The Vietnam Conflict Files
This section contains correspondence, speeches, publications, and other documents of various public figures and organizations concerning the Vietnam conflict. Eccles opposed U. S. military involvement in Vietnam, believing it needlessly sacrificed innocent lives and threatened world economic and political stability. He therefore spent a great deal of time making addresses, raising money, and lobbying for the withdrawal of U. S. troops in Southeast Asia.
Box
160
Business Executives Move for Peace
Correspondence pertaining to the Business Executives Move for Vietnam Peace, organized in 1967 by Henry E. Niles, a Baltimore businessman. The organization's goal was to bring the economically devastating effects of the Vietnam conflict to the attention of the public, the Congress, and the president.
1966-1972
161
Businessmen's Education Fund
Correspondence, reports, and pamphlets of the Businessmen's Education Fund, an offshoot of the Business Executives Move for Peace. The fund, organized by Harold Willens, was created to disseminate information condemning the Vietnam conflict and the growing U. S. military-industrial complex.
1969-1974
162
Peace Organizations, A-C
Correspondence and publications with various anti-nuclear and peace organizations, arranged alphabetically. Many of these groups sought Eccles' moral and financial support. Although most of his financial contributions went to the campaigns of incumbent senators who opposed the Vietnam conflict, Eccles also made donations to many of these organizations, principally the Center for Defense Information.
1964-1977
Box Folder
162 1
American Friends Service Committee
1964-1969
162 2-9
Center for Defense Information
1972-1977
162 10
Center for War/Peace Studies
1967
162 11-12
Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam
1967-1970
162 13
Coalition on National Priorities and Military Policy
1971-1972
163
Peace Organizations, C-M
1966-1977
Box Folder
163 1-2
Common Cause
1971-1975
163 3
Council for a Livable World
1969
163 4
Dissenting Democrats
1967
163 5
Division of Peace and World Order (Methodist Church)
1967-1968
163 6-9
Educational Committee to Halt Atomic Weapons Spread
1966-1969
163 10
Friends World Institute
1966-1968
163 11
Fund for Education in World Order
1969
163 12-13
Fund for Peace
1969-1974
163 14
Individuals Against the Crime of Silence
1967
163 15
Institute for American Democracy, Inc.
1966
163 16
Institute for Policy Studies
1967
163 17-18
Members of Congress for Peace Through Law
1969-1977
164
Peace Organizations, N-W
1963-1977
Box Folder
164 1
National Convocation on the Challenge of Building Peace
1968-1970
164 2
Negotiation Now!
1967
164 3
Peace Alert USA
1972
164 4
Persons Associated for Peace Advertising
1968
164 5
Promoting Enduring Peace, Inc.
1966-1968
164 6
Resistance Newspaper
1968
164 7
Salk, Ward & Salk, Inc.
1966
164 8
SANE (National Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy)
1963-1968
164 9
Strategy for Peace Conference
1963-1966
164 10
Test Ban Treaty
1963-1972
164 11
U. S. Committee to Aid the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam
1966-1967
164 12
University of California, Berkeley (The Washington Convocation on the National Crisis)
1967
164 13
U Thant, Secretary General of the United Nations
1966
164 14
Vietnamese Veterans Against the War
1968
164 15
War Control Planners, Inc.
1965-1966
164 16
War Resisters League of Northern California
1966
164 17-20
World Peace Broadcasting Foundation
1960-1977
165
Miscellaneous Vietnam Documents
Various papers, much of which is speech material, concerning the Vietnam conflict.
1965-1970
166
Vietnam Articles and Clippings
Copies of newspaper and journal articles, editorials, and letters to the editor pertaining to the Vietnam conflict.
1964-1971
167
Vietnam Correspondence
General correspondence pertaining to the Vietnam conflict.
1965-1979
Box Folder
167 1-6
Exchanged Letters, Speeches, and Legislation
1965-1969
167 7-9
Miscellaneous Vietnam Correspondence
Materials arranged alphabetically
VIII: Organizations-General Files
This section contains documents related to various organizations to which Eccles belonged. Eccles was appointed to some of the organizations because of his expertise in economic and political issues, and to others because of his personal feelings in regard to socio-moral issues.
Box
168
Hall of Fame Correspondence
Correspondence concerning Eccles' even terms as an elector to the Hall of Fame. These materials are arranged alphabetically.
1944-1976
169
Hall of Fame Candidates, A-L
Materials pertaining to candidates to the Hall of Fame.
1945-1960
Box Folder
169 1-2
Susan B. Anthony
169 3
Clara Barton
169 4
Alexander Graham Bell
169 5
Elizabeth Blackwell
169 6
Andrew Carnegie
169 7
George Rogers Clark
169 8
Jefferson Davis
169 9
Dorothea Lynde Dix
169 10
Mary Mapes Dodge
169 11
Mary Baker Eddy
169 12
Thomas Alva Edison
169 13
Henry George
169 14
Josiah Willard Gibbs
169 15
William Gorgas
169 16
John Gorrie
169 17
Robert G. Ingersoll
169 18
Stonewall Jackson
169 19
Sidney Lanier
169 20
Ezra L'Hommedieu
170
Hall of Fame Candidates, M-W
1945-1965
Box Folder
170 1
Edward McDowell
170 2
Charles Mazzuchelli
170 3
Albert A. Michelson
170 4
Lucretia Mott
170 5
James E. Oglethorpe
170 6
Thomas Paine
170 7
Maud Powell
170 8
Henry Martyn Robert
170 9
Sacajawea
170 10
Elizabeth Cady Stanton
170 11
Zachary Taylor
170 12
Sylvanus Thayer
170 13
George Henry Thomas
170 14
Henry David Thoreau
170 15
Unknown Soldier
170 16
Lillian D. Wald
170 17
William Henry Welch
170 18
Horace Mells
170 19
George Westinghouse
170 20
Orville and Wilbur Wright
170 21
Letters Supporting Other Candidates
171
Commission on Money and Credit
Documents related to Eccles' work on the Commission on Money and Credit, established in 1958 by the Committee for Economic Development as a self-governing body to study the financial and monetary institutions of the United States. Such a study had not been undertaken since 1906 when the Albrich Commission performed a similar task, which eventually led to the establishment of a central banking system-the Federal Reserve-in 1913.The Commission on Money and Credit, financed by its mother organization and the Ford Foundation, published its report in 1961 amid criticism for its failure to produce new ideas. Eccles recognized the commission's shortcomings and filed a short dissenting opinion with the report.
1958-1961
172
Commission on Money and Credit
Documents related to Eccles' work on the Commission on Money and Credit, established in 1958 by the Committee for Economic Development as a self-governing body to study the financial and monetary institutions of the United States. Such a study had not been undertaken since 1906 when the Albrich Commission performed a similar task, which eventually led to the establishment of a central banking system-the Federal Reserve-in 1913.The Commission on Money and Credit, financed by its mother organization and the Ford Foundation, published its report in 1961 amid criticism for its failure to produce new ideas. Eccles recognized the commission's shortcomings and filed a short dissenting opinion with the report.
1961-1964
173
American Assembly
Documents and correspondence pertaining to the American Assembly, a Columbia University-based organization created to study various aspects of U.S. economics and politics. Eccles served as a trustee of the assembly form 1959 to 1975, donating a great amount of time and money to it.
1957-1975
Box Folder
173 1-9
Black Notebook
Papers from and pertaining to the Black Notebook, the assembly's governing document.
1957-1975
173 10-15
Correspondence
Correspondence concerning trustees and meetings.
1959-1964
174
American Assembly Correspondence
1965-1975
175
Arden House Assemblies
Materials pertaining to the American Assembly's Arden House assemblies, at which U.S. economic and political topics were discussed.
1957-1963
Box Folder
175 1-2
International Stability and Progress: United States Interests and Instruments
1957
175 3-4
United States Monetary Policy
1958
176
Arden House Assemblies and Regional Assemblies
Materials pertaining to the American Assembly's Arden House and regional assemblies, at which U.S. economic and political topics were discussed.
1959-1968
Box Folder
176 1-2
Arden House Assemblies
The United States and Japan; The Future of American Policy; and Overcoming World Hunger.
1965-1968
176 3-6
Regional Assemblies
1959-1967
177
Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions
1965-1975
178
Atlantic Council
Correspondence regarding membership to the Atlantic Council, an organization that evolved from the Atlantic Union Committee, founded in 1949 as an association of Western nations to "meet the growing communist challenge."
1959-1975
179
Conference on Public Welfare
Correspondence pertaining to the New York Governor's Conference on Public Welfare, held November 2-3, 1967, at Arden House, to "improve state and national social welfare policies." University of Utah personnel assisted in preparing materials for the conference.
1967
IX: Correspondence-Personal
Box
180
General Correspondence, A
1951-1977
181
General Correspondence, B
1951-1977
182
General Correspondence, C-Cof
1951-1977
183
General Correspondence, Col-Cu
1951-1977
184
General Correspondence, D-E
1951-1977
185
General Correspondence, F-G
1951-1977
186
General Correspondence, H-I
1951-1977
187
General Correspondence, J-K
1951-1977
188
General Correspondence, L
1951-1977
189
General Correspondence, M-N
1951-1977
190
General Correspondence, O-R
1951-1977
191
General Correspondence, S
1951-1977
192
General Correspondence, T-Z
1951-1977
193
Senators, A-F
1951-1977
Box Folder
193 1
Wallace F. Bennett
1958-1970
193 2
Homer Capehart
1954
193 3
Howard W. Cannon, Dick Clark, and Joe Clark
1960-1975
193 4-5
Frank Church
1960-1973
193 6-7
Alan Cranston
1962-1975
193 8
Paul Douglas
1952-1968
193 9
Clair Engle
1959
193 10-18
J. William Fulbright
1951-1977
194
Senators, G-Mc
1954-1977
Box Folder
194 1
Walter F. George
1954
194 2
Charles E. Goodell and Albert Gore
1967-1970
194 3-4
Ernest Gruening and Wayne Morse
1965-1968
194 5
Vance Hartke, Lister Hill, and Harold Hughes
1967-1973
194 6
Mark Hatfield
1966-1973
194 7
Jacob Javits
1965-1967
194 8
Estes Kefauver
1960
194 9
Edward M. Kennedy
1968-1975
194 10
Robert F. Kennedy
All letters with Kennedy's signature are photocopies. Originals are in the Manuscripts Division safe.
1967-1968
194 11
Eugene McCarthy
1968
194 12-17
George McGovern
1965-1977
195
Senators, Man-W
1951-1976
Box Folder
195 1
Mike Mansfield
1966-1970
195 2
Wayne Morse
1965-1968
195 3-8
Frank E. Moss
1959-1976
195 9
Edmund Muskie
1971-1973
195 10
Gaylord Nelson
1968-1969
195 11
Claiborne Pell
1968-1969
195 12
Charles H. Percy
1967-1970
195 13
William Proxmire
1971
195 14
Hugh Scott
1969
195 15
Adlai Stevenson III
1973
195 16
Stuart Symington
1963-1973
195 17
Robert Taft
1951
195 18
John Tower
1972
195 19
John V. Tunney
1969-1976
195 20
Joseph Tydings
1966-1969
195 21
Arthur V. Watkins
1954
196
Representatives
1951-1976
Box Folder
196 1
Roger Boas, Chester Bowles, Phillip Burton, and George Bush
1959-1972
196 2
Lawrence J. Burton
1963-1970
196 3
John G. Dow
1968
196 4
Don Edwards
1967-1970
196 5
Frank M. Karsten
1951
196 6
David S. King
1960-1966
196 7
Sherman P. Lloyd
1963-1971
196 8
Paul N. McCloskey, Jr.
1967-1973
196 9
Gunn McKay
1972-1973
196 10
Wilbur Mills
1955
196 11
Wayne Owens
1973-1976
196 12
Wright Patman
1952-1965
196 13
Charles O. Porter and William F. Ryan
1959-1968
196 14
Al Ullman and Clement Zablocki
1967-1975
197
Federal Reserve Board/Bank Members
Correspondence with Federal Reserve Board and Bank members, arranged chronologically. Correspondents include Allan Sproul, C. Norris, Lloyd Adams, Elliott Thurston, David Kennedy, and Spencer F. Eccles.
1951-1976
198
Universities and Colleges
Correspondence with administrators, professors, and students at various U. S. universities and colleges.
1951-1977
Box Folder
198 1
Brigham Young University
1968-1975
198 2
Columbia University
1961-1962
198 3
Harvard University
1976
198 4
Mills College
1964-1970
198 5-8
Utah State University
1952-1977
198 9-10
University of Utah
1951-1974
199
Beckoning Frontiers Correspondence
Correspondence concerning Beckoning Frontiers, Eccles' autobiography. In June 1951, Alfred A. Knopf published 5,000 copies of the book, which generated favorable comments from major review sources. Another 1,500 copies were printed in November of that year, and in 1966 the final 1,000 were published. Eccles, who wrote the book with the editorial assistance of Sidney Hyman, called it a "personal as well as an economic history of the past two decades." Over the years, the volume was presented to many of Eccles' business associates, friends, acquaintances, and family members.Although many of the letters in this box are perfunctory thank-you notes, they indicate the wide circle of people Eccles felt would have an interest in the book, and in some cases, add insight into the role each played in the events chronicled in the book. The materials are arranged chronologically.
1951-1957
Box Folder
199 1
List of Book Recipients
1951-1975
199 2-18
Correspondence
1951-1957
200
Beckoning Frontiers Correspondence
1958-1978
201
Biography Correspondence, A-M
Correspondence regarding Marriner S. Eccles: Private Entrepreneur and Public Servant, a biography written by Sidney Hyman and published in 1977 by the Stanford University Graduate School of Business. The book expands upon Beckoning Frontiers, covering Eccles' later years as a private citizen vitally interested in public affairs, especially the Vietnam conflict, population control, and governmental fiscal and monetary policy. Much of the correspondence pays tribute to Eccles' life accomplishments, particularly a letter from Joe Quinney, his brother-in-law. These materials are arranged alphabetically.Correspondence regarding Marriner S. Eccles: Private Entrepreneur and Public Servant, a biography written by Sidney Hyman and published in 1977 by the Stanford University Graduate School of Business. The book expands upon Beckoning Frontiers, covering Eccles' later years as a private citizen vitally interested in public affairs, especially the Vietnam conflict, population control, and governmental fiscal and monetary policy. Much of the correspondence pays tribute to Eccles' life accomplishments, particularly a letter from Joe Quinney, his brother-in-law. These materials are arranged alphabetically.
1976-1977
202
Biography Correspondence, N-Z
1976-1977
Box Folder
202 1-8
Correspondence, N-Z
1976-1977
202 9
Scholarly Reviews
Responses to Marriner S. Eccles: Private Entrepreneur and Public Servant, by officials from various universities who had received copies of the book from Arjay Miller, dean of the Stanford University Graduate School of Business.
1976-1977
202 10
Other Reviews
1976-1977
203
Books Received and Quotations
Correspondence pertaining to books sent to Eccles by others and articles either featuring Eccles or mentioning his ideas. These materials are arranged chronologically.
1941-1977
Box Folder
203 1-5
Correspondence on Books Received
1941-1977
203 6-14
Correspondence on Eccles' Quotations
1951-1977
204
Invitations
Invitations received by Eccles from business, government, and civic leaders, friends, family members, and acquaintances requesting his participation and attendance at various events. Social invitations sent to the Eccles home, however, are not included. Because of his busy schedule, Eccles declined many more invitations than he accepted. He was invited to every presidential inauguration between 1951 and 1977, but apparently attended none of them. This correspondence is arranged chronologically.
1951-1955
205
Invitations
1956-1958
206
Invitations
1959-1963
207
Invitations
1964-1968
208
Invitations
1969-1977
209
Christmas Correspondence
Christmas letters sent by Eccles to some members of the Roosevelt administration, later to associates in the Federal Reserve System, and later still to business associates. The correspondence includes Christmas greetings sent to him beginning in the late 1930s. Apparently, Eccles remained in Washington during the Christmas season in the 1930s, but celebrated the holidays in Utah during the 1940s. The correspondence shows a broadening of his social acquaintances throughout his career.Correspondents include members of the Washington social establishment, including Evelyn Walsh McLean; prominent members of the press, including Walter Lippman, Arthur Krock, and Drew Pearson; and close friends, such as Robert Hinckley.
1934-1948
210
Christmas Correspondence
The collection contains little Christmas correspondence after 1951, when Eccles' second wife, Sallie, began attending to the family social correspondence.
1949-1974
211
Condolences and Obituaries
Letters of condolence-more than 300-and obituaries after Eccles' death, December 18, 1977. Eccles' funeral was held in Evans and Early Mortuary in Salt Lake City, with more than 500 in attendance. Though the funeral was not a Mormon ceremony, the invocation was offered by N. Eldon Tanner, a member of the First Presidency of the Mormon church and First Security Corporation's board of directors.
1977-1978
Box Folder
211 1
Obituaries
1977
211 2
Lists of Letters and Flowers
Lists of those who sent letters of condolences and flower arrangements.
1977-1978
211 3
Letters to George Eccles
1977-1978
211 4
Letters to SpencerEccles
1977-1978
211 5-21
Letters to Sallie Eccles
Letters of condolence, arranged alphabetically.
1977-1978
211 22
Miscellaneous Letters
X: Business and Banking Files
Box
212
Miscellaneous Directorships
Correspondence and other papers of organizations to which Eccles contributed money and was thus appointed honorary director or trustee.
1951-1977
Box Folder
212 1
Menninger Foundation
1961-1966
212 2-3
National Society for Crippled Children and Adults, Inc.
1951-1954
212 4-5
Park City Institute for the Arts and Sciences
1965-1970
212 6
Uranium Institute of America
1958
212 7
Youngtown
1969-1970
213
Pet Milk Company
Correspondence and an article in Business Week concerning the Pet Milk Company and Theodore Gamble, its president. The Eccles family sold Sego Milk Company to Pet Milk Company, to which Marriner S. Eccles was appointed as a director.
1938-1965
214
Utah International
Publications and reports from Utah International, a company founded in 1910 by David Eccles and William H. Wattis with $25,000 in capital. It merged with General Electric in 1976, resulting in the largest stock transfer to that time in U.S. history. The company underwent two name changes, from Utah Construction Company to Utah Construction and Mining, and finally to Utah International. Marriner S. Eccles was appointed director in 1922, president in 1931, and chairman of the board in 1940.
1910-1976
215
Amalgamated Sugar Company
Reports, publications, and correspondence of the Amalgamated Sugar Company, for which Eccles served as chairman of the board.
1963-1977
216
First Security Corporation
Publications, statements, reports, and correspondence of First Security, for which Eccles served as chairman of the board.
1917-1965
217
Bank Holding Companies
Correspondence concerning bank holding companies, branch banking, and banking legislation. Correspondents include E. G. Bennett, vice president and manager of First Security Corporation; John Thomas, U.S. senator from Idaho; Charles W. Collins, Washington lawyer for First Security; A. P. Giannini, president of the Bank of America; Senator Carter Glass; the law firm of Ray, Quinney & Nebeker, counsel for First Security; and the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
1929-1974
218
Banks and Banking
Documents discussing budget cuts in land grant colleges; background material on the Glass and Steagall banking bills; and the Committee for the Nation, an organization that attempted to "rebuild prices and purchasing power." Eccles served on the national auxiliary group of the committee
1933
219
First Security Correspondence
Correspondence with First Security Corporation officials while Eccles was working in Washington.
1934-1950
220
Banking Organizations Correspondence
Correspondence with several banking organizations on a variety of topics.
1963-1972
XI: Miscellaneous Materials
This section consists of miscellaneous materials pertaining to Eccles and his public and business careers. The materials include typescripts of biographies, journal articles, papers from other libraries, and various recordings.
Box
221
Draft of The Management of Money
Draft of The Management of Money, which discusses Federal Reserve policy since 1914. Harold Barger, author of the work and professor of economics at Columbia University, met with Eccles in Salt Lake City in May 1958 and was given access to Eccles' papers for his research. In September 1959, Barger sent Eccles a preliminary draft. (See Box 181, Folder 1 for Eccles' comments on the work.) The final book, which was published in 1960 by Rinehart and Co., is not included in this collection. These materials are arranged by book chapters.
1959
222
Typescript of Beckoning Frontiers
One of the final carbon-copy typescripts of Beckoning Frontiers, Eccles' autobiography.
1951
223
Typescript of Untitled Biography of Marriner S. Eccles
Revised photocopied typescript of Eccles' biography by Sidney Hyman that was eventually titled, Marriner S. Eccles: Private Entrepreneur and Public Servant. The work was submitted to the University of Utah Press and other publishers, but was finally published by the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University. The typescript is in a binder, accompanied by a two-page handwritten table of contents.
1975
224
Typescript of Bankers Extraordinary
Photocopied typescript of Bankers Extraordinary: A History of First Security Corporation, 1928-1973, a book by Leonard J. Arrington, professor of history at Utah State University. First Security sponsored the research and writing of the work, which was never published. Researchers may have access to this volume but may not copy or cite its contents.
1973
225
Hyman Index to Eccles' Washington Papers
The beginnings of an index to Eccles' Papers and related correspondence. Sidney Hyman, author of Eccles' biography, was hired by the Eccles family to complete an index of the papers, which had been aranged in volumes by Va Lois Egbert, Eccles' secretary while he worked in Washington. There was a significant dispute about the project between Hyman and Sallie Eccles, and he was asked to discontinue his work before the project was completed.
1978
Box Folder
225 1
Hyman's Letter to Sallie Eccles
Letter to Sallie Eccles in which Sidney Hyman explains the work he had completed on indexing the Marriner S. Eccles papers, and why the task was not proceeding as expected.
1978
225 2
Hyman Index to Eccles' Washington Papers
1978
226
Archibald Egbert and Dean May
Research and correspondence of graduate students Archibald Egbert and Dean May, both of whom wrote dissertations dealing with Eccles and his economic theories.
1966-1972
Box Folder
226 1
Archibald Egbert Correspondence
Correspondence with Egbert, who was given access to Eccles' papers in preparation of a 1972 doctoral dissertation in history at Brigham Young University titled, Marriner S. Eccles and the Banking Act of 1935. A copy of the work is included in the Eccles collection. Aunt Val, mentioned in Egbert's correspondence is Va Lois Egbert, Eccles' secretary.
1966-1970
226 2
Dean May Correspondence
Correspondence with Dean May, a Harvard University student who had written a 1966 seminar paper titled, "The Banking Act of 1935." (See Folder 3.) May had planned to expand on this topic with his dissertation, prospectively titled, The Public Career of Marriner S. Eccles, but changed his focus to Eccles' response to the 1937 recession. This work was published in 1981 under the title, From New Deal to New Economics: The American Liberal Response to the Recession of 1937, which is included in the Eccles collection.
1966-1972
226 3
"The Banking Act of 1935"
Dean May's seminar paper.
1966
226 4
Guide to Eccles' Washington Papers
May's log book prepared as he microfilmed Eccles' Washington file. While doing his research, May made an agreement with Eccles that granted him permission to produce the microfilm reels on the condition that they later be added to the collection. This frame-by-frame guide, prepared as he worked on the project, shows the Eccles papers in their original order.
1968
227
Honors and Awards
Honors and awards, as well as related correspondence, from various organizations.
1934-1978
Box Folder
227 1
American Academy of Achievement
1971-1972
227 2
Colorado School of Banking Scarboro Memorial Award
1976
227 3
Governor's Appreciation Dinner Guest Book
1971
227 4-5
Miscellaneous Awards
Certificates from Amalgamated Sugar Company; American Assembly; American Heritage Research Association, Inc.; Artus; Building Owners and Managers Association; Federal Reserve Board; First Security Corporation; Friends of the University of Utah Libraries; National Planning Association; Reconstruction Finance Corporation; Shareowners Educational Foundation, Inc.; Sigma Chi Fraternity; University of Utah; Utah International; Utah Power & Light Company; and World Trade Club of San Francisco.
1934-1978
228
Journal Articles
Articles by and about Eccles pertaining to his business and public careers, and his feelings about economic and social issues. The publications range from general news magazines, such as Time and Newsweek, to more specialized magazines like Forbes and Fortune, to highly specialized publications, such as Burroughs Clearing House and The Churchman. These materials are arranged chronologically. However, oversized materials are all in Box 230.
1934-1967
229
Journal Articles
1968-1977
230
Oversized Journal Articles
1934-1977
231
Materials from Other Libraries
Photocopied materials from other libraries, principally from the collections of Eccles' Washington colleagues, that pertain to Eccles.
1933-1974
Box Folder
231 1
Allan Sproul Papers
Biographical data from the Bancroft Library, University of California at Berkeley.
1948
231 2
Franklin D. Roosevelt Papers
Eccles' nomination and renomination to the Federal Reserve Board, and related correspondence, from the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.
1933-1941
231 3-12
Henry Morgenthau, Jr., Papers
Materials from the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York, that document Eccles' relationship with Morgenthau.
1934-1940
231 13
The Era of Franklin D. Roosevelt
A 360-page Roosevelt selected biography that lists periodical, essay, and dissertation literature from 1945 to 1971, including manuscripts, microfilm, and oral history collections in the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.
1974
231 14
Samuel I. Roseman Papers
Limited correspondence from the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.
1944
231 15
Henry A. Wallace Papers
Limited correspondence from the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.
1942
232
Materials from Other Libraries
1934-1955
Box Folder
232 1
Stuart Chase Papers
Correspondence from the Library of Congress.
1935-1948
232 2-7
Emanuel A. Goldweiser Papers
A finding aid, notes, and correspondence from the Library of Congress.
1934-1951
232 7a
Jesse J. Jones and Ernest G. Draper Papers
Materials from the Library of Congress that contain no significant information about Eccles.
1936-1955
232 8-9
Federal Reserve Records
Lists of Federal Reserve records covering the period 1914-1954. These materials were transferred to the National Archives in September and December 1975.
1935-1952
232 10-15
Harry S. Truman Papers
Materials from the Harry S. Truman Library in Independence, Missouri, pertaining to the Federal Reserve Board in the 1940s, and Eccles' change of status on the board in particular.
1934-1949
232 15
Carter Glass Papers
Microfilm copy of the Glass inventory and index from the University of Virginia Library, showing more than twenty references to Eccles.
233
Columbia University New Deal Collection
Microfiched papers of prominent figures of the New Deal. References to Eccles are not significant.
Box Folder
233 1
Thurman Arnold
233 2
Chester Bowles
233 3
Chester C. Davis
233 4
Chester Morrill
233 5
Rexford G. Tugwell
233 6-13
Henry A. Wallace
233 14
Robert E. Wood
234
Washington File on Microfilm
Microfilm reels containing Eccles' Washington file in its original order before being processed as a manuscript collection. A guide to the microfilms, completed in 1968 by Harvard University graduate student Dean May, is contained in the folder.
1910-1951
235
Washington File on Microfilm
1910-1951
236
Recorded Vietnam Speeches
Reel-to-reel and cassette tape recordings of speeches delivered by Eccles and others regarding peace in Vietnam and the world in general. Other speakers include Senator Wayne Morse and Professor Chris Hoch. These tapes are kept in the audio-visual collection.
1966-1970
237
Recorded Vietnam Speeches
Reel-to-reel tape recordings of speeches delivered by Eccles and others regarding peace in Vietnam and the world in general. Other speakers include John M. Kelly, Jr., Senator Wayne Morse, Jerome D. Frank, Norman Thomas, William Sloane Coffin, Jr., Erich Fromm, Gunnar Myrdal, and Russell Johnson. These tapes are kept in the audio-visual collection.
1966-1968
238
Miscellaneous Recordings
Reel-to-reel and cassette tape recordings of two of Eccles' speeches, Eccles' family reunion oral history of his father, Sallie Eccles' birthday tributes to her husband, a reading of Marriner S. Eccles: Private Entrepreneur and Public Servant, and some interviews conducted by Gwen Gittins and Everett Cooley. These tapes are kept in the audio-visual collection.
1951-1977
239
Appointment Calendars
Eccles' Salt Lake City and San Francisco day books as maintained by his secretaries. These materials, arranged chronologically, also include one daily appointment record book for 1968.
1966-1977
240
Addendum
Miscellaneous materials, concerning Eccles and his family, that were added to the collection after it was processed.
1977-1985
Box Folder
240 1
List of Eccles Collection Materials
1982
240 2
Newsclippings of the Federal Reserve Board Building Dedication
1983
240 3
Unveiling of the Chairmen Portraits
Photocopied program of the unveiling ceremony for the portraits of the Federal Reserve Board chairmen, including Eccles.
1979
240 4
Federal Reserve Board News Clippings
1983
240 5
Eccles' Funeral Service Program
1977
240 6
First Security Corporation Clippings
1983
240 7
New Deal Clippings
1983
240 8
Index to Eccles' News Clippings Scrapbook
1979
240 9
"Marriner S. Eccles and the Accord"
A paper that outlines the part played by Eccles in the Federal Reserve Board-U.S. Treasury Accord, 1951.
1984
240 10
Utah Construction Company
A copy of the finding aid from Special Collections, Stewart Library, Weber State College, "Utah Construction Company, Corporate Records Survey, 1906-1961."
240 11
Miscellanea
241
Eccles' Register Inventory and Indexes
This preliminary register was primarily the work of Gwen Gittins who processed most of the collection. Mrs. Gittins resigned her position at the library in 1982. Limited sections of the collection processing and register writing were completed by Nancy Young. This version has been retained because of the substantial detail found in the inventory which may be useful to some researchers.

Names and SubjectsReturn to Top

  • Subject Terms :
  • Banks and banking--Utah
  • Birth control
  • Federal Reserve banks
  • United States--History--1933-1945--Sources
  • United States--History--1945-1959--Sources
  • Utah--Politics and government
  • Vietnamese Conflict, 1961-1975--Protest movements--United States
  • Corporate Names :
  • First Security Corporation
  • United States. Federal Housing Authority
  • United States. Federal Reserve Board
  • Form or Genre Terms :
  • Correspondence
  • Reports
  • Speeches