Eatonville, Washington, Photograph Collection, ca. 1942-1943  PDF

Overview of the Collection

Title
Eatonville, Washington, Photograph Collection
Dates
ca. 1942-1943 (inclusive)
Quantity
50 photographic prints ((1 box))
Collection Number
PH0456
Summary
Photographs of the company towns of Eatonville, Onalaska, Malone, and Bordeaux, Washington, ca. 1942-1943; shown are homes, streets, stores, and lumber mills.
Repository
University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections
Special Collections
University of Washington Libraries
Box 352900
Seattle, WA
98195-2900
Telephone: 206-543-1929
Fax: 206-543-1931
speccoll@uw.edu
Access Restrictions

Collection is open to the public.

Languages
English
Sponsor
Funding for encoding this finding aid was partially provided through a grant awarded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.


Historical BackgroundReturn to Top

The northwest lumber industry had a direct economic impact on the development and decline of the "company town." In order to entice employees to move to the remote areas where the mills were located, homes, stores, and other community services were built to accommodate workers. To varying degrees, these lumber companies owned and controlled the businesses, buildings, and services in these communities. Eventually, a combination of factors contributed to the demise or transformation of many of these company towns. These factors included the depletion of raw materials and the lumber industry's consequent shift from logging to "farming" trees, as well as the advent of modern freeways and automobiles, making these once remote areas more accessible. The Washington towns of Eatonville, Onalaska, Bordeaux, and Malone all experienced dramatic and increased population growth with the establishment of lumber mills and were, at least for a time, company towns.

Eatonville is in southern Pierce County west of Mt. Rainier. The Eatonville Lumber Company has been closed for decades but the community has transformed into a residential community for south Puget Sound and as an entryway to major outdoor recreational areas. The Carlisle Lumber Company owned the town of Onalaska and the mill closed in 1942. Bordeaux, in western Thurston County, was named for Thomas and Joseph Bordeaux, who arrived in 1887. They founded a sawmill, the Mumby Lumber and Shingle Company, which brought workers to the area, and the community of Bordeaux sprouted. The town was abandoned by 1941 when the timber ran out. The Malone lumber mill was established in the early 1900's by the Joe Vance Lumber Company. It was later sold to the Bordeaux Lumber Company. The mill was eventually closed during the depression years and the company owned houses were sold.

Content DescriptionReturn to Top

The collection, originally an album, includes pictures of Eatonville, Onalaska, Bordeaux, and Malone, Washington. It appears to have been made for legal or other reasons as the index is marked "Exhibit B." The Eatonville images include town scenes and privately owned residences, as well as Eatonville Lumber Company buildings and homes. Also depicted are the remains of the Carlisle Lumber Co. at Onalaska and the remains of the Mumby Lumber and Shingle Company at Malone and Bordeaux. Information from the index to the album indicates that the buildings in Onalaska were converted for use as a prison camp during the war years. An Onalaska citizen remembered that the prisoners, from the state penitentiary in Walla, Walla, Washington, were housed in Onalaska to cut wood for the prison in Walla Walla. All photographs are attributed to Associated Photographic Service, Commercial Photography, 714 Market Street, Tacoma, Washington

Use of the CollectionReturn to Top

Administrative InformationReturn to Top


Detailed Description of the CollectionReturn to Top

 

Eatonville, WashingtonReturn to Top

Container(s) Description
Folder item
1 1
Eatonville High School
1 2-3
Eatonville Grade School
1 4
Eatonville High School athletic field and play field
1 5
Eatonville Methodist Community Church
2 6
Private house
2 7
Apartment house
2 8-9
Private houses
2 10
Parsonage
3 11
Private house
3 11a-12
Mill official's house
3 13
4 14-20
Private houses
5 21-23
Company owned houses
5 24
6 25
Main Street
6 26
6 27
6 28
6 29
Christensen Motors
7 30
Post office and Roxy Theater
7 31
Christensen's Texaco
7 32
7 33
Bird's-eye view from county road
7 34
Sawmill from log pond
8 35-36
8 37
Sawmill crane
8 38-39

Onalaska, WashingtonReturn to Top

Container(s) Description
Folder item
9 40
"Onalaska as it looks today [ca. 1942-1943] after the dismantling of the Carlisle Lumber Company"
9 41
Remains of Onalaska
"These buildings, we are told, are now [ca. 1943] used as a prison camp" (caption).
9 42-43
Remains of Carlisle Lumber Company

Malone and Bordeaux, WashingtonReturn to Top

Container(s) Description
Folder item
10 44-45
Remains of Mumby Lumber and Shingle Company at Malone, Washington
10 46
Remains of the town of Bordeaux, Washington, as it looks today [ca. 1942-1943] after the dismantling of the Mumby Lumber and Shingle Company
10 47
Remains of the Mumby Lumber and Shingle Company plant at Bordeaux, Washington
10 48
Remains of the hotel at Bordeaux, Washington
10 49
Remains of the Mumby Lumber and Shingle Company plant at Bordeaux, Washington

Names and SubjectsReturn to Top

  • Subject Terms :
  • Company town architecture--Washington (State)--History--20th century
  • Company towns--Washington (State)--Photographs
  • Industrial buildings--Washington (State)--Photographs
  • Lumber industry--Washington (State)--Bordeaux--Photographs
  • Lumber industry--Washington (State)--Onalaska--Photographs
  • Sawmills--Washington (State)--Photographs
  • Corporate Names :
  • Carlisle Lumber Company
  • Eatonville Lumber Company
  • Mumby Lumber and Shingle Company
  • Geographical Names :
  • Bordeaux (Wash.)--Photographs
  • Eatonville (Wash.)--Photographs
  • Malone (Wash.)--Photographs
  • Onalaska (Wash.)--Photographs
  • Other Creators :
    • Corporate Names :
    • Associated Photographic Service (photographer)

Names and SubjectsReturn to Top

  • Subject Terms :
  • Visual Materials Collections (University of Washington)