George Alan Connor Esperanto collection, 1880-1976  PDF

Overview of the Collection

Creator
Connor, George Alan
Title
George Alan Connor Esperanto collection
Dates
1880-1976 (inclusive)
Quantity
136.75 linear feet, (240 containers (56 rsb; 4 flat boxes; 2 msb; 178 half msb))
Collection Number
Bx 178
Summary
This collection focuses on the artificial language, Esperanto; and, secondarily, on other artificial world languages. The collection was compiled by George Alan Connor. The collection includes reference books, pamphlets, ephemera, correspondence, and artifacts.
Repository
University of Oregon Libraries, Special Collections and University Archives.
UO Libraries--SPC, 1299
University of Oregon
Eugene OR
97403-1299
Telephone: 541-346-3068
Fax: 541-346-3485
spcarref@uoregon.edu
Access Restrictions

Collection is open to the public.

Collection must be used in Special Collections and University Archives Reading Room.

Collection or parts of collection may be stored offsite. Please contact Special Collections and University Archives in advance of your visit to allow for transportation time.

Additional Reference Guides

A catalog of books, serials, and periodicals in Series 1: Esperanto Language Publications is available in the Knight Library general collection and in the reading room upon request.

Languages
English


Historical NoteReturn to Top

Esperanto

The Esperanto language was created by Ludwik Lazar Zamenhof. According to his reminiscences, conflicts among Russians, Poles, Jews, and Germans in his native, multi-racial village of Bialystock, Poland, stimulated him to search for possible solutions to daily human discord and prejudices caused by these national and ethnic differences. Zamenhof became convinced that a common auxiliary language would lead to international friendship and tolerance among the many nationalities of the world. He wanted to emphasize the use of his language not only as a means of better communication, but in relationship to his goals for universal brotherhood One hundred years ago Zamenhof finished the rudimentary concepts of his language, and studied it with school friends who were in enthusiastic agreement to its utopian possibilities. Esperanto publications flourished between 1900 and 1940. During this time many Esperanto clubs and organizations were founded on a regional, philosophical, social, or professional basis; many such groups issued periodicals. Many Esperantists had hopes that their language would receive official endorsement and achieve recognition as a required auxiliary language. Some philosophical disagreements within the movement led to several short-lived schisms. The closest step to official acknowledgement of Esperanto occurred in 1954 when UNESCO stated that its programs were in agreement with the goals of Esperanto, and promised to cooperate with the Universal Esperanto Association (UEA) to aid in the use of Esperanto.

George Alan Connor

This collection was formed through the efforts of George Alan Connor, editor and moving force of American Esperanto Magazine for twenty years. Connor was born in Waterbury, Nebraska in 1895 and died in Portland, Oregon in 1973. His early printing experiences earned him a living while in normal school in La Crosse, Wisconsin,; a Washington post while in the U.S. Army; a graphic arts position in the New York City schools; and an opportunity to apply his trade in the Soviet Union, 1930-1932. Esperanto had been an early interest and upon his return from the Soviet Union he again felt very strongly the need for an international language. His enthusiasm for Esperanto led him to study it seriously, teach the language, and head tours for Esperantists through the Soviet Union and Western Europe. From the mid-1940s, George Connor and his wife Doris concentrated their energies on promoting Esperanto in America. They were active in the New York Esperanto Association of North America; they wrote for and edited the American Esperanto Magazine Amerika Esperantisto and served as its officers. The Connors assembled an enviable record as represented by their efforts and as reflected by the George Alan Connor Collection.

Content DescriptionReturn to Top

The George Alan Connor Esperanto collection includes books, papers, and artifacts on the topic of Esperanto and artificial world languages.

Series 1 includes books, periodicals, and reference works on Esperanto. A catalog of these materials is available upon request and is available in the Knight Library. Series 2 includes papers, programs, ephemera, and correspondence related to Esperanto international conferences and national organizations. This series also includes artifacts and ephemera from international conferences including metal pins, badges, and ribbons, as well as oversize flags and banners. Series 3 includes materials published in Esperanto, including national travel guides, music, advertisments, and artifacts. The series also includes periodicals printed in braille Esperanto. Series 4 includes correspondence, personal papers, and non-Esperanto material of George Alan Connor. The series also includes the papers of prominent American Esperantists collected by Connor. Series 5 includes books, periodicals, and pamphlets related to linguisitics and other non-Esperanto artificial world languages.

Use of the CollectionReturn to Top

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], George Alan Connor Esperanto collection, Bx 178, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, Eugene, Oregon.

Restrictions on Use

Property rights reside with Special Collections and University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries. Copyright resides with the creators of the documents or their heirs. All requests for permission to publish collection materials must be submitted to Special Collections and University Archives. The reader must also obtain permission of the copyright holder.

Administrative InformationReturn to Top


Detailed Description of the CollectionReturn to Top

Series 1:  Esperanto language publications and resources, 1887-1976Return to Top

Container(s) Description Dates
Subseries 1.1: Books and monographs, by author
1887-1971
Box
1-2
A
1907-1964
2-8
B
1896-1966
8-9
C
1905-1965
9-10
D
1905-1966
10-12
E
1907-1963
12-13
F
1903-1970
13-15
G
1900-1968
15-16
H
1905-1966
16-17
I
1907-1971
17-18
J
1907-1961
18-20
K
1907-1968
20-22
L
1889-1969
22-24
M
1904-1963
24-25
N
1907-1966
25
O
1903-1970
25-27
P
1904-1969
27
Q
1947-1960
27-28
R
1905-1968
28-33
S
1903-1968
33-34
T
1906-1967
34-35
U
1908-1962
35-36
V
1906-1962
36-37
W
1903-1964
37
X
1942-1951
37
Y
1943-1959
37-38
Z
1887-1968
Subseries 1.2: Serials and periodicals, by title
1889-1976
Box
39-58
A
1907-1971
58-80
B
1905-1975
80-81
C
1936-1967
81-83
D
1908-1965
83-111
E
1889-1974
111-116
F
1908-1963
116-120
G
1908-1969
121-122
H
1910-1971
123-132
I
1911-1971
132-135
J
1906-1967
135-139
K
1911-1972
140-149
L
1896-1972
150-152
M
1909-1970
153-161
N
1911-1966
161-167
O
1908-1976
167-175
P
1906-1968
175-188
R
1906-1976
188-205
S
1908-1974
205-207
T
1905-1966
207-208
U
1909-1962
208-211
V
1908-1973
211-212
W
1938-1967
212
Y
1931
212
Z
1936
213-217
Miscellaneous and oversize
Box
218-220
Subseries 1.3: Dictionaries, by edition/author
1906-1966
Folder
221 1-15
Subseries 1.4: Informational pamphlets and short reference works
Materials on the subject of Esperanto and Esperantists including articles, newspaper clippings, pamphlets, speeches, poems, schools and coursework, and vocabularies. Pamphlets are written in English, Esperanto, and other languages.
circa 1905-1960

Series 2:  Esperanto conference and organization materials, circa 1905-1968Return to Top

Container(s): Box 221-225, 229, 239-240

Materials about international Esperanto organizations and congresses including proceedings, membership lists, brochures, and guidebooks. Organizations represented in the collection include Esperantista Akademio-Lingva Komitato, Internacia Esperanto Ligo, Internacia Scienca Asocio Esperantists, Sennacieca Asocio Tutmonda, Tutmonda Junular-Organizo, and Universala Esperanto-Asocio. Materials on conferences are arranged by date and materials about organizations or clubs are arranged by country. Box 229 includes small artifacts from conferences such as pins, ribbons, buttons, and ephemera. Box 239 and 240 include pennants, banners, and oversize flags.

Series 3:  Esperanto cultural materials, 1907-1970Return to Top

Container(s) Description Dates
Box Folder
224 16-38
Subseries 3.1: Travel brochures and guidebooks
Arranged by country.
1908-1954
226 1-16
Subseries 3.2: Pamphlets
Materials written in Esperanto arranged by subject matter including advertising, art and culture, calendars, postcards, phtoographs, literature, politics, and religion.
1907-1970
226-228
Subseries 3.3: Esperanto works in braille
Periodicals published in the braille alphabet of Esperanto including Esperanta Ligilo and Auroro. Also includes a grammar book printed in braille published by The National Institute for the Blind (London).
1920-1964
227-228
Subseries 3.4: Sheet music and song books
1910-1951
229
Subseries 3.5: Artifacts
Includes objects with packaging written in Esperanto such as cigarettes, matchbooks, perfume, signs, pins, and cards. Also includes photographs and blank postcards.
circa 1915-1952

Series 4:  Esperantist personal papers, 1907-1966Return to Top

Container(s) Description Dates
Box
230
Subseries 4.1: Charles H. Briggs papers
Includes correspondence, manuscripts, language practice and organizational material. Also includes addresses of Esperantists located in Minnesota collected by Briggs.
1907-1928
230
Subseries 4.2: Ernest G. Dodge papers
Includes manuscripts, correspondence and materials about Esperanto Lending Library. Includes correspondence with descendants of L.L. Zamenhof.
1937-1954
230-231
Subseries 4.3: George Alan Connor papers
Includes correspondence and miscellaneous non-Esperanto pamphlets and publications.
1915-1962
231
Subseries 4.4: Other Esperantist papers
Includes correpondence of various Esperantists. Also includes papers of Doris Connor on the Vietnam War.
1920-1966

Series 5:  Other artificial world language publications, circa 1880-1960Return to Top

Materials on other artificial international languages including Interlingua, Antido, Ido, Mondilinguo, Olingo, Occidental, Interglossa, Suma, and others. Also includes articles and pamphlets on the general topic of linguistics and international languages, as well as miscellaneous political and scientific works.

Container(s) Description Dates
Box
231-236
Subseries 5.1: Books and monographs, by author
circa 1880-1960
236-238
Subseries 5.2: Serials and periodicals, by title
circa 1900-1955
225, 238
Subseries 5.3: Informational pamphlets and short reference works
1922-1959

Names and SubjectsReturn to Top

  • Subject Terms :
  • Esperanto