A. J. Eardley papers, 1940-1972  PDF

Overview of the Collection

Creator
Eardley, A. J.(Armand John), 1901-
Title
A. J. Eardley papers
Dates
1940-1972 (inclusive)
Quantity
4.75 linear feet
Collection Number
Ms0642
Summary
The A. J. Eardley papers (1940-1972) contain the personal and professional papers of Armand John Eardley (1901-1972), a Utah-born geology educator, writer, and administrator. The collection includes personal and textbook materials, magazine articles, essays, notes, and maps.
Repository
University of Utah Libraries, Special Collections.
Special Collections, J. Willard Marriott Library
University of Utah
295 South 1500 East
Salt Lake City, UT
84112-0860
Telephone: 801-581-8863
special@library.utah.edu
Access Restrictions

Twenty-four hour advanced notice encouraged. Materials must be used on-site. Access to parts of this collection may be restricted under provisions of state or federal law.

Languages
English


Historical NoteReturn to Top

(This biography, edited here, appeared in the Geological Society of America memorial to Armand John Eardley and was written by William Lee Stokes.)

Armand J. Eardley was born 25 October 1901 in Salt Lake City, Utah. He died in the city of his birth 7 November 1972 at the age of 71. Eardley was of Mormon stock. His father and mother were English, and his four grandparents migrated to Utah under pioneer conditions. He attended the public schools in Salt Lake City and took his college training at Stanford University, University of Utah, and Princeton University. In 1930 he married Norma Ashton. Their son, Michael, was born in 1940. Armand's teaching career began in 1932 at the University of Michigan where, over the ensuing years, he attained the position of full professor. From 1942 to 1949 he was director of the University of Michigan Rocky Mountain Field Station at Camp Davies.

Eardley returned to the University of Utah in 1949. He served as acting head of the Department of Geology from 1951 to 1954 and as dean of the College of Mines and Mineral Industries from 1954 to 1965. In 1970, he retired and became Professor Emeritus.

Armand Eardley was an educator, writer, and administrator, as well as a scientist--the type of individual whose career adds luster and credit to the profession of geology and the institutions which he served. Eardley is probably best known through his books. In these his genius as an expositor and educator shines forth. He sought and reported his own truths but went beyond to integrate and publicize the contributions of others. His first book, Aerial Photographs: Their Use and Interpretation, published in 1942, was a pioneer treatment of what was to become, in an age of aerial and space photography, a discipline of major importance.

In 1951, Harper and Brothers published his monumental 750-page Structural Geology of North America. The title is somewhat misleading as the book is not merely structural geology, it is a reference work on the stratigraphy and historical geology of a continent as well. Although there were many joking comments about its odd shape and format and the difficulty of getting it on a shelf with ordinary books, the decision of the publishers to print it in an 8 1/4 X 11 inch edition was a wise one which did justice to the magnificient flowing lines of Eardley's cross sections and diagrams that are so important and instructive. Without the author's permission, this book was translated into Russian and widely distributed in the U.S.S.R. He never went to Russia to collect the 50,000 rubles due him. A second edition of the book came out in 1962 with seven new chapters and extensive revisions.

In 1965, Harper and Row published his General College Geology, a 499-page textbook for the nonprofessional student. This also reflects Eardley's great desire to make geology interesting and understandable to the average student. Its illustrations include many line drawings and photographs that are Eardley's own work.

His final book, Science of the Earth, was issued by Harper and Row in 1972. Again, it reflects the breadth of his interests and capabilities as well as a desire to instruct. It is more than conventional geology. There are several chapters that must be classed as oceanography and several that are meteorological and climatological. Finally, there is a section on environmental science which stresses the management and conservation of the Earth's water, land, and air.

Not only did Eardley write much that must be classed as educational in aim and content, he also sought to foster and encourage such pursuits in others. He served as president of the National Association of Geology Teachers from 1962 to 1963. He was a member of the steering committee of the Earth Science Curriculum Project which produced the textbook Investigating the Earth, which, together with its student manuals and teachers' guides, made an important contribution to earth science education in the United States.

Eardley served the profession of geology in other important positions. He was actively involved in local as well as national academic and professional organizations. He was president of the Rocky Mountain Section of Petroleum Geologists from 1950 to 1951, a member of the executive committee and editor of the bulletin of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists from 1952 to 1954, and president of the American Geological Institute from 1964 to 1965.

Eardley received many honors and awards. He was Distinguished Lecturer, American Association of Petroleum Geologists, 1952-1954; and National Lecturer, Sigma Xi, 1956. Among his awards are the Distinguished Service Award, Utah Academy of Sciences, 1958; James E. Talmage Scientific Achievement Award, Brigham Young University, 1963; award for distinguished service in the earth sciences, American Federation of Mineralogical Societies, 1968; Distinguished Research Professor, University of Utah, 1969-1970; and Distinguished Sigma Xi Lecturer, University of Utah, 1970. He received an honorary Doctor of Science degree at the University of Utah in 1970.

When Eardley was called to be dean of the School of Mines and Mineral Industries at the University of Utah in 1954, it was a difficult new position involving integration of eight diverse departments including geology, ceramic engineering, fuels engineering, geophysics, metallurgy, meteorology, mineralogy, and mining and geological engineering. The space problem was acute, and competition among the departments for all resources was a constant problem. In addition to the on-campus tasks of administration, relations with a diversity of downtown mining and industrial interests required constant attention.

Eardley had an abiding interest in the practical aspects of geology and was sought out as a consultant because of his wide and basic knowledge of the geology of the Western United States. From 1946 to 1949 he worked on a seasonal basis for Sinclair Oil and from 1949 to 1954 was retained by Cities Service Oil Company. He also contributed in various capacities to the development of other resources, including uranium, salt, and rock products.

As a scientist, Armand Eardley tended to paint with a broad brush, and he was well qualified to do so because of his familiarity with basic patterns and wide regional relationships. He had a way of summarizing and synthesizing the works of others which preserved their essentials, gave due credit and fitted their work into the big picture fairly and accurately.

Wherever he went, Eardley could see geologic problems and opportunities. A short visit to Alaska resulted in papers on the Yukon Valley sediments and topography. A stay in southern France produced a fresh contribution on that well-worn topic of flyshe and molasse and on the petroleum geology of the Aquitaine Basin.

He was a conservative in geological thinking. His works show that he did not "become a believer" in plate tectonics or continental drift. In his personal struggles with global matters, illustrated by papers on the relationships of North and South America (1954) and the Arctic Basin (1949), he managed without either plate tectonics or polar wandering.

Fundamentally, Eardley was a believer in vertical uplift as a primary tectonic force. His unparalleled experience in the ranges of the Rocky Mountains convinced him that the thrust faults on the margins were due to gravity sliding. It was interesting to see him attempt to translate his thinking about the "thin-skinned" Rockies to the geosynclinal Great Basin. He looked for prethrust uplifts and gave the thrusters a good run for their money.

Although Eardley's interests and publications were wide ranging, there were several subjects to which he reamined devoted during his professional career. His doctoral thesis was on the southern Wasatch Mountains and was the basis for his first four papers published from 1932 to 1934. Occasional papers on the Wasatch Range followed, the last in 1969. A longstanding interest in the Great Salt Lake is even more evident. His pioneer paper on sediments of the lake (1938) is widely quoted and basic to much subsequent work. Offshoots of his interest in the modern lake and sediments were publications on Lake Bonneville and consulting jobs and services as an expert witness in relation to exploration and utilization of the mineral resources of the briny "liquid ore body." At the time of his death, he was engaged in a significant joint study, financed by the National Science Foundation, of a deep core in the nearshore bottom sediments, which proves the existence of a succession of many lakes in the area. He lived to see the installation of great commercial enterprises on the lake and the utilization of much of his data in a practical way.

His life's work proves that he kept busy on long-range projects of many kinds. Yet he always had time to listen to the troubles of students and colleagues. He enjoyed his vacations at Camp Davies at the Eardley cabin, which he built himself. Outstanding was his willingness to go into the field with his graduate students to check their progress and keep them working effectively.

Eardley was a superb craftsman. The relation of carpentry and drafting are unmistakable in his productions. With board or paper, he always came up with something that fit, had utility, and was both understandable and economical.

Eardley was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He served as a missionary for this church in Switzerland and Germany from 1921 to 1923. At the time of his death, he was a High Priest in the 11th Ward, Monument Park Stake, Salt Lake City.

Armand Eardley is difficult to classify profesionally. He is known chiefly as a structural geologist, but this probably arises from the frequent necessity of having to fill the blanks of some survey or citation with a specialty of one sort or another. In addition to structure and tectonics, his bibliography has important titles in sedimentology, stratigraphy, geomorphology, Pleistocene geology, and the geology of oil and other mineral products.

Eardley may have resented the classification of men of his type as being of the classical school. He could be proud of being a geologist, which is more than being a mineralologist, paleontologist, or seismologist. He was a student of the Earth.

Content DescriptionReturn to Top

The A. J. Eardley papers were given to the University of Utah by Earley's son, Michael, in 1991. This collection, which spans over thirty years, from the 1940s to the 1970s, appears to be just a small sampling of Eardley's work. Although he focused his studies on areas in the Intermountain West, he also did quite a bit of work on the Arctic. Some notes of his work in Ethiopia and France are also included here.

This collection has been divided into three sections. Box one contains the first section, which consists of personal material (his memorial and medicare information) and textbook material. The textbook material includes information on his last textbook Science of the Earth and on an environmental textbook he was planning to write, based on the environmental section in Science of the Earth.

The second section, found in boxes two through five, consists of sucject files which, for the most part, use Eardley's own organization and titles. Around 20 percent of these subject files are newspaper and magazine clippings, largely about environmental issues. This may be information that he was collecting for his environmental textbook. The rest of the subject files contain some of his articles and papers (including notes and rough drafts), a few of his students' papers, and various geological notes about the places he was studying.

The third section of this collection, boxes six through eight, and four folders in the map case, contain Eardley's map collection, many of which are hand-drawn by Eardley. In the front of each folder from which the maps have been removed, there is a list giving the map titles and locations. If photographs and publications have been removed, the folder will include a list of these as well.

Boxes nine and ten were added at a later date and contain writings by Eardley and others, correspondence, maps, and other materials.

Use of the CollectionReturn to Top

Restrictions on Use

It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain any necessary copyright clearances.

Permission to publish material from the A. J. Eardley papers must be obtained from the Special Collections Manuscript Curator.

Preferred Citation

Initial Citation: A. J. Eardley papers, Ms 642, Box [ ]. Special Collections and Archives. University of Utah, J. Willard Marriott. Salt Lake City, Utah.

Following Citations:Ms 642.

Administrative InformationReturn to Top


Detailed Description of the CollectionReturn to Top

Personal and Textbook MaterialReturn to Top

This section contains Eardley's memorial, medical bills, and medicare information for himself and his wife, Norma. It also includes information on his last textbook Science of the Earth and an environmental textbook he was planning to write.

Container(s) Description Dates
Box
1
Personal Material and Textbook Material
Folder
1
Memorial
2-5
Medicare
1967-1979
6-7
Science of the Earth
Correspondence, review, and advertisement.
1969-1972
8
Proposed Environmental Science Textbook
Correspondence, outline, etc.
1972
9
"Environmental Science"
Part four from Science of the Earth.

Subject FilesReturn to Top

The subject files, for the most part, use Eardley's own organization and titles. Around twenty percent of these files are newspaper and magazine clippings, largely about environmental issues. This may be information that he was collecting for his environmental textbook. The remaining files contain some of his articles and papers (including notes and rough drafts), a few of his students' papers, and various geological notes of the places he was studying.

Container(s) Description Dates
Box
2
Subject Files, A-C
Folder
1-5
Air Pollution
Clippings, research proposal, "Common Carrier," "Air Pollution," "Interim Plan for Air Pollution Abatement, Salt Lake Valley," "Armistice on Air Pollution-Salt Lake City."
1970; 1972
6
Alaskan Pipeline
7-11
Arctic Oil and Gas Reserves
Clippings, presentation correspondence and outline, "Oil and Gas Reserves in the Siberian Shelf," "Arctic Oil and Gas Reserves: A Preliminary Estimate."
1970-1972
12
Atomic Reactors
13
Auto Exhaust Problems
1971-1972
14
Bentonite, Harris Canyon
15-16
Biarritz Geologic Notes
1943-1945
17-19
Bituminous Sandstone
"The Beneficial Use of Water for the Recovery of Oil from Bituminous Sands" and road logs.
1964-1969
20
Black Rock Meadows
1947-1948
21
Blood Groups
1933-1963
22
Bryner Survey
1963
23-27
Camp Davis Area
Correspondence, field notes, and student reports.
1939-1953
28
Camp Williams
1968
29
Caribou Structure
1947
30
Centennial Structure
Correspondence, drawings, and maps.
1964
31
"Centennial Structure"
1947
32
Church Buttes Field
1949
33
Cliff Creek Structure
1947-1956
34
Crestone Claims Colorado
1954-1956
35
Cumberland, Wyoming
1956-1957
3
Subject Files, D-L
Folder
1
DDT, Mercury, etc.
1972
2
Dams
1971
3
Degradable Materials
1972
4
Dillon, Montana
1947-1948
5
Driggs Anticline
1949-1957
6
Early Conservationists
7
Earthquake Environment
8
Ecology Problems
1972
9
Endangered Species Materials
1971-1972
10
Energy Crisis
1971-1972
11
Erosion of Zion Canyon
1965
12-13
Ethiopia-Sinclair
Reports and correspondence.
1946-1947
14
Forests, Recreational Areas, and Wilderness
15
Fruita Silver Prospects
16
Fundamental Questions
1971-1972
17
Garland Pool, Wyoming
1956
18-19
Gas Hills Uranium
Airborne anomaly location maps, correspondence, and reports.
20
Geochemical Surveys
1972
21
Goshen
1967
22
Granite Creek Structure
1945-1951
23-25
Green River Logging Project
Clippings and Skyline-Robertson corehole nos. 1-2.
1959-1968
26
Harrisville Brick Company
1940-1958
27
Hebgen Trip
1959-1960
28
Henrys and Hebgen Lakes
29
Ice Cap Tectonics
30
Idaho-Wyoming Fold and Thrust
1966-1967
31
"Idaho-Wyoming Fold and Thrust Belt: Its Division and an Analysis of its Origin"
32
Industries Affected
1971
33
Jackson Hole Reports-Sinclair
1944-1945
34
Kyanite
1956
35
Lake Pollution
1972
36
Lane Use
1972
37
Lead and Zinc Smelting Industry in Utah
1972
38-39
Lima Anticline
1947-1951
40
Lisbon Field
1958
41
Little Mountain
1966-1968
42
Lonetree-Burnt Fork Area
1950
43
Lyman, Wyoming
4
Subject Files, M-U
Folder
1
Madison County Structure
1947-1948
2
Manti-Sterling
1954-1957
3
Maughan Drilling
1969
4
McCarthy Mountain
5-6
Metallogenic Provinces
"Igneous Provinces of the Western Cordillera and their Relation to Melatiferous Provinces."
1955
7
F. S. Turneaure, "Metallogenic Provinces and Epochs"
8-9
Montana Foothills
Base maps of the Thrust Belt area and township plats showing seismograph lines.
1953-1954
10-11
Montana Stratigraphy
"Upper Part of the Phosphoria Formation, Sawtooth Peak, Beaverhead County, Montana."
1947-1949
12
Mosquito Creek
1952
13
Mountain Building
1957
14
Nevada Tertiary
1954
15
Ocean Pollution
1972
16
Oil Spills
17
Ophir Canyon
1967
18-19
Orogenic Nomenclature
"Stratigraphic Nomenclature in the United States."
1933
20-21
Parley's Quarry
Field chemical analysis.
1967-1972
22
Pine Springs Archaeological Site
1964
23
Population Growth
1972
24-25
Portland Cement Company of Utah
1967-1972
26
Power Plants
1972
27
Rates Denudation
Correspondence, notes, and "Rates of Denudation in the High Plateaus of Southwestern Utah."
1966
28
River Pollution
1971-1972
29
San Rafael Swell
1951-1957
30
Hyrum Schneider
1955
31
Sinclair Reports
1944
32
Springville
1968
33
Stansbury Island
1967
34-36
Tar Sands
Correspondence and letter from John Morgan.
1965-1969
37
Timpie Springs
1968
38
Twin Bridges, Montana
1955-1968
39-40
Uranium Production
Notes, "Relative Costs of Fuels for Generation Electricity," and "Production and Consumption of Uranium: An Outsider's Estimate."
1955, 1965
41
Urban Sprawl
1972
5
Subject Files, V-Z
Folder
1-2
Volcanic Rocks
Correspondence and notes.
1957-1958
3
Wahweap Gravels
1957
4
Wasatch Region, Manuscript
1949
5
Waste Disposal
6
Water Resources
1972
7
Western Cordillera
1967
8-10
Western Oil Shale
Correspondence.
1970-1971
11
Wetlands
1972
12-13
Zion, Bryce, Cedar Breaks, Capitol Reef
1968
14-15
Zion National Park
1965-1969
16
Miscellaneous
1959-1972

MapsReturn to Top

This is the largest section of the collection and is housed in three flat boxes and four folders in the map case. Many hand-drawn maps by Eardley are included.

Container(s) Description Dates
Box
6
Maps
item
1
(Unititled) Africa Craton, North America Craton, South America Craton, East Pacific Ridge, Eugeoshncline
2
(Untitled) Africa, Craton S.A., N.A., Eugeogyncline, Folded Miogeosyncline
3
(Untitled) Craton, Mendocino, Murray, Shirley, Clarion, Clipperton, etc.
4
(Untitled) R43E--R44E--T5N, M. L. Manning
5
(Untitled) Salt Lake Meridian, Kaysville, R1S R1E T4N T3N
6
(Untitled) T6S, T5S, T4S, McCartney Mountain, Dubois Ranch, Nelson Ranch, Beaverhead Rock, Big Hold River, Twin Bridges, Sheridan, Ruby Mountains, etc.
Two copies.
7
(Untitled) T. 37 N., Gros Ventr, Grayback Ridge, Wyoming
8
Aeromagnetic Profiles across Portions of Glacier, Pondera and Flathead Counties, Montana by Frost Airborne Survey Corporation, Tulsa, Oklahoma
1952
9
Bouguer Anomalies and Geologic Structure West of Lisbon Valley, Utah, United States Geological Society (hereafter USGS) Professional Paper 316 Plate 9
10
Bouguer Gravity Anomaly map of the Lisbon Valley Area, Utah and Colorado, USGS Professional Paper 316 Plate 7
11
Camp Williams Site NW 1/4 Section 16, T5S, R1W
Two copies.
12
Cross Section
Two copies.
1972
13
Cross Sections of Northern Ethiopia
14
Cross Sections through Gamma II Claims
Two copies.
15
Development of the Western Cordillera
16
Division No. 4
1971
17
Division No. 4 Operation Status
Two copies.
1972
18
Figure 1. Geologic Map of Bituminous Sandsstone Deposits Near Quarries of the Rock Asphalt Company of Utah, Figure 4. Cross Section along Line A-A on Figure 1. by Clifford N. Homes, Ben M. Page, and Paul Averitt
1948
19
Gamma II Claims, Portland Cement Company of Utah
Two copies.
20
Generalized Geologic Map of the Lisbon Valley Area, Utah and Colorado, USGS
21
Geologic Column in That Part of Southwestern Wyoming Shown in Pl. III (3694 No. 56-07)
22
Geological Map of the Gravelly Range Area, Madison County, Montana
23
Goshen Quarry Site T95, R1W, Utah County
Two copies.
24
Imperium Neptune REgis
Crossing equator certificate.
25
Interpace Shale Quarry near Mouth of Big Cottonwood Canyon for Utah Portland Cement Company
Two copies.
26
Lease Holdings of Resource Ventures in Lison Valley Area, San Juan County, Utah
Two copies.
27
Limestone and Shale Sites Investigated for Portland Cement Company of Utah
28
Little Mountain Great Blue Limestone Section
Two copies.
29
Little Mountain Prospect
Five copies.
30
Lonetree-Burnt Fork Area, Utah and Wyoming, Reconnaissance Survey
1950
31
Map and Section of Wahweap Sand and Gravel Deposit, Kane County, Utah
32
Nature of Shearing and Westward Shifting of North American Plate
33
North Pole to Arctic Circle
34
North Pole to Arctic Circle with Shelves, Platforms, Basins, and Folding Zones
35
Northeast Utah
36
Northwest Quarter, Utah
37
Proposed Placer Claims in Section 27, T5S, R4W, Tooele County
Two copies.
38
Reconnaissance Map, Topography, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Shoshone Quadrangle, USGS
1908
39
Relation of East Fork to Present Quarry, Parleys Canyon, Portland Cement Company of Utah
40
Relation of Sedimentary Units of Present Quarry to Old Quarry
Refer to report of 17 July 1967 for description of Units.
1967
41
Southeast Quarter, Utah
42
Structure Contour Map of the Cumberland Area, Uinta and Lincoln Counties, Wyoming
43
Structure Contour Map on Eroded Charles-Madison, FM Northwest Montana and Southeast Alberta, Canada
Referred to in 27 July 1953 letter from Rolf Varland.
44
Southwest Quarter, Utah
45
Timpie Springs Site T1S, R7W Tooele County
Two copies.
46
Topography Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, Lake Quadrangle USGS
1906
47
Township T2S, R6W Tooele County
Two copies.
48
Yellowstone National Park, Revised, NPYel7006
1956
7
Unnamed Charts and Maps
8
Maps
item
1
(Untitled) Map Showing a Portion of Montana
2
(Untitled) West Cross Section, East Cross Section, Highway 73, Clay Pit, NM 1/4 Section 16, T5S, R1W
Two copies.
3
Area No. 1, Navajo, Northeast Arizona, T. B. R.
4
Byron A. Ray Gypsum Property, Gunnison Plateau, Utah, by A. J. Eardley
Two copies.
1972
5
Datum--Tensleep Sandstone, Lloyd G. Gray, Geologist, C. A. Johnson Building, Alpine
1980
6
Geologic Map, Henry's Lake Mountains, Montana and Idaho Plate III, Surveyed in 1949
7
Geologic Map and Sections of the Cumberland Area, Uinta and Lincoln Counties, Wyoming, compiled by A. J. Eardley
1953
8
Geologic Map of the Centennial Structure
1947
9
Hanksville Q, State of Utah
1967
10
Horseshoe Creek Anticline, by John Bayless and A. J. Eardley, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Two copies.
1949
11
Index Map of the Uinta Basin in Utah and Colorado
12
Map Showing Anticlines on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation, Montana, by Eugene Stebinger, USGS Bulletin 641 Plate XXV
13
Mineral Survey No. 4847, Utah Land District Plat of the Claim of W. L. Ellerbeck et. al. Known as the Kaolin Placer Mining Claim
14
Montana Hogan Quadrangle, Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army Progressive Military Map, Advance Sheet 180-S-E/2
1943
15
Mosquito Creek Anticline, Teton County, Wyoming, Mapped on Aerial Photos by A. J. Eardley
Two copies.
1948
16
NE-SW Cross Section of the Lisbon Structure, San Juan County, Utah
17
NE 1/4 Section 36 T4N-R2E Morgan County, Utah
18
Neilson Construction Company/Oscar E. Chytraus So./R. Lamont Stevens T2S R6W 1-970
19
Oil and Gas Development Map Showing Leasehold Acreage of the Resource Ventures Corporation, East Central Utah, Extract Map of Map U-38
1960
20
Parleys Terrace
21
Pehrson Limestone Prospect
Two copies.
22
Plate IV--Section along Line B-B' Plate III, Plate V--Section along Lines C-C' and D-D' Plate III, Plate VI--Section along Line E-E' Plate III
23
Pleasant Grove Shale Belt
Three copies.
24
Proposed Subdivision of the Eardley Property, Alpine City, Utah
25
Rattlesnake Anticline, Montana, G. K. Brasher
Four copies.
26
Reconnaissance of Montana Foothills Belt, by A. J. Eardley
1953
27
Section 10 TP2S R 2W, Salt Lake Base and Meridian, Granite
28
Section 13 TP2S R 2W, Salt Lake Base and Meridian, Granite
29
Section 16 TP2S R 1W, Salt Lake Base and Meridian, Granite
30
Section 17 TP2S R 1W, Salt Lake Base and Meridian, Granite
31-34
Sections 28-31 T4N-R3E Morgan County, Utah
35
Setting before Thrusting/Setting after Thrusting, Cretaceous Basin, Snow Line Anticline
Referred to in 19 February 1951 letter to Tom Hiestand.
36
Sketch Map of Gypsum Splendor, Gypsum Deposit NE 1/4 Section 22, R1E, T15S, Utah, by A. J. Eardley
Two copies.
1972
37
Structure Contour Map of the Willow Creek Anticline, J. Chivers
38
Structure Contour Map of Willow Creek Anticline, Teton County, Wyoming, Bonolyn J. Brown
1944
39
Structure Section Horseshoe Creek Anticline
40
Timpie Quadrangle, Utah-Tooele County, USGS
1955
41
USGS Hatch Rock Quadrangle, Utah, San Juan County
This map is glued to a USGS map of Lisbon Valley Quadrangle, Utah-Colorado.
1954
42
Utah County Plats NW 1/4 Section 7 Township 6 South, Range 3 East
43
Utah County Plats Section 14 Township 5 Range 1 West
44
Utah County Plats Sections 15, 16, 17, 18 Township 5 Range 1 West
45
Utah County Plats Section 22 Township 5 South Range 2 East
46
Utah County Plats Sections 7, 8, 9, 10 Townsip 5 Range 1 West
47
Utah County Plats Section 8 Township 5 South Range 2 East
48
Utah County Plats SW 1/4 Section 6 Township South Range 3E
Folder
1
item
1
(Untitled) Western United States
2
Bayonne No. 3, Institut Geographique National Quadrillage Kilometrique Projection Lambert III Zone Sud
3
Bayonne No. 7 (same as above)
4
Geologic Reconnaissance from Trimetrigon Photos of Northern Ethiopia, Sinclair Petroleum Company
5
Index to Topographic Maps of the Geological Survey, United States, Revised
1968
6
Jordan Narrows Quadrangle, Utah, 7.5 min. Series USGS
7
Lease Holdings of Resource Ventures on the Big Flat Structures
1958
8
Magna Quadrangle Utah-Salt Lake County USGS
1952
9
Notom 3 NE, Utah, Mapped by USGS
1952
10
Pacific Creek and Buffalo River Anticline, Geology by G. H. Gaul and A. J. Eardley, Assisted by A. Brown and W. Pilley
1944
11
Relation of Sedimentary Units of Present Quarry to Old Quarry
1967
12
Sinclair Wyoming Oil Company, Jackson Hole Area, Teton County, Wyoming, Geology by G. H. Gaul and A. J. Eardley
1944
13
Township 5 South Range 1 West of the Salt Lake Meridian, Utah District 2 Utah County
14
Twin Bridges Area, Montana, Preliminary Work Map Compiled by A. J. Eardley
Referred to in 18 May 1955 letter to R. P. Drury.
1955
15
Wyoming, Sinclair Prairie Oil Company
2
item
1
Ashton, Idaho; Montana; Wyoming
2
Bayonne Nos. 5-6, Institut Geographic National Quadrillage Kilometrique Projection Lambert III Zone Sud
3
Bondurant Anticline, Teton and Sublette Counties, Wyoming Plane Tabled by W. E. Pilley, A. Brown, and A. J. Eardley, Contouring by A. J. Eardley
4
Gallatin National Forest, U.S. Department of Agriculture
5
Geologic Map and Sections of Birch Creek--Sun River Region, Montana, USGS Bulletin 691 Plate XXIV
1918
6
Maps Showing Structure, Overburden, and Thickness for a Rich Oil-Shale Sequence in the Eocene Green River Formation, East-Central Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado, by W. B. Cashion
Oil-shale lease study, Utah sites, were originally attached to this map.
7
Parleys Canyon Plant, File No. U-012, Portland Cement Company of Utah
8
Structure Contour Map of the Montana Plains, by C. E. Dobbin and C. E. Erdmann, USGS
1946
9
Twin Bridges Area, Montana, Preliminary Work Map Compiled by A. J. Eardley
Referred to in 18 May 1955 letter to R. P. Drury. Two copies.
1955
3
item
1
(Untitled) Map of Portion of Montana
2
Bedford Quadrangle, Wyoming, by William W. Riley
1958
3
Geology of the Bituminous Sandstone Deposits Near Sunnyside, Carbon County, Utah, by Clifford N. Holmes, Ben M. Page, and Paul Averitt
1948
4
Structural Cross Section, Bituminous Sandstone Deposits, Sunnyside, Carbon County, Utah, Sunnyside Development Corp.
5
Beaverhead National Forest (East Half), Montana Principal Meridian, Montana, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service
1940
6
Beaverhead National Forest, Montana, Principal Meridian, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service
1947
7
North and Central Africa, Published by the War Office
1941
8
Preliminary Geologic Map of Southwest Montana, University of Michigan Thesis Studies
Two copies.
1947-1948
4
item
1
Geologic Map of East Central Utah and a Portion of Western Colorado Showing Holdings of Harry Ruyster
2
Geologic Map of the Lima Anticline, Beaverhead County, Montana, by A. J. Eardley
1946
3
Geologic Map of Utah, by William Lee Stokes
1961-1962
4
Structure Contour Map of the Lima Anticline, Beaverhead County, Montana, by E. J. Eardley
5
Tertiary Stratigraphy of the Jackson Hole Area, Northwest Wyoming, Oil and Gas Investigation, Preliminary Chart 27
6
Twin Bridges Area, Montana, Preliminary Work Map, Compiled by A. J. Eardley
Referred to in 18 May 1955 letter to R. P. Drury.
1955

General Materials, 1948-1971Return to Top

Container(s): Box 9

Container(s) Description Dates
box
9
Folder
1
Correspondence
1954-1966
2
"Fragmentation of Western North America in Late Cenozoic Time"
3
"Gypsum Dunes and Evaporite History of the Great Salt Lake Desert"
1962-1963
4
"Primary Vertical Uplifts in Arizona and Southern Nevada"
1961, 1965
5
"Willard Thrust and the Cache Uplift"
1968
6-7
Essays and Reports
1948-1971
8
Jordan Steam Electric Station
1949
9
Lieu Lands
1962-1969

General Materials, 1951-1965Return to Top

Container(s): Box 10

Container(s) Description Dates
box
10
Folder
1
Maps and Charts
1951-1965
2
Mineral Land Section Committee
1958-1964
3
Miscellaneous

Names and SubjectsReturn to Top

  • Subject Terms :
  • Geology, Structural
  • Geology--West (U.S.)
  • Geology--West (U.S.)--Maps
  • Mineral industries--West (U.S.)
  • Pollution--Environmental aspects--Utah
  • Personal Names :
  • Eardley, A. J. (Armand John), 1901- --Archives
  • Corporate Names :
  • University of Utah--Faculty
  • Form or Genre Terms :
  • Articles
  • Clippings
  • Maps