Saving the Legacy oral history project, 2001-2010  PDF

Overview of the Collection

Collector
American West Center
Title
Saving the Legacy oral history project
Dates
2001-2010 (inclusive)
Quantity
32 boxes, (16 linear feet)
Collection Number
Accn2070
Summary
The American West Center, at the University of Utah, is involved in a nationwide effort to preserve the stories of men and women who witnessed the events of World War II. This oral history project, Saving the Legacy: An Oral History of Utah's World War II Veterans, has the mission of interviewing veterans living in Utah and the Intermountain Region. The American West Center later expanded their mission to include all war veterans.
Repository
University of Utah Libraries, Special Collections.
Special Collections, J. Willard Marriott Library
University of Utah
295 South 1500 East
Salt Lake City, UT
84112-0860
Telephone: 801-581-8863
special@library.utah.edu
Access Restrictions

Twenty-four hour advanced notice encouraged. Materials must be used on-site. Access to parts of this collection may be restricted under provisions of state or federal law.

Languages
English


Content DescriptionReturn to Top

The American West Center at the University of Utah is involved in a nationwide effort to preserve the stories of men and women who witnessed the events of World War II. This oral history project, Saving the Legacy: An Oral History of Utah's World War II Veterans, has the mission of interviewing veterans living in Utah and the Intermountain Region. The project is ongoing, and has been enlarged to include veterans of subsequent wars.

Use of the CollectionReturn to Top

Restrictions on Use

It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain any necessary copyright clearances.

Permission to publish material from the Saving the Legacy oral history project must be obtained from the Special Collections Manuscript Curator.

Preferred Citation

Initial Citation: Saving the Legacy oral history project, Accn 2070, Box [ ]. Special Collections and Archives. University of Utah, J. Willard Marriott. Salt Lake City, Utah.

Following Citations:Accn 2070.

Administrative InformationReturn to Top


Detailed Description of the CollectionReturn to Top

Allred to FowlerReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 1

Container(s) Description
box
1
Folder
1
Dwaine Allred
Dwaine Allred (b. 1924) discusses his childhood in Bingham Canyon, Utah, his enlistment in the Navy in December 1941, and his service on the submarine tender USS Fulton. 41 pages.
2
Allen S. Anderson
Allen Anderson (b. 1925) grew up in the Sugarhouse area of Salt Lake City. He was drafted in March 1943 and entered the Army Air Corps. Anderson served in the 89th Air Service Group and the 500th Air Service Group in India. He recalls his experiences maintaining several different types of aircraft. 57 pages.
3
Soren Barrett
Barrett (b. 1919) was a senior in college and a member of the Army ROTC when the United States entered the war. He transferred to the Air Corps and was stationed at Kimbolton, England. 33 pages.
4
Eldon Baxter
Baxter (b. 1920) grew up in Idaho and joined the Idaho National Guard at seventeen. He was released in 1942 and joined the army, where he volunteered for the Special Service Force. He served in Italy, France, and Norway. 29 pages.
5
Dorothy J. Beutler
Dorothy Beutler (b. 1924) reminisces about life in Utah during World War II. 30 pages.
6
Ray E. Brim
Brim (b. 1922) volunteered for the Army Air Corps shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor. After eight months of training he was assigned to Paine Field, near Seattle, Washington, where he flew P-39 aircraft. He recalls training on B-17s and his experiences in Africa and England. Brim remained in the service and retired as a colonel in 1975. 36 pages.
7
Charles and Frieda Bytheway
Charles (b. 1926) and Frieda (b. 1924) recall growing up in Salt Lake City. Charles enlisted in the Navy Air Corps in 1944. 52 pages.
8
Mark Cooper
Mark Cooper (b. 1915) enlisted in the Air Force in 1942. He was on a B-29 ground crew. 55 pages.
9
Norma A. Day
Norma Anderson Day (b. 1923) worked at the Remington arms plant before enlisting in the Navy in 1944. She was stationed in Washington, D.C. 42 pages.
10
Eliza R. Fife
Eliza Fife was born in Switzerland in 1929. She recalls life during the war, coming to the United States in 1949, and her subsequent life in America. 48 pages.
11
Royce Flandro
Flandro (b. 1922) was in the ROTC at the University of Utah. He was called to active duty in 1943. He discusses his training in an artillery unit, and serving in North Africa and Italy. 44 pages.
12
Delbert H. Fowler
Fowler (b. 1924) joined the Navy in 1943. He discusses being stationed in Scotland and England. 32 pages.

Franke to KimballReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 2

Container(s) Description
box
2
Folder
1
Paul Franke
Franke (b. 1919) recalls growing up in Utah during the Depression, working at Kennecott until he was drafted in 1944, and working as a machinist in the army. He was discharged in 1946. 48 pages.
2
Austin Garner
Garner (b. 1919) recalls growing up in Southeastern Idaho. He joined the National Guard and was stationed on the West Coast. 36 pages.
3
Lucile Georgell
Born in Salt Lake in 1925, Georgell worked in an arms plant in the early days of the war. She reminisces about life in Utah. 35 pages
4
Vern Glade
Glade (b. 1920) was drafted into the army in 1942. He served in Alaska in a harbor craft detachment unit. 40 pages.
5
Joan Gould
Joan Gould (b. 1919) took her nurses training at the Seton School of Nursing in Colorado Springs, Colorado. She joined the Navy and served aboard the hospital ship USS Samaritan, which was stationed offshore during the landings on Iwo Jima, Peleliu, and Okinawa. 49 pages.
6
Conrad O. Hansen
Hansen (b. 1923) recalls growing up in Salt Lake City, working at the Remington Arms plant, entering the army in 1943, and landing on Iwo Jima on D-day, plus two. 48 pages.
7
Masami Hayashi
Hayashi (b. 1923) recalls growing up in the small farming community of Fort Lupton, Colorado. He attempted to join the Air Corps but was classified as 4-C, or alien. His classification was later changed to 1-A and he was drafted into the army and assigned to the Military Intelligence School at Fort Snelling. The war ended while he was on a transport ship to Manila. He was a translator in the prosection section responsible for trying Japanese war criminals until he was discharged in 1946. 31 pages.
8
Cora Lee Johnson
Cora Lee Johnson (b. 1920) talks about her family's history as Canadian pioneers and growing up in Thistle, Utah. She joined the U.S. Coast Guard and was assigned to the post office in Palm Beach, Florida. She was later transferred to San Diego. 54 pages.
9
Dennis Johnson
Dennis Johnson (b. 1921) recalls being in ROTC at East High and the University of Utah. After graduation from the university, he was trained at Fort Sills and then assigned as a forward observor to the Fourth Infantry Division, which served in Europe. He recalls his experiences in Germany and his time in Korea. 63 pages.
10
Frank Johnson
Frank Johnson (b.1917) enlisted in the U.S. Coast Guard in 1939, three days before Hitler invaded Poland. He was stationed in Seattle when the Japanese bombed the fleet at Pearl Harbor and was later transferred to Boston. He finished his service time in Ketchikan, Alaska. 38 pages.
11
Wayne Kimball
Wayne Kimball (b. 1925) reminisces about growing up in Salt Lake City and working in the family laundry business until Pearl Harbor, when he enlisted in the Air Corps. He went to basic flight training in Bakersfield, California, and was assigned to air transport command, which was an aircraft delivery outfit. He later flew aircraft over the hump in India. 39 pages.

Konishi to MillerReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 3

Container(s) Description
box
3
Folder
1
James and Jeanne Konishi
James Konishi (b. 1918) grew up near Fort Lupton, Colorado. He was inducted into the army prior to the Japanese attack on the fleet at Pearl Harbor. He served at various bases in the United States prior to being transferred to the canal zone in Panama where he remained until the end of the war. Jeanne worked at the state capitol in Salt Lake during the war. 30 pages.
2
Jun Kurumada
Jun Kurumada (b. 1913) graduated from the University of Utah with a degree in dentristry in 1937 and opened an office on Main Street in Salt Lake City. He reflects on life in Utah during World War II. He was drafted into the army in 1953 and was stationed in Tokyo, Sapporo, and Yokohama. 30 pages.
3
Charles K. Laver
Charles Laver (b. 1922) recalls farm life in Mantua, Utah, and working in Salt Lake City as a young man. He enlisted in the Army Air Corps in February 1943. He trained as a bombadier on a B-24 crew and was stationed in Italy, where they flew missions over Northern Italy, Austria, Poland, and Germany. He was discharged in October 1945. 49 pages.
4
Jay Layton
Jay Layton (b. 1925) enlisted in the Navy in 1942 and was trained as a radio technician. He was assigned to a communications station in Hawaii. He was discharged in March 1945. 52 pages.
5
Melvin Lewis
Mel Lewis (b. 1917) grew up in Redding, California, and operated a private airstrip before enlisting in the Army Air Corps one day after Pearl Harbor. He flew with the 14th Air Force in Pakistan, the 5th A.F. in the South Pacific, and the 7th A.F in Saipan and Guam. He was also a flight instructor in Greenville, South Carolina. 77 pages.
6
John A. Lindquist
John Lindquist (b.1919) discusses growing up in Ogden, Utah during the depression, helping to run the family mortuary. After being drafted into the Army, he served as a surgical technician, and then entered pilot training. He flew his first combat mission on D-Day as a bombardier-navigator. He retired from the Air Force Reserve in 1962 at the rank of Major. 36 pages.
7
Edward Lueders
Edward Lueders (b. 1923) recalls his youth in Chicago. He was drafted in 1943, joined the Air Force, and spent several months in various stateside postings. He eventually ended up in India, attached to the Air Transport Command, where his assignment was to provide recreation and entertainment for the troops. He was discharged in March 1946. 72 pages.
8
Lee S. Manwill
Lee Manwill (b. 1916) ran movie projectors and served an LDS mission to England before being drafted into the Army in 1941. He served as a radio operator at Governor's Island, New York, before completing Officer Candidate School and joining the Army Air Corps. He then served in Virginia and North Carolina, retiring in 1945 as a Captain. 30 pages.
9
H. Warren Maw
Herbert Warren Maw (b.1922) is the son of former Utah Governor Herbert B. Maw. He joined ROTC at the University of Utah in 1940, and was admitted to the United States Naval Academy in 1943. After graduating in 1946, he served on the a destroyer, the USS Theodore E. Chandler. He was later called up for service in Korea aboard the USS Hawkins. He served in the Naval Reserve for 21 years. 53 pages.
10
Robert A. McGregor
Robert A. McGregor (b. 1923) enlisted in the Army Air Corps in 1942. He served as a pilot in Italy and was shot down over Steyr, Austria. He was a prisoner in Stalag Luft 1 in Northern Germany. He was a pilot for the Air Force Reserve until 1955, and for the National Guard until 1961. 35 pages.
11
Marvin J. Miller
Marvin J. Miller (b. 1925) enlisted in the Army in 1943. He served as a gunner in the 464th bomb group in Italy and was a prisoner of war at Stalag Luft 4 in Poland. 40 pages.

Morrell to Smith, DorothyReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 4

Container(s) Description Dates
box
4
Folder
1
Grant B. Morrell
Grant Morrell (b. 1924) enlisted in the Marines' "Mormon Battalion Platoon" in 1942. He was a member of the signal corps in Hawaii, the Marshall Islands, and Clearfield, Utah. He served as a recruiter in the Reserve and at Camp Pendleton during the Korean War before retiring in 1954. 32 pages.
2
Leah (Jo) Neilan
Leah Jo Neilan (b. 1922) grew up in Cleveland, Utah. She joined the Navy WAVES in 1943 and served at Hunter College, then Milledgeville, Georgia, and finally San Diego, where she was the Yeoman for the director of the 11th Navy Waves. She was discharged in November 1945. 35 pages.
3
Kenneth K. Nodzu
Kenneth Nodzu was born in Kenilworth, Utah, in 1927. He was drafted into the Army in 1945, and served in Minnesota, California, and the Philippines as a supply clerk. He also discusses his work with the Japanese American Citizen's League of Mt. Olympus. 25 pages.
4
Herman Oliekan
Herman Oliekan (b. 1916) emigrated from Holland to the United States in 1925. Drafted into the Army in 1940, he served in the infantry in Hawaii and Guadalcanal. After contracting malaria and impetigo, he was discharged in 1945. 31 pages.
31 pages
5
Evan Olsen
Before enlisting in the Navy in 1942, Evan Olsen (b. 1921) worked for Western Union Telegraph in Salt Lake City, Utah. He was trained at the Naval Medical School in Balboa Park, and then served as a pharmacist's mate at the New Zealand Naval Hospital and as a medical officer on a submarine chaser on Ulithi. 48 pages.
6
Lester C. Paxton
Lester Paxton (b. 1920) was a member of ROTC at the University of Utah. He served as a pilot in Saipan and Okinawa during the occupation of Japan. He remained in the Air Force Reserve, learning to fly helicopters and retiring as a colonel in 1980. He also worked as a school counselor and assistant principal. 43 pages.
7
Cecil Payne
Cecil Payne was born in 1915 in Georgetown, Idaho. He was drafted in 1940 and was a member of the 753rd Field Artillery group in Europe. The first combat he saw was the Battle of the Bulge, while supporting the 9th Army. He was discharged in 1945. 60 pages.
8
John Perschon
John Perschon (b. 1921) was a member of the Tenth Mountain Division, which was shipped to Italy shortly after Anzio. He discusses training at various bases, fighting alongside the 442nd regiment, the heavy casualty rate under Major General George Hayes, digging foxholes, life at the front, and the fighting methods of Gurkhas. Perschon was awarded two Bronze Stars. 46 pages.
9
Raymond W. Peterson
Raymond Peterson (b. 1925) grew up in Montpelier, Idaho. He was drafted into the army in November 1943 and was assigned to an intelligence and reconnaissance platoon in the 255th Infantry Regiment of the 63rd Division. He recalls his first combat experience in the Colmar region of Germany on Christmas Eve 1944, discovering the operation sites of the new Messerschmidt 262 jet aircraft, liberating one of the work camps associated with Dachau, and serving in the army of occupation. He was discharged in 1946. 64 pages.
10
Della M. Petty
Della Petty (b. 1923) grew up in Salina, Utah. She joined the WAVES and was stationed in San Francisco, where she was a secretary for Commander Ross. She recalls life on the West coast during the war. 33 pages.
11
Ann Sharp
Ann Sharp (b. 1932) talks about her childhood in Holland under German occupation. She lived in Rotterdam but was sent to Arnhem for a time. Sharp emigrated to the United States with her husband in 1953, settling in Salt Lake City to be near her sister, who had joined the LDS Church. 44 pages.
12
Arnold Smith
Arnold Smith (b. 1921) recalls growing up in Hunter, Utah, and working at Kennecott until the attack on Pearl Harbor. He joined the army and served at an ammunition depot in New Guinea. 47 pages.
13
Dorothy N. V. Smith
Dorothy Smith (b. 1923) recalls her childhood in Salt Lake City and working in the Arms plant shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor. She enlisted in the WAVES in October of 1944. She worked in the laundry, did secretarial work, and became a Teletype operator at Ream's Field in San Yisidro. She was discharged in November 1945. 26 pages.

Smith, Gerald to WintersReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 5

Container(s) Description
box
5
Folder
1
Gerald W. Smith
Smith was born in 1919 in Snowflake, Arizona. He worked at the family dairy until joining the Army Air Corps in January 1942. He washed out of pilot training due to airsickness and enlisted in the Navy, serving as a hospital corpsman with Mobile Unit 7 in New Caledonia. He then trained other corpsman in San Francisco. He was discharged in December 1945. 47 pages.
2
Robert E. Thayer
Robert Thayer was born in 1916 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Drafted in 1942, he served as a communications officer in the 381st Bomb Group in Wales and received a Bronze Star. 57 pages.
3
Joseph Tobari
Joseph Tobari (b. 1924) grew up in Salt Lake City. He discusses the discrimination he faced as a Japanese-American high school student after Pearl Harbor. He joined the Army in 1943 as a member of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team. He served in Italy, and later worked for the . 26 pages.
4
B. Ward Turner
B. Ward Turner (b. 1922) was raised in Lyman, Utah. He was drafted into the Army in May of 1943. As a member of the 315th Ordnance MAM Company, he landed on Utah Beach several days after D-Day. He was present at the liberation of Buchenwald concentration camp, and received five Bronze Stars before being discharged in December 1945. 54 pages.
5
Calvin Wardrop
Calvin Wardrop was born in 1924 in Hermosa Beach, California. He was drafted into the Navy in 1943. After passing the test for Officer Training School, he attended Willamette University in Oregon for a year. He was then assigned to the USS Solace, a hospital ship in the South Pacific. He served as a supply clerk until June 1946. He later worked as an elementary school teacher and principal. 23 pages.
6
Ray H. Wheeler
Ray Wheeler was born in 1926 in Lewiston, Utah. He joined the Merchant Marines in 1944, and served aboard the and the in the Pacific. He discusses the radiation sickness he suffered after the use of atomic weapons, as well as the treatment of Merchant Marines by the government after the end of the war. 37 pages.
7
Dean G. Winters
Born in 1921 in Salt Lake City, Utah, Dean Winters joined the Marines in January 1942. He was a member of Carlson's Raiders, fighting in the Aleutian Islands, Midway, and Makin. He was wounded at Iwo Jima. 43 pages.

Adamson to BlanthornReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 6

Container(s) Description Dates
box
6
Folder
1
Lloyd T. Adamson
Lloyd Adamson (b. 1920) recalls his youth in Ogden, Utah, and joining the National Guard when he was sixteen. After Pearl Harbor he applied for flight training and ended up flying B-25s and B-17s. Adamson discusses his missions over Europe and his postwar military career. 47 pages.
2000
2
Earl D. Allen
Allen (b. 1915) recalls his Montana childhood and entering the U. S. Navy at seventeen. He recalls his first tour of duty from 1932 to 1936 on the light cruiser Detroit. His second tour of duty was from 1936 to 1940. He then served from 1940 to 1954. He served aboard the San Francisco, the Canobus, the Savannah, the Northhampton, the Neosho, the Mobile, and the Vogelgesang. Service locations include China, Manill, Pearl Harbor, Brisbane, the Marshall Islands, Wotje, Midway, Noumea, Guadalcanal, New Britain, Truk, Iwo Jima, and Guantanamo. 40 pages.
2000
3
Clarence E. Allred
Clarence Allred (b. 1924) recalls growing up in Canada and the western U. S., joining the Marine Corps shortly after Pearl Harbor, and shipping out to the Marshall Islands. He operated an anti-aircraft gun on various islands in the Pacific, including Okinawa, Tinian, and Saipan. 30 pages.
2000
4
Glen E. Allred
Allred (b. 1921) served in the U. S. Army from 1942 to 1945. He was in the 246th Engineer Combat Battalion staioned in Salisbury, England prior to traveling to France, Belgium, Holland, and Germany. He finished his tour of duty with the occupation army in Berlin. 54 pages.
2001
5
Robert H. Allred
Robert Allred (b. 1925) was with the 463rd Parachute Field Artillery and served in Italy, France, Belgium, and Germany. He recalls his childhood in rural Utah, and discusses his training prior to parachuting into France. He was in Bastogne when it was surrounded by the German army and describes his experience there. 89 pages.
2001
6
Alving Andersen
Andersen (b. 1920) recalls his boyhood in Denmark and the German invasion when he was a teenager. He was drafted into the Danish army and was a forward observer north of Odense. 54 pages.
2003
7
Michael Bilello
Bilello (b. 1924) served aboard the USS Gosper while in the Navy from 1943 to 1946. The ship, an attack transport, served as a hospital ship off Okinawa. Bilello also recalls postwar trips to Alaska and Siberia. 41 pages.
2001
8
Roy Bird
Roy Bird (b. 1925) served with the 42nd Infantry Division between 1943 and 1945. His unit was in France and Germany. He was wounded and sent to El Paso, Texas, where he remained until the war ended. Bird also talks about his trips to Europe and military reunions. 41 pages.
2002
9
Bryan Blanthorn
Bryan Blanthorn (b. 1919) of Grouse Creek, Utah, enlisted in June of 1944. He was assigned to the USS Indianapolis in November of that year. He was a gunner and saw action at Iwo Jima and Okinawa. He describes the torpedo attack and sinking of the Indianapolis, being in the water, experiences with sharks, the rescue, and being in the hospital in Guam. A second interview with Bryan and his wife, Bobbie, contains more details about the incident, his being picked up by the Ralph Talbot, and an Indianapolis reunion. 54 and 29 pages.
2001

Brady to ClarkReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 7

Container(s) Description Dates
box
7
Folder
1
Stanley J. Brady
Brady (b. 1923) served with the 327th Glider Infantry, 101st Airborne Division in Europe. He recalls being shipped to England directly after completing basic training and landing on Utah Beach during the D-Day invasion. Brady also describes his experiences at Bastogne and Deuseldorf. 98 pages.
2001
2
Walter Steven Burdette
Burdette (b. 1924) recalls his childhood in Salt Lake City. He entered the army in 1943 and was shipped to Camp Barley, Texas, where he received training as a medical corpsman. He was stationed in New Guinea, Australia, Biak, and the Philippines. 49 pages.
2002
3
Owen Wallace Burnham
Burnham (b. 1923) recalls his childhood in Blanding, Utah, and describes his basic training as part of the 17th Airborne Division shortly after Pearl Harbor. His unit landed in Naple, Italy, in March of 1944, and later fought in France and Germany. He was mustered out of the service in 1946. 48 pages.
2000
4
Marjorie Campbell
Marjorie Campbell (b. 1924) discusses her family history and growing up in Laketown, Utah, before moving to Salt Lake City, where she graduated from South High. She recounts her experiences working at Fort Dougles before joining the Navy (WAVES) in 1944. She trained in Brooklyn before being assigned to the commissary at Annapolis. She was discharged in 1944, and talks about her marriage, the death of her husband, and raising her four children while working for the Selective Service and the the Bureau of Land Management. 21 pages.
2002
5
Harold Carroll
Carroll (b. 1919) recalls growing up in Utah, being drafted in October 1941, going through basic training, and being assigned to the signal corps stationed in New Orleans before going to India. He was in Chittagong before being sent to Burma, where he recalls hunting a tiger. Later sent to Luzhou, China, he remained there until the war ended. He concludes with his recollections of being a mechanic and working at various car dealerships in Salt Lake County. 41 pages.
2001
6
Otto Carter
Carter (b. 1924) enlisted in the Army Air Corps in November 1943. He trained as a ball turret gunner in a B-17. His crew were shipped to England on the and attached to the 92nd Bomb Wing. Carter flew 25 missions over Germany before being rotated back to the United States, where he trained new crews at various bases. 39 pages.
2001
7
William E. Christensen
Christensen (b. 1925) recalls growing up in Salt Lake City, learning to ski, and being drafted into the army the day after he graduated from high school in June 1944. At the end of basic training he volunteered for mountain combat training and was assigned to the 10th Mountain Division. Christensen describes combat in the Apennine Mountains of Italy. He was discharged in June 1946. 26 pages.
2000
8
Ray H. Church
Ray Church (b. 1920) recalls his childhood in Depression-era Delta, Utah. After two and a half years at Dixie College, he found himself without funds and joined the Marines. He was posted to Guam in 1941 and attached to the military government. He was taken prisoner in December, shortly after Pearl Harbor. Church describes his time as a prisoner of war in Tanagawa, known as the "death camp," and in Osaka. 32 pages.
2000
9
Herbert H. Clark
Herbert Clark (b. 1923) enlisted in the Marine Corps in the Spring of 1942. He went to San Diego for his basic training and was assigned to H Company, 2nd Battalion of the 9th Regiment. H Company was trained in heavy weapons--machine guns and mortars. He was shipped to the Pacific Theater aboard the , stopping in Hawaii and New Caledonia prior to arriving in Auckland, New Zealand, for several months of training for beachheads. Clark's division went to Guadalcanal as a replacement division and remained there until the island was secure. He also participated in the invasions of Bougainville and Guam. He was discharged from the service in October 1945. 85 pages.
2002

Clay to DickersonReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 8

Container(s) Description Dates
box
8
Folder
1
Robert B. Clay
Clay (b. 1918) was born in Willard, Utah. He grew up in Utah during the Depression and, after graduating from high school, he learned to fly a Piper Cub through a program sponsored by the Civil Air Authority (CAA). He recounts how he saw an Army Air Corps advertisement which said "You can take this $25,000 course in flying, and get your wings, and get to be a 2nd lieutenant." He joined in 1940 and was trsined in California, New Mexico, Colorado and Montana. He was assigned to the 351st Bomb Group, and went to Europe in 1943. Shot down on his seventeenth mission, he was a prisoner of war in Denmark and Germany. After the war he received a PhD in Physics, eventually specializing in explosives research. He was part of the group of men who formed Ireco Chemical Company. 122 pages.
2001
2
Arden S. Clegg
Arden Clegg (b. 1924) was born in Heber, Utah. He was drafted into the army and went to Europe on the British ship . He did not participate in the D-Day invasion, but arrived in France vai Omaha Beach a few days after the invasion. Among other things, Cleff was a medic. He was a medic in the First General Hopspital on V-E day and describes his recollection of the celebration in Paris. 45 pages.
2000
3
Richard K. Cluphf
Cluphf (b. 1922) grew up in Colorado and Wyoming. He enlisted in the Army Air Corps and was trained as a crewmember of the B-24. His first mission was to France, his second was over Friedrichshafen, Germany. He flew two missions as a navigator with actor James Stewart. He later qualified for training as a pilot and was in flight school on VE day and VJ day. He was discharged in December of 1945. 47 pages.
2000
4
Harold D. Collipriest
Collipriest (b. 1926) was raised in Salt Lake City by his widowed mother. He had an older brother who was a pilot in the Navy. Collipriest was drafted in 1944 and sent to the Manila. Shortly after he arrived there, his brother was killed in action. As the last surviving son of a family, he was no longer eligable for combat duty and so remained in Manila as a member of General Baker's staff. Collipriest's godfather was an aid to General MacArthur, and he relates some personal anecdotes about the General. After the war, Collipriest stayed in the Air Force Reserve and retired as a Colonel 39 pages.
2000
5
Margaret Lois Conaty
Margaret Conaty (b. 1917) recalls growing up in Depression-era Denver, Colorado. She worked at the Fitzsimmons Army General Hospital and lived in the nurses' quarters, so war began and nurses began going overseas she volunteered for the Navy Signal Corps. After being trained to operate the Link flight simulator, Conaty was stationed at the Naval Academy in Annapolis.38 pages.
2005
6
Robert L. Cope
Cope (b. 1918) joined the Army Air Corps shortly after Pearl Harbor. Although he had a pilot's license, he was not trained as a military pilot because he couldn't pass the pressure chamber test. He spent the war training pilots and in the Army Flight Service, giving weather briefings and managing field traffic. 21 pages.
2001
7
Zeniff J. Cox
Mr. Cox (b. 1922) recounts his early life of ranching and farming in Duchesne County, Utah. He enlisted in the Marines in the autumn of 1942. He recalls his boot camp experience and subsequent training before his transfer to Guadalcanal where he was assigned to the SBD Dauntless Dive Bomber. He completed 62 missions before being transferred stateside in September 1944. Cox describes occupation duty in Nagasaki, Japan before he was discharged in 1946.23 pages.
2001
8
F. Keith Davis
Davis (b. 1924) recalls being drafted into the army a week after he graduated from high school. He describes basic training and advanced training with the 16th Field Artillery Observation Battalion. He boarded the for England and trained there for two months before landing in France ten days after D-Day. Davis recalls combat in Brest, Saint Lo, Schnee Eifel, and Koblenz, as well as talking about the Battle of the Bulge. He also describes spending Christmas Eve with a Belgian family. He recalls the liberation of Ohrdruf concentration camp and describes being a member of the army of occupation. 46 pages.
2000
9
Billy G. Dickerson
Dickerson (b. 1927) recalls his childhood in Arkansas recounts how he enlisted in the Navy when he was seventeen. He was trained on an amphibious personnel attack (APA) vesse and staioned in the Pacific. He went to Luzon, Subic Bay, Leyte, and Okinawa.l44 pages.
2001

Donkin to FreeReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 9

Container(s) Description Dates
box
9
Folder
1
Janette R. Donkin
Mrs. Donkin (b. 1918) details her family history and recalls growing up in Lewiston, Idaho, graduating from North Cache High School, and attending Utah State University. She joined the Navy (WAVES) in May 1944, received training at Hunter College and Cedar Falls, Iowa, and was assigned to the San Francisco District Discipline Office. She was discharged in April 1946. She also talks about her marriage and raising five children. 33 pages.
2002
2
Delmar Dudley
Dudley (b. 1921) served in the Army Air Corps. He was an airplane mechanic and flight engineer, assigned to the 308th Bomb Wing. He was born in Wisconsin and discusses his early years at some length. He was stationed at Luzon in the Philippine Islands. 41 pages.
2001
3
Dale Ellis
Mr. Ellis (b. 1922) recalls his childhood in North Ogden. He worked for the Southern Pacific Railroad prior to enlisting in the U.S. Navy in 1943 and was assigned to the minesweeper , on which he was a radar/sonar operator. After the was hit by a mine and sunk, Ellis was reassigned to an aircraft carrier. He finished out the war in various places in the Pacific, including Okinawa and Tokyo. 41 pages.
2003
4
Elman Ellsworth
Ellsworth (b. 1918) entered the National Guard and was commissioned as a second lieutenant in 1940. He trained as an artillery officer and became a communications officer in an artillery battalion. Initially scheduled to go to the Philippines following Pearl Harbor, his unit ended up in England, landing on Utah Beach in July of 1944. Ellsworth recalls the move through France and Germany, entering Dachau, serving in the occupation forces in Europe, and being discharged in 1945. Less than a year later he rejoined the army and was sent to Japan, where he remained for four years. He also served in Germany, Korea, and Vietnam, before returning to Utah and Fort Douglas. He retired in 1964 and was recruited by a reserve unit, serving in various places, including Israel. He retired from the reserve in 1983.37 pages.
2000
5
Lowell S. Flamm
Lowell Flamm (b. 1923) recounts stories of his parents in Rexburg, Idaho, and recalls growing up in Billings, Montana, during the Depression. He joined the National Guard at 15 and served two years. He was drafted in March 1943 and accepted into OCS, eventually ending up with the 12th Armored Division in Europe. He discusses Le Havre, the Maginot Line, Herrlisheim, Adelmannsfelden, Strasbourg, Colmar, Frankfort, the Danube River, the Black Forest, and occupation duty in Austria. His stories of army life include the cold, propaganda and rumors, a wartime birth, being wounded, close escapes from death, army nurses, fighting with the Free French, and experiences with German civilians. 83 pages.
2000
6
Paul W. Flandro
Flandro (b. 1921) describes his childhood on the East bench of Salt Lake City, where he was in both high school and college ROTC. In 1943 he transferred from the U. S. Army into the U. S. Marine Corps for active duty. After a period of training Flandro was assigned to the newly-formed 5th Marine Division and shipped to Saipan. He spend most of his service time attached to the 2nd Marine Division, "H" Battery, 3rd Battalion, 10th Marines--a field artillery outfit. He was assigned to the first group of soldiers into Nagasaki after the bomb was dropped. He was discharged as a Captain, but was recalled for the Korean war. 43 pages.
2000
7
Dee R. Forbes
Forbes (b. 1922) recalls his graduation from Davis High School in 1940 and attendance at Weber College prior to answering an advertisement by the government for "mechanic learners." After a brief period of training he was transferred to the Salt Lake Army Air Base where he and his fellow-workers helped ready lend-lease planes for delivery to England. He served at various bases around the U. S. before being shipped to Casablanca in North Africa, where he remained until his discharge in March 1946. 35 pages.
2001
8
Lillian H. Fox
Fox (b. 1911) recalls her childhood in Manti, Utah, and working at the parachute factory during the war, while her husband was overseas. She discusses raising children, teaching, and tells many stories of her life. At the time of the interview, Mrs. Fox was ninety-three years old. 20 pages.
2004
9
Ray D. Free
Free (b. 1910) recalls growing up in the Sugarhouse area of Salt Lake City, describing the effects of the Depression on his family, his many childhood illnesses, and participating in the ROTC. He served an LDS mission to Germany and traveled extensively before coming home to study at the University of Utah and work at the family business, Hygeia Ice Rink. He enlisted in the army in January 1941 and was assigned to the 7th Division, 57th Field Artillery. He participated in combat at Attu, Kwajaalein, Leyte, and Okinawa. After the war he was in the reserves and retired as a Major General. 55 pages.
2000

Fullmer to HeenanReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 10

Container(s) Description Dates
box
10
Folder
1
Nathan J. Fullmer
Fullmer (b. 1925) discusses serving with the 69th Infantry Division, in Company C of the 272nd Infantry Regiment (the so-called "Battle Axe" Regiment.") He was assigned to a 12-man rifle squad and classified as a sharpshooter. By the time he boarded a troop ship headed for England he was a PFC. He describes moving through Germany with his regiment, being on patrol, and meeting up with the Russian army at the Elbe River. After V-E day he was transferred into Ordnance, where he was responsible for captured enemy material. Fullmer returned home on the Santa Maria, and was discharged as a Staff Sergeant. 34 pages.
2001
2
Rollo Fullmer
Rollow Fullmer (b. 1918) tells of his youth in Circleville, Utah, recalling his father's death in 1926 and the subsequent hardships suffered by the family. He joined the National Guard in 1941 and was placed in a medical unit with the 115th Comban Engineers of the 40th Division. He took his basic training at in San Luis Obispo before being transferred to Camp White, Oregon, with the 353rd Engineers. Fullmer describes his trip overseas on the to New Caledonia, where his unit was assigned to construction tasks. He was accepted into OCS at Fort Belvoir, Virginia, where his unit participated in the color guard at President Franklin D. Roosevelt's funeral. He was discharged as a sergeant in November 1945. 40 pages.
2000
3
Harold V. Gividen
Gividen (b. 1924) recalls growing up in Mapleton, Utah. He joined the civil air patrol and later, the Army Air Corps. He received his training in 1943 in Kearns, Utah, and Pullman, Washington, before entering flight training in Tulare, California. He was trained in the BT-13, PT-17 Stearman, Cessna PT-17, and the B-17. He describes crossing the Atlantic in January 1945 to reach Polebrook, England, where he was assigned to the 8th Air Force, 351st Bomb Group, 509th Squadron. He was shot down on a mission to Munich, Germany, and managed to land his aircraft in Munswagen, Switzerland, where he spent a month in the hospital. Eventually transferred back to England, he was reassigned to Ellington Field, Texas, where he learned to fly C-47s. He remained in the Reserves, from which he retired as a lieutenant colonel after twenty eight years in the service. 42 pages.
2000
4
Harriet Greguhn
Mrs. Greguhn (b. 1921) grew up in Salt Lake City, Utah. She was married in 1937 and her husband joined the army after Pearl Harbor, serving in Iran. She recalls joining the WACS in 1945 and being sent to Fort Sam Houston in Texas where she was assigned to a medical unit and received training. She worked as a surgical technician in Louisiana and Georgia before being discharged at the end of the war. 17 pages.
2004
5
Ray D. Gurr
Gurr (b. 1925) recalls his childhood in Utah and Nevada. He received an appointment from Senator Pat McCarran to the Annapolis Naval Academy, but turned it down because he was afraid the war would end before he graduated. He was sixteen years old at the time of Pearl Harbor and had dreamed of being in the armed forces since that time. He enlisted in the Marince Corps and trained in San Diego before being shipped out to New Caledonia and Guadalcanal. He also saw action at Bougainville, on Guam, and on Iwo Jima. He returned home on the aircraft carrier USS Guadalcanal. He was discharged in November 1945. 69 pages.
2001
6
Norley Hall
Hall (b. 1925) recalls his childhood in rural Utah and listening to the news about Pearl Harbor when he was in his first year of high school. He enlisted in the Merchant Marines because they had the shortest training period and he wanted to get into the war quickly. He received engine room training in California and ended up on a ship transporting troops from Seattle to the Aleutian Islands. He later went from San Francisco to New Guinea on a liberty ship. He spent the remainder of the war in the Pacific. 86 pages.
2001
7
Edward L. Hart
Hart (b. 1916) describes growing up in a large family on a farm in Bear Lake County, Idah. He attended the University of Utah, where he studied economics, poetry, and writing. He was awarded a Rhodes Scholarship which was suspended when Britain entered the war. He attended graduate school at the University of Michigan and received his MA in English in the summer of 1941. He enrolled in an intensive Japanese language course and was invited to enter a program sponsored by the US Navy. Aften being commissioned as a yeoman second class Hart was ordered to section Z of the communication annex in Washington, DC. He remained there until July 1945. Hart describes the facility, work, and culture of code breaking. After promotion to lieutenant junior grade he received orders to Pearl Harbor. He arrived the day the peace treaty was signed aboard the USS Missouri. Hart discusses warfare, life in Tokyo, civilian life in England, and various teaching positions at the University of Washington, Brigham Young University, University of California at Berkeley, and Arizona State. 58 pages.
2001
8
Harold R. Heath
Mr. Heath (b. 1923) discusses growing up in Holladay, Utah, during the Depression. He talks about his father's involvemnt in World War I. He participated in ROTC at the University of Utah and was inducted into the army in April 1943. He received training at Camp Sibert, Alabama and attended ASTP at the University of Pittsburgh before being assigned to the 90th Chemical Mortar Division, B Company, 1st Division, 1st Army, at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. He recounts combat experiences in Heurtgen Forest, Remagen Bridge, and the Ruhr pocket. He also discusses occupation duty in Nurenberg, Germany before being discharged in March 1946. He also gives an account of his career as a chemical engineer with Mountain Fuel Supply Company. 45 pages.
2000
9
Lillian and Peter Heenan
Lillian Crenshaw grew up in Independence, Missouri, and received her nurse's training at the University of Kansas. She was sworn into the army at Fort Leavenworth in November 1942, and worked as an operating nurse until her unit was shipped out to North Africa where hospital units were being formed to support the European invasion. Her unit followed the troops ashsore in Salerno, Italy. She spent her entire service time in Italy. 28 pages.
2001

Henriques to JohnstonReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 11

Container(s) Description Dates
box
11
Folder
1
Vico Henriques
Henriques (b. 1930) joined the National Guard in 1947. He had been in the State Guard during World War II. In 1950 he was on a survey crew working for the Bureau of Land Management at thd Dugway Proving Grounds when a man came out and told him that he had been ordered to active duty because war had broken out in Korea. According to Henriques, 80% of the Utah Guard was called up on the first day of the Korean War. He recalls being processed and sent to Japan, then Korea. He was immediately transferred to the 1343rd Engineer Combat Battalion (Alabama National Guard)and put into an intelligence and reconnaissance platoon. He talks about being a Sergeant Major and what that means in the military, being promoted to 2nd lieutenant, and about army life in combat. Other topics covered include leadership in combat, the CIA, being a primate caretaker for the National Zoo, political advice from J.D. Williams, hunting game in Korea, adjusting to civilian life after the military, leading the "enemy" unit in field maneuvers, and receiving the Bronze Star. 86 pages.
2004
2
Robert M. Howard
Howard (b. 1922) talks about family life and growing up in the Depression. He volunteered for the Army Air Corps and was inducted in 1942, taking his basic traing at Miami Beach, Florida. Having had pre-war experience as an aircraft mechanic, he was assigned to the Mobile Air Depot at Buckley Field near Mobile, Alabama. He was shipped to the Pacific in 1943 and describes being on the USS Sea Corporal when it was attacked by a Japanese submarine. He was assigned to bases in Australia, the Philipines, and also served on a small airstrip on Horn Island. 41 pages.
2002
3
Sophia Howard
Howard (b. 1924) talks about her birth and childhood in Utrecht, Holland. She recalls hearing about the German bombing of Rotterdam and the surrender, which took place five days later. During the war she worked for a company that cleaned the homes of German officers. Topics covered include food shortages, German roundups of men and resistance workers, the black market, curfew, the liberation of Holland and postwar events, and converting to the LDS Church in the 1950s. 46 pages.
2002
4
Dale L. Husband
Husband (b. 1923) recalls growing up in Salt Lake City. He enlisted in the Navy in 1944 and was shipped to the Pacific after finishing his training. 39 pages.
2002
5
Ora Mae Hyatt
Hyatt (b. 1922) recalls her childhood in Manti, Utah, and describes her nurses training and entlistment in the Army Nurse Corps. She met and married a fellow officer during her period of basic training and was shipped out to various bases in the Pacific. 15 pages.
2004
6
Gilbert Iker
Gilbert Iker (b. 1927) describes his childhood and youth in Detroit, his father's involvement in an Army Corps of Engineers Reserve Unit prior to the war, and life on various bases after his father was called to active duty. He reminisces about his high school years at East High in Salt Lake City, when his father was stationed in Kearns. He joined the Navy in 1945 and was in basic training at the Great Lakes Naval Training Station when the war ended. He was stationed near Hayward, California until his discharge in 1946. He returned to Utah and entered the University where he joined the Air Force ROTC. Following graduation he served in Germany with the Air Force and transferred to the United States Army in 1962. He remained in the Army until 1983. Other topics discussed include the history and mission of the Special Forces, the CIA, NATO war games, and the Vietnam war. 106 pages.
2002
7
Woody James
James (b. 1922) recalls his childhood in Alabama. He joined the Navy in 1942, and was sent to Pearl Harbor, where he was attached to the fleet camera party, whose job it was to tow a target for gunnery practice. He requested and got a transfer to the USS Indianapolis, where he served throughout the war. He describes the torpedoing of the Indianapolis, being in the water with the sharks, and talks at length of the efforts of the surivors to clear the name of their Captain, Charles Butler McVay III. Other topics include Saipan, Eniwetok, the Gilbert Islands, and Howling Joe Smith. James ends the interview with his thoughts on marriage and family life, and descriptions of talking before school groups. 29 pages.
2003
8
J. Harold Johnson
Johnson (b. 1921) talks about his youth in Salt Lake City, including graduation from West High School, participation in ROTC, the effects of the Depression on his family, and working at the Denver and Rio Grand Depot. He describes being drafted into the army in 1942, his military training, traveling to England on HMS Samaria, and across the channel on the USS Nicholas Herkimer. He first saw combat near Cherbourg, France, later traveling across France and Belgium, over the Rhine River, and through three concentration camps in Austria. He served briefly in the army of occupation before returning home in 1946. He went back to work for the railroad and continued there until his retirement. 31 pages.
2003
9
William Johnson
Mr. Johnson (b. 1919) speaks of living and working in coal mining towns in Carbon County, Utah during the Depression. He was drafted into the army, attended radio, telegraph school, and radar schools, and was detailed to the Pacific. He describes communicztions activities during combat and interaction with native people. He was discharged in November 1945 and returned to Utah where he worked for the railroad until retirement. 46 pages.
2000
10
Wilma Johnston
Wilma Johnston (b. 1925) recalls growing up in the midwest, and going to work at Boeing in Wichita in 1943. Her job consisted of riveting sections of the wing on B-29 aircraft. She later moved to Wyoming with her mother and met her future husband, who was home on leave. 33 pages.
2005

Kemp to MahoneyReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 12

Container(s) Description Dates
box
12
Folder
1
Keith Kemp
Kemp (b. 1923) describes growing up in Salt Lake City and working for Remington Arms. He was drafted into the army, where his duties included harvesting crops in North Dakota in the fall of 1943. He was assigned to the 817th Tank Destroyer Battalion. Kemp talks about combat, contact with indigenous populations, and meeting the Russiona. He also describes serving as a bodyguard for Count Von Luckner and his wife during the occupation. 39 pages.
2002
2
Ruth Klein
Klein (b. 1923) was born and raised in the midwest. She came to Utah to attend BYU and got a job at Remington Arms. She joined the WAVES in 1943, received her boot camp training at Hunter College, and training as a gunnery instructor in Pensacola, and spent the rest of her service time in San Diego. 24 pages.
2005
3
Logan R. Kunz
Logan (b. 1920) discusses the Depression, a school bus-train crash in 1938, working at the Remington Arms plant, and being drafted into the army. He traveled through Scotland to England, landed at Le Havre, and made his way across France into Belgium with the 112th Special Service Engineering Battalion. He also describes his experience with the weapons platoon of the 112th Infantry, 28th Division in Germany. His post-war career was in cabinetry and building construction. 38 pages.
2000
4
O. Marvin Lewis
Lewis (b. 1924) grew up in Ogden, Utah, entered the army in 1943, and was assigned to the 11th Airborne Division. He describes his jump training, the voyage on a troop ship to New Guinea, being wounded in the Philippines, rejoining his unit and being shipped to Okinawa, hearing about the Hiroshima bomb, and serving in the occupation forces. Lewis also describes his post-war activities in medical school and practicing internal medicine in Ogden. He also talks about learning to fly and various aircraft he has owned. 63 pages.
2000, 2001
5
David E. Lofgren
Lofgren (b. 1922) was born in Butlerville, at the mouth of Big Cottonwood Canyon. He attended Utah State University before going to work for the FBI in 1941. He entered the army in December 1942, and saw his first combat in Cologne, Germany, with the 342nd Infantry. After the war in Europe was over, Lofgren was shipped to the Philippines. 58 pages.
2001
6
Malcolm MacGregor
MacGregor (b. 1923) recalls his childhood in rural New York and describes learning about Pearl Harbor and attempting to enlist in the Air Corps. He was drafted into the army and was assigned training as a combat engineer. Shortly after that he was transferred to the 8th Air Force and sent to bombardier school. MacGregor talks about his training and the trip to England. His first mission was on D-Day with the 702nd Bomber Squadron. He was shot down over Germany and describes his capture and treatment as a prisoner of war. 121 pages.
2002
7
Kenneth R. Madsen
Madsen (b. 1925) details his family genealogy and recalls his childhood in rural Utah. He was inducted into the army when he turned eighteen and was assigned to the 86th Infantry Division and sent to Louisiana for jungle warfare training. Sent to Europe, instead of the Pacific, Madsen saw combat in France and Germany. Other topics covered include descriptions of the Alsace-Lorraine area, the deaths of fellow soldiers, the "Froidenberg Farm" skirmish, being wounded and receiving medical care, and his long convalescence including time spent at Bushnell military hospital in Brigham City, Utah. Madsen also talks about going to law school, being recruited by Ernest Wilkinson when he was a Senior, and joining the firm of Wilkinson, Cragun and Barker, which specialized in Indian claims cases. He left there for a job at AT&T, from which he retired. 126 pages.
2001
8
Charles "Mont" Mahoney
Mahoney (b. 1922) was in ROTC at the University of Utah when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. After his graduation in 1943 he was assigned to the 276th Armonred Field Artillery Battalion. He describes joining up with his tank crew in France, being diverted up to the Battle of the Bulge, combat in Germany, and coming into contact with liberated American prisoners of war whose fellow-prisoners had confiscated the lion's share of food packages, leaving them to starve. He served with the occupation forces in Austria. 43 pages.
2003

Manwill to MurrayReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 13

Container(s) Description Dates
box
13
Folder
1
J. Stewart Manwill
Manwill (b. 1923) was inducted into the Army in August 1943 and was sent to radio training school and navigation training prior to being assigned to the Air Transport Command. He was sent to India and was a member of a C-54 crew flying supplies over "the hump." 12 pages.
2001
2
William J. Maynes
Maynes (b. 1917) was born and raised in Salt Lake City, serving in the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), Works Progress Administration (WPA), and National Youth Administration (NYA) before enlisting in the Marine Corps in July 1941. He was assigned to the Quartermaster Corps and stationed in San Diego, then accepted for flight training and sent to the Memphis Naval Air Station. He was in flight training when Japan surrendered and was discharged in May 1946. 44 pages.
2000
3
Lloyd E. McCleary
McCleary was in the Army Reserves when the war began. He was in the 7th Army under General Patch and saw combat in France and Germany. 38 pages.
2001
4
Calvin McPhie
McPhie (b. 1923) volunteered for the Navy and went from Mare Island to Midway. He served on the submarine Finback, which completed five patrols before the end of the war. He describes a rescue of five men, one of whom was George Bush. Other topics include life aboard a submarine, depth charges, and rest camps between patrols. 25 pages.
2001
5
Ruth Messick
Messick (b. 1923) discusses family life, the Depression, and growing up in Brigham City, Utah. She joined the WAVES in September 1944, took training at Hunter College, and attended yeoman school at Oklahoma A&M before assignment to the Naval Air Station in Alameda, California. She was discharged in December 1945. 33 pages.
2002
6
Wataru Misaka
Misaka (b. 1923) was born and raised in Ogden, Utah. He was a student at Weber College and the University of Utah before being drafted in June 1944. He was assigned to the language training school at Ft. Snelling where he was trained for the occupation forces. He served nine months in Japan, determining how the bombing affected civilian morale. He was discharged in 1946. 46 pages.
2001
7
Harold D. Morris
Morris (b. 1917) took his flight training at Dos Palos, California, in 1942 before being sent to Marfa, Texas, for advanced training. He flew missions in Africa and the European Theater in a B-24. 60 pages.
2001
8
Harry A. Moyer
Moyer (b. 1920) was in the aviation cadet program at the University of Akron at the time of Pearl Harbor. He was called to active duty in January 1942. He discusses his flight training at length. Other topics covered include joining the 33rd Fighter Group, Africa and Sicily, aerial combat, his views on General Montgomery, contact with Sicilian civilians, the merits of various aircraft, Anzio, being stationed in China, marriage, and duty as a flight instructor. 115 pages.
2002
9
Adria J. Munk
Munk (b. 1923) discusses growing up in Fountain Green, Utah, and moving to Salt Lake City to work at Malouf Manufacturing and Remington Arms. She enlised in the WAVES in 1943, and trained at Hunter College, where she was ranked as hospital apprectice, first-class. She was assigned to Mare Island Naval Hospital and also served in a nearby psychiatric hospital. She was discharged in July 1946. 26 pages.
2002
10
William Edward Murray
Murray (b. 1919) was raised in the midwest and in Ogden, Utah. He attended Weber Junior College and Utah State University, where he studied Forestry and graduated in 1941. He recalls enlisting in the Navy and being commissioned as an ensign in 1942. He volunteered for hazardous duty and was sent to Rhode Island to the Motor Torpedo Boat Squadron Training Center prior to being sent to Tulagi as a replacement in 1943. He discusses Suva, Figi, Noumea, New Caledonia, Australia, the Philippines, Guadalcanal, and China. 46 pages.
2001

Nielsen to PizzelloReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 14

Container(s) Description Dates
box
14
Folder
1
Chase Nielsen
Nielsen (b. 1917) recalls growing up on a farm near Hyrum, Utah. He was a senior at Utah Agricultural College when the army air force medical team came to campus conducting physicals for their expanding pilot training program. He signed up for a physical and was called up for taining in August 1939. He discusses training at length, including his experience in PT-13s, B-10s, B-12s, B-18s, and B-23s. He was flying B-25s when he was selected by Jimmy Doolittle for the raid on Tokyo. His airplane ran out of gas and crashed off the coast of Japan. He made it to shore and hooked up with a group of Chinese guerillas. He describes being captured and tortured by the Japanese, being tried as a war criminal by a military tribunal, and his imprisonment in Nanking and Peking. Other topics covered include his liberation by American forces, recovering in military hospitals, testifying in the war crimes trial of his former captors, serving in the Strategic Air Command, and his retirement as a Lieutenant Colonel in 1961. 65 pages.
2000
2
Ethel Nielson
Ethel Nielseon (b. 1921) describes her childhood in Ephraim, Utah, and working at a parachute factory in Manti, Utah. 34 pages.
2004
3
Wes Nordgren
Nordgren (b. 1922) joined the Navy early in 1941. He recounts the story of the rescue of a paratrooper whose chute had caught on the tail of a DC-3. He describes his flight training, meeting any marrying his wife, and his postwar service in the Reserves, and being a flight controller. 26 pages.
2004
4
Richard F. North
North (b. 1925) entered the Army Air Corps at eighteen and was trained as a navigator. He was assigned to the 14th Air Corps, then serving in the China-Burma-India theater of operations. 10 pages.
2002
5
Olive O'Mara
O'Mara (b. 1920) recalls growing up in a small mining town in Pennsylvania during the Depression. She enlisted in the WAVES, was trained as an electrician's mate, and served in New York. 47 pages.
2002
6
Wayne A. Omer
Wayne Omer (b. 1921) details his genealogy and recalls his childhood in Holladay, Utah. He went to work for the FBI in 1941 and moved to Washington, DC. He enlisted in the Navy and begain flight training in Athens, Georgia. After being commissioned he transferred to the Marines and was shipped out to the Solomon Islands. After serving in the Pacific he was reassigned to a traning mission in Santa Barbara, where he remained until the war ended. Other topics covered include serving in the Reserves, making jewelry, and working for Litton Industries. 75 pages.
2001
7
Hazel Onstott
Onstott (b. 1914) recalls her childhood in the rural South and describes joining the WACS after Pearl Harbor. 23 pages.
2004
8
W. Duane Parker
Parker (b. 1926) was inducted into the army right after graduation from high school in 1944. He reported to Fort Douglas, Utah, and then was transferred to Camp Walters and Camp Swift in Texas. He recalls his experiences in the 10th Mountain Division. 44 pages.
2001
9
James H. Patterson
Patterson (b. 1921) was in the Army Air Corps stationed at Del Monte in the Philippines, where he was taken prisoner by the Japanese He relates his experiences as a POW. 42 pages.
2001
10
R. John Pizzello
Pizzello (b. 1923) grew up in a military family in New Jersey. After dropping out of high school he worked for General Motors building Avenger bombers before enlisting in the Army Air Corps in September 1942. He was attached to the 376th Bomb Group, 515th Squadron and served in British Liberia, Dakar, Marakesh, Casablance, Oran, Tunis, Cairo, and San Pancrazzio. He recalls bombing raids over Italy and describes being shot down and captured by Germans in 1944. Pizzello discusses POW life at length. 58 pages.
2002

Porath to SorensenReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 15

Container(s) Description Dates
box
15
Folder
1
Preston Porath
Porath (b. 1921) recalls his childhood in Hyrum, Utah and describes joining the Seabees as a Third-Class Petty officer. He served in the Pacific, including Guadalcanal, New Guinea, Okinawa, and New Caledonia. He speaks at length about life aboard a ship. 80 pages.
2001
2
Dorothy Jean Pugmire
Pugmire (b. 1923) recalls growing up in Paris, Idaho, and Logan, Utah prior to enlisting in the WAVES in 1944. She trained at Hunter College and was assigned to the post office of the Naval Training Center in San Diego, California. 36 pages.
2002
3
William F. Roos
Roos (b. 1919) reminisces about his childhood and education in Utah, including his ROTC experience. He was attending West Point when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, and he speaks at length about his experiences there. He was assigned to an engineering unit with the responsibility for turning the island of Guam into a military base. After the war he transferred to the Army Air Corps and earned a masters degree in civil engineering from the University of Iowa. He later served in Germany, Korea, Vietnam, and the Central Pacific. 75 pages.
2004
4
Harley Sandberg
Sandberg (b. 1922) recalls growing up in Salt Lake City, Utah, where he graduated from West High School in 1941. He attended the University of Utah and completed an aircraft engine mechanic training in Ogden before being drafted into the army in 1942. He received training in radio operation and special weapons before attending primary flight school. He worked on early radar. 32 pages.
2001
5
Hanskarl Schade
Schade (b. 1915) recalls his childhood in Dresden, Germany, and being drafted into the army in 1939. He served in Italy, where he was wounded and then taken prisoner by the Americans. Because he had been trained as a singer, Schade spent much of his time entertaining the American troops. He emigrated to America in 1955. 41 pages.
2000
6
Barnard H. Seegmiller
Seegmiller (b. 1915) discusses ranching in southern Utah, his LDS mission in the central states, and his experience in the army as a ground crew member on a B-25. He served in North Africa, Italy, and Corsica. 43 pages.
2000
7
Stanley G. Smith
Smith (b. 1923) joined the Air Force in December 1942. He trained in Santa Ana, Visalia, Merced, and Stockton, California. He was sent to Ardmore, Oklahoma, where he trained in a B-17. He recalls his experiences while stationed in Lavenham, England; discusses missions, strategies, fellow crew members, being shot down over Cologne, and his internment in Stalag Luft Three. 57 pages.
2002
8
Van C. Sorensen
Sorensen (b. 1922) recalls his childhood on a cattle ranch in Utah, working on the construction of the Topaz Japanese Relocation camp, and joining the U.S. Marines in December 1943. After training as a gunner and being assigned to a flight crew, Sorensen was assigned to the Pacific Theater of Operations. He talks at length about his combat experiences. He also talks about returning to civilian life and suffering from what would come to be known as Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome. 95 pages.
2001

Stewart to VanScheltReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 16

Container(s) Description Dates
box
16
Folder
1
Walter Stewart
Stewart (b. 1917) talks about his ancestors being early settlers of Payson, Utah, and discusses raising and selling racehorses. Other topics covered include the Depression, his LDS mission to Scotland, and ROTC. He enlisted in the Army Air Corps and was assigned to the 8th Air Force, 93rd Bomb Group. He speaks at length about his combat missions, the Ploesti raid, piloting the "Utah Man," the rescue of downed crew members, touring the United States on a morale-building assignment, and his post-war reserve duty. 61 pages.
2000
2
Allen Donald Tallman
Tallman (b. 1925) quite school at the age of fifteen and worked in a photo shop until he joined the Navy at the age of seventeen. He was assigned to the battleship Massachusetts, where he worked in the Combat Information Center. He later spent time as a photographer for the Navy. 37 pages.
2003
3
Ralph M. Tannenbaum
Tannenbaum (b. 1921) recalls his childhood in Salt Lake City, joining up with the navy V-7 officer procurement program, training, and being assigned to the heavy cruiser USS Chicago at Pearl Harbor in the Spring of 1941. His ship left Pearl Harbor on December 1 as escort to the aircraft carrier , and so was not in port when the Japanese attacked. Other topics covered includes an early radar device called CXAM, duty in Australia, the battle of Coral Sea, shore leave, getting married, being stationed in New Caledonia, ship duty throughout the Pacific, and post-war reserve duty. 27 pages.
2000
4
Leslie Teasdale
Teasdale (b. 1920) was born in a suburb of London. He recalls his boyhood and education prior to getting a job with a passenger liner. He was conscripted into the Royal Artillery Coastal Defense Regiment and later served in Egypt, where he was taken prisoner in June 1942. He was subsequently transferred to prisoner of war camps in Italy and Germany. His camp was liberated by the Americans in January of 1945. 55 pages.
2001
5
Robert D. Teran
Teran (b. 1922) describes a difficult childhood in New Mexico during the Depression, and recalls his education at Fort Lewis College, army enlistment, and schooling at Scott air base in Illinois. He also details his experiences in flight training, B-17 crew assignments, and crossing the Atlantic to England, where he served in the 8th Air Force, 379th Bomb Group, 527th Squadron, based at Kimbolton Field near London. He flew twenty missions before being shot down and captured by German soldiers, ending up at Stalag Luft 3. He recounts his days as a prisoner of war, including a forced march away from the advancing Russions, incarceration in Stalag 7A, liberation, and his return to the United States. 51 pages.
2000
6
Lee E. Tucker
Tucker (b. 1924) describes his youth on a farm in East Mill Creek, Utah, during the Depression. He attended the University of Utah prior to enlisting in the army air corps. He recalls his training experiences, including meeting his fellow trainee and future actor, Jack Webb. He joined the 9th Air Force, 404th Fighter Group, 507th Fighter Squadron as a pilot of P-47Ds, and was stationed in England, where he flew fifty-four missions. He was discharged at war's end but chose to remain in the reserves and was called up for stateside duty during the Korean conflict. 57 pages.
2000
7
Willis L. Ure
Ure (b. 1922) describes his duties in the 559th Bomb Squadron, 387th Bomb Group, of the Ninth Air Force. He flew fifteen missions as a radio gunner and sixteen missions as a "togglier," a position in the nose of the aircraft. 21 pages.
2003
8
Henry and Anna Vanderveur
Henry (b. 1922) recalls being a young boy in Utrecht, Holland, during the German occupation from 1940 to 1945. He trained as a barber and describes cutting the hair of German soldiers. He explains his difficulties hiding from the Germans to avoid forced labor in a German factory or camp. He eventually came to the United States. Ann (b. 1923) recalls her own childhood in Utrecht, describes the German occupation, and talks about her life with Henry. 57 pages.
2002
9
Van Schelts
The Van Schelts (b. 1929, b. 1934) recall growing up in Holland during the Nazi occupation. Topics covered include employment, schooling, the black market, the resistance, and interaction with German soldiers. They immigrated to the United States in the early 1950s, where they met and married. Peter recalls working for Jordan Meat Company, Wasatch Meat, and Siegried's Deli, as a meat cutter and sausage maker (a trade he learned as a teenager). 48 pages.
2002

Walker to YoungReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 17

Container(s) Description Dates
box
17
Folder
1
Franklin E. Walker
Walker (b. 1921) grew up in Salt Lake City and attended a civilian pilot training prior to volunteering for service in the Navy after Pearl Harbor. He recalls his experiences in New Guinea, Australia, Indonesia, and Hawaii. He also discusses his postwar years in Utah, Alaska, Massachusetts, Washington D.C., Illinois, and California. 77 pages.
2000
2
Dale H. West
West (b. 1918) recalls his childhood in Provo, Utah, and describes getting a degree in English from Brigham Young University. He taught school for several years and eventually received both a master's degree and doctorage in English. He served in the Asiatic-Pacific Theater of Operations with the 7th Army Air Force. He describes intercepting and classifying enemy air-to-ground and point-to-point radio messages. He decoded and relayed information concerning weather conditions, enemy air action, and enemy administrative orders to locally-based air combat units. 28 pages.
2000
3
Boyd T. Williams
Williams (b. 1926) recalls his childhood in Rigby, Idaho, and describes enlisting in the Navy two days after graduating from high school in May 1944. He was a radio operator on the second Block Island (the first ship of that name had been sunk by a German submarine). He served in Pearl Harbor, Okinawa, Saipan, Guam, Formosa, Leyte, Manila, Ulithi, Borneo, Korea, China, and Panama. 44 pages.
2004
4
Warren Wimmer
Wimmer (b. 1920) recalls his childhood in rural Utah and enlisting in the Navy in July 1941. After basic training he was assigned to the USS Rigal in Hawaii. Upon his arrival he learned that the Rigal had been towed to Hawaii to be converted into a destroyer tender and was in the process of being rebuilt. He gives a long and vivid account of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and the aftermath. He served on work parties that recovered bodies before being admitted to the hospital for shrapnel wounds. On December 10 he was evacuated with other wounded from Pearl Harbor on a luxury liner with two coast guard cutters as escort. He was later assigned to the USS Shaw and saw combat at Guadalcanal, Tulagi, Saipan, and Savo Island. 53 pages.
2000
5
Edwin "Ned" C. Winder
Winder (b. 1922) discusses his family heritage, including his great-grandfather starting Winder Dairy in 1880. He also talks about his mission to the Southern States before joining the Navy in 1944. After his training in radar he was assigned to the destroyer Hugh W. Hadley as a fire control officer on a five-inch gun. He describes the attack on the Hadley and sinking of the Hale. He was discharged in 1945. 59 pages.
2001
6
Ronald Wright
Wright (b. 1919) recalls growing up on a farm near Blackfoot, Idaho, and talks about the effects of the Depression on his family. He developed an interest in flying through his association with a barnstormer. He enlisted in the Army Air Corps and was assigned to the 8th Air Force, 357th Fighter Group, 364th Squadron, stationed in England. Other topics include experiences flying P-51s, occupation duty in Munich, and post-war education and service with the Air National Guard. He was called to active duty during the Korean conflict and the Vietnam War, where he flew air transport. 54 pages.
2000
7
Wilson G. Wright
Wright (b. 1916) recalls his childhood in Ogden, Utah. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy with a B.S. in engineering and served as a commissioned officer on the battleship and the destroyer before going to Pensacola, Florida, for flight training. After qualifying for carrier landings he was assigned to the fighter squadron of the , where he provided air support for the Marines at Guadalcanal. He was on the when it was torpedoed and was in the water for four hours until being picked up by the destroyer . Wright's second tour of combat was with a fighter squadron based with the Marines in the Solomon Islands. He flew with such notables as "Gunner" Walsh and "Pappy" Boyington. He remained in the Navy for several years. After retirement he worked in the aerospace industry on the Polaris, Moon Landing, and Space Shuttle programs. 51 pages.
2000
8
Richard Young
Young (b. 1923) grew up in Salt Lake City, Utah, and joined the Navy in March 1943. After training at Farrigut, Idaho, and Camp Pickett, Virginia, he attended radio school and was assigned to Company 172-43, 2nd Regiment, 5th Battalion, U.S. Naval Training Station. He spent much of his duty time on a PC craft, which was 169 feet long and had about seventy on board. These small boats would take care of all radio-to-shore, radio-to-air, and radio-to-land communications. Wright saw action at Manila and near several small islands in the Philippines. After his boat was sunk in a typhoon he worked on a troop ship and at the military radio station in San Francisco, California. He was discharged in March 1946. 50 pages.
2002

Baessler to GoddardReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 18

Container(s) Description Dates
box
18
Folder
1
Siegfried Eric Baessler
Baessler (b. 1925) emigrated to the United States from Germany in 1931. He attended school in Salt Lake City, Utah, and joined the Seabees in June 1943. After basic training in Virginia, he was assigned to Pleasanton, California, prior to being shipped overseas. Attached to the 107th Seabee battalion, he served on Ebeye and Bigej Islands (part of the Marshall Islands), as a clerk and on various construction projects. He was transferred to Tinian (in the Marianas) where he worked as a baker for the duration of the war. He was discharged in June 1946. 42 pages.
2004
2
John Bleggi
Bleggi (b. 1921) was the son of Italian immigrants. He recalls his childhood in Mapleton, Utah. He was drafted into the army in September 1942 and took basic training at Camp Kohler, California, before attending Signal Corps training at Camp McCain, Mississippi. He was assigned to the 33rd Construction Battalion and left New York on the in February 1944. He spent five months in Wrexham, England, practicing for the invasion of France. He landed on Utah Beach on D-Day plus six. His unit supported A Corps and General Patton's Fourth Army through Europe, then trained in France to go to Japan. Bleggi was on a troop ship on its way to Japan when the war ended. He was discharged in December 1945 at Fort Douglas, Utah. 92 pages.
2000
3
George C. Clay
Clay (b. 1922) was born in Topeka, Kansas, where his father was a salesman for Winchester Arms Sporting Supplies. His family moved to Utah, where Clay attended school, enrolling in ROTC at West High. He enlisted in the Navy and was assigned to the 16th Seabees Battalion as a cook. He sailed from San Diego on the to Hawaii, where his unit served for two years building storage tanks and warehouses. He was discharged in October 1945. 30 pages.
2003
4
Legrand Raine Curtis
Curtis (b. 1924) grew up in Salt Lake City, where his father operated a coal company in the Sugarhouse area. He attended the University of Utah and enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1944. He applied for dental training, which he received at the University of Kansas City. After receiving his degree he was given the option of choosing to serve in the Army or the Navy. He chose the Navy and was sent to Corpus Christi. He was transferred to Norfolk, Virginia, to a repair ship where he provided dental services to men aboard the ships his shipmates were repairing. He was discharged in 1948. 33 pages.
2004
5
Thomas Duncombe Dee II
Dee (b. 1920) describes his genealogy and recalls his boyhood in Ogden, Utah. He graduated from Stanford University before enlising in the Army Air Corps in December 1941. After training in Palm Beach, Florida, he was assigned to the 14th Airways Communications Division stationed in Cairo. He discusses his assignment and experiences there, including a detailed account of a C-60 twin-engine transport crash he survived. He was sent back to the states to recover and remained there until the end of the war. 24 pages.
2006
6
Robert J. Epperson
Epperson (b. 1925) joined the Marines in 1943, attended officer candidate school and graduated as a 2nd lieutenant. He was assigned to the 79th replacement draft and was enroute overseas when the war ended. He participated in reparation duties in China and was discharged in 1946, remaining in the reserves. He was called up in 1950 and assigned to the 1st Marine Division, 7th Regiment, 1st Battalion, C Company, and participated in the Inchon landing, Chosin Reservoir campaign, Pohang patrols, and the Northern advance. He received the Silver Star and five presidential unit citations. He was discharged in 1958 with the rank of Captain. 46 pages.
2004
7
Robert B. Forsgren
Forsgren (b. 1922) recalls his Salt Lake City boyhood and describes being drafted into the army in 1942. He was assigned to Third Army headquarters at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, and served there and at Camp Kilmer, New Jersey, before heading overseas in January 1943. Forsgren reminisces about serving in the Adjutant General's office under General George Patton. 21 pages.
2003
8
Ross Fullmer
Fullmer (b. 1923) joined the Navy in December 1940. After basic training he was transported to Hawaii on the oil tanker USS Tippecanoe before transferring to the West Virginia on the morning that Pearl Harbor was attacked. He describes the attack in detail and recalls his experiences on his next ship, the Chicago. He saw action in the Pacific around New Zealand, Australia, and the Coral Sea. He was serving on Midway Island when the war ended. He was discharged in 1946. 44 pages.
2002
9
Kieth P. Gillen
Gillen (b. 1925) enlisted in the army in 1943 and was assigned to an engineering unit. He was transported by ship to Le Havre, where he was assigned to the 87th Infantry, 4th Division. His responsibilities included transporting prisoners of war. He gives a description of ferrying U.S. troops across the Rhine River while under fire from German 88s located on the banks of the river. After the war he served in the army of occupation until his discharge in April 1946. 65 pages.
2004
10
Orval D. Gillen
Orval Gillen (b. 1923) was born in Sandy, Utah, and spent his childhood there and in Myton, Utah. He was drafted into the army in December 1943 and assigned to the 718th Railway Operation Battalion, Company A. His duties took him to Europe, where he operated bulldozers and other heavy equipment, clearing away rail accidents, damaged bridges, and other large large-scale operations. He was discharged in February 1946. 37 pages.
2004
11
John B. Goddard
Goddard (b. 1920) describes his youth in Ogden, Utah. He enlisted in the army in 1942. After basic training at Camp Roberts, California, he completed officer candidate school and parachute school at Fort Benning. He served in Africa, Italy, and France with the Third Infantry Division of the Fifth and Sixth Armies. After he was wounded he was sent to the 300th General Hospital, then to Hammond Hospital in Modesto, California. He also spent time in Madigan Hospital (Seattle), Bushnell Hospital (Utah), and Bruns Hospital (Santa Fe, New Mexico). He was discharged in 1946. 53 pages.
2004

Hebert to PowellReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 19

Container(s) Description Dates
box
19
Folder
1
Joseph M. Hebert
Hebert (b. 1924) was raised in Washington and Indiana. He was inducted into the Army Air Corps in February 1943 on "limited service." After basic training in Florida he was assigned to the 484th Bomb Group, where he met the rest of his crew--the pilot, copilot, navigator, and bombardier. Hebert was the aerial gunner, completing the crew of this B24 Liberator. He describes his training and overseas flight experiences including flying with the Tuskegee airmen. Other topics covered include his relationship with Colin Powell, flying out of Toretta Base in Italy, aircraft types and battle strategies, flak, bombing Ploesti, Major General Bill Keese, jet airplanes, and his postwar life. 79 pages.
2000
2
Robert E. Irion
Irion (b. 1923) recalls his youth in Kansas and tells how he enlisted in the Army Air Corps in October 1942. He discusses his flight training in Arkansas, Alabama, and Florida. He served in the 505th and 339th Fighter Groups. 142 pages.
2002
3
Virginia Kristic
Kristic (b. 1922) recalls her childhood in Butte, Montana, and her marriage to her fiance of six months the day before he was shipped overseas. She joined the WAVES and went to boot camp at Hunter College in the Bronx. She was stationed in Seattle, where she served as a storekeeper from 1942 to 1945. 29 pages.
2003
4
Melvin S. Larsen
Larsen (b. 1922) details his genealogy and family history. His father served as a Mission President in Denmark for the LDS Church and Larsen received his primary education in Danish schools. He attended West High in Salt Lake City and was in ROTC before being drafted into the army. He was assigned to the 87th Infantry Division and was part of the D-Day invasion. He fought in Belgium, France, Germany, and Czechoslovakia. He received five Purple Hearts and returned to the United States in 1945. 29 pages.
2005
5
Sam Liner
Liner (b. 1921) recalls growing up in Depression-era Louisiana. He joined the Army Air Corps in August 1940, but problems with depth perception forced him out. He attended Officer Candidate School, graduating in 1943. He details his trip across the Atlantic and around to India, where he was assigned to a practice base for the 7th Bomb Group. His job was supervising a crew of 250 civilians in site cleanup, and settling wrongful death claims with civilians. He was later transferred to Ducca, where his group helped supply fuel for flying the "Hump." Liner was discharged in 1945. 56 pages.
2004
6
Olivia G. McCool
McCool (b. 1926) recalls her Indiana childhood. Her father, a coal miner, sought work wherever he could find it and the family moved often. She talks about her brother, serving in the 8th Air Force in England, and about working for Briggs Aviation in Indiana. She worked on Corsairs, the Navy fighter plane. 27 pages.
2004
7
Glenn H. Parkin
Parkin (b. 1922) recalls his childhood in North Salt Lake. He entered the U.S. Navy in February 1941 and was assigned to the , which was sunk at Guadalcanal. He later served on the . Parkin recalls experiences in the Marshall and Gilbert Islands, Bougainville, Wake, Marcus, Midway, Tassafaronga, Palau, and the Battle of Leyte Gulf. He appeared on the History Channel's . 30 pages.
2001
8
Henry Robert Patton
Patton (b. 1919) describes his youth in Nebraska and recalls joining the Army Air Corps in 1941. He was sent to the Philippines where he was captured by the Japanese following the attack on Pearl Harbor. He and a companion escaped from the infamous Bataan Death March and joined a Filipino resistance group. After being recaptured by the Japanese he spent time in Bilibid and Cabanatuan prisons prior to being sent to Fukuoka, Japan, to work in a steel mill. He was there at the time of the Japanese surrender and describes events at the war's end. Patton, along with other former prisoners, toured Hiroshima shortly after the atomic bomb was dropped. Other topics covered include going AWOL to visit Filipino comrades, post-war medical treatment, problems adjusting to civilian life, and his views on the current political situation. 47 pages.
2004
9
Harold W. Poole
Poole (b. 1918) recalls his childhood in Salt Lake City. He attended West High and was involved in the ROTC program. He volunteered for the Army Air Corps in August 1940 and was sent to the Philippines after training. When the war began his unit fought for four months before being taken prisoner by the Japanese. He survived the Bataan Death March and was in prison camps prior to being sent to Moji, Japan, to work in a steel mill. After the war ended he was evacuated on the ship and made his way home. 55 pages.
2000
10
James M. (Jim) Powell
Powell (b. 1923) was born in Powell, Wyoming, a town named after his ancestor, John Wesley Powell. He spent most of his childhood in Twin Falls, Idaho, and was working at Lockheed when Pearl Harbor was attacked. He volunteered for the ski troops and was sent to Camp Hale, near Leadville, Colorado, where his unit, the 10th Mountain Division, trained for three years before being sent to Italy. He describes his experiences in the Apennines Mountains, getting wounded, and the end of the war. 29 pages.
2004

Robinson to WoolseyReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 20

Container(s) Description Dates
box
20
Folder
1
Lorraine J. Robinson
Robinson (b. 1923) recalls her childhood in Wisconsin. She was a student at Carroll College in Waukesha when Pearl Harbor was attacked. She went to Milwaukee and worked in a defense factory, then enlisted in the Marine Corps, women's reserve. After boot camp at Camp LaJune, North Carolina, she went to Norman, Oklahoma, for aviation machinist mechanical school. She sailed aboard the to Pearl Harbor, where she was crew chief on an SN-J or AT-6. After returning home in 1945 she attended the University of Wisconsin on the GI Bill. 49 pages.
2001
2
Robert A. Schluter
Schluter (b. 1924) recalls his childhood and education in Salt Lake City, Utah, prior to enlising in the U.S. Army in 1942. After basic training he was recruited for special service at Los Alamos, New Mexico, where he was involved in electronic-related work on the atom bomb. He served until February 1946. He also relates his post-war experiences in research and academia at various institutions, including MIT and the Argonne National Laboratory. 55 pages.
2002
3
A. Jack Seversen
Severson (b. 1924) discusses his childhood in Montana and Idaho. He enlisted in the U.S. Marines in October 1942 and was shipped to the Pacific Theater with the First Aviation Engineers. An injury put him in the hospital in New Caledonia while the rest of his battalion fought on Guadalcanal. He rejoined his unit in New Zealand and spent time on Saipan, Tinian, and Okinawa. Among other duties, he worked as a demolition expert, defusing mines. After the Japanese surrender in August 1945, he went to Tientsin, China, for occupation duty. 43 pages.
2003
4
Zenaida Laroco Silvey
Silvey (b. 1921) was born in Natividad, Pangasinan Province, Philippines. She was in high school when the Japanese invaded the Philippines. She recalls her next door neighbor, a barrio lieutenant, being tortured for information. She joined the Luzon Guerilla Armed Forces and served for about five years. After the war she came to the United States and attended the University of Utah. 26 pages.
2004
5
Mary Camilla Howe Sims
Sims (b. 1921) was born in Darlington, Wisconsin, and received her nursing education at St. Mary's Hospital in Madison, Wisconsin. She joined the Army Nurse Corps in October 1943 and boarded the for New Guinea. She served at the 54th General Hospital for the duration of the war with the exception of a few months spent in the Philippines. She describes life on the island, her duties and activities, her post-war marriage, and talks about her children. 26 pages.
2004
6
Barbara Greenlee Toomer
Toomer (b. 1929) was born in Pasadena, California. She received her RN in 1952 from St. Joseph's College of Nursing in San Francisco, California. She joined the Army in 1953 and took basic training at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio, Texas. She served at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, until her discharge in 1955. She contracted polio in 1956 and has been confined to a wheelchair since that time. She is a successful activist, petitioning for the rights of the disabled. 43 pages.
2006
7
William A. Wells
Wells (b. 1924) talks about his childhood in Salt Lake City, Utah. He was drafted into the army in December 1942 and was sent to cooks and bakers school at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. He later trained in the aviation cadet program, but was sent to Europe attached to the 87th Infantry Division, 334th Field Artillery Battalion. His service locations included France, Belgium, Germany, and Luxembourg. He gives his impressions of the Battle of the Bulge and combat on the Siegfried Line. 26 pages.
2003
8
Emile Eugene Wickham
Wickham (b. 1923) describes his youth as the son of a Caterpillar salesman based in Oregon, Utah, and Colorado. He enlisted in the Army Air Corps in 1942, and trained in Utah, Texas, Missouri, Wisconsin, and Nevada. He served in Detroit, Michigan, before being posted to Casablanca, where he spent eighteen months as an aircraft mechanic. Discharged at the end of the war, he reenlisted and was sent to Alaska, where he met and married his wife before being discharged again in 1947. He worked at Hill Air Force Base, both as a mechanic and on the flight line, for over twenty-eight years. 26 pages.
2004
9
Jack Keith Woolsey
Woolsey (b. 1923) recalls his childhood in Salt Lake City, Utah. He joined Battery D, 145th Field Artillery of the National Guard when he was fifteen. His unit was called to active duty in January 1941. He was discharged to complete high school, after which he joined the Navy and was trained as an aviation machinist's mate. He also received gunnery and combat training and attended radar operator school. He was assigned to the USS Cabot, where he served as a radioman and gunner on torpedo bombers, completing ninety combat flights. Woolsey describes action in the Marshall and Mariana Islands. 57 pages.
2004

Azukas to DurfeeReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 21

Container(s) Description Dates
box
21
Folder
1
Edward Azukas
Azukas (b. 1915) was raised in a Catholic orphanage in Kingston, Pennsylvania, after his parents died. He was drafted into the army and serbed from 1943 to 1945. After his basic training at Camp Croft, South Carolina, he was assigned to the 91st Infantry Division and saw his first combat on 4 July 1944 in North Africa. Mr. Azukas provides several candid stories of his experiences from North Africa, Italy, and Yogoslavia. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 46 pages.
2004
2
Wallace R. Baldwin
Baldwin (b. 1931) was born in Hiawatha, Carbon County, Utah. He enlisted in the Air Force in January 1951, attended basic training at Lackland Air Force Base and advanced armament mechanic training at Lowry Air Force Base. He served in the 22nd Fighter Bomber Squadron, 36th Fighter Bomber Group, for eighteen months in Furstenfeldbruck and Bittburg, Germany. Twice a year he trained in gunnery maneuvers at Wheelus Air Force Base in Libya. After returning to the United States, Wallace was stationed at Forbes Air Force Base before retiring in December 1954 at the rank of Staff Sergeant. Interviewed by Frances Merrill. 25 pages.
2004
3
Charles Alexander "Red" Beam
Beam (b. 1923) spent his early childhood in Ely, Nevada, where his father was a forest supervisor. The family later moved to Holladay, Utah, where he graduated from Granite High School and attended the University of Utah. He was in the ROTC program at the time of his enlistment in the Navy in May 1941. He served on the Colorado and the Dickerson before entering the Naval Academy in 1942 as a Midshipman in the 20th Company. He later reenlisted as a 3rd Class Bo's'n Mate and joined the crew of a submarine bound for Palau. After being wounded near Tarawa he was assigned to an underwater demolition team and participated in the Guam and Okinawa invasions. He received the Silver Star. Interviewed by Winston Erickson. 103 pages.
2001
4
Kenneth Butler
Butler (b. 1923) was drafted in 1942. He had worked at Hill Air Force Base repairing radio equipment, so he was assigned to the Air Force and sent to California, then to school in Madison, Wisconsin. He served in the China-Burma-India theater of operations working in the control tower. Interviewed by Frances Merrill. 20 pages.
2004
5
Irma Knudson Clark
Clark (b. 1921) enlisted in the WAC in 1943 and attended training in Kentucky before being sent to Bolling Field (Washington D. C.) as a typist. She received the WAC Service Medal and Good Conduct Medal. Interviewed by Frances Merrill. 18 pages.
2004
6
Ralph Tracy Clark
Clark (b. 1926) briefly describes his childhood in Smithfield, Utah. He enlisted in the Navy in March 1944. His boot camp training took place in San Diego, California, then he was assigned to the DD782 as a "plank owner." He describes his duties as a water tender machinists mate. Clark served in Saipan, Agulon, Okinawa, and Japan. He describes his time in postwar Nagasaki. He was discharged in 1956. In 1950 he joined the army and was shipped to Korea where he joined the 2nd Infantry Division, Battery A, 38th Field Artillery Battalion, Company B. His recollections include time on "Heartbreak Ridge." After receiving the Silver Star, he was transferred from the infantry to air observer and flew 135 missions. He describes the experience that led to his being awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. Discharged in 1954 as a first lieutenant. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 116 pages.
2006
7
Robert Earl Compton
Compton (b. 1925) quite high school to join the Navy in 1942 at age 17. He was assigned to duty near Norfolk, Virginia, where he learned to operate LSVPs. He served abord the USS Oberon and the Samuel Chase in Africa and the Pacific, driving landing craft loaded with men and supplies to beach landings. After the war he delivered supplies to Japanese harbors. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 42 pages.
2004
8
Everett D. Conder
Conder (b. 1923) was inducted into the Navy in 1943 and was assigned to the USS John W. Meldrum, which supplied ammo bases in the Pacific. He was later assigned to the USS Richard J. Oglesby. Conder was a participant in the battle at Biak and received two battle stars. He was discharged in December 1945. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 42 pages. Conder's written account of his life and war experiences is located in the Saving the Legacy Manuscript Collection (Accn 2100).
2004
9
Lew W. Cross
Cross (b. 1927) joined the Navy in February 1944 and attended basic training in Farrigut, Idaho, before serving on the USS Ulysses S. Grant, USS Indiana, USS Greyhound, and the USS Sutherland. Discharged in October 1947, he joined the Naval Reserves and returned to active duty in 1950, serving at Treasure Island, California, and aboard the . He retired from military service in 1951. Interviewed by Frances Merrill. 24 pages.
2004
10
William N. Dubbeld
Dubbeld (b. 1926) enlisted in the Navy in July 1944 and took boot camp at San Diego before being assigned to quartermaster school in Farragut, Idaho. He was later assigned to the USS General Robert L. Howze, a troop transport working in the Pacific. He was later assigned to an LSM-257, resupplying various bases. He recounts losing the bottom portion of the ship during a storm and the subsequent white-knuckled tow for repairs. His final assignment was to the Jason. He was discharged in Norfolk, Virginia. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 32 pages.
2004
11
Judsen A. Durfee
Durfee (b. 1924) volunteered for the U. S. Army's 1879th Aviation Engineers in October 1943 and trained at Geiger Field in Spokane, Washington. He served various constrution roles in the Pacific Theatre, including Hollandia, Leyte, Luzon, and Manila. He was discharged from the army in 1946 and entered the Utah National Guard, where he served as the Mess Steward and Food Service Advisor for the state until his retirement. Interviewed by Frances Merrill. 19 pages.
2004

Elston to KuchReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 22

Container(s) Description Dates
box
22
Folder
1
Lowell Elston
Elston (b. 1928) was drafted into the army in 1950 and trained with A Company of the 973re Army Engineers at Camp Carson before moving to Fort Riley to assist with flood cleanup. He was assigned to the 8206 Amphibious Training Command of the Army Engineers as an electrician. He was based in Pusan and oversaw operations at the NCO club. He was discharged at the rank of staff sergeant in 1952. Interviewed by Jason Hardy. 27 pages.
2005
2
Allen R. Ervin
Ervin (b. 1923) was born in Port Arthur, Canada, and moved to Wisconsin as a young child. After high school he was employed in the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) until he entered the Navy in February 1943. He worked as a mechanic assigned to a LCVP prior to being assigned to a SLT 54. Ervin participated in the invasion of France on a LCVP crew delivering trucks and picking up prisoners and wounded soldiers. He was discharged in February 1946 at the rank of 1st Class Petty Officer. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 59 pages.
2004
3
Rueben Joseph Farnsworth
Farnsworth (b. 1924) enlisted in the Army Air Corps in October 1942. His basic training took place in Santa Ana, California. He received primary flight training at Thunderbird Air Force Base in Chandler, Arizona, and training for the B-17 in Texas and New Mexico. He joined the 8th Air Force, 384th Bomb Group, 547th Bomb Squadron, in England, where he flew 35 missions over Europe. Upon completion of his tour he was sent to Nellis Air Force Base where he served as provost marshal. He was discharged at the end of the war but stayed on in the Reserves. He was called up for active duty in Korea, where he was stationed at Pyongyang and Seoul. Following his overseas duty he was reassigned to Hill Air Force Base, where he was discharged in 1953. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 41 pages.
2006
4
James A. Faulkner
Faulkner (b. 1924) was drafted into the army in February 1943 and was assigned to the Trident Division. His unit was shipped to LeHavre, France, and saw action in Belgium. He provides a detailed account of the events that led to his unit being credited with firing the last shot of the war in Europe. The unit was shipped to the Philippines for the anticipated invations of Japan, but returned to the United States, where he was discharged in February 1946. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 44 pages.
2003
5
Charles Fenstermaker
Drafted into the army in October 1965, Fenstermaker served as a pole lineman in A Company of the 53rd Signal Corps in locations such as Bien Hoa Airbase and Long Bien. He was discharged in 1967. Interviewed by Frances Merrill. 21 pages.
2004
6
Alberto Guzman
Guzman (b. 1919) describes his childhood and going into the army, where he received his training at Camp Roberts and Fort Lewis, Washington. He served in North Africa, France, and Germany. Interviewed by Jason Hardy. 94 pages.
2006
7
Vard Lawrence Hadley
Hadley (b. 1926) recalls his depression-era childhood and describes his enlistment in the Marines in February 1944. After boot camp in San Diego, he shipped out to Hawaii where he joined the 5th Marine Division's Joint Assault Signal Corps (JASCO). He participated in the invasion of Iwo Jima. Following VJ Day he was sent to Sasebo, Japan, for duty with the occupation army until July 1946. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 41 pages.
2004
8
Ross Steele Harrison
Harrison (b. 1915) enlisted in the Army Air Corps in 1942 and attended basic training at Keesler Field. He served the majority of his army time at a base in Dateline, Arizona. He was discharged in 1945 at the rank of Corporal. Interviewed by Frances Merrill. 21 pages.
2004
9
Ray J. Hermansen
Hermanson (b. 1923), the son of a Salt Lake City carpenter, recalls the difficulties of the Depression and talks about being drafted into the army in 1943. After basic training in South Carolina he was shipped overseas to England where he worked in supply and KP before being assigned to the Signal Corps. His unit landed on the continent after Thanksgiving, 1944. He was discharged in December 1945. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 48 pages.
2004
10
Paul O. Huber
Huber (b. 1915) recalls his boyhood in Salt Lake City. He graduated from the University of Utah with a BS in mechanical engineering. He was involved in the ROTC program, and reported to active duty in January 1941. He was a field artillery anti-tank officer, serving in Tunisia, Sicily, Algeria-French Morocco, Normandy, Northern France, the Ardennes, Central Europe, and in the Rhineland. Interviewed by Winston Erickson. 51 pages.
2000
11
Norman G. Kuch
Kuch was drafted into the Navy in 1944. He attended basic training in San Diego, California, and was assigned to the Cash Eight Combat Aircraft Service Unit. He served in the Gilbert Islands, Kwajalein, Wake, Roy, and the Makin Islands. He was discharged in 1946. Interviewed by Frances Merrill. 23 pages.
2004

Larsen to PharrReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 23

Container(s) Description Dates
box
23
Folder
1
Leland Gerald Larsen Sr.
Larsen (b. 1924) served as a B24 pilot over Germany and the Balkans. Assigned to the 485th Bomb Group (nicknames "Rubdown"), he flew over Verona, Innsbruck, Vienna, Linz, Nuremburg, Northern Africa, the Azores, Gander, and the Netherlands. Personal Narrative. 57 pages.
2005
2
Alfred Robert Matern
Matern (b. 1923) was drafted into the army in May 1943 and attended basic training at Camp Callan. He was stationed at Twyford, England, and later served at Bretel Friara Creamery in France. He received the bronze star prior to his discharge in July 1945. Interviewed by Frances Merrill. 22 pages.
2004
3
Charles Lee Meek
Meek (b. 1927) joined the Navy as soon as he graduated from high school and completed his basic training in San Diego, California. He served on LSTs and mine sweepers. Interviewed by Frances Merrill. 26 pages.
2004
4
Robert L. Merrill
Merrill (b. 1961) enlisted in the U. S. Army Signal Corps in July 1980. He was stationed in Stuttgart, Germany, until December 1990, when his unit shipped out to Saudi Arabia. The ground war portion of Desert Storm began in January 1991. Merrill describes life in the military and talks about his political views. He retired from the military in 2001. Interviewed by Frances Merrill. 29 pages.
2004
5
Stephen J. Merrill
Merrill (b. 1933) spent thirty-seven years as a civilian at Hill Air Force Base in Utah overhauling aircraft engines. Interviewed by Frances Merrill. 22 pages.
2004
6
Floren Bennion "Nails" Nelson
Nelson (b. 1921) describes his childhood in Salt Lake City, Utah. He attended the University of Utah, where he was a lineman on the football team. He joined the Army Air Corps in June 1942 and trained on the B-26 ("Widow maker") prior to being transferred to P-51 fighters. He flew four combat missions and was assigned to the 322 Fighter Group of the 8th Air Force. He spent one year in the occupation forces in Germany before his discharge in 1947. He joined the Utah Air National Guard. His unit was activated and sent to Korea, where he flew fifty three combat missions. He also served in Vietnam as commander of the 13th Bomb Squadron, flying one hundred thirteen combat missions. He received the Silver Star, the Bronze Star, and numerous other personal and unit citations. He retired from the military in October 1969. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 53 pages.
2006
7
Bill Pastore
Pastore (b. 1925) enlisted in the Marine Corps in 1943. He served in the Pacific in World War II and in Korea. He recounts his experiences in detail. Interviewed by Jason Hardy. 145 pages.
2006
8
Charlie F. Pharr
Pharr (b. 1930) quit school in the 8th grade. He joined the army in June 1949 and was assigned to the 4th Signal Battalion. During the Korean conflict he was shipped to Japan, Inchon, and Seoul. Wounded in the Battle at Chosin Reservoir, he was evacuated to Osaka, then returned to the United States. He was discharged in August 1952. He later joined the Air Force and remained there for seventeen years. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 32 pages.
2006

Robbins to Ursenbach and Allan to HalvorsenReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 24

Container(s) Description Dates
box
24
Folder
1
Donaldson B. Robbins
Robbins (b. 1921) graduated from the University of Utah (where he was in the ROTC program) in 1943 and was sent to OCS in Fort Sill, Oklahoma. He was assigned to the 83rd Infantry Division, 908th Field Artillery Battalion, as a forward observer. He provides a detailed description of his duties and experiences. He received both a Bronze and Silver Star. Following the war he served in occupied Czechoslovakia until November 1945 when he was sent to Reims, France.Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 36 pages.
2006
2
Reece B. Robertson
Robertson (1920-2009) attended the University of Wyoming and joined the National Guard Calvary Unit, which was activated in February 1941. He was trained to fly the B26, A20, and A26 aircraft and was assigned to the European Theater. He served with the Ninth Air Force, 115th Bomb Group, 67th Squadron at Braintree in Southern England. He was shot down on Christmas Eve 1944, and held in Barth, Germany, at Stalag Luft One, which was later liberated by the Russian army. Interviewed by Benjamin Bahlmann. 104 pages.
2002
3
William Sackett
Sackett (b. 1922) was drafted into the Navy and attended basic training at Camp Bennion. He received further training in San Diego, Key West, Newport, and on Long Island. He was assigned as a torpedoman 3rd class to the USS Cart, and spent most of his time on lookout. Interviewed by Frances Merrill. 20 pages.
2004
4
Jeremiah Siggard
Siggard enlisted in the Marine Corps in 1997 after graduating high school. After boot camp he completed his combat training at Camp Pendleton, California. He volunteered for an infantry unit being shipped to Kuwait and Iraq. He describes his combat experiences in Al Fujar and Bagdad. He also talks about weather, living quarters, food, and other daily concerns. Interviewed by Frances Merrill. 33 pages.
2004
5
Charles D. Snow
Snow (b. 1926) recalls his Utah youth and describes enlisting in the Navy in 1944. He took his basic training in Farragut, Idaho, then was sent to Bremerton, Washington. He was commissioned on the USS Metcalf and served in the Pacific until 1946. Interviewed by Winston Erickson. 33 pages.
2003
6
Francine Sorensen
Sorensen (b. 1948) enlisted in the Navy in March 1968. She served as a Petty Officer 3rd Class Disbursing Clerk at the Naval Finance Center in San Diego until 1970. Interviewed by Frances Merrill. 20 pages.
2004
7
Steven L. Sorensen
Sorensen (b. 1947) joined the Coast Guard and was stationed aboard the and the . After ten years with the Guard he joined the Navy and was assigned recruiting responsibilities in Salt Lake City. He later attended OCS and was commissioned in 1981. His military career spanned twenty years active duty and six years in the Reserves. He retired in 1991. He served in a variety of locations, including Hawaii, the Philippines, Japan, Guam, British Columbia, the Aleutian Islands, and Vietnam. Assigned to Naval Beach Group One, he was present during Desert Shield. Interviewed by Frances Merrill. 26 pages.
2004
8
Wayne Ursenbach
Ursenbach (b. 1923) was drafted into the army in 1943 and assigned to Company A of the 524th MP Battalion. His initial assignment was as part of an honor guard for dignitaries flying into Los Angeles. In the Autumn of 1944, Ursenbach was shipped to Europe, where he was at Liverpool and Southhampton before going to France. He was injured in the Battle of the Bulge. After a hospital stay he was sent to France to serve in the 43rd Air Supply Squadron. He was discharged in 1946. Interviewed by Frances Merrill. 29 pages.
2004
9
Robert Keith "Scotty" Allan
Allan (b. 1919) was born in Garfield, Utah. He enlisted in the army in 1941, took basic training in Everett, Washington, and was shipped to a B-17 squadron at Hickam Field. He was at Midway and in the Solomon Islands in 1942, then graduated from OCS at Camp Davis in 1943. He was assigned to 10th Army headquarters at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, then shipped to Hawaii to participate in the planning for the invasion of Okinawa. He was engaged in the battle for Okinawa. After the war Allan was assigned to the 17th Army headquarters in Seoul, Korea, as liaison officer. He was discharged in early 1946, but stayed in the reserves and retired with 36 years of military service. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 34 pages.
2004
10
Kenneth W. Baldridge
Baldridge (b. 1926) was born in Modesto, California and describes growing up in the Depression. He joined the Aircraft Warning System of the Ground Observers Corps prior to enlisting in the Navy in December of 1943. He attended the College of the Pacific and University of California at Berkeley in the Naval ROTC program. He was sent to Great Lakes Naval Training Center for boot camp, then attended signal school. He was assigned to the USS Rendova, a CVE-114 based in San Diego as a training vessel. Discharged in 1946, Baldridge stayed in the reserves for eight years. His civilian career was as a professor of history. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 39 pages.
2005
11
Joseph Ulrich Beck
Beck (b. 1922) was born in Omaha, Nebraska, to a military family. He attended Utah State University prior to enlisting in the Navy. He received his basic training in San Diego and attended hospital corps school in Balboa Park. He served on the staff of Long Beach Naval Hospital before being assigned to a CVE 96, USS Salamaua. He later served at a military hospital on Kwajalein in the Marshall Islands. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 16 pages.
2004
12
Richard Wight Burt
Burt (b. 1924) was born in Bear River City, Utah. He learned to fly in the Civilian Air Corps prior to joining the Army Air Corps in the Spring of 1943. After radio school and B-17 gunnery training he was assigned to a B-24 crew in Walla Walla, Washington. He flew with the 15th Air Force, 460th Bomb Group, 760th Squadron over Europe, and was shot down in November 1944. Initially interned at Stalag Luft IV, he was marched across Germany to Stalag XIB, where he was liberated. Discharged in 1945, he joined the National Guard and was called up for service in Vietnam in 1968. He flew with the 54th Otter Company in Vung Tao, Vietnam, for two months before being assigned as a maintenance officer and test pilot. He retired from the Guard in 1979, then rejoined for five years, retiring at age 60 in 1984. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 47 pages.
2005
13
Rulon Tingey Burton
Burton (b. 1926) was born in Salt Lake City, Utah, and enlisted in the Navy in May 1944. He received his training in San Diego and was assigned to the minesweeper, USS Dour in April 1945. He served as a radioman and his Pacific service included Korea, Japan, the Marianas, and Okinawa. Discharged in 1946, his civilian life included a careers as an attorney and publisher. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 57 pages.
2004
14
Lloyd R. Byers
Byers (b. 1921) was born in Tyrone, New Mexico. He joinged the National Guard in 1938 and was assigned to the Fort Bliss Army Depot in Texax (2nd Battalion, G Battery. Sent to the Philippines in September 1941, Byers was part of the U. S. surrender in April 1942. He was sent on the Death March to O'Donnel prison camp and was a POW until liberated at the end of the war. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 34 pages.
2004
15
Thomas William Deppe
Deppe (b. 1918) was born in Smithfield, Utah. He joined the National Guard in St. Anthony, Idaho, in 1940. He received his basic training at Ft. Lewis, Washington, and additional training at Letterman General Hospital in San Francisco. He served with the 41st Infantry Division on occupation duty at Efate, New Hebrides. He was later transferred to Guadalcanal to help set up a hospital. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 41 pages.
2005
16
Charlie Andrew Halvorsen
Halvorsen (1918-2006) discussed growing up in the Salt Lake valley during the Depression. When World War II started, he was married and had three children. He was drafted in June 1944 and took basic training in Louisiana. He received a hardship discharge in 1945 upon the birth of his fourth child. Halvorsen enjoyed a long civilian career with the Salt Lake City Fire Department. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 24 pages.
2004

Hardy to SantoroReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 25

Container(s) Description Dates
box
25
Folder
1
Douglas Woodford Hardy
Hardy (b. 1918) talks about his schooling, graduation from the University of Utah in 1941 in Sociology, and his participation in ROTC. He enlisted in the army in June 1941 and was assigned to the 3rd Infantry Division, Headquarters Battery of the 39th Field Artillery Battalion. He details his experiences in Morocco, Algiers, Tunisia, Sicily, and describes his brief tenure with the occupation forces in Austria. Discharged at the rank of Captain, he stayed in the reserves and retired as a Colonel after 32 years of service. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 33 pages.
2004
2
Winston W. Hickman
Hickman (b. 1922) entered the Army Air Corps Reserves in December 1942, and was assigned as a B-24 co-pilot after his training. After a period of time as an instructor, he was assigned to the 824th Bomb Squadron, 484th Bomb Group, 15th Air Force. He flew fourteen missions over Austria and Northern Italy. He was discharged in September 1945 and served six years in the Reserves. Interviewed by Benjamin Bahlmann. 78 pages.
2001
3
Reed Talmage Johnson
Johnson (b. 1923) joined the Navy in December 1942. He took basic training in Farragut, Idaho, and attended electrician school prior to being assigned to ASBD-1 (Advanced Base Sectional Drydock) in Espirito Santo, New Hebrides. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 27 pages.
2004
4
Merrill E. Kitchen
Kitchen (b. 1916) was married with two children at the time he was drafted in 1944. After basic training in Texas he was shipped to Naples, then Bizerte, then Livorno, where he worked in an ambulance outfit. He was discharged in the Spring of 1946. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 27 pages.
2004
5
Albert E. Knight
Knight (b. 1921) was born in Idaho, where his father was a farmer. He graduated from college with a degree in pharmacy in June 1942. Shortly thereafter he joined the Navy and trained as a pilot. He was assigned to Carrier Aircraft Service Unit 1 at Pearl Harbor. He flew supplies from the Naval Air Station in Kauai. He later served on the USS Curtiss, and in Okinawa. He was discharged in November 1945. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 38 pages.
2004
6
James R. Kohles Sr.
Kohles (b. 1920) was drafted into the army in December 1942. After basic training at Camp Houze, Texas, he was assigned to the 8th Army, 84th Infantry Division, 335 Regiment, Company A. He landed on Utah Beach on D-Day plus 5. He describes his experiences while crossing France, the Ardennes, Rhineland, central Europe, and Germany. Discharged in March 1946, he received the following citations: Silver Star, Good Conduct, and the Belgian with Palm. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 68 pages.
2004
7
James Clare Lamph
Lamph (b. 1921) enlisted in the Army Air Corps in January 1940. He attended cook and bakers school in Presidio, San Francisco. He servied in Portland, Oregon, and at Westover Field, Massachusetts, prior to sailing on the , which landed in Liverpool, England. He was sent to Ramsbury Air Base and reassigned as a parachute rigger. He also built gliders. He served in Italy, and the British West Indies before being demobilized at Fort Douglas, Utah. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 125 pages.
2004
8
Nils Emil Lingwall
Lingwall (b. 1922) joined the National Guard in 1940 as part of the 145th Field Artiller Regiment (later Battalion) and was called to active duty in March 1941. He shipped out from San Luis Obispo, California, on 6 December, but returned to San Francisco due to the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Later based in Hawaii. His unit fought at Kwajalein, Saipan, Tinian, Okinawa, and Leyte. Discharged August 1945. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 51 pages.
2006
9
Gordon M. Low
Low (b. 1919) taught elementary school from 1938-1940, then worked as a telegrapher for the railroad. He enlisted in the Army Air Corps in January 1942, trained at Hamilton Field, and chose to enter cadet training to become a pilot, even though he had secured a position in the Army Air Corps Band. He graduated from advanced training at Valdosta in the class of '43-G in July 1943 as a second lieutenant, then entered airplane commander training in Montgomery. He flew across the Atlantic via South America in 1944 and was stationed in Spinazolla, Italy. He was awarded both an air medal and the Distinguished Flying Cross in July 1944 for a mission over Ploesti. He flew missions throughout Europe, and returned to the United States after completing 51 combat missions. He was assigned as a flight instructor in advanced training at Luke Field. He left the service as a First Lieutenant in May 1945. Interviewed by Benjamin Bahlmann. 112 pages.
2002
10
Ernest A. Mettenet
Mettenet (b. 1925) enlisted in the army in June 1943, and was assigned to the 99th Infantry Division, 394th Infantry Regiment, 1st Battalion, D Company (1st Army). He shipped for Europe in September 1944 and crossed the channel in October. His unit landed at LeHavre, then moved into Belgium. He describes his unit's actions, including participation in the Battle of the Bulge. In January 1945 he joined the 3rd Army when crossing the Remagen Bridge. He discusses the push through Germany and occupation duty after the war. He returned to the United States in January 1946 and was discharged as a First Sergeant. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 41 pages.
2004
11
John E. Osguthorpe
Osguthorpe (b. 1916) joined the Air Corps in April 1942, took training at Moffitt Air Base, dropped from the pilot training program and was discharged. He joined the Navy and was stationed in Hawaii as an aviation chief machinist's mate as part of a land-based heaving bombing squadron. He served in the New Hebrides, Guadalcanal, Australia, the Admiralty Islands, and Samar. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 61 pages.
2004
12
Carl Joseph Santoro
Santoro (1925) was inducted into the Navy in February 1944, and took basic training at Sampson Naval Training Station in Geneva, New York. He worked at Clearfield Naval Supply Depot as kitchen help, janitor, and boiler room personnel before being sent to Mare Island on a ship repair unit. Returned to Clearfield for MP duty prior to his discharge in April 1946. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 39 pages.
2004

Schneller to Torres, Brooke to LambReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 26

Container(s) Description Dates
box
26
Folder
1
John "Jack" Schneller
Schneller (b. 1926) joined the Navy in 1944 and took basic training in Farragut, Idaho. He joined the crew of the USS General Stewart AP-140 operating as a troop transport to the Pacific. The ship also operated in the Atlantic. Schneller crossed the Panama Canal three times. He joined the crew of the USS Wisconsin BB-64, transporting reservists on maneuvers until discharged in 1947. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 49 pages.
2004
2
Robert D. Shaffer
Shaffer (b. 1917) recalls growing up in Vandalia, Illinois, and discusses the Depression. He participated in ROTC at the University of Illinois and was commissioned in the Marine Corps in 1940. He served aboard the USS Hornet at the time of Pearl Harbor, recalls Doolittle's raid over Tokyo, and the battle of Midway. He also served aboard the Montpelier and saw action in the Solomon Islands. After a period on Guam, he was assigned to occupation duty on Chichi Jima in the Bonin Islands, where he served as the senior member of the board of investigation for war crimes. He also served in Korea as naval gunfire officer for the 1st Marine Division. He retired in 1961 at the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 72 pages.
2002
3
Clarence Edward "Pete" Skidmore Jr.
Skidmore (b. 1927) joined the Navy in 1945, taking basic training in San Diego. He was assigned to the USS Iowa BB-61 in November 1945. He traveled to Yokohama, Japan, where he was on occupation duty. Discharged in 1947. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 38 pages.
2004
4
Todd P. Smith
Smith (b. 1919) grew up in Iowa, where he dropped out of school to join the Civilian Conservation Corps. He enlisted in the army in April 1942 and was assigned to the 90th Infantry Division, Company M. He trained in Nebraska, Texas, Louisiana, and the Mojvae Desert. Landed at Utah Beach after D-Day and traveled across France into Germany. His job at regimental headquarters was filling out reports of soldiers missing, wounded, and killed. He was discharged in October 1945. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 29 pages.
2004
5
Felix S. Torres
Torres (b. 1926) was drafted in June 1944 and took basic training at Fort Carson, Colorado. He was shipped to Europe at the time of the "Bulge" as an artillery machine gunner in the 8th Infantry Division, 28th Infantry Regiment, Company H. Torres recalls his firt battle in Hurtgen Forest and describes occuption duty in Berlin following the war. He was discharged in May 1946, and served in the reserves for twelve years.Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 30 pages.
2004
6
Bill T. Brooke
Mr. Brooke (b. 1920) was born in Beaver, Utah. He discusses his childhood and schooling years. He joined the Utah National Guard, 222nd Field Artillery Regiment on December 19, 1940. Called to active duty on March 3, 1941 (when activated, their unit became the 222 Field Artillery Battalion, part of the 40th Infantry Division). Following the Pearl Harbor bombing, shipped to various temporary locations until assigned to the 739th Field Artillery Battalion. Received training at Camp Gordon, Georgia. They landed on Utah Beach in late June/early July 1944 and traveled to Germany as far as the Rhine River for the duration. He was discharged at Fort Douglas on October 16, 1945 having the rank of Sergeant Major. In civilian life, Mr. Brooke worked as a construction and location engineer. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 39 pages.
2003
7
Joseph A. Cha
Mr. Cha (b. 1921) was born in Kenilworth, Utah. He discusses life growing up in coal mining camps of Utah. He enlisted in the Army Air Corps on November 6, 1942. Received basic training at Fort Ord. Attended aircraft mechanics school in Lahunta, Colorado. He was transferred to Kearns, Utah, for advanced training. Eventually he left from New York to leMarse. He was assigned to the 3rd Photo Recon group, 12th Photo Squadron in September 1943. Served as crew chief and mechanic for P-38s. He moved with his unit north into Italy where he stayed until the war ended in Europe. His group boarded ships to cross the Atlantic. VJ Day was announced as they approached the Panama Canal. Passed through the canal, turned around, passed through the opposite way and traveled to New Jersey. He was discharged from Fort Douglas in October 1945 at the rank of sergeant. Mr. Cha's career was spent working in the coal mining industry in Utah. Interviewed by Winston Erickson. 50 pages.
2002
8
Frederick John Donkin Jr.
Mr. Donkin (b. 1922) was born in Salt Lake City, Utah. He discusses his schooling, childhood, family and the Depression. He graduated from the University of Utah in 1943 in mechanical engineering. He hired with Vega Aircraft in Burbank, California, making B-17 bombers. He enlisted in the Navy in 1944 and took basic training at Great Lakes. He was sent to Del Monte, California and Treasure Island for more schooling. The war ended during this time. He was then assigned to Daystar LSM-218 where he was in charge of all electronic equipment while delivering supplies around the Philippine area and into China. He discusses his experiences during this time. He was separated from the Navy in July 1946 in Shoemaker, California, with an Electronic Technician 2nd Class rating. Mr. Donkin worked as an engineer and spent 25 years with Hercules before retiring in 1986. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 70 pages.
2002
9
Mark A. Hafey Jr.
Hafey (b. 1927) discusses his Salt Lake City childhood and recalls joining the Navy at seventeen. His first duty was in Guam shortly after the Japanese surrender. He served aboard the cruiser USS Topeka, the flagship for Cruiser Division Thirteen. The patrolled the China coast and the waters around Korea. Hafey was discharged in 1948 and attended the University of Utah until his reserve unit was called up in the Korean conflict, where he served aboard an LST. He was discharged in 1953, completed his studies at the University of Utah, and worked for Salt Lake City for thirty-two years. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 36 pages.
2004
10
Darl C. Hansen
Mr. Hansen was born on October 2, 1925, in Salt Lake City, Utah. He discusses his growing up years. Joined the Navy in 1942 and took basic training in Farragut, Idaho. He was assigned to the armed guards serving aboard Merchant Marine ships. Received training in San Diego and Treasure Island. His first assignment was aboard a cargo ship traveling to New Guinea. He was subsequently assigned to a new cargo ship traveling to various islands, including Guam, Eniwetok and the Marianas. His next assignment was aboard a tanker that traveled between the same islands. They replenished their load at San Pedro, California, before traveling through the Panama Canal to Venezuela and Aruba. Following the war he was sent to Treasure Island and took a final cruise around the Pacific hauling fuel to the Chinese Nationalists before cruising through the Suez Canal and across the Atlantic to New York. He was discharged at Clearfield Navy Supply Depot in Utah. Mr. Hansen worked in the sporting goods industry and retired from Wolfe's Sporting Goods. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 37 pages.
2002
11
Max Eugene Harding
Harding (b. 1925) was born in Provo, Utah. He discusses growing up on a farm, and his education. He was drafted in 1943, attended basic training, and was shipped to Noumea, New Caledonia, where he worked in a warehouse. He was also assigned to a post in the Philippines, where he was wounded and evacuated to Guam, then Hawaii. After his recover he was assigned as an MP in the motor pool. After his discharge in 1945, Harding worked for Sears Roebuck for thirty-five years. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 43 pages.
2006
12
Gordon E. Harmston
Mr. Harmston joined the Army Air Corps on March 10, 1943 and took officer training in Wilmington, North Carolina. He was assigned duty on the California coast. Attended adjutant general school in Fort Washington, Maryland, and was assigned as battalion adjutant to a black battalion. Their duties were to load and unload ships. Their unit received raining in the Brooklyn Navy Yard before being shipped to England for more training. They spent the duration of the war in France guarding German POWs. Their unit was then shipped through the Panama Canal to the Philippines. He was discharged on January 16, 1946 with the rank of Captain. Mr. Harmston operated a restaurant and motel in Roosevelt, Utah. He served as a Utah State Senator and was director of the Department of Natural Resources. Interviewed by Joel C. Calderon. 15 pages.
2002
13
Stuart C. Headford
Mr. Headford was born on December 5, 1940, in Bridgeport, Connecticut. He joined the Navy in 1959 and received training at the Great Lakes Naval Training Center in Illinois. He was assigned to the USS Independence CV-62 and served there until discharged in June 1963. During his service he participated in 3 Mediterranean cruises and in the naval blockade during the Cuban Missile Crisis. He tells of his experiences during that time. He was in the Reserves as a Seabee in Rhode Island and retired in 1997. Interviewed by Matthew Stuart. 22 pages.
2005
14
Richard W. Johnson
Mr. Johnson was born on July 21, 1923, in Salt Lake City, Utah. He graduated South High School in 1940 and attended the University of Utah studying engineering. He was allowed to defer enlistment until the spring of 1944 when he graduated for college and entered the Navy as an ensign. Traveled to Fort Schulyer, New York, for naval indoctrination school, then was sent to Harvard University for advanced studies in electrical engineering from December 1944 to March 1945. He then attended radar school at MIT from March 1945 to June 1945. His next assignment was to Bell Telephone Laboratories in New York. When the war ended, he was ordered to Pearl Harbor where he was assigned to the USS Wisconsin BB-64 ferrying returning GIs to San Francisco. He was the electronics officer in charge of radar onboard the Wisconsin. He describes his experiences during that time. The Wisconsin traveled through the Panama Canal to Norfolk, Virginia, for repairs. While waiting for repairs, he was assigned to a different ship on training maneuvers for a month. He describes his experiences there. He separated from the Navy in September 1946, but stayed in the Naval Reserves for a few years following. Mr. Johnson worked for Hughes Aircraft as an electrical engineer. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 48 pages.
2004
15
Eula Kimber
Eula Kimber was born in Grouse Creek, Utah. She graduated from Box Elder High School in 1929. After high school she worked in Brigham City, Utah, and eventually became a typist in the Recorder's Office in Salt Lake City, Utah. She enlisted in the Navy WAVES. Boot School was at Hunter College in New York. Yeoman training was at Iowa State Teacher's College in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. She was then stationed at North Island off the coast of San Diego, California, where she worked at the Bachelor Officer Quarters (BOQ) as a Yeoman Third Class until discharged. She married Lyman Kimber in 1945, and used the GI Bill to attend Utah State University and receive a Bachelor's Degree. She taught school in Providence, Utah, and later in Grouse Creek. She has been an active member of the WAVES of the Wasatch, including being President and Regional Representative. Interviewed by Verna Richardson. 40 pages.
2001
16
Foster R. Lamb
Mr. Lamb was born on January 16, 1924, in Wales, Utah. He discusses his schooling, the family ranch and the Depression. He was drafted in May 1943 and worked repairing sheet metal on aircraft at Hill Air Force Base. He was shipped to England to an Air Corps base near Blackpool where he worked with the 8th and 9th Air Forces. He describes his work and activities relating to the D-Day invasion. He transferred to France until VE Day when he was sent to Erlangen, Germany, for occupation duty. He describes his activities there. He was discharged in March 1946. Mr. Lamb worked for the Federal government with the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Bureau of Reclamation. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 21 pages.
2004
17
Mark Douglas Lamb
Mr. Lamb was born on September 24, 1956, in Mt. Pleasant, Utah. He discusses his schooling and growing up years. He joined the Air Force in December 1974 and took basic training at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. He received veterinary technician training at Shepherd Air Force Base in Wichita Falls, Texas for 26 weeks. He was then sent to Goodfellow AFB in San Angelo, Texas, first as a food inspector, later as facilities inspector, and finally caring for small animals. He was then sent to Iraklion Air Station on Crete for 2 years as a master sergeant caring for animals. From there, he was sent to Carswell AFB in Fort Worth, Texas, where he switched to human care. He served in Panama with the 24th Medical Group and was on duty during Operation Just Cause to depose Manuel Noriega. His final assignment was at Hill AFB as superintendent of the aerospace medicine squadron. He ending rank was as Master Sergeant. Interviewed by Winston P. Erickson. 39 pages.
2005

Mabey to WoodburyReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 27

Container(s) Description Dates
box
27
Folder
1
Donald H. Mabey
Mr. Mabey was born on May 26, 1922, in Salt Lake City, Utah. He discusses his family life, the Depression, schooling and work before the war. He joined the Army in early 1943 and took basic training at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. He received sealed orders to report to Los Alamos, New Mexico, where he worked in the machine shop until he sustained an injury. During recuperation, he drove a vehicle for Major DeSliva, head of security at Los Alamos. Describes his experiences while there. Discharged near the end of 1945. Mr. Mabey worked for Christensen Diamond Products Company in Salt Lake City in engineering research and development for 42 years. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 46 pages.
2004
2
Riley L. Newton
Mr. Newton was born June 11, 1925, in Monroe, Utah. He discusses growing up years, schooling, family and the Depression. He enlisted in the Army Air Corps in May 1943. Received basic training at Amarillo, Texas, and tells of his experiences there. Additional training as follows: pre-flight at Altus, Oklahoma; Sherman, Texas, for college training at Austin College; San Antonio for pilot cadet training; training as bombardier, including on the Norden Bombsight; Victorville, California, for radar training. Following training, he was assigned to Williams Field, Phoenix, Arizona, as a radar instructor. He was discharged in November 1945, although he elected to stay in the Reserves. He was called up for service during the Korean conflict and served for 2 years flying as a bombardier in B-29s. Mr. Newton graduated from the University of Utah and worked as an educator and administrator for the Granite School District. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 42 pages.
2001
3
Evan Pearson
Mr. Pearson was born in Meadow, Utah, on April 30, 1921. He joined the ROTC at the University of Utah and was activated in 1943. Received basic training at Camp Roberts, California, then returned to Fort Douglas where he joined the Army Air Corps. Received pre-flight training at Santa Ana, California; primary flight training at Blithe, California; and basic flight training at Pomona, California. After graduation, he picked up a crew and orders to Dohazari, India. As part of the 1st Combat Cargo Group, 4th Combat Cargo Squadron, they flew, mostly in C-46s and C-47s, from that base into Burma, supplying mainly British troops. Mr. Pearson discusses his experiences during this time. After the war ended, he was based in Kumming, China, flying Chinese dignitaries to various locations. Later, he transported Chinese Nationalist troops. Left China in December 1945 and was separated on April 15, 1946 as a first lieutenant. Mr. Pearson received the Distinguished Flying Cross and an oak leaf cluster for over 500 combat hours of flying. Interviewed by Joel Calderon. 28 pages.
2002
4
Keith Richardson
Mr. Richardson was born in Salt Lake City, Utah, on July13, 1923. He discusses his childhood and the Depression. He joined the Navy in August 1942 and took ground training as an aviation cadet at Brigham Young University. Pre-flight school was in San Luis Obispo, California, followed by primary flight training in Pasco, Washington. He received basic flight training at Corpus Christi, Texas and graduated as an Ensign in February 1944. Ordered to Aleutian Islands (Attu) from where he flew PV-1 Lockheed Venturas on patrol bombing missions conducting sector searches around Japanese territories. Shot down August 14, 1944. Describes crash landing in Petropavlovsk, Russia. Taken as an internee for over 6 months by the Russians. He describes his experiences during that time. In January 1944, the Russians smuggled the internees out through Iran where they were transferred to American custody. Continuing through Cairo and Naples, their group boarded Liberty ships back to New York. He was reassigned to North Island ferrying aircraft until discharge in April 1946. Mr. Richardson graduated from the University of Utah in architecture. His firm designed, among other buildings, the Pharmacy building at the University of Utah; Whitmore Library; Classic Bowling; and numerous schools throughout Utah and Idaho. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 47 pages.
2001
5
William LaMonte Robison
Mr. Robison was born May 31, 1920, in Salt Lake City, Utah. His father farmed in Rupert, Idaho. Mont worked as a bookkeeper before enlisting in the Army Air Corps in March 1944. He received basic training at Sheppard Field, Texas, and attended radio operator mechanics school at Scott Field, Illinois. He was sent to Biloxi, Mississippi, to train with PBYs and shipped to California to crew up with a rescue squad. He was then shipped to Luzon, Philippines. He discusses his experiences, inluding dropping lifeboats to survivors of the USS Indianapolis and flying with bombers to provide rescue, when necessary. He participated in occupation duty in Japan before his discharge in 1945. Mr. Robison became a licensed CPA and co-owned the firm of Robison, Hill & Company for over fifty years. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 30 pages.
2004
6
Adelia Hall "Dee" Rushforth
Mrs. Rushforth was born on March 15, 1918, in St. George, Utah. She graduated from the University of Utah in 1941 and joined the WAVES in 1943. She received officer and communications training in Massachusetts before being sent to San Francisco, where she decoded messages. She achieved the rant of Lieutenant JG, married, became pregnant, and was discharged in May 1945. She taught at Layton High School for six years. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 45 pages.
2006
7
Byron J. Sharp
Mr. Sharp was born October 13, 1921, in Salt Lake City, Utah. He enlisted in the Army in May 1942, and took basic training at Camp Roberts, California, where he became an instructor. He was recruited for glider pilot training in Colorado and received gunnery training in Kentucky. After transfer to Spanhoe, England, in the fall of 1943, he was assigned to the 315th Troop Carrier Group, 52nd Troop Carrier Wing, IX Troop Carrier Command in the 9th Air Force. He describes his experiences landing paratroopers in gliders during the D-Day invasion. He was involved in Market Garden and returned to the states when the war ended. As a civilian, Sharp received his PhD in Geology, worked for the USGS, and retired from the Department of Energy. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 64 pages.
2004
8
Donald Dewey Stout
Mr. Stout was born on October 5, 1922, in Salt Lake City, Utah. He discusses his childhood and the Depression. He graduated from the University of Utah in 1943, where he was involved in ROTC. He enlisted in the Army and graduated from Officer Candidate School in 1944. After artillery training he went overseas with the 9th Armored Division, Combat Command A in January 1945. He entered combat in Belgium and participated in the battle at Remagen. After a period as a forward observer with the 16th Armored Field Artillery, he served occupation duty in Germany until transferred back to the states. He was discharged in March 1946 and stayed in the Reserves. He was called up during the Korean conflict and served for two years in Germany. As a civilian, he worked for the military. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 53 pages.
2005
9
Lael Jay Woodbury
Mr. Woodbury was born on July 3, 1927, in Fairfield, Idaho. He discusses his family, childhood and the Depression. His father was an unsuccessful farmer, but had success in several other small businesses in Logan, Utah. Due to Mr. Woodbury's size and appearance, he was able to work his way into the Navy at age 15 (August 1942). Took boot camp in San Diego, California, then additional training at Treasure Island. He was assigned to the Naval Mobile Hospital (MOB3) in Samoa performing seaman duties. Worked up to an electrician's mate 2nd class rating. Performed duty in Samoa for 22 months during which time he contracted elephantitis and was sent to Treasure Island. Following his recovery, he was assigned to the USS Duluth CL-87, a light cruiser that served in the Pacific as part of Task Force 58 (38), part of the 5th Fleet. They traveled to Okinawa in preparation for the invasion of Japan. He participated in the battle in Okinawa where he received a battle star. He describes his experiences there and elsewhere aboard ship. He was recalled home because of his wife's illness and the war ended before he could rejoin his ship. He was sent to the east coast on the USS Tidewater, a destroyer tender and traveled to Guam. He was separated in December 1946. Mr. Woodbury was chair of the Theater Department at Brigham Young University and later served as Dean of the College of Fine Arts and Communication at the same institution. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 57 pages.
2005
10
Heber Baumgartner
Baumgartner was born on 21 May 1920 in Salt Lake City. He discusses his family, schooling, and the Depression. Inducted into the army on August 1944, he describes boot camp at Camp Hood, Texas, and being shipped to England on the . He served in France, Belgium, Holland, and Germany. He sustained a knee injury from a shell concussion and was transported to a hospital in England before being sent back to the United States. He was discharged from Mitchell Hospital in San Diego in November 1945. Recipient of the Purple Heart. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 43 pages.
2002
11
Wayne Bowen
Bowen was born on 15 September 1924 in Cokeville, Wyoming. He recalls his childhood and schooling, Marine boot camp in San Diego (1943), and further training at Camp Elliott. He was shipped to New Caledonia (New Hebrides) as part of the 1st Marine Division, 1st Marine Regiment, 2nd Battalion, E Company. He participated in battles on Peleliu and Okinawa, where he was wounded and evacuated to Hawaii, then Oakland. Discharged November 1945. Interviewed by Benjamin Bahlmann. 80 pages.
2001
12
Robert Brady
Brady was born on 9 June 1922 in Bingham, Utah. He recalls his childhood, family, and the Depression. Following high school, he took an aircraft mechanics course offered at Hill Air Base and joined the Army Air Corps in 1943. After flight training he trained in B-24s and formed a crew in Boise, Idaho. Assigned to the 406th Bombardment Squadron of the 8th Air Force, 1st Air Division, he dropped propaganda leaflets over the front lines. At the conclusion of the European War he was transferred to Japan for occupation duty, ferrying troops and supplies in C-54s until discharge. He was called up for active duty to participate in the Berlin Airlift and remained in the Air Force, where he was stationed in the United States, Japan, Korea, and Europe. He retired in May 1966. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 48 pages.
2002
13
Calvin Rudd
Rudd was born on 7 November 1923 in Salt Lake City, Utah. He joined the Army Air Corps in December 1942 and trained in Nebraska, California, Arizona, and Washington prior to being assigned to a P-38 squadron in the Pacific Theater. He participated in the battle at Lingayen Gulf and the battlle of Borneo. He also flew missions into China and French Indochina. He was discharged in 1946, but stayed in the Reserves for several years. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 57 pages.
2001

Interviews, Arave to HatchReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 28

Container(s) Description Dates
box
28
Folder
1
Don Arave
Arave (b. 1923) joined the Seabees in November 1942. He received training in Virginia and joined the 84th Seabee Battalion. Later he joined the 1011 Construction Battalion in Florida where they built courses for Navy men training for underwater demolition. He was sent to Hueneme, California, for overseas training and was shipped to Samar, Philippines, in early May 1945. He was there until discharged, November 1945. Interviewed by Joel C. Calderon. 22 pages.
2002
2
Arthur A. Astle
Astle (b. 1915) was born in Montana. He discusses his childhood and the Depression. He joined the 222nd Field Artillery Utah National Guard Unit and took training near San Diego, California; Fort Lewis, Washington; and later at Stoneman, California. He shipped to Hawaii onboard the USS Republic and was based in Maui at the message center. Shipped to Saipan and Tinian for combat and later fought in Leyte and finally Okinawa. Following his discharge, he worked for Standard Oil, and in other oil-related industries. Interviewed by Winston P. Erickson. 59 pages.
2003
3
Frederick T. Baird
Baird (b. 1924) describes his childhood and life on a Utah farm. After enlisting in the Army Air Corps in 1943 and receiving basic training in Texas, he was assigned to Walnut Ridge, Arkansas, as a records clerk, then to Columbus, Mississippi. During December 1944, he was reassigned to the infantry for European duty and shipped eventually near Aachen, Germany, for combat with the 52nd Armored Infantry Battalion, 9th Armored Division, operating from a half-track. He discusses his combat experiences. At the end of the war, was assigned occupation duty in Munich, where he returned to records management with the 39th Machine Records Unit. He was discharged in 1946. Mr. Baird worked thirty-four years for Geneva Steel before retiring in 1984. Interviewed by Benjamin Bahlmann. 81 pages.
2002
4
Glenn W. Bartlett
Bartlett was born in Pekin, Iillinois. He enlisted in the Army in 1942 and joined the 101st Airborne Division, 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment. He received training at Camp Taccoa, Georgia; Camp MacKall, North Carolina and training as a radio operator at Fort Benning, Georgia. Shipped to England in January 1944 and participated in the Normandy Invasion. Mr. Bartlett relates details of his combat and other experiences. He was discharged February 1946. Interviewed by Joel C. Calderon. 116 pages.
2002
5
Walter W. Bauer
Walter Bauer (b. 1925) enlisted in the Marine Corps in April 1943. He attended boot camp in San Diego and received advanced training at Camp Elliott before being sent to Intelligence School. Shipped to Hawaii, he was redirected to the Marine Infantry. He participated in the battle for Saipan with the 6th Marines, 1st Battalion, as well as the battles on Tinian and Okinawa. Following the war, he was assigned to occupation duty in Japan. Mr. Bauer provides a description of his experiences in the military and during combat. He returned to the US in January 1946 for discharge. Mr. Bauer was a professional firefighter in civilian life. Interviewed by Winston P. Erickson. 61 pages.
2003
6
Simon K. Benson
Benson (b. 1923) grew up in Parowan, Utah. He discusses his family, farming, schooling, and work. He enlisted in the Army Air Corps, was inducted at Fort Douglas, and sent to Pullman, Washington, for civilian flight training in March 1943. From there, his training included: pre-flight at Santa Ana, California; basic flight at Marana Air Base in Tucson, Arizona; and advanced training at Pecos, Texas. He was sent to Yuma, Arizona, for B-17 gunnery training before joining his crew in Lincoln, Nebraska. Transported across the Atlantic on the Queen Mary in March 1945, he joined the 8th Air Force, 94th Bombardment Group, 410th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) at Bury St. Edmund, England. His first mission was in April 1945. He completed six missions before the war ended. After the war, he helped ship supplies into Germany and other war-affected countries. He returned home during the summer of 1946 for discharge. Benson worked as a school teacher in civilian life. Interviewed by Benjamin Bahlmann. 59 pages.
2002
7
Fred T. Beyer
Beyer (b. 1923) grew up in Manitowoc, Wisconsin. He discusses his early years and work with the Civilian Conservation Corps. Drafted in 1943, he received basic training in Arkansas. He volunteered for advanced paratroop training at Fort Benning, Georgia, and was assigned to the 517th Parachute Infantry Regiment, becaming part of the 17th Airborne Division. He took advanced training at Camp MacKall, North Carolina and became part of the 517th Regimental Combat Team. Shipped to Italy, Mr. Beyer was wounded on his first day in combat. After recovery, he returned to his unit in time for an invasion into France. He participated in fighting in Belgium, where he was wounded and lost an arm. In January 1945 he was evacuated to Bushnell Hospital in Brigham City, Utah, for recovery. He was discharged (from Bushnell and the Army) in January 1946. As a civilian, Mr. Beyer worked at Hill Field before retiring. Interviewed by Joel C. Calderon. 27 pages.
2002
8
Ray Cope
Cope (b. 1924) was born in Tropic, Utah. He discusses his childhood, work, the Depression and his schooling. He was drafted into the Army in July 1943 and received basic training at Fort Wolters, Texas. He was shipped overseas in June 1944 to New Guinea where he joined the 31st Infantry Division, 167th Infantry Regiment. Cope participated in the battle at Morotai Island before returning to New Guinea for guard duty. He later participated in the battle at Mindanao. After the war ended, he joined the 96th Infantry Division on Mindoro Island until he was discharged in February 1946. Interviewed by Ben Bahlmann. 81 pages.
2002
9
Tharon K.Dille
Dille (b. 1920) was born in Rexburg, ID. He discusses his family, the Depression and his schooling. He was inducted into the Army in July, 1941. He describes his boot camp experiences at Fort Douglas, Utah, where he worked in Headquartesr until November 1941 and then left for the Philippians on the U.S.S. Republic. While on course to the Philippians Pearl Harbor was bombed and his convoy was redirected to Australia. There his platoon volunteered to go to Darwin, Australia where they armored airplanes. He transferred to the Air Forces and served in Townsville, Brisbane, Iron Range, and New Guinea He received seven battle stars on the South Pacific Ribbon. In 1944 Dille was sent back to the United States where he served in Santa Monica, California until his discharge in September 1945. Dille worked at Hill Field in Utah as an instrument repairman. Interviewed by Winston Erickson. 56 pages.
2002
10
Stephen DuBois
Stephen Dubois (b. 1916) was born in Mankato, Minnesota. He discusses his family, the Depression and working as a school teacher. He was drafted into the Army in August 1941. He first went to Texas for boot camp; received anti-aircraft training near Los Angeles; and attended Officer Candidate School in South Carolina. He was assigned to an anti-aircraft battery in Panama, where he stayed for the duration of the war. After being discharged in December 1945, he worked for the State of California for over 30 years. Interviewed by Winston Erickson. 19 pages.
2004
11
Blain S. Gailey
Gailey (b. 1923) discusses growing up in Syracuse, Utah. He was inducted into the Army Air Corps. in February 1943. He describes his boot camp experiences at Buckley Field, Colorado, and Kingman, Arizona. Following bombardier training, he was commissioned as second Lieutenant. He flew with his company to Reykjavík, Iceland ,and then onto England. He discusses his experiences as a bombardier on thirty flight missions. Mr. Gailey returned home May 1945. He was stationed in Santa Monica, California, and then enrolled in flight school until the end of the conflict with Japan when he was discharged.Interviewed by Benjamin Bahlman. 52 pages.
2002
12
Robert W. Hatch
Hatch (b. 1921) grew up in Woods Cross, Utah. He recalls family experiences sheep ranching in Utah. A railroad agent, he was deferred from military service, but he turned down the deferment. He was drafted in August 1942. He was placed in the Airs Corps, and speaks of many experiences in the Fire Battalions to which he had been assigned. He rose quickly in rank, eventually attending OCS at Ft. Belvoir, Virginia in 1943. He eventually became the Fire Marshall of the 15th Air Force in Riverside, California. He retired in 1965. Interviewed by Robert Hatch. 59 pages.
2002

Interviews, Jacobsen to YatesReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 29

Container(s) Description Dates
box
29
Folder
1
Barbara Jacobsen
Barbara (b. 1922) begins by telling about her rural childhood in Bennington, Idaho, including her entry into college at Utah State University, in Logan, Utah. Barbara wanted to enlist in 1942, but her father refused to give his permission so she accepted a contract to teach school for one year. She joined the WAVES in August 1943 and trained sailors in firing anti-aircraft guns. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 37 pages.
2002
2
Gene S. Jacobsen
Jacobsen (b. 1921) recalls his rural childhood in Montpelier, Idaho, including work as a sheep herder following high school. He joined the Army Air Corps in 1940 and served in the Phillipines. He became a prisoner of war and survived the Bataan Death March, to become a prisoner of war at Camp O’Donnell. In 1944 he boarded a ship and was sent to Kyushu to work for the Mitsui Coal Mining Company, operated by the Japanese Army. He was liberated in 1945. Interviewed by Winston Erickson. 102 pages.
2002
3
Shirl D. Kemp
Kemp (b. 1925) describes his childhood, education, and employment in Murray, Utah. He joined the Navy in1943 and received basic training at Farrigut, Idaho. He joined the submariners and was trained in New London, Connecticut. He describes his training, upon completion of which he traveled through the Pacific to Australia where he was assigned to the Sea Robin. He describes his activities, duties and tours aboard the sub. He was discharged in April 1946. Interviewed by Benjamin Bahlmann. 89 pages.
2002
4
Alan W. Layton
Layton (b. 1917) grew up in Oakley, Idaho. He discusses his early family life, schooling, jobs, and attending the University of Utah, where he participated in ROTC. He was called up to active duty and sent to Fort Ord, California, working on a survey crew. Assigned as a gunnery instructor at Fort Skill, Oklahoma, he joined the 770th Field Artillery Battalion. He entered combat at Brest, France, in late July 1944, and moved across France, Belgium, and to the German border. Injured by an exploding mine, he was evacuated to the States and eventually to Bushnell Hospital in Brigham City, Utah. He was separated from the Army in 1945, and subsequently started the Layton Construction Company. Interviewed by Winston Erickson. 65 pages.
2000
5
Joseph Boyd McKean
McKean (b. 1916) recalls his childhood in Spring City, Utah. He discusses his family, the Depression, schooling and experiences in ROTC at the University of Utah. Called to active duty and sent to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, for field artillery training, he was assigned to the 18th Field Artillery and shipped to England. He landed on Utah Beach a few days after D-Day with the 687th Field Artillery Batallion. He fought in France, Belgium and Luxembourg and was captured during the Battle of the Bulge. McKean was interrogated in a castle at Diez before being sent to Stalag XIIA until liberated in early 1945. He returned to Salt Lake City and stayed in the Reserves until 1958. Mr. McKean worked for US Steel for 30 years as a mining engineer and following retirement there, worked for the USGS for a period of time. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 48 pages.
2004
6
Foster D. Rappleye
Rappleye (b. 1914) discusses his family, farming, schooling and the Depression. He enlisted in the Army Air Corps in 1938 and took basic training at Fort Douglas, Utah. He was then sent to Geiger Field, Spokane, Washington, and trained with the 39th Bomber Group. He was sent to Scott Field, Illinois, for radio operator training and later filled assignments in Douglas, Arizona; Alamogordo, New Mexico; Fort Dix, New Jersey, and was finally shipped to England where he was reassigned to the 301st Bomb Group. His combat service finished with the 353rd Bombardment Squadron when he was shot down in Greece. With assistance from Resistance forces, he escaped and returned to the US, where he was assigned to Mountain Home, Idaho, until the war ended and he was discharged. Interviewed by Benjamin Bahlmann. 79 pages. This interview is also contained in the BYU Veteran's History Project.
2001
7
William M. Sanderlin
Sanderlin (1921-2006) shares his experiences of growing up in Texas, including his school history. He speaks of moving to Los Angeles, California with his mother when he was a teenager. He was working for the railroad, a critical industry, when he decided to enlist. He enlisted in the US Army in 1942 and was sent to the Aircorps. He became an aerial gunner and survived 35 missions flown in B-24 bombers. Interviewed by Winston Erickson. 35 pages.
2002
8
William Smith
Smith (b. 1919) was born in Graybull, Wyoming. He discusses his childhood, family, schooling, jobs and the Depression. He joined the Army in September 1939, received training on Angel Island near San Francisco, California, and was later shipped to Hawaii. He first worked in the chemical warfare office before taking assignment in the finance office, where he was working when Pearl Harbor was bombed. He attended Officer Candidate School in Indianapolis, Indiana, and was subsequently assigned to Camp Lockett, California, in disbursement, until he was discharged in September 1945. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 36 pages.
2004
9
William H. Thompson
Thompson (b. 1918) discusses his family, the Depression and schooling. He joined the National Guard at age sixteen. He recalls experiences in Europe before being evacuated back to the US. Thompson was reactivated in the Guard as a supply sergeant with the 145th Field Artillery, the 40th Infantry Division, in January 1941. He was shipped to Hawaii after Pearl Harbor for island defense. He was later returned to Camp Roberts to lead training and was then reassigned to the 515th Field Artillery Battalion and shipped England and later crossed the channel, landing on Utah Beach in September 1944. He entered battle near the French/German border. He describes his activities and occupation duty in Dachau before discharge in 1945. He joined the National Guard in Utah and was called up for active duty during the Korean War, where he served stateside and in Germany in the 115th Engineering Battalion. Discharged in 1954, he was called up again during the Cuban Missile Crisis for one year. Mr. Thompson continued active in the National Guard and served as Assistant Adjutant General of the Guard for Utah. He worked in civilian positions at Hill Field for eighteen years before retiring. Interviewed by Winston Erickson. 75 pages.
2001
10
Blandina Tuero
Ms. Teuro (b. 1921) grew up in Hartshorne, Oklahoma. She joined the WACs in March 1943 and moved to Des Moines for basic training. She received additional training there in the cooks and bakers school. She was assigned to Camp White in Oregon, which was a training camp and also the site of a German POW camp. She describes her experiences there. In mid-1945, Teuro was transferred to the Presidio in San Francisco, and then to Fort Baker, a nearby hospital, in 1946. After being discharged, Ms. Tuero worked as a cook for the Granite School District before retiring at age 71. Interviewed by Becky Lloyd. 28 pages.
2002
11
Israel C. Wilson
Wilson (b. 1922) grew up in Bountiful, Utah. He discusses his family and his schooling years. In his senior year of high school he joined the Utah National Guard and was inducted into federal service in March 1941. He trained in San Louis Obispo, California before being sent to the Hawaiian Islands on the SS Maui. Mr. Wilson served in the First Battalion, 145th Field Artillery Regiment, later changed to the 213th Field Artillery Battalion, 40th Infantry Division. He describes his service time on the Hawaiian Islands. His group moved from the Hawaiian Islands to New Britain, then on to the Philippians. Mr. Wilson was discharged in August 1945. Interviewed by Winston Erickson. 31 pages.
2002
12
Wayne S. Winters
Winters (b. 1924) discusses his childhood in Hoytsville, Utah, including his schooling and family. After enlisting in the Army Air Corps in November 1942, he was sent to Fresno, California, for basic training. He received pre-flight training at Pullman, Washington, and Santa Ana, California; primary training in Blythe, California; and advanced training at Williams Field in Mesa, Arizona, where he graduated in April 1944. He also took gunnery training in AT-6’s at Ajo, Arizona, and trained for P-39’s in Victorville, California. Winters eventually flew P-38L-5 aircraft. He was at Hamilton Field, California, before being sent to New Guinea around February 1945. He was assigned to the 18th Fighter Group, 44th Fighter Squadron, 13th Air Force in Zamboanga, and flew 25 missions, including into Borneo. He discusses his missions and experiences. He was discharged in early 1946 and stayed in the Reserves for approximately 12 years. Mr. Winter’s civilian career was as an ecologist for Geneva Steel for more than 30 years. He also served on the State of Utah Road Commission, having been appointed by Governor Calvin Rampton. Interviewed by Benjamin Bahlmann. 105 pages.
2001
13
Theron H. Yates
Yates (b. 1916) lived in the Utah town of Benmore. He discusses the Depression, schooling, and working on the railroad. He attended an aircraft mechanics course in Logan, Utah, and worked at Hill Field. He joined the Army Air Corps and received basic training in Stockton, California. He was eventually transferred to Dover Air Base in Delaware, repairing planes for approximately three years. After being discharged in December 1945, Yates worked at the Tooele Army Depot as a mechanic for 31 years. Interviewed by Becky B. Lloyd. 32 pages.
2004

Interviews, Abbott to ThiriotReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 30

Container(s) Description Dates
box
30
Folder
1
Mark L. Abbott
Abbott (b. 1923) recalls his childhood in Sutherland, Utah. He joined the Marine Corps in November 194 and took basic training in California. He was assigned to the 2nd Marine Division, 8th Marines, 8th Regiment, E Company. He served in American Samoa and took part in battles on Guadalcanal, Tarawa, Saipan, and Tinian. He later became part of a combat training group at Camp Pendleton. Interviewed by Benjamin Bahlmann. 106 pages.
2001
2
Clyde Felsted
Felsted (b. 1924) was drafted during his senior year in high school and took basic training at Camp Roberts, California. He was assigned to the 91st Infantry Division, Battery C, 346th Field Artillery. After taking a liberty ship to North Africa and taking part in an amphibious landing at Ranger Beach, New Oran, he was sent to Italy. Interviewed by Joel Calderon. 12 pages.
2003
3
Max B. Gordon
Gordon (b. 1919) describes his life in Utah prior to being drafted in August 1944. He served on Okinawa briefly before being wounded and evacuated. Shortly after he returned to his unit the war ended. Interviewed by Benjamin Bahlmann. 68 pages.
2002
4
Grant J. Harris
Harris (b. 1922) discusses his childhood, family life, and schooling in Utah. He enlisted in the Navy in January 1942 and was assigned to the V5 flight program associated with the College of Eastern Utah. After additional flight training at Los Alamitos, Corpus Christie, and Cape May, he took carrier landing training and was assigned to the USS Essex VBF-83 Fighter Group. Haris describes combat duties and flights in detail. Interviewed by Benjamin Bahlmann. 104 pages.
2001
5
George W. Jenkins
Jenkins (b. 1918) describes his depression-era childhood in Southern Idaho. He participated in ROTC at Utah State University and after graduation was sent to Camp Davis, North Carolina, for anti-aircraft training. He was commissioned a 2nd lieutenant and received additional training at Camp Benning, Georgia. He was shipped to Europe in November 1944, and assigned to the 7th Army, 45th Division, where he was wounded in his first patrol and evacuated to a U. S. hospital in France. Interviewed by Benjamin Bahlmann. 49 pages.
2002
6
Edwin J. Johnson
Johnson (b. 1924) describes his childhood in Springville, Utah, and being inducted into the Army. He was sent to New Caledonia in December 1943 and shortly thereafter went to Guadalcanal as a replacement in the 43rd Infantry Division. He also served in New Guinea and the Philippines, as well as being part of the occupation force in Japan. Interviewed by Benjamin Bahlmann. 120 pages.
2002
7
John A. Kennicott
Kennicott (b. 1923) recalls his childhood in Des Plaines, Illinois, and describes his aviation training with the US Navy and Marince Corps. He was part of a replacement squadron formed in New Caledonia and saw action over Bougainville, where his group was eventually based prior to moving to the Solomon Islands. He was involved in carrier training in Hawaii when the war ended. He was discharged from San Francisco, California, and stayed in the Marine Reserves until 1965, achieving the rank of Major. Interviewed by Benjamin Bahlmann. 46 pages.
2002
8
Harold S. Madsen
Madsen (b. 1926) discusses his childhood in Salt Lake City, Utah. He was drafted into the army in August 1944 and received basic training at Camp Wolters, Texas. He was shipped to England and crossed the channel in an LST to Le Havre. In January 1945 he was assigned to the 3rd Army, 90th Infantry Division, 359th Infantry Regiment, B, in Belgium. Madsen describes his combat experience and his activities in post-war Europe. Interviewed by Benjamin Bahlmann. 85 pages.
2002
9
Roland D. Mower
Mower (b. 1928) recalls his childhood in rural Utah. He received his initial military training from the Utah State Guard, which he joined at the age of fourteen. In 1994, at the age of sixteen, he joined the U.S. Navy, with his parents' permission. He served in the North Pacific and the Aleutian Islands before being sent to Japan. He participated in "Operation Magic Carpet," in which his ship picked up Marines from Iwo Jima and took them back to the states. His ship was also involved in "Operation Crossroads," a test of the nuclear bomb in the Bikini Islands. He was discharged in 1948 at the age of nineteen. Interviewed by Winston Ericson. 42 pages.
2002
10
Newell D. "Newt" Moy
Moy (b. 1921) joined the U.S. Army Air Corps in September 1939, shortly after graduating high school. Because he lacked a college degree, he was ineligible for flight training and became an airplane mechanic. He was assigned to Rio Hato, Canal Zone, Panama, in November 1940, where he maintained B18 aircraft. He was accepted for pilot training as an enlisted man and received his wings and commission in 1944. He describes his participation in the bombing of Europe and recalls retrieving prisoners of war from Germany. He remained in the U.S. Air Force and retired as a Lt. Colonel in 1976. Interviewd by Benjamin Bahlmann. 163 pages.
2002
11
Fred W. Standiford
Standiford (b. 1922) grew up in Salt LakeCity and was inducted into the army at Fort Douglas in 1942. He was assigned to the 1266th Combat Engineers and sent to Europe, where he as assigned to the 3rd Army, 523rd Maintenance Company, and provided maintenance on heavy equipment. After the war in Europe ended, he was sent to the Philippine Islands, where he remained until the war ended. He was discharge at Fort Douglas in February 1946. Interviewed by Joel C. Calderon. 20 pages.
2001
12
Calvin J. Stevens
Stevens (b. 1922) recalls his childhood in Idaho during the Depression. He was drafted into the army in September 1942 and received basic training at Buckley Field, Colorado before being assigned to B-17 gunnery school as a ball turret gunner. He flew to England and was assigned to the 401st air base in Deenethorpe. Stevens talks about his crew, his duties, missions flown, and war experiences. He returned stateside in 1945 and was a gunnery instructor at Fort Meyers, Florida, until the war ended. He was discharged in October 1945. Interviewed by Benjamin Bahlmann. 76 pages.
2002
13
Lyle G. Stewart
Stewart (b. 1919) describes his early years in Hinckley, Utah, before he attended the Branch Agricultural College in Cedar City, Utah. He joined the National Guard and his unit was activated shortly after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. He served in Hawaii, Guadalcanal, New Guinea, and the Philippines. After the war he helped dismantle the Japanese internment camp at Topaz, near Delta, Utah. Interviewed by Benjamin Bahlmann. 54 pages.
2001
14
Richard V. Thiriot
Thiriot (b. 1920) enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps as a pilot cadet in December 1941. He and his friends were spurred to enlist by the attack on Pearl Harbor. He was trained in B17 and B24 aircraft and flew with actor Jimmy Stewart. He recalls high altitute bombing, being a "carpet bagger," and dropping spies, supplies, and propaganda behind enemy lines. His plane was shot down over Belgium and he stayed with the underground until he could rejoin the American forces. He ended his military service in May 1945. Interviewed by Benjamin Bahlmann. 44 pages.

Interviews, Burningham to WoodhaveReturn to Top

Container(s): Box 31

Container(s) Description Dates
box
31
Folder
1
Haven R. Burningham
Burningham (b. 1918) grew up in Bountiful, Utah. He discusses his family, schooling, the Depression, and his LDS mission to New Zealand from 1937 to 1939. He worked at the Lockheed aircraft factory in California assembling P-38s prior to enlisting in the Army Air Corps in January 1943. He completed primary training in Santa Ana, California, flying Stearmans, then basic training in Lemoore, California, flying BT-13s, before going to Douglas, Arizona, for advanced training. After being trained in B-17s at Roswell, New Mexico, he joined his crew in Sioux City, Iowa. They flew to England to join the 457th, 8th Air Force bomb group stationed in Glatton. He relates his combat flying experiences. After flying thirty missions, he returned to the US in January 1945, where he was assigned as a B-17 instructor. He was discharged after the war ended and stayed in the Reserves until offered a regular commission in the Air Force in 1947, where he spent a total of thirty-two years before retiring. Interviewed by Benjamin J. Bahlmann. 71 pages.
2002
2
Kenneth K. Chamberlain
Chamberlain (b. 1923) grew up in American Fork, Utah. He discusses his childhood, the Depression and schooling. He joined the Navy in 1941 and describes his boot camp training in San Diego. After attending machinists’ school at Great Lakes, Illinois, he was assigned to a cargo ship, Arcturus. He describes his activities and duties as they travel to their base in Oran. Other topics include the battles of Casablanca, Sicily and Salerno; travels to Australia; submarine school in New London, Connecticut; and duties, missions, and operations of the USS Sea Owl (405). The crew was in Hawaii for R and R when the war ended. They returned to the East Coast through Panama. Chamberlain continued his duty in Panama and Florida until his separation from the Navy in June 1947. After the war, he worked as a machinist at Geneva Steel for thirty-six years. Interviewed by Benjamin Bahlmann. 91 pages.
2002
3
Reed Christmas
Christmas (b. 1919) discusses family, schooling, the Depression, farming, and life in Spanish Fork, Utah. He joined the National Guard in Feburary 1941 and was called to active duty in March. He was first sent to Camp Roberts, then San Luis Obispo, and Escondido, California, for training. He was transferred to Fort Lewis, Washington, for more training before shipping to Hawaii, where the training continued. He was assigned to the 222 Field Artillery (later the 225th FA), 3rd Section, D Battery in the 40th Division. He participated in the invasion of Saipan, and battles at Leyte, Mindoro, and Okinawa. He provides a description of his combat experiences and duties. Christmas retunred home in October, 1945 for discharge. After the war he farmed in the Spanish Fork area until 1988. Interviewed by Benjamin Bahlmann. 106 pages.
2002
4
Gerald A. Corwin
Corwin (b. 1913) was born in Hardin, Montana. He graduated from Montana State University in 1937 with a degree in chemistry. While in college he joined the National Guard for help with the cost of college. After college, he went to work for the Yale Oil Corporation in South Dakota. Although still in the inactive National Guard at the time of Pearl Harbor, he wasn't called up, but enlisted in the army. He went to Ft. Lewis, Washington, applied for and was accepted into Officer Candidate School (OCS). He was commissioned in 1942 and was assigned to the chemical warfare service, Redstone Arsenal in Alabama. He was there for 20 months, applied for the infantry, and returned to Ft. Lewis to train troops. He was headed to the infantry, in fact, had arrived in Hawaii when the peace treaty was signed and the war was over. He was sent to the Philippines and left the service on meeting the time-in-service requirements. Interviewed by Winston Erickson. 33 pages.
2000
5
John H. Dinkelman
Dinkelman (b. 1924) was born in Den Helder, Netherlands. He discusses his family, immigration to the U.S., the Depression, working and school. He enlisted in the Army in 1942 and received basic training at Fort Knox, Kentucky, prior to being assigned to the 741st Tank Battalion, A Company, at Fort Meade, Maryland. Dinkelman was sent to the Desert Training Center near Indio, California, then received more training in Louisiana at Camp Pope. Although he traveled to England prior to the invasion, he was detained and missed the actual D-Day invasion, but rejoined his unit on the Continent. He describes his combat activity and duties. During the Bulge, he was assigned to the 2nd Infantry Division and was lhis return to the U. S. following the war. He was separated at Fort Douglas, Utah, then reenlisted in the Army and served in Japan, skippering army boats on MP patrols. Dinkelman Stayed in Reserves until he applied for active duty again as a warrant officer in Vietnam, where he delivered materiel by boats. He continued in active duty several more years before retiring. In civilian life he worked as a machinist. Interviewed by Benjamin Bahlmann. 83 pages.
2002
6
Niles W. Drage
Drage (b. 1923) grew up in Salina, Utah. He was drafted into the Army in March 1942, and took basic training at Camp Sibert, Alabama. He was sent to Alaska to work on the Alcan Highway, then returned to Oregon for additional training before shipping to Europe as part of the 35th Combat Engineers. Drage participated in the D-Day invasion on Omaha Beach and continued in combat to within 25 miles of Berlin before the war ended. He was in Europe for occupation duty before being shipped back to the states for discharge on in 1945. After the war, he worked for Geneva Steel for more than 30 years. Interviewed by Benjamin J. Bahlmann. 145 pages.
2002
7
Kenyon E. Graff
Graff (b. 1924) discusses growing up in Hurricane, Utah, during the Depression. He was drafted into the Army in 1943 and was inducted at Fort Douglas, Utah, before being sent to Camp Van Dorn, Mississippi, for basic training with the 63rd Division. He was transferred to Fort Dix, New Jersey, with the 90th Division, 359th Regiment, Cannon Company. They were shipped to Liverpool, England, and then to Abergavenny for additional training. Graff provides a description of the training and his duties on the cannon. He participated in the D-Day invasion at Utah Beach on D-plus two. He was wounded and spent approximately five weeks in a field hospital before rejoining his company. They moved with the front line to Germany, where they were attached to the 3rd Battalion. They participated in the Battle of the Bulge activities near Dillengen, Germany. Graff was sent back to England with injuries resulting from “trench foot,” had his appendix removed, and returned to New York on V-E Day. He spent time in hospitals in Auburn and San Francisco, California, before being rehabilitated at Colorado Springs, Colorado. He was discharged from there in November 1945. Graff spent his post-military career working for Geneva Steel. Interviewed by Benjamin Bahlmann. 62 pages.
8
Robert L. Hammar
Hammar (1922-2007) recalls his childhood in Youngston, Ohio. He graduated from high school in 1940 and attended East Nazarene College in Allston, Massachusetts. He was sworn into the Air Corps in 1942, passed the flight test and physical, and completed flight training in 1943. Originally assigned to P-38s but requested a transfer to B-25s. He flew his plane, "Shat's Cookin" on sixty combat missions and left the Air Corps in 1944. Interviewed by Winston Erickson. 48 pages.
2000
9
Floyd H. Hogan
Hogan (b. 1917) was in Woods Cross, Utah. He discusses farming, family, growing up years, the Depression, schooling and jobs. He joined the Navy in the fall of 1935 and received basic training at the Naval Training Station in San Diego, California. He was assigned to the USS Borie and achieved 3rd class petty officer in fire control. Assigned to the USS Lawrence for decommissioning. Finished his 4-year service on the USS Winslow until discharged. He returned to Salt Lake City and worked for Western Electric until January 20, 1942 when he joined the Army Air Corps. He first was sent to Mesa, Arizona, then Oxnard, California, for Primary training in Stearmans. He continued at Merced, California, for basic, flying BT-13s, and took advanced training in Stockton, California, flying T-6s. He was sent to Indianapolis, Indiana, to check out on C-47s and was then assigned to the 27th Troop Carrier Squadron at Pope Field. He joined the 314th Troop Carrier Group and was ordered overseas, where he was based in Kairouan, Tunisia, ferrying gliders. He participated in " Husky One" into Sicily, then moved to England to prepare for the D-Day Invasion. He describes his activities and experiences in and out of combat. He participated in Market Garden before returning to the States in December 1944. He was assigned to Stockton, California, as an instructor and was discharged in the summer of ’45. Mr. Hogan stayed in the Reserves and reapplied for his commission in 1947. He was assigned to Hill Field as chief of maintenance and retired as a lieutenant colonel with more than thirty years of service. Interviewed by Benjamin J. Bahlmann. 122 pages.
2002
10
Earl S. Jarrett
Jarrett (b. 1925) was born in Nephi, Utah, and had a rural childhood, working on his father’s farm. There were eight children in his family, all in a small two room house with no electricity or running water. Mr. Jarrett married in March of 1944, knowing that he would probably have to go into the service. He began his military service in August of 1944. After basic training and training as a basic infantryman, he was sent to Leyte Island, The Philippines. He fought against almost no resistance. Next he went to Ie Shima, where again there wasn’t much resistance and then to Okinawa where there was very strong resistance. He was wounded on his 30th day on Okinawa and evacuated to, first Hawaii and then to San Francisco, CA. He was separated from the service in September 1945. Mr. Jarrett goes into some detail about his reflections at the end of the war, and about actions he’d participated in. He was also affected by the war for many years. Interviewed by Benjamin Bahlmann. 75 pages.
2002
11
Donald G. Johnson
Johnson (b. 1924) shares stories of his upbringing in Salt Lake. He focuses on his time in the military, including his time in the ROTC at the University of Utah. JOhnson describes how his experiences in ROTC helped, but also caused a problem for him in basic training. When he was assigned to Field Artillery he was assigned to a French 75 artillery piece. There was no one who knew anything about the French 75. Mr Johnson knew about it, and taught student and cadre the ins and outs of the French. He was assigned to the 817th Tank Destroyer Battalion. He was first assigned to a half-track vehicle with the French 75 piece. Eventually he was assigned to an M18 Hellcat. He participated in D-Day, hitting Omaha Beach D+2 hours. He describes being surrounded by Germans, how they had to surrender, then about their escape from the shed the Germans had placed them in. He also recalls occupation duty following VE day. Interviewed by Benjamin Bahlmann. 72 pages.
2002
12
Peter Klinke
Klinke (b. 1920) was born in Fortine, Montana. He joined the Air Corps as 18-years-old. He took basic training at Jefferson Barracks, Missiouri and airplane mechanic school at Keesler Field, Biloxi, Mississippi. He became a flight engineer and joined his crew in June 1942. The B-26 crew flew overseas in October 1942, and was based in North Africa. Klinke flew a total of twenty-one missions before being shot down over Italy. He hid with friendly villagers for several days until he returned to US lines and eventually back to North Africa. He was shipped home in November 1943 and was assigned as a gunnery instructor in Louisiana until discharged at the end of the war. Mr. Klinke operated a Christmas tree farm as a career and was active in several military organizations. 72 pages.
2005
13
Paul W. Levorsen
Levorsen (b. 1922) was born in Magna, Utah. He joined the Marine Corp “Mormon Battalion of 1943” and took training in San Diego, California. He was based in New Zealand before joining combat in Tarawa and later Saipan. He briefly discusses his experiences. He was part of the 4th Battalion, Battery L, 10th Marines, 2nd Division. He returned to the US (North Carolina and Florida) for additional training before discharge when the war ended. Mr. Levorsen worked as a school teacher for his profession. Interviewed by Benjamin Bahlmann. 30 pages.
2002
14
Brigham D. Madsen
Madsen (b. 1914) was born in Magna, Utah. He discusses growing up in the railroad town of Pocatello, Idaho; schooling, family, and the Depression. He attended the University of Utah for two years, completed a LDS mission to the eastern central states and attended graduate school at Berkeley for two years, where he studied history. He was drafted in 1942 and took basic training at Camp Roberts in California. He attended OCS at Fort Benning, Georgia, and upon graduation was assigned as an instructor there. He was sent to Germany at the end of the war for occupation duty. He remained there for eight months, during which time he was assigned as the historian of the Third Army. He returned home in July 1946. Madsen returned to Berkeley to finish his PhD and joined the faculty at Brigham Young University. Later, he taught at Utah State University. He served as assistant director of training for the Peace Corps in Washington, DC, and as training director for VISTA. He returned to Utah as the Dean of the Division of Continuing Education at the University of Utah and served in several other administrative positions including Administrative Vice President, Director of the Marriott Library, and chair of the Department of History. He returned to a full-time faculty position in history before retiring from the University in 1984. Interviewed by Winston Erickson. 58 pages.
2003
15
James E. Slick
Slick (b. 1923) was born in Johnstown, Pennsylvania. He discusses his family life and the Depression. He volunteered for the army in September 1942, was inducted in Pennsylvania, and took basic training at St. Petersburg, Florida. After basic he transferred to the Army Air Corps. He received gunnery training in Nevada and transitioned to B-17s in Washington State, training as a tail gunner. With his crew he flew to Kimbolten, England, before flying his first mission in November 1943. He was assigned to the 525th Bomber Squadron, 379th Bomber Group. He describes his missions and combat experiences. Mr. Slick completed 25 missions in four months and returned to the US in May 1944. After recuperating, he was sent to Madison, Wisconsin, where he worked as an MP and a projectionist. He was sent to Tinker Field, Oklahoma, as a fire control officer on a B-29, where he was stationed when the war ended and he was discharged. Joined the Navy Reserves (in the Seabees) and was discharged at the age of forty-nine. Interviewed by Benjamin J. Bahlmann. 70 pages.
2002
16
Ralph Wadley
Wadley was born in Fowler, Colorado. He enlisted in the army, and was shipped to Hawaii. He was there at the time of the Pearl Harbor attack, and discusses his experiences that day. He was part of the 25th Infantry Division and participated in the landings on Guadalcanal in January 1943. He contracted malaria and was sent to a hospital, first in the New Hebrides, then Winter General Hospital in Topeka, Kansas. He was discharged August 1943. Interviewed by Joel Calderon. 18 pages.
2002
17
Theodore Woodhave, Jr.
Woodhave (b. 1922) was born in Salt Lake City, but the family moved out of Salt Lake almost immediately to follow his father who was seeking work. When he and his family returned to Salt Lake he was nine years old. He shares his experiences of growing up and of going to school. When he graduated from high school he got a job. Attending college was not an option because of the shortage of money. He was drafted and inducted into the Army Air Corps in 1942. He attended gunnery school and then was off to Europe. He was assigned to the 351st Bomb Group and to B-17s. Just as he was finishing his required number of missions, the required number was changed. An officer approached him and wanted to make him a gunnery officer. Woodhave agreed, but as he watched his crew members going home, he backed out and was sent home. He remained in the service for the duration of the war. Interviewed by Benjamin Bahlmann. 64 pages.
2002

Interviews, Grant to Williamson, 2009Return to Top

Container(s): Box 32

Container(s) Description Dates
box
32
Folder
1
Ammon R. Grant
Grant (b. 1976) has a Maori father and an Australian mother who immigrated to the United States in the mid-1970s. Ammon grew up in Alpine, Utah on his family farm. After graduating high school at age 16, he worked until he was old enough to serve an LDS mission in Fresno, CA. Ammon joined the Marine Corps in his mid-20s, a few days prior to September 11, 2001. Ammon's unit, Fox Company 2nd Battalion 23rd Marines, were deployed to Kuwait in February 2003 in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. They were attached to the 1st Marine Division and participated in the invasion of Iraq and the fall of Baghdad in April 2003. After serving in Iraq, Ammon remained in the reserves until the end of his enlistment. He lives in Payson, Utah, with his wife and children. Interviewed by John C. Worsencroft. 34 pages.
2009
2
Matthew Wycoff
Matthew Wycoff (b. 1979) graduated from Hillcrest High School in Salt Lake City. He enlisted in the Marine Corps as a private first class under the PLDC reserve officer program. He went to boot camp in October 1999. While in the reserves, Matthew took two years off to serve an LDS mission in Brazil before returning to reserve status in the Marines. After September 11, 2001, Matthew's unit, Fox Company 2nd Battalion 23rd Marines was called to active duty in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Noble Eagle. They spent a year on active duty stationed on Camp Pendleton, CA. as a "Quick Reaction Force" (QRF). After one year in California, Matthew and his unit were reactivated for the Iraq War in 2003. They were attached to the 1st Marine Division, and participated in the invasion of Iraq and the fall of Baghdad in April, 2003. Matthew has since leftf the Marine Corps and has served as a security contractor in Afghanistan. Interviewed by John C. Worsencroft. 55 pages.
2009
3
Morgan Hall
Morgan (b. 1981) grew up in rural Utah. He joined the Marine Corps Reserve and served with Fox Company 2/23. In response to September 11, 2001, Morgan's unit was called to active duty and served in California as part of a Quick Reaction Force, Operation Noble Eagle, and Operation Enduring Freedom in 2002. In 2003, his unit was reactivated and was assigned to the 1st Marine Division in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Morgan discusses his six years in the Marine Corps and the difficulties in transitioning back to civilian life after combat. Morgan is the recipient of the Purple Heart for wounds he sustained in combat in Baghdad, Iraq. Interviewed by John C. Worsencroft. 46 pages.
2009
4
James D. Johnson
Johnson (b. 1947) grew up in Logan, Utah. He attended Logan High School and graduated from Utah State University, where he was commissioned in the ROTC. J.D. talks about the importance of leadership and the qualities he finds prevalent in good leaders. During the Vietnam War, JD served as a senior military advisor in a Mobile Advisory Team (MAT 135) as part of the "Vietnamization" efforts in South Vietnam. In Vietnam, J.D. learned the importance of NCO leadership in the Army. He talks about the institution of the All-Volunteer Force and the end of the draft. J.D. also worked in Afghanistan as a civilian employed by Military Professional Resources Incorporated (MPRI) and he talks about the geopolitical, military, and social issues surrounding the war in Afghanistan, as well as in Iraq. He helped to create a non-profit to build an orphanage in Afghanistan, called the Afghan Orphanage Project. During the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, J.D. led a brigade of army reservists and guardsmen as a part of a Joint Security Task Force for the games. Interviewed by John C. Worsencroft. 31 pages.
2009
5
Dustin Sexton
Dusty was born in Orlando, Florida, but moved around the United States a lot growing up. His dad was an Episcopal priest. Dusty enlisted in the Marine Corps and went to boot camp in 1991 at MCRD San Diego. He talks about boot camp, deployments, and life in the Marines. Dusty has served multiple deployments to Iraq in numerous leadership positions. The interview is largely a chronological narrative of his nearly 20 years in the Marine Corps. Dusty currently lives in Kamas, UT. where he is a firefighter with Park City Fire Department. He also runs a business, Sexton Off-Road, which builds custom off-road vehicles. Interviewed by John C. Worsencroft. 142 pages.
2009
6
Doss A. Dean
Dean (b. 1919) was born in St. Anthony, Idaho, but grew up in Bingham Canyon, Utah. He discusses his family life, schooling and the Depression. He graduated from Jordan High School and attended Utah State Agricultural College for two years, where he participated in ROTC. He was drafted into the Army July 1941 and joined an ordnance group at Fort Douglas, Utah. He boarded a ship headed for the Philippines in early December 1941, which was redirected to Brisbane, Australia, when Pearl Harbor was bombed. His duty in Australia included longshoreman and handling ordnance for planes during the Battle of the Coral Sea. He moved to New Guinea and discusses the conditions there and his duties. He returned to the US in September 1944 and was assigned to McClelland Field, Sacramento, destroying ordnance until he was discharged in September 1945. After the war, Mr. Dean worked as a carpenter in construction and also in the mink trade. Interviewed by Winston Erickson. 34 pages.
2000
7
Donald E. and Jerry E. Sutherland
Donald Sutherland and his twin brother Jerry were born in 1924 in Sodus, New York. Shortly after their birth, they were brought to California, where they grew up. They discuss growing up and going to school during the Great Depression. They received their draft notifications on June 2, 1943 into the Army. They received basic training together at Camp Roberts, California. After basic training, Donald and Jerry split up and Donald went to Ft. Ord. Donald was sent to the Pacific as a combat replacement for units fighting on Guadalcanal (Americal Division). His unit, the 162 Infantry M Company, landed on Bougainville, Solomon Islands. He was involved in sustained combat in the Solomon Islands. After the Japanese surrender, his unit was sent to Japan. He returned home in 1945 and became a manufacturing engineer. Interviewed by Winston Erickson. 66 pages.
2000
8
Ken Workman
Workman was born in Vernal, Utah, and attended Carbon Junior College (now College of Eastern Utah) before being drafted into the army in December 1942. He was sent to Fort Custer, Michigan, for basic training and received additional training at various locations before being shipped to England in January 1944. His unit was sent to Wales to operate a petrol dump and run vehicle convoys. He landed in France on D-Day-plus-3 and joined the 3rd Army, 20th Corps. After the war Workman returned to the states for discharge and joined a Utah National Guard engineer combat group that was called up for active duty and stationed in Europe. He retired from the guard in 1982. Interviewed by Joel Calderon. 15 pages.
2003
9
Brent Huff
Huff was born in West Valley City, Utah. He discusses his family, growing up and schooling. He joined the Marine Reserves, went to boot camp, and trained as an infantryman. He was called up for active duty shortly after September 11, 2001. His unit was sent to California for a year of training before being sent to Kuwait, then later Baghdad. He discusses the experiences and conditions there. He relates his combat experiences, missions and activities. He also talks about returning home and continuing his reserve activities, relating various training missions and other activities. He completed his enlistment in the Marines, and got a degree in philosophy from the University of Utah before joining the Army. Interviewed by John C. Worsencroft. 64 pages.
2009
10
Tyler Jewkes
Jewkes was born in Richfield, Utah. He joined the Utah National Guard 222 Field Artillery unit out of high school. He received boot camp training at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, starting in November 2001. That was followed by Advanced Individual Training at the same location. He describes these training experiences. He served a LDS mission to Santiago, Chile, from 2002 to 2004. His unit was deployed to Camp Shelby, Mississippi in January 2005. After training, Jewkes shipped to Kuwait and was stationed at Ramadi, Iraq, for a year, where he rotated through duties: base defense; road and combat patrol; artillery. He left Iraq in June 2006. Interviewed by John C. Worsencroft. 44 pages.
2009
11
John Reed
Reed (b. 1951) was born in San Antonio, Texas. He discusses his family and recalls his experiences at Occidental College during the Vietnam War, his feelings and thoughts about the war, and serving in the military. He joined the Army Reserves in 1982, drilling with a unit out of Santa Barbara, California, until his move to Inactive Reserves in 1995. In 2000, he and his family moved to Salt Lake City, Utah, where he returned to active status when he joined the 96th Regional Readiness Command at Fort Douglas as historian with the 96th Infantry Division Association. In April 2007 he was deployed to Iraq. He discusses the impact of his deployment on himself and his family. He received Military Transition Team Training (MITT) at Fort Riley. His unit arrived in-country in July. He served with the 104th Training command, working with the Multi-National Security Transition Command-Iraq (MNSTC-1), assisting with Iraqi reconstruction projects. He describes his activities, experiences and duties in Iraq, including his travel through the region with reconstructions inspectors to project sites. He was released from duty after nearly nine months of service in Iraq. He describes the thoughts, feelings, and challenges associated with his return home. John retired as a lieutenant colonel in the Army. He is currently an adjunct professor at the University of Utah. Interviewed by John C. Worsencroft. 58 pages.
2009
12
Matthew Williamson
Williamson (b. 1979) was born in Montpelier, Idaho, and grew up in the nearby small town of Georgetown. Like many kids he grew up playing soldier and decided to join the Marine Corps Reserves after seeing the positive results when a friend returned from boot camp. He was able to navigate through boot camp easily enough but recalls several stories of recruits having rough, but sometimes humorous encounters with drill sergeants. After 9/11 he spent over a year in training as part of a Quick Reaction Force in California's Camp Pendleton. Soon after the QRF mission his unit shipped out to Kuwait. He remembers feeling that the last-minute decision to ship his unit into Iraq in 7-ton trucks, rather than an armored Amtrak, was made because they were Reservists. The remains of enemy vehicles and men littered their path; evidence that air support had cleared much of the heavy resistance away. Soon they were in action; he recalls aiding a pinned down unit, taking sniper and RPG fire, and clearing out an Iraqi Defense Ministry building. He encountered trouble when, during a lighter moment, he donned Republican Guard pants and his flak jacket but was spotted by an NBC reporter who interviewed him for the nightly news. His commanding general saw the video and the end result was that he received a thorough chewing out for the infraction. Later he became very ill from what he believes was the over-chlorinated water they were provided. Returning home felt great but he did have symptoms and was eventually diagnosed with PTSD. He is proud of his mission to remove Saddam from power and has little patience with people that think they have all the answers but who have never served in combat. Interviewed by John C. Worsencroft. 71 pages.
2009
13
Wayde Broberg
Broberg (b. 1978) grew up in Sandy, Utah. He had always wanted to join the military and looked up to relatives who had fought in Korea and Vietnam. His best friend convinced him to join the Marine Reserves instead of the Army, and he entered boot camp in 1996. Boot camp was slightly easier than he expected but the experience did deter him from looking to the Marines as a career. He recalls loving Reserve life with Fox Company even though it was difficult to manage at times. He was able to get married and was about to wind down his service when the 9/11 attacks occured. When he saw the broadcast of the terrorist attacks, he immediately called his commander and asked to be deployed with Fox Company but was disappointed when his unit was instead deployed to camp Pendleton, California, where the unit drilled as a quick reaction force for Operation Noble Eagle. He discusses the tensions between Active Service and Reserve Marines at camp Pendleton. After ten months of training and drilling in California, he thought the news that they were deploying to Iraq might be a joke. He goes on to discuss how this second, overseas, deployment began to put a major strain on his marriage. Wayde's unit was assigned to the 1st Marine Division in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. He felt very weird when he arrived in Kuwait and had no idea what to expect in the following months. He describes the extreme fear he felt after seeing dead bodies in Iraq and eventually went numb to the violence. In addition, he talks about how he and the other Marines in his unit felt they could not be too friendly to Iraqi civilians after seeing so much urban violence. During a firefight in Baghdad he was knocked out, suffered several minor injuries, and had to be withdrawn from combat. He remembers his experience in the medical branch of the military as being very confusing, although he was happy when he got the opportunity to call home on a satellite telephone. His eventual homecoming was difficult. He had a hard time talking to people, especially his wife, who he separated from soon after returning. Although he was diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) he still feels he can have a fully functional life. Regardless of his difficulties he is very proud of his eight and a half years in the Marines. Interviewed by John C. Worsencroft. 49 pages.
2009
14
Steven Schiele
Schiele (b. 1956) was born in Davenport, Iowa, and lived in Denver, Colorado, Cheyenne, Wyoming and Granger, Utah. Steven talks about his decision to enlist in the Air Force in high school, which was influenced by his brothers' service and seeing a Jimmy Stewart movie called Strategic Air Command when he was young. He discusses basic training where he became a squad leader. After basic training he went to Chanute Air Force Base where he became a general vehicle maintenance mechanic and then reported to Francis E. Warren for three and a half years. He describes his duties and his life with his family at Francis E. Warren. He talks about his decision not to reenlist with the Air Force after serving for four years. After his enlistment with the Air Force, Steven joined the Air National Guard because it allowed him to be closer to planes. He describes his work for the Air National Guard during the eighties were he was deployed to Moron, Spain several times. In the nineties Steven worked as a crew chief and was able to see the world. He describes his deployments to the United Arab Emirates, Italy, and Kosovo. He talks about the conditions and the atmosphere with the locals in Souda Bay, Crete where they were stationed during the Kosovo mission. After this Steven became student flight coordinator in charge of new recruits and then a first sergeant. Interviewed by John C. Worsencroft. 39 pages.
2010
15
Michael Schoenfeld
Schoenfeld was born and raised in Utah. His father was a thirty plus year veteran of the Marine Corps Reserve, which nurtured his interest in joining. He joined the Marine Corps Reserves in 1986. Bootcamp was a great experience despite some of the challenges. He was activated after 9/11 and went to Iraq, experiencing SCUD alerts and passing by signs of earlier destruction during Desert Storm. He recalls the tragedy of losing his Staff Sergeant, their first casualty, in a humvee driving mishap. Later his unit was involved in a heavy firefight in an Iraqi neighborhood where he almost ran out of ammo before the Heavy Weapons commander rushed in with a load for the unit. Michael enjoys his continuing work in the Reserves and has no regrets. Interviewed by John C. Worsencroft. 40 pages and 32 pages.
2009
16
Nick Lopez
Lopez (b.1965) was born and raised in Utah. His family has a strong military tradition, and he always wanted to be a Marine. After graduating high school in 1983 Nick began to have legal and financial problems that first drove him to Columbus, Ohio, and then into the Marine Corps. He talks about his experience in boot camp on Parris Island and how he was going to make something of his life. He graduated as a heavy equipment operator and was stationed at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. His switch to the Marine Corps Reserve was made to spend more time with his kids but he found that he was not keeping himself busy enough so he went back to active duty in time for Desert Storm in August, 1990. His unit flew into Saudi Arabia where they spent eight months working an average of ten hours a day supplying other units for Operation Desert Shield. He explains the chaotic nature of the first gulf war from his vantage points in Saudi Arabia and Kuwait. Nick talks about the patriotic American pandemonium during his return home. Soon after his return, he was promoted to Staff Sergeant and looked into becoming a Drill Instructor. For Drill Instructor training, he went back to Parris Island to face an even more intense boot camp. He didn't care much for his position after training and also began to have serious marital problems. In an attempt to save his marriage he chose not to reenlist and instead joined the 1457th Army National Guard unit in Murray, Utah. Quickly frustrated by the dynamics of the Army National Guard, Nick decided to switch to the Marine Corps Reserve with Charlie Company at the rank of Gunnery Sergeant. During the Utah winter Olympics in 2002, Nick decided to switch to Fox Company as a 1st Sergeant. Nick discusses the initial problems with communication, rumors, and disputes between officers. He recalls feeling like his unit was often short of supplies simply because it was a Reserve battalion. In addition, he describes the problems he experienced with the embedded Japanese journalist in his unit. He describes the combat his unit encountered, the effect combat had on his Marines, and the basic strategy his unit took approaching Baghdad. Furthermore, Nick explains the dynamics of the chain of command and his opinion on the state of Iraq today along with how it has changed since he was there. He discusses returning home and the medical problems his unit experienced, particularly PTSD symptoms. Interviewed by John C. Worsencroft. 160 pages.
2009

Names and SubjectsReturn to Top

  • Subject Terms :
  • Veterans--Utah
  • World War, 1939-1945--Personal narratives, American
  • Form or Genre Terms :
  • Oral histories
  • Oral history