Everett L. Cooley oral history project, 1983-2014  PDF

Overview of the Collection

Collector
American West Center
Title
Everett L. Cooley oral history project
Dates
1983-2014 (inclusive)
Quantity
74 boxes, (36 linear feet)
Collection Number
Accn0814
Summary
The Everett L. Cooley oral history project is an ongoing oral history program designed to document the history of Utah with an emphasis on the interaction between the University of Utah and the local and regional communities.
Repository
University of Utah Libraries, Special Collections.
Special Collections, J. Willard Marriott Library
University of Utah
295 South 1500 East
Salt Lake City, UT
84112-0860
Telephone: 801-581-8863
special@library.utah.edu
Access Restrictions

Twenty-four hour advanced notice encouraged. Materials must be used on-site. Access to parts of this collection may be restricted under provisions of state or federal law.

Languages
English


Historical NoteReturn to Top

While director of Special Collections at the Marriott Library, Dr. Everett L. Cooley proposed an oral history project to chronicle the development of the University of Utah and provide a more comprehensive view of its history than is found in the written records that have been preserved. A small amount of funding was secured and a limited number of individuals were interviewed.

It became apparent, however, that a much broader program was needed in order to document the activities of local leaders in business, communications, politics, education, and other areas. The funds to launch such an oral history program were generously provided by a prominent businessman who is a scholar in his own right and very much interested in the acquisition and dissemination of historical materials to scholars, researchers, and the public. In 1983, the donor gave the University of Utah a challenge grant to finance the beginning of the oral history program and named it for Everett L. Cooley, who had retired that year from his position as assistant director of the Special Collections department of the Marriott Library and professor of history at the University of Utah.

The program was initiated and an advisory committee was selected. The committee consisted of Everett L. Cooley, Roger K. Hanson (director of the Marriott Library), Gregory C. Thompson (newly-appointed director of Special Collections at the Marriott Library), S. Lyman Tyler (director of the university's American West Center), and Brigham D. Madsen (retired professor of history). In 1985, Dr. Tyler retired but remained on the committee, and Floyd A. O'Neil, the incoming director of the American West Center, was named to the committee. The last committee member, Margery Ward, directed the tapes from the many interviewers through the process of transcription and editing.

The American West Center, which had a previously established oral history program, transcribes the tapes and produces the finished transcripts of the interviews. After completion, the transcripts are permanently housed in the Manuscripts Division of the Special Collections Department of the J. Willard Marriott Library.

The greatest emphasis has been on interviewing individuals connected with the University of Utah. However, there has been expansion in other areas of Utah history. There are now projects underway to interview individuals active in the fields of education, recreation, science and medicine, religion, and other areas, in addition to the previous focus on the University of Utah.

Content DescriptionReturn to Top

The Everett L. Cooley oral history project serves as a Who's Who in Utah. It features interviews with many who have played significant roles in Utah's history, as well as others whose viewpoints and memories are important to understanding the history and the people of Utah.

A wide range of topics are discussed in the interviews, including politics, religion, history, education, the University of Utah, medicine, art, theater, midwifery, radio and television broadcasting, sports, entertainment, genealogy, dancing, science, women's issues, polio, skiing, nuclear power, the environment, and athletics. The interviews were mostly conducted in the mid 1980s, but range from 1960 to 2014. Time periods discussed in the interviews begin with the end of the 19th century.

Use of the CollectionReturn to Top

Restrictions on Use

It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain any necessary copyright clearances.

Permission to publish material from the Everett L. Cooley oral history project must be obtained from the Special Collections Manuscript Curator.

Preferred Citation

Initial Citation: Everett L. Cooley oral history project, Accn 814, Box [ ]. Special Collections and Archives. University of Utah, J. Willard Marriott. Salt Lake City, Utah.

Following Citations:Accn 814.

Administrative InformationReturn to Top


Detailed Description of the CollectionReturn to Top

Interviews 1-8, 1983-1984Return to Top

Container(s): Box 1

Container(s) Description Dates
box
1
Folder
1
No.1 Rex Campbell
Campbell (b. 1920) recalls his early life, his work at KSL Radio and Television, and his later career at the University of Utah where he was involved in establishing both KUER and KUED and where he continues as a member of the faculty teaching in the area of the Humanities. 1940s-1980s.Interviewer: Sherry Baker
1984
2
No.2 Parry D. Sorenson
Sorenson (b. 1916 ) recalls his background and association with the administration of the University of Utah in the area of public relations. 1940s-1980s.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1983
3
No.3 Daniel Dykstra
Dykstra (b. 1914) recalls his background and service to the University of Utah as faculty member and later dean of the College of Law and academic vice president of the University. 1949-1960s.Interviewer: Donald Zillman
1983
4
No.4 Bruce Jensen
Jensen (b. 1931) recalls his architectural student days at the University of Utah during the 1950s and expresses his admiration for the head of the department of Architecture, Roger Bailey. He also discusses his career at the University where was in charge of campus planning. 1950s-1980s.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1984
5
No.5 David Alder
Alder (1901-1985) recalls his early life in Salt Lake after his arrival from Latvia, the Jewish community in the city, and the Rosenblatt family. 1909-1940s.Interviewers: Floyd A. O'Neil, Gregory C. Thompson
1984
6
No.6-1 Vincent (Vinnie) E. McGuire
McGuire (b. 1917) recalls his background and his association with golf in Utah and the University of Utah.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1983
7
No.6-2 Pearl Armstrong
Recollections of her husband, Ike Armstrong, his coaching career, and the athletic program at the University of Utah. 1920s-1950s.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1983
8
No.7 Ernest L. Poulson
Poulson (b. 1921) recalls his background and education, his military career, and his association with the Personnel Department and Research Park at the University of Utah.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1983
9
No.8 R. J. Snow
R. J. Snow (b. 1937) recalls his early life, his friendship with Juanita Brooks and her family, and his career at the University of Utah. He also discusses sports at the University, his directorship of the Hinckley Institute on campus and the relationship of the Mormon Church with the University.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1984

Interviews 9-16, 1983-1984Return to Top

Container(s): Box 2

Container(s) Description Dates
box
2
Folder
1
No.9 Elizabeth Haglund
Haglund (b. 1917) recalls her early life, her work with the National Broadcasting Company, and her career at the University of Utah in Public Relations. 1960s-1980s.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1984
2
No.10 Brigham D. Madsen
Madsen (b. 1915) recalls his education and early background as a contractor, his East Central States Mission for the Mormon church, and his career as a professor and administrator at both Brigham Young University and the University of Utah. 1940s-1980s.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1983
3
No.11 Don Hatch
Hatch (b. 1928) discusses the early history of river running Utah, beginning with the time of the trappers and explorers in the 1800s. He also talks about organized expeditions from the 1920s to the present.Interviewer: Roy Webb
1984
4
No.12 A. Russell Mortensen
Arlington Russell Mortensen (b. 1911) relates his personal background and talks about his affiliation with the Utah State Historical Society, the , , the University of Utah Press, and the University's Department of History. See also interview No.367 Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1983
5
No.13 Sherman (Pete) R. Couch
Couch (b. 1905) recalls his background and career with the athletic program, University of Utah in the 1930s-1980s.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1983
6
No.14 William H. Behle
William H. Behle (b. 1909) recalls his background, education, and affiliation with the Departments of Biology and Zoology at the University of Utah from 1937 to the 1970s. He also discusses faculty then and now, Mormonism vs. Non-Mormonism at the University, and the Utah Academy of Arts, Letters and Sciences.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1983
7
No.15 Mark L. Money
Money (b. 1928) recalls his early education and background, his military service in the Korean War as a chaplain, the origins of Research Park and the difficulties associated with its development.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1983
8
No.16 Paul Cracroft
Cracroft (b. 1922) recounts his student days at the University of Utah in the 1940s, his work as press secretary for Senator Wallace Bennett in the 1950s, and his career at the University of Utah. During his tenure at the University, he was with Public Relations, the Division of Continuing Education, and the Alumni Association. At the time of the interview Cracroft was serving as manager of Kingsbury Hall.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1983

Interviews 17-24, 1983-1985Return to Top

Container(s): Box 3

Container(s) Description Dates
box
3
Folder
1
No.17 Stan Russon
Russon (b. 1905) recalls his background, his association with the theater at the University of Utah during the 1930s-1970s, and also comments generally about the theater in Salt Lake City.Interviewer: Winnifred Margetts
1984
2
No.18 Allien Russon
Russon (1905-1986) recalls her family background; her appointment as the first woman in the College of Business, 1940s-1960s; and her participation in local theater, 1930s-1970s.Interviewer: Winnifred Margetts
1985
3
No.19 Kenneth B. Castleton
Castleton (b. 1903) recalls his background, medical training, the construction of the University of Utah Medical Center, 1960s; his appointment as dean of the University Medical School and later appointment as vice president for Health Sciences, University of Utah, 1960s.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1983
4
No.20 Ralph E. Margetts
Margetts (b. 1909) recalls his early life, his theatrical heritage, and his World War II experiences. The majority of the interview is about his work in theater at the University of Utah, 1940s-1970s.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1983
5
No.21 James (Jack) H. Gardner
Gardner (b. 1910) recalls his background, his coaching prior to coming to the University of Utah in 1953 and his work at the University of Utah, 1953-1979. He also discusses the build-up of the University's basketball program, the Billy McGill issue, and professional basketball in Utah.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1984
6
No.22 Boyer Jarvis
Jarvis (b. 1923) recalls his background; his acquaintance and work with Sterling McMurrin, 1940s-1980s; his graduate work at various universities; and his career as a University of Utah administrator, particularly with KUED and the theater issues, 1950s-1980s.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1983
7
No.23 Larita Evans
Evans (b. 1930) recalls her background, her decision to go into nursing and later midwifery, her conflict with physicians, and opening her own practice.Interviewers: Jan Brugel and Lisa Litton
1985
8
No.24 Daniel Rainger
Rainger (b. 1925) recalls his early life, his work as a photographer and writer, his programming job with KDYL radio and later television, and his association with Sid Fox.Interviewer: Ronald Rainger
1985

Interviews 25-32, 1983-1984Return to Top

Container(s): Box 4

Container(s) Description Dates
box
4
Folder
1
No.25 Gordon J. Miller
Miller (b. 1911) recalls his background, his work in the University of Utah's Accounting Department and his career in the University's administration in the 1960s and1970s.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1983
2
No.26 Mary Jane Hair
Hair (b. 1919) recalls her service to the University of Utah libraries and their history, 1946-1984.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1983
3
No.27 Jesse D. Jennings
Jennings (b. 1909) discusses his background, his career at the University of Utah as professor and chairman of the Department of Anthropology, 1948-1980s, and his directorship of the Museum of Natural History.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1983
4
No.28 Edwin A. Read
In a monologue, Read (b. 1922 ) recalls the Stewart Training School at the University of Utah and his association with the Graduate School of Education at the University of Utah, 1960s-1970s.
1984
5
No.29 Vern Adix
Adix (b. 1912), a long-time theater faculty member at the University of Utah, discusses his work in children's theater and his association with C. Lowell Lees, 1940s-1970s.Interviewer: Winnifred Margetts
1984
6
No.30 Deanne Roberts Williams
Williams (b. 1947) recalls her education, her work in nursing, and her practice of midwifery, 1970s-1980s. Interviewers: Jan Brugel, Lisa Litton
1985
7
No.31 James R. (Bud) Jack
Jack (b. 1918) recalls his early life and military experience, his employment at the University of Utah, becoming athletic director, the first black athletes at the University, the building of the Special Events Center and being a member of the Olympic Committee.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1984
8
No.32 Ray R. Canning
Canning (b. 1920) recalls his background in Wyoming, his experiences in WW II, his work at Brigham Young University during the administration of Ernest Wilkinson, and his career at the University of Utah in the Department of Sociology and as dean of the College of Arts and Letters during the 1960s. He also discusses the administrations of Presidents A. Ray Olpin and James Fletcher.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1983

Interviews 33-40, 1980-1985Return to Top

Container(s): Box 5

Container(s) Description Dates
box
5
Folder
1
No.33 Gail Evans
Evans (b. 1948) discusses her practice of midwifery in Utah.Interviewers: Jan Brugel, Lisa Litton
1985
2
No.34 Donald Hague
Hague (b. 1926), Director of the Utah Museum of Natural History, discusses his background, education, and his career at the University including the establishment of the museum, 1960s-1980s.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1984
3
No.35 Orin Tugman
At age 100, Orin Tugman (b. 1880) recalls his work in physics and electrical engineering and other activities at the University of Utah.Interviewer: Gregory C. Thompson
1980
4
No.36 Tyrrel Boehme
Boehme (b. 1946) discusses the history of nursing and midwifery in Utah, 1965-1985.Interviewers: Jan Brugel, Lisa Litton
1984
5
No.37 Ronan Degnan
Degnan recalls his association with the College of Law, University of Utah, 1955-1962.Interviewer: Donald Zillman
1983
6
No.38 John A. (Jack) Spencer
Spencer recalls his education and background both in Utah and California, his work with microfilming, and specifically his microfilming for the University of Utah.Interviewer: Richard Van Orden
1983
7
No.39 Ralph Thomson
Thomson (b. 1906), former director of the University of Utah Library and assistant to University President A. Ray Olpin, recalls his campus experiences during the 1960s.Interviewer: Richard Van Orden
1983
8
No.40 Ralph Thomson
In this second interview, Thomson discusses his background in rural Utah, attending Snow College, and his career at the University of Utah which culminated in becoming director of University Libraries. He also recounts his role in planning the library in the 1960s and establishing the State of Utah's library program.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1983

Interviews 41-49, 1984-1985Return to Top

Container(s): Box 6

Container(s) Description Dates
box
6
Folder
1
No.41 Mary Anne Graf
Graf (b. 1947) discusses the history of nursing and midwifery in Utah, 1970s-1980s.Interviewers: Jan Brugel, Lisa Litton
1985
2
No.42 Aziz S. Atiya
Atiya (b. 1898) discusses his early life and schooling in Egypt. He also talks about his career at the University of Utah, which included the establishment of the Middle East Center, and Middle East Library, and his work on the Coptic Encyclopedia, 1950s-1980s.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1985
3
No.43 Dr. Claude Grant
Grant (b. 1918) discusses his work in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Utah, 1940s-1970s.Interviewer: Calvin Harris
1984
4
No.44 Merva Morris
Morris (b. 1907) discusses her career in the College of Education at the University of Utah, the progress made by women faculty members and her own accomplishments, 1950s-1970s.Interviewer: Calvin Harris
1985
5
No.45 Francelyn Reeder
Reeder (b. 1939) discusses midwifery education in Utah.Interviewer: Lisa Litton
1985
6
No.46 Nelma Tolman Irvine
Irvine recalls the association between her father, John Tolman, and the "father of television," Philo Farnsworth. She also discusses the television patent hearing held in Utah.Interviewer: Helen B. Gibbons
1984
7
No.47 Reed Merrill
Merrill (b. 1919) discusses his career at the University of Utah in the Department of Psychology, as head of the Counseling Center, and his association with the College of Education, 1940s-1970s.Interviewer: Calvin Harris
1984
8
No.48 Shizuko Harry
Harry (b. 1910) discusses her career in the College of Education at the University of Utah, the problems for women in education, and her accomplishments.Interviewer: Calvin Harris
1984
9
No.49 Donald Brumbaugh
Brumbaugh (b. 1912) recalls his early education, his association with the College of Education at the University of Utah, his work in Ethiopia, and the use of KUED by the faculty, 1960s-1980s.Interviewer: Calvin Harris
1984

Interviews 50-59, 1980-1985Return to Top

Container(s): Box 7

Container(s) Description Dates
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7
Folder
1
No.50 Earl Harmer
Harmer (b. 1926) discusses his association with the College of Education at the University of Utah, 1940s-1970s.Interviewer: Calvin Harris
1984
2
No.51 C. Gregory Crampton
Crampton (b. 1911) recalls his early life and education in California, his career at the University of Utah in the Department of History, and his association with the , the American West Center, the Doris Duke Oral History project, and his studies at Glen Canyon, 1950s-1970s.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1984
3
No.52 E. Theodore (Ted) Demars
Demars discusses his early life and education and his association with the College of Education, University of Utah, 1940s-1970s.Interviewer: Calvin Harris
1984
4
No.53 Gene Jacobsen
Jacobsen recalls his early life, schooling and the faculty in the College of Education, University of Utah, 1950s-1970s.Interviewer: Calvin Harris
1984
5
No.54 Paul Fawley
Fawley recalls his childhood, his education and his association with the College of Education, University of Utah, 1950s-1970s.Interviewer: Calvin Harris
1984
6
No.55 Lillian Ence
Ence (b. 1912) recalls her background and her work and impressions of with University of Utah presidents and other administrators, 1950s-1980s.Interviewer: Gregory C. Thompson
1980
7
No.56 Asahel D. Woodruff
Woodruff (b. 1904) recalls his early life and schooling, his work at Brigham Young University, and his assumption of the deanship of the College of Education at the University of Utah, 1950s-1970s.Interviewer: Calvin Harris
1984
8
No.57 Dorothy G. Snow
Snow (b. 1901) talks about her pioneer heritage, family life and education, her teaching career at the University of Utah, and the influence of George Thomas, President of the University.Interviewer: Winnifred Margetts
1985
9
No.58 Charles E. Dibble
Dibble (b. 1909) discusses his education, his work in anthropology and linguistics, and his career at the University of Utah, 1940s-1970s. He recalls his association with Jesse Jennings who was in the Anthropology Department, and A. Ray Olpin, President of the University.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1985
10
No.59 Roger K. Hanson
Director of the Marriott Library, University of Utah, Hanson (b. 1932) discusses his education, the library, and its future.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1985

Interview No.60 Calvin L. Rampton, 1983-1984Return to Top

Container(s): Box 8

In twenty-nine monologues, Calvin Rampton (b. 1913) recalls his early life, schooling, work as a lawyer, marriage and life with Lucybeth Cardon, political activities, governorship (1964-1976), and his activities since leaving office, 1977-1983.

Container(s) Description Dates
box
8
1983
1983
1983
1984

Interviews 61-69, 1984-1985Return to Top

Container(s): Box 9

Container(s) Description Dates
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9
Folder
1
No.61 Lela M. Ence
Ence (b. 1927) discusses her work with community fundraisers and her position with the University of Utah Alumni Association during the 1960s-1980s.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1985
2
No.62 Lillian Smith
Smith (b. 1912) recalls her early life and education, her teaching, and the University of Utah Graduate School of Education.Interviewer: Calvin Harris
1984
3
No.63 Roald Campbell
Campbell (1905-1988) recalls his experiences in education and his position as an educator at the University of Utah during the 1940s-1950s.Interviewer: Calvin Harris
1984
4
No.64 Wanda Clayton Thomas
Thomas (b. 1912) discusses her involvement with the University of Utah Theater during the 1940s-1970s as well as her association with C. Lowell Lees, Maud May Babcock, and George Thomas.Interviewer: Winnifred Margetts
1985
5
No.65 Mary Nielson
Nielson (b. 1903) relates her acting experiences in local theater, the University of Utah Theater, and the Emma Lucy Gates Opera Company.Interviewer: Winnifred Margetts
1985
6
No.66 Halbert Greaves
Greaves (b. 1907) discusses his early life and education, heading the Speech Department at the University of Utah, and his colleague C. Lowell Lees, 1940s-1960s.Interviewer: Winnifred Margetts
1985
7
No.67 Rowena Miller and Dorothy Jacobson
Miller (b. 1911) and her sister, Dorothy Jacobson, discuss their theater experience in Salt Lake City during the 1940s-1950s with the Interstake Drama Group and the Deseret Theater.Interviewer: Winnifred Margetts
1985
8
No.68 Edward (Ted) Kimball
Kimball (b. 1910) recalls his pioneer heritage and his early days in radio in Salt Lake City, Utah, and in Washington, D. C. He also discusses J. Golden Kimball, the Gardo House, Emma Lucy Gates, and other Salt Lake Theater actors.Interviewer: Winnifred Margetts
1985
9
No.69 Brewster Ghiselin
Ghiselin (b. 1903) recalls his early life and education, his tenure with the Department of English at the University of Utah, his poetry and other publications, and the creative process in general.Interviewer: Winnifred Margetts
1985

Interviews 70-79Return to Top

Container(s): Box 10

Container(s) Description Dates
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10
Folder
1
No.70 Robert Huefner
Huefner (b. 1936) recalls his schooling at the University of Utah, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Harvard University. He discusses his work with local, state, and national groups on planning and public administration projects; his tenure at the University of Utah in the Political Science Department, and as Director of the Institute of Government and Center for Public Administration, and University's administration, 1972-1985.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1985
2
No.71 Charles Smyth
Smyth recalls his academic background in chemistry at Princeton, 1920-1963; recounts his association there with Henry Eyring, 1930s-1940s; and gives his evaluation of Eyring as a scientist.Interviewer: Robert Miller
1984
3
No.72 Dorothy Nyswander
Nyswander recalls her early life and schooling; her work as professor of mathematics, University of Utah, 1926-1936; her work in public health, locally, nationally, and internationally, 1930s-1950s; and her participation in the 1950 Centennial Celebration at the University of Utah.Interviewer: Shauna Adix
1976
4
No.73 Billings Brown
Brown discusses his academic background in chemistry and chemical engineering, his time as an adjunct professor at the University of Utah, and his association with Henry Eyring and Melvin Cook.Interviewer: Robert Miller
1984
5
No.74 Kenneth Pitzer
Pitzer, professor of Chemistry, University of California at Berkeley, recalls his association with Henry Eyring and evaluates his work in chemistry.Interviewer: Robert Miller
1984
6
No.75 Neal A. Maxwell
Maxwell discusses Henry Eyring's work at the University of Utah, his work in the LDS Church and his contribution as a scientist.Interviewer: Robert Miller
1984
7
No.76 Melvin Calvin
Calvin discusses the contribution of Henry Eyring to the field of chemistry.Interviewer: Robert Miller
1984
8
No.77 Wayne Carl
In a sermon and an interview Carl, former superintendent of the Dayton Ohio School District and former Mormon, discusses his attitude and the attitude of the school district toward the Mormon Church. Carl also addresses the issue of blacks and segregation.Interviewer: Fred S. Buchanan
1973
9
No.78 Katie Lee
Lee recalls her experiences running rivers including the Colorado, the Green, and the San Juan, 1940s-1960s.Interviewer: Roy Webb
1984
10
No.79 S. Lyman Tyler
Tyler (b. 1920) discusses his early life, his experiences with the History Department of the University of Utah, his involvement with the Western History Center (1960s), and the American West Center (1970s-1980s).Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1984

Interviews 80-87Return to Top

Container(s): Box 11

Container(s) Description Dates
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11
Folder
1
No.80 Leon B. Robertson
Robertson (b. 1930) recalls his years as budget director at the University of Utah, 1960s-1980s.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1985
2
No.81 Arch L. Madsen
Madsen recalls his association with Philo Farnsworth and Farnsworth's work in developing television.Interviewer: Helen Gibbons
1984
3
No.82 Glenn Seaborg
Seaborg recalls his work with and the contributions of Henry Eyring to the field of chemistry.Interviewer: Robert Miller
1985
4
No.83 Arthur Frost
Frost, professor of chemistry at North Western recalls Henry Eyring's contributions to the field of chemistry.Interviewer: Robert Miller
1985
5
No.84 Edward (Ted) Eyring
Eyring recalls the work and home life of his father, Henry Eyring, 1930s-1970s.Interviewer: Robert Miller
1984
6
No.85 Ferdinand T. Johnson
Johnson (b. 1919) recalls his schooling, his early work, and his role as the state and later the University of Utah's first Records Manager.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1985
7
No.86 G. Bennett Larson
Larson (b. 1910) recalls his career in radio and later television in Salt Lake, Washington D. C., New York and California, 1920s-1970s; and his association with entertainers--Al Jolson, Eddie Cantor, Milton Berle, and Fannie Brice among others.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1984
8
No.87 Samuel Weller
Weller (b. 1921) recalls his early life in Germany and later in Salt Lake City; the establishment of Zions Book Store in 1929 by his father, Gustave Weller; his marriage and business partnership with his wife, Lila; and his career as a bookseller and proprietor of Zions Book Store, 1940s-1980s.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1985

Interviews 88-91Return to Top

Container(s): Box 12

Container(s) Description Dates
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12
Folder
1
No.88 Thomas Sieg
Sieg (b. 1937) recalls his college years; his work in the Development Office at the University of Utah during the administrations of presidents James Fletcher and David Gardner, 1960s-1970s; and his subsequent career as restauranteur in Salt Lake City, 1970s-1980s.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1985
2
No.89 Byron Openshaw
Openshaw (b. 1918) recalls his early career in radio at KSL, 1940s; his work at KUTV television, 1940s-1950s; and his association with KUED, 1950s-1970s.Interviewer: Sherry Baker
1984
3
No.90a Robert R. Porter (Volume I)
Porter (1910-1986) recalls his early life in Salt Lake; information about the Porter Walton Nursery; living in Federal Heights, 1920s-1930s; mining and metallurgy in the Western United States, 1930s-1980s; mining and metallurgy in Southern Africa, 1940s-1980s; and uranium Development in Southern Africa and the United States, 1950s-1980s. Interviewers: Gregory C. Thompson, Floyd O'Neil
1984-1985
3 1984-1985
3 1984-1985
4
No.91 Philip C. Sturges
Sturges (b. 1917) recalls his early life in Iowa and later at the University of Utah, 1940s-1970s, where he headed both the University Press and the History Department. He discusses notable members of the University administration and faculty during that period.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1986

Interviews 92-98Return to Top

Container(s): Box 13

Container(s) Description Dates
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13
Folder
1
No.92 Lorin F. Wheelwright
Wheelwright (b. 1909) recalls his background, his membership on the Deseret Sunday School General Board, 1950s-1970s; his work as associate editor of the Instructor; and his association as editor with Henry Eyring.Interviewer: Robert Miller
1986
2
No.93 Donald Brumbaugh
Brumbaugh (b. 1912) recalls his early life and education; his association with the University of Utah in the Extension Division, as head of the Audio Visual Division, and as chairman of the Educational Media Department; and his work in instructional media with KUED as part of the U of U team which went to Ethiopia in the early 1960s.Interviewer: Winnifred Margetts
1986
3
No.94 Gordon Paxman
Gordon Paxman (b. 1925) recalls his early life and education; his association with Willam Christensen, San Francisco Ballet, 1950-1959; his association with the development of dance at the University of Utah and the founding and functioning of Ballet West, 1959-1986.Interviewer: Winnifred Margetts
1986
4
No.95 Ruth Wright Wilkins
Wilkins recalls her early life and education; women in the University of Utah's Law School, 1950s; and her time as a law clerk under Justices McDonaugh, Lewis, and Ritter, 1950s-1960s.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1986
5
No.96 Lowell Durham
Durham (b. 1917) recalls his early life, his interest in and life-long career in music, his education, and his association with the University of Utah as dean of Fine Arts and in other capacities, 1940s-1980s. He discusses his association with Maurice Abravanel, Jay Welch, Alvin Gittins, Avard Fairbanks, George Dibble, and others.Interviewer: Winnifred Margetts
6
No.97 Bertrand F. Harrison
Harrison (b. 1910), a professor of Botany at Brigham Young University, 1930s-1970s, discusses evolution from his viewpoint, that of Brigham Young University, and of various Mormon church authorities. He recalls his association with Henry Eyring, Lorin Wheelwright, and others who served on the General Sunday School Board for the Mormon Church.Interviewer: Robert Miller
7
No.98 Robert L. Bliss
Bliss (b. 1921) recalls his early life, his education, and his tenure as chairman of the Department and later College of Architecture, University of Utah, 1963-1986.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1986

Interviews 99-102Return to Top

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No.99 Ellis Theodore (Ted) Demars
Demars (b. 1910) recalls his early life in Brigham City, his education at the University of Utah , his career as an educator in the public schools (1930s), his tenure at the University of Utah in the College of Education, (1940s-1970s), and his establishment of the Utah School on Alcohol Studies and Other Drug Dependencies.Interviewer: Winnifred Margetts
1986
2
No.100 John Morrey
Morrey recalls his discussions with Henry Eyring about chemistry and religion and he evaluates Eyring's work as a scientist.Interviewer: Robert Miller
1986
3
No.101 Steven Heath
Heath (b. 1943) recalls his association with Henry Eyring during the 1970s when he met and studied with Eyring in preparation for writing his thesis, "Henry Eyring, Mormon Scientist," 1980.Interviewer: Robert Miller
1985
4
No.102 Khosrow Mostofi
Mostofi (b. 1921) recalls his early life and education in Iran; his graduate work at the University of Utah in political science, 1949; his teaching career at the University of Utah, 1950s-1960s; and his directorship of the Middle East Center, University of Utah, 1966-1983.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1985

Interviews 103-111Return to Top

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No.103 Howard J. White
White (b. 1920), with the National Bureau of Standards, recalls his undergraduate and graduate work with Henry Eyring at Princeton during the 1940s, and also evaluates Eyring's contributions to the area of chemistry.Interviewer: Robert Miller
1985
2
No.104 George Boyd
Boyd (b. 1910) recalls his early education and professional work in the seminary system of the LDS church; his association with Sterling McMurrin; his marriage to Maurine Eyring; and his association with the Eyring family; and the views of certain prominent LDS church leaders toward evolution.Interviewer: Robert Miller
1985
3
No.105 Reed C. Richardson
Richardson (b. 1917) recalls his career in the College of Business, University of Utah, 1950s-1980s; his work as a labor arbitrator; his role with the Institute of Industrial Relations and the Bureau of Economic Research at the University of Utah; the work of various deans of the College of Business; and his attitude toward removing the holdings of the College of Business and transfering them to the Marriott Library.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1986
4
No.106 Robert Hyde Wilson
Wilson (b. 1918) recalls his early life and interest in the theater, generally, community theater in Salt Lake City specifically, his career with the Theater Department at the University of Utah, 1940s-1980s, and his association with the Lagoon Opera House.Interviewer: Winnifred Margetts
1986
5
No.107 Sterling McMurrin
McMurrin (b. 1914) recalls his association with Henry Eyring at the University of Utah during the 1940s-1970s, discusses Eyring's tenure as dean of the Graduate School, comments on University events and its administration and Eyring's religious beliefs, and recounts his own experiences with the Mormon church and certain Mormon authorities.Interviewer: Robert Miller
1985
6
No.108 Franklin L. McKean
McKean (b. 1919) recalls his early life and schooling; his work with and philosophy about the admissions program at the University of Utah; his evaluation of various presidents of the University of Utah, 1940s-1980s; and his responsibility for the construction of the campus Student Services Building in early 1980.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1984
7
No.109 Agnes Lindsay
Lindsay (b. 1908), a sister of Philo Farnsworth, recalls Farnsworth's early life and education, his ideas about developing television, and his later work with IT&T.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1985
8
No.110 Monroe Cowan Wissmar
Recollections by "Wizzy" Wissmar (b. 1910) of his background, his work at the University of Utah in athletics, and his later careers in oil and mining.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1983
9
No.111 Rex A. Skidmore
Skidmore(b. 1914) recalls his background and service to the University of Utah including his role as dean of the College of Social Work, 1956-1976.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1984

Interviews 112-118Return to Top

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No.112 Everett L. Cooley
Cooley (b. 1917) recalls his early life and schooling; Mormon missionary experience in Germany, 1938-1940; military service in the South Pacific, 1943-1945; his education at the University of Utah and University of Calafornia, Berkeley, 1951; association with the Utah State Historical Society, 1954-1969; the establishment of Special Collections, Marriott Library, University of Utah, 1969-1983; and his continued association with library programs--the Tanner book series, the Red Butte Press and the Everett L. Cooley Oral History Project.Interviewer: Margery Ward
1986
2
No.113 J. Michael Mattson
Mattson (b. 1938) recalls his family, his education at the University of Utah, his career in development and fund raising at the University (1960s-1980s), and evaluates the administrations of James Fletcher, David P. Gardner, and Chase Peterson.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1985
3
No.114 A. J. Wann
Wann (b. 1920) recalls his early life in Missouri; his military career in World War II; his graduate study in political science and his career at the University of Utah, 1968-1985.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1985
4
No.115 Priscilla M. Mayden
Mayden (b. 1918) recalls her early life, schooling and work prior to coming to Salt Lake City in 1952 as a librarian at the Veterans Administration Hospital; her subsequent career as medical librarian at the University of Utah, 1966-1985; her development of the Eccles Medical Library; and the library-university politics during her tenure.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1985
5
No.116 Keith M. Engar
Engar (b. 1923) recalls his background and career at the University of Utah beginning with KUED and KUER, later chairman of the University's Department of Theater, followed by the deanship of the College of Fine Arts, 1950s-1980s.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1984
6
No.117 Gaylord Staveley
Recollections by Staveley (b. 1930) of his life's work running western rivers, the Green and the Colorado, from the 1940s to the present.Interviewer: Roy Webb
1984
7
No.118 Wanda Robertson
Robertson (1903-1990) describes her early life and family; her brother, Utah composer Leroy Robertson; her education; her teaching career on the elementary, secondary, and university levels; her work at Topaz, Utah, the Japanese internment camp during the 1940s; her work in Ethiopia in the 1960s; and her chairmanship of the Department of Elementary Education, University of Utah.Interviewer: Winnifred Margetts
1985

Interviews 119-128Return to Top

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No.119 Mervin B. Hogan
Hogan (b. 1906) discusses his pioneer ancestors; early life; education; Henry Eyring; and his association with General Electric, Yale Engineering School, and the University of Utah.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1983
2
No.120 W. Richard Hildreth
Hildreth (b. 1934) recalls his early life, education, and career at the University of Utah establishing the State Arboretum, 1977 to the present.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1986
3
No.121 Walter J. Kauzmann
Kauzmann (b. 1915) discusses his early life and schooling, his career at Princeton, some of the leading theoretical chemists of the 1930s, and an evaluation of the contributions of Henry Eyring to the field of chemistry.Interviewer: Robert Miller
1985
4
No.122 Mary Jane Hair
Hair (b. 1919) recalls her family, her education, and her career as a professor of library science and as librarian at the University of Utah, 1940s-1980s.Interviewer: Calvin Harris
1984
5
No.123 Nathan (Nate) Hale
Hale (b. 1915) recalls his association with theater in Salt Lake City, 1950s-1970s; his work with Promised Valley Playhouse; the background on the Deseret Players; and the support of theater by the Mormon church.Interviewer: Winnifred Margetts
1986
6
No.124 Ira J. Kaar
Kaar (b. 1902) recalls his early experiments with radio in Salt Lake City ca. 1916; the establishment of KDYL radio, 1920s; the development of television; and his later work with Hoffman Electronics in California, 1950s-1960s.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1986
7
No.125 Michael Parsons
Parsons recalls his background and schooling in England, his arrival at the University of Utah, and his career in the Department of Education at the University.Interviewer: Calvin Harris
1986
8
No.126 Helen Bitner Wilcox
Wilcox, daughter of Irma Felt Bitner, recalls her mother's life, 1888-1965; her career at KSL, 1930s-1940s; her work as a writer; and her work as Salt Lake City Recorder in the 1940s, during Earl Glade's tenure as mayor of Salt Lake City.Interviewer: Helen Gibbons
1985
9-10
No.127-1 George Snell; No. 127-2 George and Althea Snell
Snell (b. 1909) discusses staff members he knew at KDYL Radio and others he knew in broadcasting and associated fields, 1920s-1940s.Interviewer: Tim LarsonThe Snells (b. 1909; b. 1910) recall their early life and work at KDYL radio, 1920s-1940s and their association with John Baldwin, Floyd Farr, Sid Fox, and others.Interviewers: Tim Larson, Gregory C. Thompson
1984; 1988
11
No.128 Marcia Strahn
Strahn (b. 1951) recalls her early life, nursing education, mid-wifery training at the University of Utah--evaluating the program, faculty, and other students--and the growth of nurse-midwifery in Utah, 1970s-1980s.Interviewer: Lisa Litton
1985

Interviews 129-139Return to Top

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No.129 Rex Campbell
Campbell (b. 1920) recalls his career in broadcasting at KSL and KUED, 1940s-1980s; teaching at the University of Utah, 1950s-1980s; and evaluates the role of women in broadcasting generally and specifically Alene Dalton, Margaret Masters, and Louise Hill Howe.Interviewer: Helen Gibbons
1985
2
No.130 Virginia Cutler
Cutler (b. 1904) recalls her education, her family life, and her career at the University of California, as dean of Home Economics at the University of Utah where she developed the Sterling Sill Home Living Center, at Brigham Young University, in Thailand, Ghana, and as a national consumer specialist with the appliance industry.Interviewer: Shauna Adix
1976
3
No.131 Jackie Nokes
Nokes (b. 1930) recalls her career in television at KSL and comments on many of the people employed at the station, 1950s-1980s.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1986
4
No.132 Peter L. Carlston
Carlston (b. 1911) recalls his early life and schooling; his career as professor of Health, Physical Education & Recreation, and Track; and comments on the role of athletics at the University of Utah, 1940s-1970s.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1986
5
No.133 John Wahlquist
Wahlquist (b. 1900) recalls his early life and schooling; his first teaching assignments in rural Utah; his tenure with the College of Education, University of Utah, 1930s-1950s (he evaluates University presidents--Thomas, Cowles, and Olpin); and his time as president of San Jose State University. Included is a list of Wahlquist's publications.Interviewer: John Wahlquist
1984
6
No.134 Jewell J. Rasmussen
Rasmussen (b. 1908) recalls his early life in Box Elder County, his education at the University of Utah and Stanford, his teaching at the University of Utah in the Department of Economics, and presents his evaluation of the college of Business. He also discusses his work with the university administration, his work on outside committees, and the successful careers of his children.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1986
7
No.135 Cecil Samuelson
Samuelson recalls his schooling and his tenure at the University of Utah as a professor in the Department of Educational Psychology, 1960s-1980s.Interviewer: Harry Bluhm
1986
8
No.136 Vincent E. Clayton
Clayton recalls his long-time employment with KSL radio and television and later Bonneville International where he eventually became vice president of engineering. He discusses his work at KSL, people with whom he associated, the growth of the Bonneville system, and the many technical problems he dealt with, 1940s-1980s.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1986
9
No.137 Luacine Clark Fox
Fox (b. 1912), daughter of Mormon church General Authority, J. Reuben Clark, Jr., recalls her work at KSL, writing scripts and performing on the air; other women in radio in Salt Lake City; and her association with the Mormon church shortwave radio station, WRUL, which broadcast world-wide from Boston, 1930s-1940s.Interviewer: Helen Gibbons
1985
10
No.138 Tom Barberi
Barberi (b. 1943) recalls his early life in California, including his first jobs in radio; expounds on his career in Salt Lake City with KALL radio, 1971 to the present; and speculates about the new directions in radio.Interviewer: Glenda Riesen
1985
11
No.139 Frank H. Johnson
Johnson, professor emeritus of biology at Princeton and long-time colleague of Henry Eyring, recalls his professional and personal association with Eyring. He also discusses their work on pressure, temperature, and narcosis; and Johnson's work on bacterial luminescence; and evaluates Eyring's contributions to science.Interviewer: Robert Miller
1984

Interviews 140-144Return to Top

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No.140 E. Jack Fuller
Fuller recounts his association as a student and later colleague of Henry Eyring, 1950s-1980s. He evaluates Eyring's contributions as a researcher, teacher, and human being who was almost equally devoted to his science as well as his Mormon religion.Interviewer: Robert Miller
1986
2
No.141 Georgiana Taylor Lees
Lees (b. 1903) remembers her early life, pioneer heritage, and work in the theater under Maude May Babcock at the University and later in Salt Lake and New York drama groups. She also discusses her marriage to C. Lowell Lees, his many accomplishments including staging the first showing of Promised Valley, following with summer festival productions in the "U" stadium, the beginnings of ballet on campus, and outlines his career in California.Interviewer: Winnifred Margetts
1986
3
No.142a Sterling M. McMurrin (Part I)
McMurrin discusses Henry Eyring in great detail--his work, religion, and also in a personal context. He also discusses early seminary teaching, anthropomorphism, BYU, and perspectives on evolution.Interviewer: Robert Miller
1983
3
No.142b Sterling M. McMurrin (Part II)
McMurrin discusses Henry Eyring in great detail--his work, religion, and also in a personal context. He also discusses early seminary teaching, anthropomorphism, BYU, and perspectives on evolution.Interviewer: Robert Miller
1986
4
No.143 James E. Dooley
Dooley (b. 1933) recalls his early years in Arkansas, his marriages and family, his move to Salt Lake in 1963, his work in civil rights, his presidency of the NAACP in Utah, the situation of blacks in Utah, the attitude of the Mormon church towards blacks, and the Ku Klux Klan in Utah during the years 1963-1983.Interviewer: Leslie Kelen
1983
5
No.144 Albert L. Fisher
Fisher (b. 1925) recalls his personal and educational background; his work in political science and geography; chairmanship of the Geography Department, 1960-1970; and evaluates the department and his colleagues, 1960s-1980s.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1986

Interviews 145-154Return to Top

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No.145 Jack Adamson
Professor of Communications, Adamson, recalls his first jobs in radio in Salt Lake, his later jobs as president of both the California and Washington divisions of Bonneville International, and his return to Salt Lake as CEO of KSL, 1950s-1980s.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1986
2
No.146 Homer Peterson
Peterson discusses his career at KALL radio and as president of Intermountain Network, and his work with George Hatch, president of Communications Investment Corporation, which owns KALL and the Intermountain Network along with other communications properties, 1950s-1980s.Interviewer: Tim Larson
3
No.147 Harold (Hack) Woolley
Woolley (b. 1919) recalls his early schooling, World War Two military service, and his career in radio and later television in Idaho, California, and Utah where he became general manager of Channel 4 television (later KTVX). He discussed the importance of programming, especially the news and local historical figures in broadcasting such as Sid Fox and G. Bennett Larson, 1950s-1980s.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1986
4
No.148 Virginia Parsons Frobes
Frobes (b. 1912) recalls her childhood as a non-Mormon in Salt Lake; her attendance at Westminster, then a high school; her work on the undergraduate and graduate levels at the University of Utah; and her career as dean of women, dean of students and vice president of student affairs, University of Utah. She discusses the administrations of Presidents Olpin, and Fletcher and the changes in the studentbody, 1950s-1970s.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1986
5
No.149 Cloyde Anderton
Anderton (b. 1920) discusses his work as an engineer at KALL radio, 1940s-1950s; his work at KSL as chief engineer, 1950s-1980s; the Farnsworth Peak transmitter; and the danger of radiation from the equipment.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1986
6
No.150 Richard Y. Bennion
Bennion (b. 1918) recalls his early life and education at East High School and the University of Utah where he served in student body offices and was a ranked tennis player. He discusses his father, Adam S. Bennion, and a business associate, Obert C. Tanner, and provides his evaluation of the perception of the University by the Salt Lake business community.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1987
7
No.151 Jack Goodman
Goodman (b. 1913) recalls his work at a New York City radio station in news, 1930s-1940s; at KALL radio as news director, 1940s-1950s; at the Salt Lake Tribune as a writer, and a stringer for Newsweek and the New York Times, 1950s-1970s; news director for KDYL, 1950s; writer for Evans Advertising, 1960s; news director, KUTV, 1960s; and his present work as a book reviewer and architectural critic, Salt Lake Tribune. Interviewers: Roy Gibson, Tim Larson
1986
8
No.152 Cathryn Mainwaring
Mainwaring recalls her nursing education in Logan, Utah; her work in establishing the University of Utah nursing program; her graduate schooling; and her later work in beginning a baccalaureate program in nursing at Weber State College, 1930s-1970s.Interviewer: Bonnie C. Clayton
1985
9
No.153 Annetta Bilger
Bilger recalls her nursing education in Portland Oregon; Columbia University; Marquette University; and her directorship of the graduate program in nursing at the University of Utah, 1930s-1970s.Interviewer: Bonnie C. Clayton
1985
10
No.154 Earl J. Glade Jr.
Glade, Jr., recalls the pioneering radio work of his father, Earl J. Glade, Sr. at KSL in the 1920s; relates stories about early broadcasting in Salt Lake; his work at KSL, 1920s-1930s; the entry of George Hatch in broadcasting, 1930s; radio and TV work in Boise, Idaho, 1940s-1960s; BYU director of broadcast services, 1960s-1970s; and the history of the Utah Broadcasters Association, 1950s to the present.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1986

Interviews 155-161Return to Top

Container(s): Box 21

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No.155 Paul W. Hodson
Hodson (b. 1909) recalls his early life, schooling, and business career; schooling at Harvard and Stanford; and his career at the University of Utah in the areas of budgeting and planning during the administrations of Presidents Leroy Cowles, A. Ray Olpin, James Fletcher, Fred Emery, and David P. Gardner. Appendices to the interview are papers by Hodson on the reasons for the demise of the Salt Lake Theater and the development of the Dimple Dell Ranchettes.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1986
2
No.156 Robert S. Olpin
Olpin (b. 1940) recalls his life growing up in California, his relationship with his uncle, A. Ray Olpin; his student days at the University of Utah, 1950s; schooling at Boston University; his academic career and colleagues at the University of Utah, and his work as dean of the College of Fine Arts, University of Utah, 1960s-1980s.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1987
3
No.157 Phelon Malouf
Malouf (b. 1919) recalls his education; his career at the University of Utah Counseling Center; his teaching in the Educational Psychology Department, University of Utah; the development of counseling education at the University and in the community; and discusses colleagues and students with whom he worked.Interviewer: Calvin Harris
1984
4
No.158 Edward W. Clyde
Clyde (b. 1917) recalls his early life and education; his academic work at the College of Law, University of Utah, his friendship with Willis Ritter, many of his law cases--particularly those having to do with water and natural resources; and the development of Las Vegas. He also discusses his role as a member of the University of Utah's Board of Regents and Institutional Council and comments about his personal value system. Copies of speeches and resume are attached.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1987
5
No.159 Wayne Richards
Richards (b. 1916) recalls his early career at KSL radio in the late 1930s; his return to KSL after the war; his participation in the establishment of KSL television; and his career in sales and promotion--first with Dahnken's, later the Cottonwood Mall, and finally with the ZCMI center.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1986
6
No.160 Margaret Hemmert
Hemmert (b. 1923) recalls her work as a bookkeeper-copywriter at KBRV a radio station in Soda Springs, Idaho, 1950s; later work at KVEL, Vernal, Utah; and her association with the Utah Broadcasters Association of which she served as state president in 1977.Interviewer: Carl Stuart Fauver
1986
7
No.161 Thomas Gerald Bleak
Bleak (b. 1913), a cousin to Dale Morgan, recalls Morgan's early life and later career as a researcher and noted writer. Interviewers: Everett L. Cooley, Della Dye
1976

Interviews 162-172Return to Top

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No.162 Frank C. Carman
Carman (b. 1909) recalls his experiences in Utah radio broadcasting, 1920s-1970s; and his ownership of KUTV and several radio stations in surrounding states. Among his Salt Lake stations were KUTA, later KLUB and KISN. Memorable colleagues were Earl J. Glade, Reed Bullen, Arch Madsen, Leland Perry, and George Hatch.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1986
2
No.163 Alden Richards
Richards recalls his experiences in Utah broadcasting first at KSL radio, then KSL television, and finally at Channel Four. He was program director and writer and producer of television commercials. Memorable colleagues were Jackie Nokes, Bob Welti, and Danny Rainger, 1940s-1970s.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1986
3
No.164 Elizabeth Hayes
Hayes (b. 1911) recalls her early interest and later education and training in dance and her long career, 1940s-1980s, at the University of Utah where she established modern dance as a major. She discusses several of her students and colleagues at the University, especially Joan Woodbury and Shirley Ririe, and speaks candidly about the difficulties in making the University a center for dance.Interviewer: Winnifred Margetts
1987
4
No.165 Don D. Walker
Walker (b. 1917), emeritus professor, of English, recalls his rural Utah upbringing; his education at the University of Utah and the University of Minnesota, and his career in the Department of English, University of Utah, 1950s-1970s.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1987
5
No.166 Bob Welti
Welti (b. 1925) recalls his early life in Logan, Utah, his introduction to radio broadcasting in Logan, his service during World War II as a Navy pilot; and his career at Channel 4 and later Channel 5 television in Salt Lake City. He discusses KSL colleagues and his advertising business.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1988
6
No.167 Donald Logan
Logan (b. 1940), professor of special education and educational psychology and former head of the Department of Special Education, discusses his work and that of others in the Graduate School of Education, University of Utah, 1960s-1980s.Interviewer: Harry Bluhm
1987
7
No.168 Walter P. Gnemi
Gnemi (b. 1930), vice president for Administrative Services, University of Utah, recalls his early life growing up in Idaho; his career as a CPA working in several areas of the county; his work at Steiner American Corporation, 1960s; Telemation, 1960s; and his role at the University of Utah, 1970s. Included with the interview is a 37- page "Profile of Administrative Services," 1988.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1988
8
No.169 Reed W. Brinton
Brinton (b. 1915) recalls his early life in Mount Pleasant; his career in the insurance industry in Salt Lake City, 1940s-1980s; and his service on the University of Utah's Board of Regents and the Institutional Council. He discusses clients, University administrators, and subjects that came before the Regents and the Council.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1987
9
No.170 Joel Jacknow
Jacknow (b. 1937), a former student of Henry Eyring, recalls his early schooling and his graduate work under Eyring at the University of Utah, 1959-1963. He discusses Eyring as a scientist, professor, and administrator, and also voices his opinion on Eyring's approach to religion and work.Interviewer: Robert Miller
1987
10
No.171 Clifford Drew
Drew (b. 1943) recalls his early life in Oregon, his graduate work in special education and educational psychology, and his faculty appointments at Kent State and the University of Texas prior to his appointment at the University of Utah in 1971. He discusses the administration of the College of Education, the college's relationship with the University administration, and notable students.Interviewer: Calvin Harris
1986
11
No.172 August Faust
Faust (b. 1918) recalls his education, military service, graduate work, and his tenure at the University of Utah in the College of Education--specializing in Comparative Education. He also discusses the deanships of Wahlquist, Orton, and Hencley, the building of Milton Bennion Hall; and issues facing the college, 1950s-1980s.Interviewer: Calvin Harris
1984

Interviews 173-180Return to Top

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No.173 William M. Purdy
Purdy (b. 1921) recalls his life growing up in coal mining camps in Wyoming and Utah; World War II experiences as a pilot; and teaching in Salt Lake City and Manila, Utah, prior to becoming a teacher and later headmaster at Rowland Hall-St. Marks in Salt Lake City. He discusses his work at Rowland Hall and his theories about education.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1989
2
No.174 Leonard McDonald
McDonald (b. 1914) recalls his childhood, education at Utah State University, tenure as USU Alumni Association executive secretary, and organizer and first director of Utah Retirement System, the Utah State Public Employees Association. Included with the transcript are his vita, summaries of various retirement bills he was responsible for seeing enacted by the Utah Legislature, 1950s-1970s, and the minutes from the first organized meeting establishing UPEA.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1987
3
No.175 Marshall Small
Small (b. 1922) recalls his early career in radio at KUTA and later work at KSL radio on-the-air and then sales for KSL radio and television, 1960s-1980s. He discusses Paul Harvey, Frank Carman, Ken Samson, Joe Kjar, Arch Madsen, Jack Adamson, Duane Hill, Brent Parrish, Herb Jepko, and others.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1988
4
No.176 Mary Lowe
Lowe (b. 1917), professor emeritus of family and consumer studies at the University of Utah, recalls her early life and education, her career at the University, the administrative discrimination faced by women on the faculty, and her international studies.Interviewer: Winnifred Margetts
1986
5
No.177 Robert Erdman
Erdman (b. 1929) recalls his background and schooling, his first years at the University of Utah as a faculty member, his chairmanship of the Department of Special Education, and his deanship of the College of Education, 1976-1983.Interviewer: Harry Bluhm
1987
6
No.178 Thomas Anderson
Anderson (b. 1940), president and general manager of Eastern Utah Broadcasting (KOAL and KARB) recalls his role as a broadcaster, 1960s-1980s.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1988
7
No.179 Robert Temple
Temple (b. 1921) recalls his career in broadcasting at Washington State with KREM radio and television; KTVI-television in St. Louis; KGMB, in Hawaii; and KUTV in Salt Lake City. He provides an overview of broadcast marketing and Utah's Hatch family broadcast holdings.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1986
8
No.180 Scott Clawson
Clawson (b. 1917), retired program director at KSL television recalls his early work at KSL radio, 1930s; and his career in television, 1940s-1980s; and television technology, programming, facilities, and personnel at both KSLs.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1986

Interviews 181-191Return to Top

Container(s): Box 24

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No.181 Clifton Tolboe
Tolboe (b. 1910), a retired general contractor, and his wife, Euniece, recall the Tolboe's ownership of radio station KOVO in Provo (1930s-1940s); and their association with Abe Glassman and Arch Madsen.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1988
2
No.182 Frank Jex
Jex (b. 1920) recalls the development of and his tenure with the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Utah, university politics, and his work in prediction research, 1940s-1980s.Interviewer: Harry Bluhm
1987
3
No.183 Louise Hill Howe Mallonee
Mallonee (b. 1898) discusses her early career in Salt Lake City as an actress in local productions, 1920s; her subsequent roles in radio with the KSL Players and other shows, 1930s-1950s; teaching at the University of Utah, 1940s-1960s; and the work of her colleagues.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1986
4
No.184 Grant Bitter
Bitter (b. 1921) recalls his schooling in special education, his emphasis on education for the deaf and the many controversies surrounding that issue, and his work with the LDS church and community groups in educating the handicapped.Interviewer: Harry Bluhm
1987
5
No.185 Tony Kontgas
Kontgas (b. 1908) recalls his work as a telegrapher at radio station KDYL, 1929-1930; and his W W II service as a telegrapher; people he knew in broadcasting--Sid Fox, George Snell, Philip Lasky; and his later life in Price, Utah.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1988
6
No.186 Kenneth L. Hatch
Hatch (b. 1935) recalls his childhood in Vernal, his education, military service, and his career in broadcasting at KSL and KIRO. He provides information about Bonneville International, the holding company for the LDS church, and management figures such as Arch Madsen, Lloyd Cooney, etc.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1988
7
No.187 Odean Hess
Hess (b. 1919) recalls his early life, his schooling, his tenure in the Department of Educational Studies, 1940s-1980s, and the administrations of the deans of the College of Education--John T. Wahlquist, Asael Woodruff, Steven Henckley, and Don Orton.Interviewer: Calvin Harris
1986
8
No.188 Lewis Max Rogers
Rogers (b. 1918) recalls his childhood, his education through graduate school, his years of teaching religion and the difficulties experienced with the Wilkinson administration at BYU, and the academic climate at the University of Utah (1960 to present). He discusses the influence of Heber Snell, Sterling McMurrin, Waldemer Read, etc., and evaluates University Presidents, Olpin, Fletcher, and Gardner.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1988
9
No.189 Dick Crookston
Crookston discusses his career at KUTV doing propwork and eventually as creative director, his presidency of the Salt Lake Advertising Club, and various people he worked with, including George Hatch.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1988
10
No.190 Peter L. Goss
Goss (b. 1943) recalls his background and education in the East, his tenure in the College of Architecture, University of Utah from 1970; his work in architectural preservation; his opinion of the Marriott Library; and his feelings about the local culture.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1988
11
No.191 Hurschell Urie
Urie (b. 1919) recalls growing up in southern Utah; working at KSUB radio in Cedar City as an operator, manager, and chief engineer, (1938-1950s), his education at Branch Agriculture College and later at the University of Utah; and his association at Weber State College in the Department of Electronics (1958-1984).Interviewer: Tim Larson
1988

Interviews 192-198Return to Top

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No.192 George A. Pierson
Pierson (b. 1904) recalls his career at the University of Utah, 1930s-1970s--his role as dean of students, student unrest, and the establishment of the Student Counseling Program and the Department of Educational Psychology.Interviewer: George Pierson
1986
2
No.193 Arthur L. Higbee
Higbee recalls his early experiences with and the establishment of KSUB radio in Cedar City, Utah, 1940-1948; his work at KCPX radio and KTVT television, Salt Lake City, 1948-1950; and his appointment as professor and director of Telecommunications, Utah State University, Logan, Utah, 1959-1987.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1986
3
No.194 Ray Briem
Briem (b. 1930) recalls his career in radio beginning as a teenager in Ogden, Utah, at KLO; KUTA/KLUB, Salt Lake City; KING, Seattle; and KLAC and KABC, Los Angeles. He discusses the communications training he received during army service (1950s); and the talk radio format for which he has become well-known in L.A. and in syndication.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1988
4
No.195 Philip Lasky
Lasky (b. 1902) recalls his early days in radio in Denver at KFEL as announcer, engineer, etc., and his move to Salt Lake where he helped Sid Fox to successfully market KDYL radio, 1927-1935. He discusses Sid Fox, Ben Larson, George Snell, and other early radio pioneers in the Salt Lake area.Interviewers: Tim Larson, Gregory C. Thompson
1984; 1988
5
No.196 Harold (Hal) Collipriest
Collipriest (b. 1926) discusses his career in radio broadcasting both on-the-air and marketing. He recalls incidents and personalities at KUTA, KLUB, and KSUW, a commercial short-wave station.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1988
6
No.197 Martin Brixen
Brixen (b. 1927) recalls his background and education in architecture; his work as head of Campus Planning, University of Utah, 1950s-1960s; private practice as an architect in Salt Lake City, 1960s-1980s; and his assessment of architecture on the campus and in the Salt Lake community.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1988
7
No.198 Paul Bennion Cannon
Cannon (b. 1902) recalls growing up in a polygamous family in the Forest Dale section of Salt Lake City; his law education at Columbia; his law practice, 1920s-1980s--particularly mining cases representing the Jesse Knight family; the financial power of the Mormon church; and his views on the fiscal policies of the government.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1988

Interviews 199-211Return to Top

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No.199 Bernie Calderwood
Calderwood (b. 1924) recalls his career in radio as a child performer at KSL, and his continuing work at stations KSL, KDYL, KMUR and later at television stations KCPX and KSL. He was part of the first television demonstration in Salt Lake in 1939. His career covered sixty years of broadcasting in Salt Lake--1920s-1980s.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1988
2
No.200 Lloyd Cooney
In a telephone interview, Cooney recalls his early broadcast career with KSL radio, ca. 1955-1964; his later career at KIRO, Seattle, 1964-1980; his campaign for the U. S. Senate from Washington, 1980; and becoming a broadcast consultant, 1980 to the present.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1988
3
No.201 Martha Stewart
Stewart (b. 1916) recalls her family history, marriage, career as a librarian, and her philosophy of Unitarianism. Interviewers: Stan Larson, Lorille Miller
1989
4
No.202 Pricilla Mayden
Mayden r(b. 1923) ecalls her career as a librarian at the Veterans Administration Hospital; establishing the Eccles Medical Library, University of Utah, 1950s-1980s; and her association with the Unitarian church, Salt Lake City, 1950s-1980s. Interviewers: Stan Larson, Lorille Miller
1989
5
No.203 Bryce Roe
Roe (b. 1921) recalls his early life and association with the Mormon church, his education, and some about his career as a lawyer. He reflects on his reason for leaving the Mormon church, his beliefs about religion in general, and his association with the Unitarian church, Salt Lake City.Interviewers: Stan Larson, Lorille Miller
1989
6
No.204 William Mulder
Mulder (b. 1915) recalls his family and personal history, early life in Salt Lake, education, military service, Scandinavian studies, four sojourns in India, responsibilities at the University of Utah including his editorship of the Western Humanities Review, his work with the establishment of the Middle East Center, tenure as a faculty member of the English Department, and association with the "Swearing Elders."Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1988
7
No.205 Edwin Wilson
Wilson (b. 1898) discusses his career and concerns as a Unitarian minister, 1928-1980s (Salt Lake City, 1946-1949); his work as executive director of the American Humanist Association, 1949-1963; and his philosophy of religion. Interviewers: Stan Larson, Lorille Miller
1989
8
No.206 Martin Zwick
Zwick (b. 1920) recalls his musical career, his work with Maurice Abravanel and the Utah Symphony, and his philosophy of Unitarianism.Interviewers: Stan Larson, Lorille Miller
1989
9
No.207 Kathryn Ormsby
Ormsby (b. 1920) recalls her personal and family history and some of her activities in the Unitarian church, Salt Lake City, 1950s-1980s.Interviewer: Stan Larson, Lorille Miller
1988
10
No.208 Florien Wineriter
Wineriter (b. 1925) discusses his personal life, his association with and philosophy about Unitarianism, and particularly his activities in the First Unitarian Church of Salt Lake City. Interviewers: Stan Larson, Lorille Miller
1989
11
No.209 Reid Carpenter
Carpenter (b. 1927) recalls his career in engineering for television broadcasting, 1950s-1980s--his positions with Frank Carman and George Hatch, KUTV and as a consultant nationally and internationally as a television broadcast engineer.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1988
12
No.210 Muriel Zwick
Zwick (b. 1914 recalls her personal history, activities in various Salt Lake civic organizations, and her association with the Unitarian church in Salt Lake City.Interviewers: Stan Larson, Lorille Miller
1989
13
No.211 Ardo Perri
Perri (b. 1913) recalls his family history and his work in the ski industry in Utah, 1940s-1980s. He discusses the designing and installing of ski lifts at Brighton, Park City, and Solitude ski resorts. Much of the interview centers around his work at Brighton and with Zane Doyle.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1989

Interviews 212-214Return to Top

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No.212 Clark Wilson
Clark Wilson (b. 1914) recalls his personal and family history, mining in turn-of-the-century Utah because of the involvement of his father, R. C. Wilson, banking in Salt Lake, 1920s-1950s, and his involvement in mining in the Park City area, 1930s-1980s, Lead-Zinc lobbying activities in Washington D. C., 1960s, and Park City skiing, 1960s-1980s.Interviewer: Floyd O'Neil, Gregory C. Thompson
1986; 1987
2
No.213 Denna Wright
Wright (b. 1941) discusses her personal and family life and her participation in the Unitarian church, Salt Lake City, 1970s-1980s. Interviewers: Stan Larson, Lorille Miller
1989
3
No.214 Jan Harold Brunvand
Brunvand (b. 1933) recalls his family life, education, and academic career. He discusses his professional colleagues; the administration of the Department of English, University of Utah, 1960s-1990; foreign study; and his work in folklore, especially his work with urban legends.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1990

Interviews 215-221Return to Top

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No.215 William R. Murdoch
Murdoch (b. 1931) recalls his early life and schooling; his family, especially his father Lennox Murdoch, KSL television station manager in the late 1940s; his involvement in promotion and management of KSL television; and many individuals who worked at KSL, 1940s-1980s.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1988
2
No.216 Elinor Lowe Linden
Linden (b. 1908) recalls coming to the United States from Hungary, the difficulties she encountered in her life; and joining the Unitarian church, 1930s. Interviewers: Stan Larson, Lorille Miller
1989
3
No.217 Barbara Samuels
Barbara Samuels (b. 1911) was interviewed by Larson and Miller in July, 1989. She recalls her family, education, and work with her husband, Leo T. Samuels, a noted endocrinologist, (ca.1910-1978), who was at the University of Utah from 1944-1978. Dr. Samuels headed the Department of Biochemistry at the University Medical School, 1944-1964. Mrs. Samuels discusses her association with and views about Unitarianism. She was interviewed in November by Everett Cooley. Topics covered in this interview include her marriage to Leo and their life together, his work at the university, the development of the medical school, Leo's research and recognitions, cultural life in Utah, being a gentile in Mormon culture, and Barbara's community involvement. Interviewers: Stan Larson, Lorille Miller, and Everett Cooley
1989
4
No.218 Stanley D. Rees
Rees (b. 1912) recalls his personal history; experiences as a recording engineer at KSL; his work with the Tabernacle Choir, 1930s-1950s; his business, Recording Arts, 1950s-1980s; and his leadership positions in the Mormon church, 1960s-1980s. He discusses various prominent people he was associated with including Arch Madsen, Earl J. Glade, Alexander Schriener, Harvey Fletcher, and Gordon B. Hinckley.Interviewer: Linda Davies
1989
5
No.219 Helen LeCheminant
LeCheminant (b. 1902) recalls her early family life in Manti, Utah; her education; first and second marriages; her work as a teacher; her affiliation with the Unitarian church; association with Unitarian ministers; and her philosophy of Unitarianism.Interviewers: Stan Larson, Lorille Miller
1989
6
No.220 Dorene Gogins
Gogins (b. 1937) recalls her association with the Unitarian church, Salt Lake City, 1960s-1980s; her business career; civic involvement; and her family. Interviewers: Stan Larson, Lorille Miller
1989
7
No.221 Joseph Kjar
Kjar (b. 1920) recalls his long association with KSL and Bonneville International, 1950s-1980s; his working relationship with many of the administrative personnel in these organizations, with Arch Madsen and the relationship of the Mormon church with KSL and Bonneville.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1988

Interviews 222-228Return to Top

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No.222 Paul Coburn
Coburn (b. 1918) recalls his career in radio in Salt Lake City, 1940s-1980s as an announcer, DJ and later program director at KUTA, KALL, KNAK, and KLUB; and various radio personalities including Frank Carman, Frank McIntyre, and members of the "Fabulous Five," at KLUB radio during the 1950s.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1988
2
No.223 O. N. Hunter
Hunter (b. 1919) recalls his personal history and his professional career at the University of Utah--professor, College of Education; chairman of the Department of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation; dean of the College of Health. He discusses the presidents of the university between 1960s-1980s.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
3
No.224 Paul Hansen
Hansen (b. 1920) discusses his tenure with the Department of Education and the College of Education, University of Utah, 1950s-1980s. He headed the department and worked closely with the University's central administration.Interviewer: Harry Bluhm
1987
4
No.225 Justin Stewart
Stewart (b. 1912) recalls his family history and education and discusses communism, civil rights, discrimination, and the co-op and union movements in Utah. He briefly discusses his membership in the Unitarian Church, Salt Lake City.Interviewer: Stan Larson, Lorille Miller
1989
5
No.226 Duane Hill
Hill (b. 1927) recalls speech education classes at the University of Utah, 1950; KSL television production work, 1951-1955; KUTV program director, 1955-1960; program director and marketing for KSL television, 1960-1984; director of advertising for American Stores, 1984-1986 and currently president of Duane Hill Marketing Concepts.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1988
6
No.227 William B. Smart
Smart recalls his family life; education; and career at the Deseret News, 1940s-1980s. He discusses issues of community concern, policies and people at the paper, other Utah publications, and people who have influenced him.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1989
7
No.228 James M. Rock
Rock (b. 1935) recalls his family and personal history growing up on a dairy farm in Wisconsin; his education; academic career, especially his tenure in the Department of Economics, University of Utah, 1960s-1990s. He discusses department politics and personalities and his community involvement with the NAACP and one of its leaders, Alberta Henry.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1989

Interviews 229-234Return to Top

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No.229 Charles (Chick) Morton
Morton (b. 1916) recalls the development of skiing and the ski industry, 1930s-1980s--first at Brighton and later at Alta; operating the Alta ski lifts; the skiing philosophy practiced at Alta; and many of the individuals involved at Alta including Alf Engen and Joe Quinney.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1989
2
No.230 Joe Lee
Lee (b. 1920) recalls his career in radio and television broadcasting in Utah, 1940s-1980s, at stations KOVO, KDYL, KNAK, KCPK, Channel 4, and finally Channel 13.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1988
3
No.231 Heber Grant Wolsey
Wolsey (b. 1920) recalls his work at Gillham Advertising, Brigham Young University, and KSL television in sales and management.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1988
4
No.232 Jan Peterson
Peterson (b. 1939) recalls his parents' interest in skiing; his racing career; skiing at Alta, Brighton, and Park City; and his sporting goods business in Park City.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1989
5
No.233 Max Lundberg
Lundberg (b. 1939) recalls skiing as a youngster; teaching programs for children; joining Alta as assistant ski school director; involvement in standardizing the techniques of ski instruction and certification; and membership nationally and internationally in ski instructors' associations.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1989
6
No.234 Glade Peterson
Peterson (1928-1990) recalls his family and personal history, musical training, operatic career in Europe and the United States, and his return to Utah in 1975 where he established Utah Opera Company. There is a discussion of his experiences with the company, 1975-1990, as fund raiser, performer, and director.Interviewer: Wanda Mae Robinson
1989, 1990

Interviews 235-247Return to Top

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No.235 Evelyn and Kathryn Bertilson
Bertilson ( b. 1935) and her daughter, Kathryn (b. 1964) discuss their family life, education and feelings about Unitarianism. Kathryn details her service in the Peace Corps in Honduras, ca. 1986-1988.Interviewer: Stan Larson
1989
2
No.236 Charlotte Newman
Newman (b. 1915) recalls her personal and family history, her education, work as a teacher, her community and civic work as a leader in the League of Women Voters, her membership in several important governmental committees, and her reasons for joining the Unitarian church. She also discusses her poetry.Interviewers: Stan Larson, Lorille Miller
1989
3
No.237 Ineda Roe
Roe (b. 1921) recalls her personal and family history, civic and community work, her employment as secretary to A. Ray Olpin (1946-1950), and her work as head of the Utah Council for Handicapped and Developmentally Disabled Person, 1972-1986. She also discusses her membership in the Unitarian church.Interviewers: Stan Larson, Lorille Miller
1989
4
No.238 Morgan White
White (b. 1924) recalls his education and his career in radio and television in Utah (Ogden, KLO), Colorado (Denver, KIM), and Hawaii (Honolulu, KGMB), 1940s-1980s. Most of the time he worked for Cecil Heftel, a son-in-law of Abe Glassman and brother-in-law of George Hatch. White describes his role as an on-the-air personality and discusses the personalities of Glassman, Hatch, and Heftel.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1989
5
No.239 Earl Miller and Gladys Miller
Earl (b. 1917) and Gladys recall the history of organized skiing at Snow Basin, Weber County, Utah, 1930s-1950s, where they operated a ski school and concessions. They list a number of people with whom they were associated, such as the Engen and Eccles families.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1989
6
No.240 Mel Dalebout
Dalebout (b. 1930) discusses his skiing career and the development and marketing of his custom manufactured ski boot, the Daleboot.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1989
7
No.241 Leo T. Samuels
Samuels (b. 1894) discusses his early life and education; the establishment of the four-year College of Medicine, University of Utah; his work and research in biochemistry and endocrinology and his career at the University, 1940s-1970s. Interviewers: Hans K. Jacobs, Clarence Stover
1969, 1970
8
No.242 Verona Creer
Creer (b. 1902) recalls her family, personal history, and the career of her husband Leland Creer, who headed the history department at the University of Utah, 1940s-1960s.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1988
9
No.243 Margo Walters McDonald
McDonald (b. 1942) recalls her introduction to skiing, her racing career, people she knew in skiing, and the benefits she received as a result of her being an Olympic contender in 1964.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1990
10
No.244 Irving B. McNulty
McNulty (b. 1918) discusses his education, experiences as a German prisoner of war during W W II, and his career in the Biology Department, University of Utah, 1940s-1980s; the career of Walter Cottam, University faculty member in the Department of Biology, 1930s-1970s.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1990
11
No.245 Thomas J. Parmley
Parmley (b. 1897) recalls his family history; his education as a physicist; and his career at the University of Utah, 1920s-1970s, where he headed the Department of Physics for a number of years. He recounts being alive during the tenures of all the University of Utah presidents and discusses those he knew, as well as academic freedom at the University, and the founding of the Aztec Club.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1989
12
No.246 Frank Soren Miller
Miller (b. 1921) recalls his personal and family history, his treatment for a tubercular hip, his love of tennis, his pride in his children and their accomplishments, his membership in the Mormon church, and his later affiliation with the Unitarian church.Interviewer: Lorille Miller
1989
13
No.247 Vee (Vervene) Carlisle
Carlisle (b. 1920) recalls her personal and family history; career with the Foreign Service; business career in Salt Lake--particularly her work at Tracy Collins Bank; her involvement in Democratic politics; service in the Utah Legislature, 1970s; and in Women's issues, particularly the ERA.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1988

Interviews 248-257Return to Top

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No.248 Ann Thatcher Hinckley
Hinckley (b. 1933) recalls her friendship with Fawn McKay Brodie and her husband Bernard and provides an evaluation of them as a couple, parents, writers and scholars and also discusses her thoughts about Fawn Brodie's relationship to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.Interviewer: Newell Bringhurst
1984
2
No.249 Samuel W. Taylor
Taylor (b. 1906) recalls his correspondence with Fawn McKay Brodie and discusses her writing as well as Carl Carmer's , in relation to Mormonism and his thoughts about Brodie's Mormonism.Interviewer: Newell Bringhurst
1989
3
No.250 Thomas B. McKay
McKay (b. 1917) recalls his early family life in Huntsville, Utah, and relations with his sister Fawn McKay Brodie, as well as her attitude towards Mormonism and her scholastic achievements.Interviewer: Newell Bringhurst
1989
4
No.251 Stan Larson
Larson (b. 1946) recalls his Latter-day Saint childhood in Idaho as well as his mission; later recalls his studies throughout his doctorate program and afterwards, along with current projects and church standing.Interviewer: Lorille Miller
1989
5
No.252 Becky Wintrobe
Mrs. Wintrobe (b. 1905) recalls her childhood in Canada as well as her schooling through college and her marriage to Dr. Maxwell M. Wintrobe; moving to Utah and his work at the University of Utah medical school.Interviewer: Everett Cooley
1990
6
No.253 Luella Seeholzer
Seeholzer (b. 1905) recalls her early ski episodes with her husband and the beginnings of Beaver Mountain with the early ski tows and later chair lifts. She also discusses running a family business and hiring instructors and ski patrol.Interviewer: Joseph Arave
1990
7
No.254 Lou Lorenz
Lorenz (b. 1924) recalls his father's background and coming to Utah, as well as his own background in skiing and work in Utah's ski industry as an instructor and administrator and later incorporation of his business, the greater Salt Lake Ski School.Interviewer: Joseph Arave
1990
8
No.255 Jim Gaddis
Gaddis (b. 1940) recalls growing up in Salt Lake City and his early interests in golf and skiing, as well as races he's won and awards he's received along with his promotion of ski racing for juniors.Interviewer: Joseph Arave
1989, 1990
9
No.256 L. Don Harris
Harris (b. 1908) recalls his early experiences and interest in boating; cataract boats, motorboats, and river running with inflatables.Interviewer: Roy Webb
1990
10
No.257 Horst Menderhausen
Menderhausen (b. 1910) recalls his association with Bernard Brodie and a slight social relationship with Fawn Brodie as well through the RAND Corporation.Interviewer: Newell Bringhurst
1988

Interviews 258-270Return to Top

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No.258 Brad Barber
Barber (b. 1950), the Director of Demographic & Economic Analysis for the Utah Office of Planning & Budget recalls his involvement in the first and second Utah Olympic bids in the 1980s and his chairmanship of the Utah Winter Games organization in the late 1980s.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1990
2
No.259 William P. Hewitt
Hewitt (b. 1909) recalls his career as a mining engineer at Columbia University and later his career with American Smelting and Refining Company and describes mining exploration in Nevada. Later he headed the Utah Heological and Mineralogical Survey, which was a project of both the state government and the University of Utah.Interviewer: Floyd O'Neil
1991
3
No.260 Hugh Gillilan
Gillilan (b. 1934) recalls his preparation for and service as a Methodist minister as well as his resignation from the Methodist church and service as a Unitarian minister. He also discusses his activities as a professsor at Westminister, the University of Utah, and his private practice as a psychologist.Interviewers: Stan Larson, Lorille Miller
1989
4
No.261 Stanley Wopert
Dr. Wopert recalls his professional and personal association with Fawn and Bernard Brodie while the three of them worked as UCLA faculty together.Interviewer: Newell Bringhurst
5
No.262 Dortha Miller McDonald
McDonald (b. 1899) recalls attending the Training School at the University of Utah and her career as a first grade teacher primarily in the Salt Lake District. She also discusses the problems of minority children as well as the influence of Mormonism in Utah education.Interviewer: Fred Buchanan
1990
6
No.263 Otto Carpenter
Carpenter (b. 1915) recalls early skiing in Summit County during the 1920s-1930s, his later establishment of the Snow Park ski area during the 1940s-1960s, which is the area of where Deer Valley was later established.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1989
7
No.264 Bill Lash
Lash (b. 1928) recalls his work with Claude Jones, skiing in Utah and Idaho, as well as his books on ski instruction and the establishment of the Intermountain Ski Instructors' Association and the Professional Ski Instructors Association.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1990
8
No.265 Vicki Varela
Varela, a staff member of Utah's Board of Regents recalls her involvement in defeating first the tax initiatives which would have impacted Utah's education and second to promote and win approval for the Utah Olympic bid in the late 1980s.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1990
9
No.266 Alan Coombs
Coombs, a professor of History at the University of Utah and board member of the Unitarian Church in Salt Lake City during the 1970s, recalls his personal background as well as his interest and participation in the Unitarian Church from the 1960s to the 1980s.Interviewers: Stan Larson, Lorille Miller
1989
10
No.267 William Monroe and Evangeline Monroe
William (b. 1912) and Evangeline Monroe recall their childhoods, educations and religious backgrounds, as well as moving to Salt Lake City in the 1920's and later joining the Unitarian Church.Interviewer: Stan Larson
1989
11
No.268 J. R. Keate and Martha Keate
J. R. (b. 1922) and Martha (b. 1921) recall their respective families, their Unitarian heritage and long association with the Unitarian Church mainly in Salt Lake City and California.Interviewer: Lorille Miller
1990
12
No.269 Irving Bernstean
Bernstean, a professor of political science at UCLA recalls his personal and professional relationship with Fawn McKay Brodie and her husband, Bernard Brodie.Interviewer: Newell Bringhurst
1988
13
No.270 Ray Stewart, JoAnn Lewis, and Ava Stewart
The Stewarts and their daughter JoAnn recall their establishment and operation of Timphaven Ski Resort and the later establishment of Sundance Ski Resort by Robert Redford.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1989

Interviews 271-281Return to Top

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No.271 Hans Rogger
Rogger, a professor of history at UCLA, responds to questions about his personal and professional relationships with Fawn McKay Brodie and her husband Bernard.Interviewer: Newell Bringhurst
1988
2
No.272 Peter Loewenberg
Loewenberg (b. 1933) recalls his association with Fawn McKay Brodie and her husband Bernard, through the Department of History at UCLA and in group discussions about psychoanalytical biography as a genre.Interviewer: Newell Bringhurst
1988
3
No.273 Barbara Korsch-Ward
Korsch-Ward (b. 1921) recalls her friendship with Fawn McKay Brodie and her husband Bernard, whom she met as neighbors and later helped Fawn with her widowhood and in 1981, she helped Fawn during her last ordeal with cancer, as she was a medical doctor.Interviewer: Newell Bringhurst
1989
4
No.274 Dick Movitz
Movitz (b. 1925) recalls his extensive background with skiing leading to the 1948 Loympics. He discusses skiing for the Army during WWII and his involvement in the sport after his racing career.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1990
5
No.275 W. Jay Eldredge
Eldredge (b. 1915) recalls his association with Promised Valley Playhouse, its establishment and development as well as the role played by the Mormon church in the creation of this theater.Interviewer: Winnifred Margetts
1986
6
No.276 John P. Brophy
Brophy (b. 1929) recalls his Kearns family background, the family interest in broadcasting and newspaper publishing, as well as personal insight into his personal background.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1990
7
No.277 Jack Paige
Paige (b. 1903) recalls his work in theatre and later broadcasting with Mutual Network in New York City and Washington D.C., and later moving to Salt Lake City to help George Hatch in establishing the Intermountain Network. Interviewers: Afton Paige, Tim Larson
1986
8
No.278 Junior Bounous
Bounous (b. 1925) recalls his early interest in skiing, teaching with Alf Engen and directing ski schools at Sugar Bowl in California, Timphaven/Sundance and Snowbird, as well as the development of the American Technique.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1989
9
No.279 Lynn Lehmann
Lehmann (b. 1947) recalls his growing up in Salt Lake City, early career in broadcasting and later working for KNAK and KCPX. He later began writing, creating and developing television programs on a national level.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1989
10
No.280 Ron Anderson
Anderson (b. 1936) recalls his early life and participation in the Mormon church, his later disillusionment with the Mormon Church and subsequent affiliation with the Unitarian Church and service on the Board of Trustees at the First Unitarian Church in Salt Lake City.Interviewers: Stan Larson, Lorille Miller
1989
11
No.281 Harold Goodro and Helen Goodro
The Goodros (b. 1916; b. 1920) recall their early interests in skiing and later endeavors by Harold working with the Ski Patrol at Alta for 50 years, Utah Power and Light and the University of Utah ski program.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1989

Interviews 282-288Return to Top

Container(s): Box 35

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No.282 Jesse Kimball "K" Smith
Smith (b. 1916) recalls the establishment of skiing at Brighton, World War II service in the 10th Mountain Division, skiing in Japan, and further development of skiing at Brighton.Interviewer: Gregory C. Thompson
1989
2
No.283 Maxwell M. Wintrobe
Wintrobe recalls coming to Utah to head the Department of Medicine at the University of Utah Medical School in 1943 and all aspects regarding his career.Interviewer: Leonard Jarcho
1970
3
No.284 Mervin B. Hogan
Hogan recalls the establishment and development of the Aztec Club at the University of Utah, 1920s-1930s.
1989
4
No.285 Leonard Jarcho
Jarcho, Professor Emeritus of Neurology at the University of Utah, talks about his early family life in New York City, and about his education, including Harvard, Columbia, and his internship at Beth Israel. He recalls his army service in World War II, stationed at Fort Dix, in Manila, and on Guadalcanal. Details of his long career in medicine include a residency at Mount Sinai, Neurological studies with primates, a fellowship at Johns Hopkins, assistant chief of medicine at the Veteran's Administration Hospital in Salt Lake City, NIH training in London, and the development of a Department of Neurology at the University of Utah. Topics also covered include discrimination, Eleanor Roosevelt, autopsies, Max Wintrobe, the importance of taking a good medical history, living in Salt Lake City, and problems in modern medical practice.Interviewer: Everett Cooley
1989
5
No.286 Lee Craig Brockbank
Brockbank (b. 1927) recalls the radio soap operas of her childhood, her early career in radio, and working for KFEL TV in Denver. She worked at KLUB Radio in Salt Lake City for a number of years before moving to California, where she did TV commercials. She also worked in public relations. Other topics include the Pacific Pioneer Broadcasters organization, Frank Carmen, and various people in the broadcast industry.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1988
6
No.287 Clark S. Knowlton
Knowlton (1919-1991) recalls his childhood in Holladay, Utah. He also describes his education, military service, and early teaching experiences. He also talks about his two years in Brazil doing research for his thesis on the Syrian and Lebanese immigrant population there. Other topics covered include ethnic turmoil in New Mexico, studying illegal immigrants, teaching at the University of Texas at El Paso, being investigated for subversive activities, creation of the University of Utah Minorities Program, Minority endeavors in Utah, problems in the U of U sociology department, and personal achievements and disappointments.Interviewer: Everett Cooley
1988
7
No.288 Golden H. Brimhall
Interviewer: Newell G. BringhurstBrimhall, an uncle of Fawn McKay Brodie, recalls his impressions of her as a child. He talks about her book , and about the reaction to it within the family. He also talks about various people in the Brimhall and McKay families, their genealogy, histories, and how the families related to one another.
1988

Interviews 289-297Return to Top

Container(s): Box 36

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No.289 Mark Hamson
Hamson (b. 1916) recalls his childhood in Depression-era Salt Lake City, going to work for KDYL radio in 1946, Allen Gunderson, KDYL-TV, Ben Larsen, David Evans, real estate, and his association with Harry Golub.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1989
2
No.290 Tom Goldsmith
Reverend Goldsmith of the Unitarian Church, recalls his youth and religious education, discusses Unitarian philosophy, and speculates on the future of Unitarianism in Utah. Interviewers: Lorille Miller, Stan Larson
1989
3
No.291 Russell L. Davis
Davis (b. 1924), director of the Utah State library, talks about his childhood in rural Idaho, his LDS mission to New England, libray science at Utah State University and Michigan State, establishing the Utah State library system, the bookmobile project, regional libraries, automation and computers, funding, and library politics.Interviewer: Everett Cooley
1987
4
No.292 Andrew W. Cooley
Monologue entitled "A Confidential Account of My Days of Wine and Roses," detailing his experience as an alcoholic.
1991
5
No.293 Leonard Brody
Brody (brother of Bernard Brody) details his family genealogy and his recollections of Bernard both before and after he married Fawn. He also gives his impressions of Fawn's books.Interviewer: Newell Bringhurst
1988
6
No.294 Cohn Morrison
Morrison talks about his family and personal history before explaining his ideas on Unitarianism. Interviewers: Lorille Miller, Stan Larson
1989
7
No.295 Agi Plenk
Agi Plenk (b. 1916) recalls her early life--being born in Hungary, living as a child in Yugoslavia, then moving to Austria where at age 11 she joined the Socialist Youth Movement. She describes her schooling, meeting Henry Plenk, leaving Europe under strained circumstances in the late 1930s and finally moving to Utah in the 1940s where Henry would be at the University of Utah Medical School as a radiologist 1940s-1980s. Agi Plenk worked as a child psychologist, eventually taking a Ph.D. in Psychology and establishing the Children's Center for children with special mental health needs. Interviewers: Lorille Miller, Stan Larson
1989
folders
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No.296 Elva Plummer
Plummer discusses her husband Gail's (1899-1964) career as the manager of Kingsbury Hall on the campus of the University of Utah. She talks about some of the famous people who performed there and how various U of U administrators dealt with the theater. Persons mentioned include Maude Adams, Marian Anderson, William Gillette, and Lowell Lees. Following the interview is a folder of information on Gail Plummer.Interviewer: Winnifred Margetts
1989
Folder
10
No.297 C. Arnold Ferrin Jr.
Ferrin ( b. 1925) recalls his Utah childhood and basketball experience at the University of Utah. He talks about playing for the Los Angeles Lakers, being general manager for the Utah Stars, and being athletic director at the University of Utah. Subjects discussed include the relationship between academics and sports, athletic budgets, women's athletics, public relations questions, and the high and low points of his tenure at the university.Interviewer: Everett Cooley
1986

Interviews 298-307Return to Top

Container(s): Box 37

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No.298 Roman Kolkowicz
Kolkowicz, a professor of political science at UCLA, recalls his relationship with Fawn and Bernard Brodie. He gives his impressions of their personalities, talks about their children, and discusses some of the people he met at dinner parties hosted by the Brodies. He also talks about Bernard's career, Daniel Ellsberg, and Henry Kissinger.Interviewer: Newell Bringhurst
1988
2
No.299 Victor Wolfenstein
Interviewer: Newell BringhurstIn this conversation with Newell Bringhurst, Professor Wolfenstein explains his social relationship with the Brodies through his aunt, psychoanalyst Martha Leites Wolfenstein. He gives his impressions of Fawn, Bernard, and of their relationship. Other topics covered include psychoanalysis, Romi Greenson, psychobiography, and Fawn as a teacher.
1989
3
No.300 Hildi Greenson
Greenson recalls her initial impressions of Fawn McKay Brodie and talks about the development of their friendship. Other topics covered include psychoanalysis, Edward Teller, Fawn's reasons for doing the Nixon biography, Brodie's excommunication, and her death.Interviewer: Newell Bringhurst
1988
4
No.301 Gary Nash
Gary Nash, Professor of History at UCLA, recalls the controversy surrounding Fawn Brodie's appointment to the faculty, and talks about the Jefferson biography. Other topics covered include Brodie's teaching, her relationship with Bernard, and her feelings about Nixon.Interviewer: Newell Bringhurst
1988
5
No.302 Betty Dalgliesh
The Reverend Betty Dalgliesh, affiliated with St. Paul's Episcopal Church, is the wife of Professor W. Harold Dalgliesh, in the University of Utah's Department of History. In this interview, Dalgliesh (b. 1904) talks about the Depression, meeting and marrying Harold, and the subsequent move west to teach at the University of Utah. She talks about her children and grandchildren, her calling as a Priest, and the Episcopalian church.Interviewer: Everett Cooley
1988
6
No.303 Joan E. Bournstein
Bournstein (b. 1928) recalls her Salt Lake City childhood and education, her marriage and subsequent moves. She talks at length about her father, Manny Drucker. Other topics include Sid Fox, Jewish religion and holidays, and broadcasting personalities.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1989
7
No.304 Alan F. Frank
In a series of three interviews Alan Frank (b. 1926) describes growing up in Salt Lake, military serevice, broadcasting at KNAK, KUTV, establishing an advertising agency with Bob Thomas, the "Kentucky Fried Chicken" account, and the Arthur Frank Clothing store.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1988
8
No.305 David J. Miller
In two interviews David J. Miller (b. 1950) recalls growing up in Utah, attending Utah State University, becoming involved in radio broadcasting in Logan, Utah, later in St. George, Utah and at the time of the interview in Oregon with Frank Carman who had been a pioneer in Utah radio broadcasting.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1989
9
No.306 Earl W. Harmer, Jr.
Harmer (b. 1926), Professor of Education, recalls his life involvement in the education field, including his experience in the Salt Lake City School District, 1940s-1960s.Interviewer: Fred Buchanan
1990
10
No.307 J. P. Gibbons
In two interviews, J.P. Gibbons (b. 1916) recalls the history of his company, Gibbons and Reed, which participates in mining, public works, highways, and commerial construction projects in Utah and other intermountain states. Accompanying the interviews is a 24-page illustrated history of the company. In addition, Gibbons discusses briefly his family history and community involvement.Interviewer: Everett Cooley
1988

Interviews 308-316Return to Top

Container(s): Box 38

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No.308 Dorothy Higgs Smith
Dorothy Smith (b. 1905) recalls her schooling in Salt Lake City and her career as primarily a teacher of typing and shorthand at East High School 1940s-1950s. She discusses teacher/administration politics and various methods of education she was familiar with during her years of teaching, 1930s-1960s.Interviewer: Fred Buchanan
1990
2
No.309 Dorothy Snow
In two interviews, Dorothy Snow (b. 1901) recalls growing up in Salt Lake City, her family, and her education and Ph.D., which enabled her to teach in the Department of English at the University of Utah from the 1920s-1970s. She discusses living in the East, receiving a Master's degree from Radcliffe, her doctoral work at Berkeley, and the satisfaction provided by her career as a professor.Interviewer: Fred Buchanan
1990
3
No.310 Clark W. Brimhall
Clark W. Brimhall recalls his early education in Florida and becoming a math and physical education teacher at West High School and, later, Lincoln Junior High School in Salt Lake City, 1950s-1980s.Interviewer: Fred Buchanan
1990
4
No.311 Andrew W. Cooley III
In this taped monologue, Cooley (b. 1913) recalls growing up in the Millcreek area of Salt Lake County, a rural lifestyle, working with Wallace Stegner at the I and M Furniture Store, Stegner dating his sister, and his mission for the LDS Church in Jacksonville, Florida.
1990
5
No.312 Daniel Howe
Daniel Howe (b. 1937), professor at UCLA, recalls his personal and professional relationship with Fawn McKay Brodie. His parents, Utah natives, were close friends of Dale Morgan, who was a mentor of sorts of Brodie. He discusses Brodie's anti-Mormon feelings and the personal warmth of the Brodies toward their friends.Interviewer: Newell Bringhurst
1989
6
No.313 Arch L. Madsen
Madsen talks about his philosophy of communications, early broadcast experiences, personal history, the Intermountain Radio Network (RAB), the Radio Advertising Bureau, the Broadcast Advertising Bureau (BAB), and WLS radio in Chicago. Other topics include KSL and Bonneveille International, international radio, Arthur Gaeth, and people at KSL.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1986-1988
7
No.314 Roger V. Logan, Jr.
Roger V. Logan, a judge from Arkansas, is a descendent of the victims of the Mountain Meadows Massacre and has done extensive research on the massacre. His findings are discussed in this oral history. Interviewers: Everett Cooley, David Bigler, Brigham Madsen
1990
8
No.315 Alfred C. Emery
In a 1987 interview with Everett L. Cooley, Alfred C. Emery (b. 1919) recalled his family, education at West High and naval service during WWII. The bulk of the interview has to do with his 48-year association with the University of Utah as student, faculty member, College of Law, and finally his terms as Vice Prestident, Provost, and President of the University-- 1930s-1980s.
1987
9
No.316 Edward Jacobsen
Edward Jacobsen (b. 1930) was the director of the special events center at the Universiyt of Utah. Topics discussed include his persoanl background, important campus figures, administration, budgeting, A. Ray Olpin, James Fletcher, Fred Emery, David Gardner, Chase Peterson, controversy over construction of the center, scheduling, expenses and revenue, competition, architectural problems, booking artists, NCAA basketball, gymnastic program, athletic directors, Joh Huntsman, and various performers.Interviewer: Everett Cooley

Interviews 317-326Return to Top

Container(s): Box 39

Container(s) Description Dates
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39
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No.317 M. Donald Thomas
M. Donald Thomas (b. 1926), the son of Italian Immigrants, born Mario Donato DiTommaso, recalls his childhood and education, culminating in his Ed.D., prior to coming to Utah where he served as superintendent of the Salt Lake City School Board. He discusses his innovations in educational administration, particularly his concept of shared governance of schools. Of particular interest are his recollections regarding the politics and personalities he dealt with during his Salt Lake School Board tenure, 1970s-1980s.Interviewer: Fred Buchanan
1991
2
No.318 Jerome Stoffel
Monsignor Jerome Stoffel (b. 1910) recalls his life growing up in Utah and discusses his role as a Catholic priest in the state serving in Southeastern Utah, 1930s; a short term as an army chaplain, WWII, administering to the needs of Catholic students at Utah State University, 1940s-1970s; and his return to Salt Lake, where he is associated with the Cathedral of the Madeline, 1970s-1980s.Interviewer: Everett Cooley
1989
3
No.319 Ladd Holt
Ladd Holt (b. 1934) recalls his upbringing and early education and talks about his teacher training. Other topics covered inlcude Granite School District, teaching in Panguitch, Utah, the Stewart School, the Utah Education Association (UEA), the University of Utah, and changes in public eduations.Interviewer: Fred Buchanan
1991
4
No.320 James Duane
James Duane, an assosiate professor of educational studies, relates his academic preparation, and discusses the graduate program of educational studies at the University of Utah. He also talks about the development of an instructional computer program and the need for computers in the public schools.Interviewer: Harry Bluhm
1987
5
No.321 Donald Cartwright
Cartwright, an engineer at KSUB Radio, discusses his education and the station experience before the affiliation with CBS. He also recalls coverage of the atomic testing in Nevada, talks about station ownership history, and remembers colleagues.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1986
6
No.322 Stephen Hencley
Stephen Hencley recalls his experiences at the University of Utah Graduate School of Education. Interviewers: Fred Buchanan, Harry Bluhm
1986
7
No.323 Marvin Melville
Marvin Melville (b. 1935) recalls his early racing days, and discusses the Winter Olympic Games of 1956, 1960, and 1964. He also talks about the Jim Gaddis controversy, ski training, the Alpine Training School, his NCAA positions, and speculates about his future involvement in the sport.Interviewer: Joseph Arave
1990
8
No.324 Adrien Segil
Adrien Segil (b. 1911) recalls his childhood in Cripple Creek, Colorado, and his first experience skiing. He also talks about instructor certification, standardized instruction techniques, powder skiing, and reminisces about various people he has enountered.Interviewer: Joseph Arave
1990
9
No.325 Hugh Nibley
Hugh Nibley (b. 1910) talks about his belief that he is living in the last days. He also recalls his association with Joseph Fielding Smith, Ernest Wilkinson, and Sterling McMurrin. Other topics covered include patriarchal blessings, the Book of Mormon, Thomas Stuart Ferguson, teaching Arab-speaking students, and his interpretation of various things in the Book of Mormon.Interviewer: Stan Larson
1990
10
No.326 Nancy Streator Reuling
Nancy Reuling (b. 1929) describes her first river trip with Norm Neville and comments on various river runners. Other topics include Rainbow Bridge, the Green River, the San Juan River, Rosalind Johnson, Frank Wright, and Bob Rigg.Interviewer: Roy Webb
1990

Interviews 327-333Return to Top

Container(s): Box 40

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No.327 Patti O'Keefe
O'Keefe details her genealogy and recalls her childhood and education in parochial schools. She also discusses her education at the University of Utah, her student teaching experience, and her years in the public school system. Other topics include inner-city schools, teaching methods, curriculum, the Utah Education Association (UEA), Don Thomas, John Bennion, school faculty and administrations, the "Mormon Question" at the University of Utah, Mormon culture and influences in the educational system, and the changing roles of teachers and administrators.Interviewer: Fred Buchanan
1990
2
No.328 Joy Hashimoto
In a 1990 interview with Everett L. Cooley, Joy Hashimoto (b. 1927) recalls her family. She describes being interned, 1942-1945 in the Granada Relocation Center (later called Amache) in Colorado, attending college one year at Carleton and finishing her degree at North Dakota. Bound with the interivew are a biographical sketch of Dr. Hashimoto and a copy of the convocation address he gave to the graduating class of 1981 of the College of Medicine.Interviewer: Everett Cooley
1990
3
No.329 Elzy J. Bird
Bird (b. 1911), a Utah artist, discusses his genealogy and childhood in Layton, Utah. He recalls working for the art section of the WPA, serving in the Pacific theatre of operations in World War II, and his career as an artist.Interviewer: Everett Cooley
1991
4
No.330 Charles Nabors
Nabors (b. 1934), Assistant Dean for Minority Affairs, University of Utah College of Medicine, community civil rights leader, and Democratic party activist both locally and nationally discusses his early years, his education, his work at the College of Medicine, his active role in politics, and his activities on behalf of African-Americans in Utah.Interviewer: Leslie Kelen
1984
1984
1984
5
No.331 Virginia Picht
Picht, one of the authors of , a history of Unitarianism in Utah, recalls her childhood in the midwest, her marriage and teaching career, and her involvement with the Unitarian Church. Interviewers: Lorille Miller, Stan Larson
1989
6
No.332 Robert L. Scott
In an interview with Robert Miller, Robert Scott (b. 1918) recalls his association with Henry Eyring, 1940s-1980s, and presents a friendly but critical analysis of Eyring's work and contributions to science.
1987
7
No.333 Lois Dunne
Dunne, a daughter of Virginia Picht, discusses her mother, her childhood in Salt Lake City, and her association with the Unitarian Church.Interviewer: Stan Larson
1990

Interviews 334-340Return to Top

Container(s): Box 41

Container(s) Description Dates
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41
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No.334 Virginia Kelson
Kelson (b. 1929), founder and former director of the Phoenix Institute and publisher of , recalls her youth in Salt Lake City, schooling at the University of Utah, marriage, and community service. She discusses her reasons for founding the Phoenix Institute, an organization devoted to helping women on welfare find and train for nontraditional jobs, and outlines several of their programs. She also talks about how grew out of the activities associated with the International Women's Year.Interviewer: Everett Cooley
1988
2
No.335 Sylvia Burt Durrant
Durrant (b. 1908) recalls her early life, education, teaching at the University of Utah and the YWCA. She also discusses the teaching career of her husband, Stevan Durrant and happenings in the Biology Department, University of Utah, 1930s-1960s. Included are reflections on their father by Sue Marilynn Durrant and Steve Durrant Jr.Interviewer: Everett Cooley
1991
3
No.336 Geoffrey Symcox
Symcos, a professor of history at UCLA, discusses his memories of Fawn McKay Brody.Interviewer:Newell Bringhurst
1988
4
No.337 Everett L. Cooley
Everett L. Cooley (b. 1917) recalls his association with Fawn McKay Brodie. He discusses meeting her in the 1960s when he was director of the Utah State Historical Society, her speeches to various groups in Utah, 1960s-1970s, her writing, her friendship with Dale Morgan, her views on Mormonism, relations with her family, and the gift of her papers to the Marriott Library, 1970s.Interviewer: Newell Bringhurst
1988
5
No.338 Vernal Holley
Vernal Holley (b. 1924) discusses his research on the Spaulding Theory, his church activities and excommunications. He also talks about his life after being excommunicated.Interviewer: Lorille Miller
1991
6
No.339 William L. Stokes
W.L. Stokes discusses his early life in Eastern Utah, his interest in dinosaurs and geology, graduate education at Princeton, friendship with henry Eyring, his tenure at the University of Utah in Geology, difficulties with university adminiszstration, religion at the University of Utah, the attitudes of certain General Authorities towards Science and Evolutions vs. Creationism, and the theological strengths of Mormonism.Interviewer: Robert Miller
1985
7
No.340 Marcus R. Cooley, Jr.
Marcus Cooley, whose father, Mark, was the oldest son of Andrew Wood Cooley and Ann Hazen, recounts family stories about "Grandpa Cooley."Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1984

Interviews 341-345Return to Top

Container(s): Box 42

Container(s) Description Dates
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42
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No.341 Lena Marie and Alvin Pack
In this series of interviews with Tim Larson, Lena (1905-2000) and Alvin (1907-1994) discuss their courtship and marriage, their travels, writing, and public service. They detail their lifetime involved in broadcasting, including KSL radio, KLO, writing radio promotions, KDYL, broadcasting in World War II, the beginnings of KALL radio, Lena Marie's teaching career, the Pony Express Memorial organization, recording Mormon funerals, the University of Utah, and retirement.
1986-1987
1986-1987
1986-1987
Folder
3
No.342 Elizabeth Newby (Beth)
In two interviews, Beth Newby (b. 1906) recalled growing up in the Heber/Midway area, attending the University of Utah in the 1920s, taking classes from Ralph Chamberlin and marrying William Wallace (Kim) Newby, also a professor of biology.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1988
4
No.343 Louise Hill Howe Malonee
Speaking with Winnefred Margetts, Malonnee (b. 1898) recalls her childhood and early interest in "speaking pieces." She also discusses Maude May Babcock, touring companies, her education at the University of Utah, marriage and children, the KSL Players, Keith Engar, teaching at the University of Utah, Lowell Lees, and Pioneer Memorial Theater.
1985
5
No.344 Louise Hill Howe Malonee
In an interview with Helen B. Gibbons, Malonee recalls how she got into radio and discusses the KSL Players and the development of radio drama. Other topics include unions, Dr. Lowell Durham, Maude May Babcock, and her career at the University of Utah.
1985
6
No.345 J. Byron Sims
Sims (b. 1931) details his background and genealogy, being the son of a minister, growing up in rural Idaho, the Korean War, his career at Westminster College, moving to the University of Utah, the , publicity surrounding Cold Fusion, and the public image of the university.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1992

Interviews 346-352Return to Top

Container(s): Box 43a

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No.346 Raymond Songi Uno
Judge Raymond Uno (b. 1930) describes his family life internment during WWII at the Japanese relocation camp, Heart Mountain, 1941-1945, university studies, his judgeship, the Japanese American Citizens League (JACL), civil rights, Utah politics, and the formation of the Utah chapter of American Civil Liberties Union.Interviewer: Lorille Miller
1991
2
No.347 Ralph Johnston
Johnston (b. 1908) recalls his Arizona boyhood, moving to Salt Lake City to attend high school, his days at the University of Utah, and the growth of skiing in the 1950s and 1960s. Topics covered include Snow Basin, an avalanche, the ski patrol, Wasatch Mountain Club, and the Air Force races.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1991
3
No.348 L. Ruby Geerlings
In a 1989 interview with Everett L. Cooley, Ruby Geerlings (b. 1904) recalled her early life and education in Holland, Michigan, meeting Jacob Geerlings, and life in Utah as it centered around the University of Utah where he was professor, headed the Classics Department, later he became Dean of the Faculty, 1947-1953, and returned to teaching.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1989
4
No.349 Joseph Morrell
In an interview with Newell Bringhurst, Morrell (a cousin of Fawn Brodie) talks about the family in Huntsville, Utah, and his memories of Fawn. He also describes the reaction of various family members to .
1988
5
No.350 David Blackbird
Blackbird recalls his childhood, the Christian Science Church, his education at Texas Tech, and his marriage. He also discusses his Air Force career and the Unitarian Church.Interviewers: Lorille Miller and Stan Larson
1989
6
No.351 Barbara McKay Smith
Smith, a younger sister of Fawn McKay Brodie, recalls their Huntsville childhood, the McKay family relationships, and Fawn's education and marriage. She also discusses the reaction of various family members to the Joseph Smith biography.Interviewer: Newell Bringhurst
1987
7
No.352 James J. Brophy
In a series of interviews James J. Brophy (1925-1992) recalls his childhood in Illinois, his education, early friendship with Hugh Hefner, his research interests, his positions at various universities and other professional work. His discussions of the Artificial Hear Program and Cold Fusion are particularly interesting.Interviewer: Robert Miller
1991

Interviews 353-354Return to Top

Container(s): Box 43b

Container(s) Description Dates
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43b
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No.353 James L. Clayton
In a 1983 interview with Everett L. Cooley, James L. Clayton (b. 1931), then Dean of the Graduate School, University of Utah and Chairman of the Selection Committee for the new president of the university, discusses the process used by the committee, the criteria they established, the candidates, the role played by the Institutional Council, and finally the rationale for the choice of Chase Peterson.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
2
No.354 James L. Clayton
James L. Clayton, former Dean of the Graduate School, Provost, and Academic Vice President of the University of Utah, 1970s-1990, and a professor of History, both before and after these dates recalls his family, education at Cornell under Paul Gates, and work both in and out of academia. His primary focus is his tenure at the University of Utah, both as a faculty member and administrator. Topics covered include instituting the faculty review system, the presidency of Chase Peterson, the Board of Regents, the Sorenson gift to the medical school, and cold fusion.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1990

Interviews 355-359Return to Top

Container(s): Box 44

Container(s) Description Dates
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No.355 Suzy Harris Rytting
Suzy Harris Rytting (b. 1930) talked about her experiences as a member of the United States Olympic Ski Teams in 1948 and 1952, difficulties of women as competitive athletes in the 1950s, her involvement with Utah skiing, and her views on Utah as a site for the Olympic games.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1990
2
No.356 Normand L. Gibbons
In three interviews, Normand L. Gibbons (b. 1931) talked about his boyhood in St. George, Utah and the influence of his parents in shaping his humanitarian and educational philosophy and practices; his time spent on a church mission, military service, and graduate education; and his work with students at Cyprus High School which led to his career in student services at the University of Utah.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1990
3
No.357 Tom Welch
Tom Welch (b. 1944) discussed the Utah Olympic Bid Effort for 1994 and 2002: the people involved, strategies developed, and the benefits he sees to the state from this effort.Interviewers: Joe Arave, Gregory C. Thompson
1991-1992
4
No.358 Kent Hoopengarner
Kent Hoopengarner tells about his involvement with skiing: boyhood in Glenwood Springs and Aspen, Colorado; high school in Napa, California; working at Alta, Utah and Jackson, Wyoming; association with Ted Johnson and the development of Snowbird, Utah. Of particular interest are Hoopengarner's thoughts on the potential and limitations of Little Cottonwood Canyon as a destination ski area, and a mid-1970s trip he made to Teheran, Iran.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1992
5
No.359 Michael Parsons
Michael Parsons talks about his education in England and in Illinois and his career in the Department of Education at the University of Utah: departmental conflicts, reorganization of staff and procedures, and the standing of the department within the education community.Interviewer: Calvin Harris
1986

Interviews 360-368Return to Top

Container(s): Box 45

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45
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No.360 Emily Jones Flowers
In a 1991 interview with Everett L. Cooley, Emily Flowers (b. 1907) recalls her vagabond childhood, settling in Salt Lake--her mother teaching at Rowland Hall, her father--superintendent, Rosenblatt Steel Co. She briefly describes her education, short career as a high school science teacher, her courtship with Seville Flowers, their life together, and her later work at the Marriott Library. The bulk of the interview has to do with Seville's career, 1930s-1960s Dept. of Biology, University of Utah.
1991
2
No.361 Craig Brandon Wirth
In a series of 1989 interviews and 1990s updates with Tim Larson, Craig Wirth (b. 1952) recalls growing up in Montana and early broadcast experiences. College at the University of Utah, 1970-1974 at which time he began his broadcast career in Utah. Receiving masters degree from Wisconsin, 1976; teaching experiences; broadcasting experiences in Salt Lake, 1970s-1990s; experience in New York City--WOR-TV and working with Linda Ellerbee, 1980s; experience in California, 1980s-1990s and working with the Financial News Network, 1989-1991. He also discusses ownership of a Moab, Utah radio station, KURA. He discusses several Salt Lake City broadcasters.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1989-1990s
3
No.362 Keith Montague
In two 1993 interviews with Everett L. Cooley, Keith Montague (b. 1921) describes his family life and growing up in Salt Lake City; his father's men's clothing business, Heusted and Montague; attending the University of Utah; meeting his future wife, Elizabeth Snow, their lives together; his WWII service as a Navy pilot; influential people in his life including Olive Woolley Burt; and the establishment with Richard (Dick) Bailey of the advertising firm, Bailey-Montague.
1993
4
No.363 Bae B. Gardner
Gardner (b. 1925) recalls her early life and education but spends most of her time discussing the establishment of the Hinckley Institute of Politics by Robert Hinckley, the goals and successes of the Institute under its three directors, J. D. Williams, R. J. Snow, and Ted Wilson.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1990
5
No.364 Gunn McKay
McKay (b. 1922), former Democratic Congressman from Utah and a cousin Fawn McKay Brodie, recalls the McKay's as a family living in Huntsville Utah, his limited association with Fawn Brodie due to their age difference, and his closer association with her mother, Fawn Brimhall McKay, whom Gunn McKay found and took to the hospital suffering from burns which caused her death.Interviewer: Newell Bringhurst
1987
6
No.365 Robert Wangsgard
Wangsgard (b. 1915) recalls growing up in Huntsville, Utah, his association with the McKay family, and the special friendship between his mother and Fawn Brimhall McKay. Although the same age as Fawn McKay Brodie, she had been promoted several grades ahead and he only knew her slightly but indicated she had a close relationship with her family.Interviewer: Newell Bringhurst
1992
7
No.366 Esther Landa
In a 1991 interview with Fred S. Buchanan, Esther Landa recalls her early family life and education. She spends most of her time during the interview detailing her terms on the Salt Lake City School Board--1958-1970 and time discussing her term on the state school board.
1991
8
No.367 A. Russell Mortensen
Mortensen recalls his association with Fawn McKay Brodie from 1960 when he became director of the Division of State History (Historical Society) and over her lifetime. He discusses her relationship with her family and David O. McKay in particular.Interviewer: Newell Bringhurst See also interview No.12
1987
9
No.368 William Fitzgerald
Fitzgerald (b. 1930) recalls his association with Fawn McKay Brodie in the 1960s-1970s as one of her students in some graduate classes at UCLA, her interest in his academic career, her interest and strong belief in psychohistory, her dislike of Nixon, and her excellence as a teacher.Interviewer: Newell Bringhurst
1991

Interviews 369-372Return to Top

Container(s): Box 46

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No.369 Emil L. Smith
In a series of six interviews conducted in Los Angeles, California, Smith (b. 1911), Professor Emeritus of Biological Chemistry at UCLA (1962-1976) and former faculty member at the University of Utah (1946-1962), describes growing up in New York, his education and early work at Cambridge and Yale, his research over the years centered around enzymological protein structure, his election to the National Academy of Science and the textbook he coauthored, . Of particular interest are his descriptions of the early days of the 4-year medical school at the U of U and faculty members, Maxwell Wintrobe, Leo Samuels, Louis Goodman and Henry Eyring.Interviewer: Robert Miller
1988-1991
2
No.370 Frank Moss
In this series of 8 interviews, Senator Moss (b. 1911) recalled his childhood growing up in Salt Lake County, his father, a noted Utah educator James E. Moss, his education in the public schools, at the University of Utah and later George Washington Law School, his marriage to Phyllis Hart, his work in Washington prior to WWII, his army service in WWII, his career as Salt Lake County Attorney and later as a judge, his entry into Democratic politics and winning the race as United States Senator, a position he held from 1958-1976. He listed his major accomplishments in the senate as the work he did on behalf of Utah water projects, creating national parks within the state, Great Salt Lake assistance, and banning television advertising for tobacco products. He discussed his activities since leaving the senate which included association with some law firms, his love of travelling and spending time with his family. Included with the interviews is an 18 page personal history that details his many accomplishments.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1992
3
No.371 Richard C. Howe
Howe (b. 1924), Utah State Supreme Court Justice, recalls growing up in Murray, his family genealogy, his education at the University of Utah, and University College of Law, his role as a Utah State Legislator, 1950s-1970s, and his service on Utah's highest court, 1980s-1990s. He discusses family members, his law practice, members of the Utah Bar and the Judiciary, and he provides thumbnail sketches of his Supreme Court colleagues.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
4
No.372 David Freed
In this interview, Freed (b. 1909) recalls his childhood in Salt Lake City, attending the University of Utah and his long association as an alumni; friendship with Wallace Stegner; business interests in Utah--Lagoon, ranching, Deseret Livestock Company, finance company; the terms as Captain of the Davis Cup Team for the United States; and his great pride in his wife, children, and grandchildren; and his interest in collecting Mormon material, especially coins.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1992

Interviews 373-379Return to Top

Container(s): Box 47

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No.373 Gertrude T. Peterson
Peterson recalls her education at the University of Utah, MBA at Northwestern, family life, tenure at the University of Utah 1950s-1980s where she taught at the College of Business and served as Assistant Dean of Students.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1992
2
No.374 Dean Roberts
In two interviews, Roberts (b. 1931) recalls moving to Ogden, Utah in 1944, skiing at Snow Basin, working with Earl and Gladys Miller, early racing, teaching for K. Smith at Brighton and later teaching and becoming Ski School Director at Solitude, 1960s-1990s.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1989
3
No.375 Phil Jones
In a series of interviews, Jones, President and General Manager of Park City Ski Area, shares his observations on skiing as a recreational sport and as a business enterprise. Interviewers: Joe Arave, Gregory C. Thompson
1992
4
No.376 Ruth Yeaman
Yeaman (b. 1918) recalls her early family life, interest in books and western history, and her career at the George Thomas and Marriott Libraries, University of Utah, 1930s-1980s. She provides interesting descriptions of her co-workers, librarian colleagues, and the growth of the library system at the University.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1985
5
No.377 Charles Hitch
Hitch (b. 1910), former president of the University of California at Berkeley (1960s-1970s) who held several positions at the RAND corporation in California (1940s-1960s), recalls his professional association with Fawn Brodie's husband, Bernard Brodie, at RAND and the friendship as couples the two families enjoyed. He assesses the work of Bernard and provides insight into the family life of the Brodies.Interviewer: Newell Bringhurst
1989
6
No.378 Robert G. Snow
Snow (b. 1910) discusses his lineage (his father was the youngest son of early LDS church leader, Erastus Snow), his father's medical practice, his friendship with George Thomas (University of Utah president), his service on the Board of Regents, his sister, Dorothy Snow who was a member of the University of Utah's English faculty for some 40 years, his brothers who practiced medicine, his wife Lenora Stewart, their children Christopher, Lenora, and Nicholas, his ecumenical views on religion, his education at Harvard and later practice, and finally his views on various medical issues and his personal philosophy.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1992
7
No.379 Oakley J. Gordon
Gordon talks about his forty-year career at the University in three interviews. As he looks back on his childhood in a small town in Indiana, his undergraduate days at Purdue University, his struggle with tuberculosis, his marriage to Charlotte Sanders, and events which led to his teaching and administrative positions in General Education, Psychology, and the Dean of the Division of Continuing Education (DCE), 1973-1991, Gordon also explores his own abilities in leadership which qualified him for the various aspects of his life at the University. In addition to experiences in student-faculty conflicts during the 1960s, Director of the Peace Corps Training Program, and particularly when he was administering DCE, Gordon offers insights into the administrations of University Presidents David Gardner, James Fletcher, and Chase Peterson. His comments on the financial arrangements of DCE and the University are of interest.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1992

Interviews 380-387Return to Top

Container(s): Box 48

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No.380 Ewart A. Swinyard
During 10 interviews, Swinyard (b. 1910), former Dean of the College of Pharmacy, University of Utah, recalls growing up in Logan, Utah, his education, his family, pharmacology research, and his tenure at the University of Utah.Interviewer: Robert Miller
1989-1990
2
No.381 Ruth Draper
Draper (b. 1923) recalls her early life in Ririe, Idaho, her marriage to Delbert Draper, activities with the League of Women Voters and friendship with various Utah Democrats--Scott Matheson, Calvin Rampton, Ted Moss, Wally Sandak and Republican, Norman Bangerter. She discusses her experiences as Director of the Utah Arts Council--1970s-1980s and as a board member for the National Endowment for the Arts, 1980s.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1992
3
No.382 Richard Bird
In a 1991 interview with Joe Arave, Richard Bird (b. 1929), Engineer for Idaho, Utah, and Nevada discusses his work inspecting all ski lift facilities at resorts on Forest Service land with an emphasis on Utah resorts (Snowbird and Solitude) and the evolution of ski lift technology.
1991
4
No.383 Paul and Betty Dinwoodey
In a 1989 interview with Joe Arave, Paul Dinwoodey (b. 1909), prominent Salt Lake City furniture merchant, is joined by his wife Betty in recalling their experiences as Utah skiers in the late 1930s- early 1940s. They focus their recollections primarily on Brighton describing facilities, clothing, equipment, and personalities.
1989
5
No.384 Kenneth Sleight
In 1991, at his Pack Creek Ranch in San Juan County, Utah, Kenneth Sleight related to Everett Cooley some of his experiences and observations as a river and canyon guide. Also discussed were Sleight's childhood in Paris, Idaho, and Davis County, Utah; his first marriage and family life; his second marriage and purchase of Pack Creek Ranch; politics, people, resource and land use in San Juan County. Glen Canyon, before and since completion of the dam, seems a significant place for Sleight.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1991
6
No.385 Ramona Shepherd Adams
In this series of interviews, Adams focused on her early years in Paris, Idaho; education, marriage, and public relations work in California; and her post graduate work and career at the University of Utah. Of specific interest is her concern with the development of Student Services and in particular the Women's Resource Center.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1991
7
No.386 Hans Brogle
In 1990, Joe Arave interviewed Hans Brogle about his lifelong involvement with skiing--from his boyhood in Berchtesgaden, Germany; his immigration to the United States after WWII; his employment at Timberline Lodge in Oregon; to his move to Alta, Utah in 1953 where, he was employed until his retirement in 1986. Brogle describes Alta's ski trail planning and life development as well as day-to-day operation of the ski area.
1990
8
No.387 Cal McPhie
McPhie talks about the eighteen years he owned and operated Little Mountain Ski Area, where he introduced such innovations as lights for night skiing, using a snow packer, grooming slopes, and planting long crested wheat to protect the slopes during summertime. McPhie also discussed his plans for a multiple-use facility at Gargoza which he managed 1968-1972.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1991

Interviews 388-396Return to Top

Container(s): Box 49

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No.388 David C. Knowlton
Knowlton (b. 1955) recalls growing up in Georgia, New Mexico, El Paso Texas (where his father was involved in the Chicano movement) later in Las Vegas, and finally moving to Salt Lake. His undergraduate work at the University of Utah; mission to Bolivia, 1970s; graduate work at the University of Texas at Austin; his third-year review at Brigham Young University which led to his eventual termination from the university on the basis of citizenship and scholarship--both charges he vehemently denies and refutes in this interview.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1993-1994
2
No.389 Robert (Bob) Chambers
Chambers discusses his life-long involvement with skiing: his childhood in Jackson, Wyoming, the family move to Ogden, Utah in 1941 and skiing at Snow Basin; the ski team at Ogden High School; two years with the U.S. Army Tenth Mountain Troops during the Korean conflict; collegiate skiing competition and his ski scholarship to the University of Wyoming; working at The Ski Shop which Chambers eventually bought and expanded.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1989
3
No.390 George C. Hatch
Hatch (b. 1919) spends the majority of the interview discussing his role and that of his wife's family, the Glasmanns of Ogden, in communications in Utah and the West. Among the major components of the Hatch-Glasmann holdings were KUTV, KALL, the Ogden Standard Examiner, KLO, and the stations that were part of the Intermountain Network. Broadcasting personalities are also discussed.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1989
4
No.391 Lola Atiya
Lola Atiya (b. 1917) talked about her family and education in Egypt, her marriage to Aziz Atiya, their life in Egypt and the United States at the University of Michigan, in Washington D.C., and the University of Utah, and her interest in book binding, papermaking, and bead collecting. A second interview was conducted in 1992 following the publication of the Coptic Encyclopedia, which she completed following her husband's death. In this interview Mrs. Atiya also described travel experiences in India, Norway, London, Japan, New Zealand and Australia.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1989
5
No.392 Zane A. Doyle
Doyle (b. 1916) talked about his 45 years of owning, operating, and developing the Brighton Ski Area, a family business focusing initially on beginner and local skiers. He described working with the Forest Service to improve trails, his relationship with Kay Smith and others involved with skiing at Brighton, his association with the Riblet Company, and the evolution of ski lift technology and installation from the 1940s.Interviewers: Joe Arave, Gregory C. Thompson
1989
6
No.393 Seth Teasdale
Teasdale (b. 1920) discusses his early years in Utah; memories of the Teasdale family; and his grandfather, George Teasdale, an apostle in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.Interviewer: Stan Larson
1993
7
No.394 Pierre Agrinier Bach
Bach (b. 1924) discussed his association with Thomas Ferguson and the New World Archaeological Foundation, and in particular, Bach's impression of Ferguson's disappointment with Joseph Smith Jr.Interviewer: Stan Larson
1993
8
No.395 George Belsey
George Belsey (b. 1939) discusses his career in hospital administration in Chicago and at the University of Utah Medical Center; his future with the American Hospital Association; his involvement with the Unitarian Church and the Salt Lake City community; and his philosophical, political and health care viewpoints.Interviewer: Lorille Miller
1992
9
No.396 Chuck Panter
Chuck Panter (b. 1935) discusses his involvement with skiing and the establishment and development of Powder Mountain Ski Area.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1990

Interviews 397-402Return to Top

Container(s): Box 50

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No.397 Michele Parish
Michele Parish (b. 1950) recalls growing up in Iowa, her education at Cornell College in Iowa, the University of Iowa, graduate work in theology at Claremont College in California, her marriage to fellow graduate student and later Methodist minister Wesley Pixler, and their coming to Utah in 1987. She discusses being hired by the ACLU where she became executive director, 1989-1992 and the issues she worked on most notably school prayer, abortion, and prison reform.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1992
2
No.398 Mildred Quinn
Mildred Quinn (b. 1908) details her family background and talks about her education and the development of the nurse midwifery program. She also talks about lay midwives.Interviewer: Jan Brugel, Lisa Litton
1985
3
No.399 Quentin France Kolb
Quentin France Kolb (b. 1924) details his genealogy, recalls his early religious training, and describes his BIA and boarding school experiences. He also talks about public school, serving in the Navy in World War II, employment, his marriages, deciding to enter the seminary, living in New York City, duties as curate of St. Mark's Cathedral, the foundation of Odyssey House, native americans in government, and retirement from the Episcopal ministry.Interviewers: Floyd A. O'Neil, Gregory Thompson
1997
4
No.400 Earl A. Miller
In a series of interviews, Earl A. Miller (b. 1925) discusses his childhood, early skiing experiences, the U. S. Air Force, and the development of the Miller Ski Company. Other topics include Alta ski school, types of ski equipment, being a ski instructor in Japan, Cubco, patents and trademarks, ski injuries, the Robinson-Pitman Act, falling contests, snowboards, Alaska skiing, the Alf Engen ski museum, and various people and places he has known.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1994; 1995
5
No.401 William J. Luttrell
William J. Luttrell (b. 1921) talks about his early life in Californai, experiences in the U.S. Army, marriage and college, his family, his affiliation with the World Federalists Association (WFA), Norman Cousins in Salt Lake City, and friends and associates.Interviewer: Stan Larson
1997
folders
6
No.402a P. Lennox Tierney
P. Lennox Tierney (b. 1914) recalls his early years, his education, his years in California, Mexico, the Channel Islands, and teaching photography. He speaks at length about his time in Japan.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1993
7
No.402b P. Lennox Tierney
P. Lennox Tierney (b. 1914) recalls his early years, his education, his years in California, Mexico, the Channel Islands, and teaching photography. He speaks at length about his time in Japan.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1993

Interviews 403-412Return to Top

Container(s): Box 51

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No.403 John W. Bennion
Bennion talks about his childhood in Salt Lake City, his education, and his career in education. Among the topics covered are the Salt Lake school district, open enrollment, the review process, closing South High, the career ladder program, magnet schools, the International Baccalaureate (IB) Program, the dropout rate, and promising programs.Interviewer: Fred Buchanan
1991
2
No.404 Jack Walker
Jack Walker (b. 1915) looks back on a lifetime of skiing. Topics include his first skis, the Utah Ski Club, Mt. Olympus Ski Club, the 10th Mountain Division, scaffolding jumps, Snow Basin, Ecker Hill, Centennial Ski Jump in 1947, Snowbird ski team, and Park City racingInterviewer: Joe Arave
3
No.405 Joyce Cameron Foster
Joyce Cameron Foster (b. 1936) talks about the history of the nurse midwifery program at the University of Utah. Other topics include her personal background, education at UCLA and Yale University, teaching at Yale, coming to Utah to teach at Brigham Young University, procedures at LDS hospital, conflict with the medical community, teaching at the University of Utah, Mildren Quinn, the Nurse Midwife Practice Act, Madeleine Leininger, the Shiprock program, faculty turnover, candidate selection for nurse midwives, history of nurse midwifery, young mothers program, reality-oriented teaching methods, ACM certification, future challenges in the field.Interviewer: Jan Brugel, Lisa Litton
4
No.406 Richard H. Nebeker
Richard H. Nebeker (b. 1924) recalls his early skiing experiences and discusses skiing and the military. Other topics include basic training, Camp Hale, Harry Wagner, General George C. Hayes, the battles of Mt. Belvedere and Mt. dell Torrecia, Friedel Pfeifer, officer candidate school, VJ-day, skiing at the University of Utah, and an Albion Basin cabin.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1995
5
No.407 Silvia Behrend
Silvia Behrend (b. 1954) talks about her life, marriage, study for the ministry, and moving to Salt Lake City for the Unitarian Church with Lorille Miller.
1993
6
No.408 Gladys Teasdale Bringhurst
Gladys Teasdale Bringhurst (b. 1904) has a brief conversation about her grandfather, LDS Church Apostle George Teasdale.Interviewer: Stan Larson.
1993
7
No.409 Mel H. Fletcher
Mel H. Fletcher (b. 1918) recalls his childhood in Park City, Utah, working in California, serving in the military, and returning to Park City and skiing. Other topics include teaching and certification, community ski programs, local jumping tournaments, Bill Lash and the American ski technique, organizing the Park City ski patrol, winter carnivals and the snow train, Glenwood Cemetary Association, his ski patrol experiences, and the Ecker Hill memorial.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1989; 1990
8
No.410 Priscilla Mayden
Priscilla Mayden (b. 1923) discusses her role as chairperson of the building committee for a religious education building for the First Unitarian Church of Salt Lake City. Subjects include committee appointments, selection of an architect, Karen Nichols and spacial requirements, plans and adjustments, permits, Friendship Manor parking lease, construction and finishing touches.Interviewer: Lorille Miller
1994
9
No.411 Robert Wheaton
Robert Wheaton (b. 1952) discusses his midwestern childhood, moving to Utah with his wife to ski in the 1970s, and working at Park City and Deer Valley. The focus of the interview is on Wheaton's experiences as General Manager of Deer Valley.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1995
10
No.412 Lurt Knee
Lurt Knee (b. 1910) talks about his childhood in Durango, Colorado, and moving to California after his father was killed in a railroad accident. He recalls moving back to Monument Valley and building Sleeping Rainbow Ranch. Other topics include Clyde King, Mit Chidester, developing tours and horseback trips, the Burr trail, Doc Angelsby, Charles Kelly, Chuck Lundy, the clannishness of Fruita residents, the uranium boom of the 1950s, prospecting, and deeding his property to the Seventh-Day Adventists.Interviewer: Brad Frye
1992

Interviews 413-419Return to Top

Container(s): Box 52

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No.413 Hazelle B. MacQuin
MacQuin talks about nursing education in the 1920s and the development of university nursing programs to supplant the tradition hospital training schools. She talks at great length about the development of nursing curriculum over the years.Interviewer: Bonnie Clayton
1983
2
No.414 Mildred Quinn
Dean Emerita Quinn recalls her long career in nursing education. Subjects discussed include the College of Nursing at the University of Utah, Holy Cross Hospital, the nursing faculty, cadet corps, building the medical center, midwifery, family planning, Navajo students, public health nurses, and her experiences at the University of Utah.Interviewer: Bonnie Clayton
1984
3
No.415 Dorothy Z. Mortensen
Mrs. Mortensen (b. 1916) recalls her parentage, childhood, and education. She discusses her marriage, houses lived in during World War II, her job with the legislature, siblings, her divorce and college degree, and her position as editor at the Historical Society. She recalls her move to the University of Utah Press, her remarriage in 1963, the founding of the American West magazine in the 1960s, the sale of the magazine in the 1970s, and working in Washington, D.C. She also recalls working in Tuscaloosa, Alabama and her retirement.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1995
4
No.416 Ray Nye
Nye (b. 1920) recalls his early experiences with skiing as a child and talks about the growth of the ski industry in Utah. Other topics include Beaver Mountain, the National Ski Patrol, Squaw Valley, the Olympic Ski Patrol, ski injuries, the biathlon, Snow Basin Ski Patrol, personal enjoyment of skiing, and avalanches.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1990
5
No.417 Fred L. Petersen
In a series of interviews, Petersen (b. 1933) recalls his childhood and school years in Brigham City, Utah. He also talks about his marriage, working for Kennecott and Litton, moving to the University of Utah personnel department in 1973, Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO), budgets, unions, benefits and retirement, affirmative action, minority recruiting, Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the Hay job classification system, unniversity presidents and officers, service awards, and his family life and personal interests.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1993
6
No.418 William Nutting
Nutting begins the interview with his recollections of teaching a one-room rural school in southern Idaho. He also talks about coming to the University of Utah as Chairman of the Department of Elementary Education and Director of the Stewart School. Other topics include his two years in Liberia, tenure, closing the Stewart School, the faculty of the college of education, experiences in Ethiopia, and the student protest movement of the 1960s.Interviewer: Fred Buchanan
1996
7
No.419 Ethel Piper
Piper (b. 1892) recalls her childhood and early schooling in Ogden, Utah. She also discusses her first teaching position and subsequent career, family members, the National Education Association (NEA) and her philosophy of teaching.Interviewer: Fred Buchanan
1992

Interviews 420-425Return to Top

Container(s): Box 53

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No.420a Vernon A. Cooley (Part I)
In this series of interviews, Vernon Cooley (b. 1913), patriarch of the Andrew Wood Cooley Association, details his genealogy and recalls his childhood in Logan, Utah. He also discusses various famiy members and provides insight into growing up in a polygamous clan. Other topics covered include his missions to England and Israel, his marriages and family life, service as a U. S. Army chaplain, and influential people he has known.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1995
2
No.420b Vernon A. Cooley (Part II)
In this series of interviews, Vernon Cooley (b. 1913), patriarch of the Andrew Wood Cooley Association, details his genealogy and recalls his childhood in Logan, Utah. He also discusses various famiy members and provides insight into growing up in a polygamous clan. Other topics covered include his missions to England and Israel, his marriages and family life, service as a U. S. Army chaplain, and influential people he has known.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1995
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No.421 Phyllis (Phee) R. Belsey
Belsey deteails her genealogy, recalls her childhood in Illinois, and talks about her education and marriage. Other topics covered include moving to Utah, volunteer work, involvement in the arts and with the Unitarian Church.Interviewer: Lorille Miller
1992
4
No.422 Ronald G. Coleman
Coleman (b. 1944) recalls his childhood in a racially diverse neighborhood in San Francisco. He describes his education in the California public school system, being offered an athletic scholarship to the University of Utah, and his experiences as a black person in Utah. Other topics covered include the Utah coaching staff, Ray Canning, working for General Mills, his return to the University of Utah as a member of the history faculty, the ethnic studies program, and role models in the community.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1993
5
No.423 Patrick Miller
Miller (b. 1948) recalls his childhood in New England and talks about moving West to attend Fort Lewis College in Durango, Colorado. He also discusses the U. S. Ski Team, training, graduate work and coaching at the University of Utah, recruiting, and NCAA competitions.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1990
6
No.424 Dean Collett
Collett (b. 1928) details his childhood, education in the public schools of Salt Lake City, and his career at Highland High School.Interviewer: Fred Buchanan
1992
7
No.425 Richard J. Cummings
This interview is restricted. See Manuscript Curator for details.

Interviews 426-432Return to Top

Container(s): Box 54

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No.426 George (Judd) Preston
Preston (b. 1932) recalls getting his first pair of skis for Christmas in 1938. He describes learning to ski, the ski patrol at Beaver Mountain, first aid training, an early cable tow, the Alf Engen Ski School, skiing safety, rescue equipment, and skiing with family and friends.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1996-1997
2
No.427 George D. Smith
This interview is restricted. See Manuscript Curator for details.
3
No.428 Bruce S. Jenkins
Jenkins (b. 1927) was at the time of this interview the chief judge of the U. S. District Court for Utah. He recalls his childhood and education and briefly descdribes his experience in the Navy. He talks at length about attending law school at the University of Utah, and about various lawyers including Willis Ritter, Kenneth Culp Davis, and Dan Dykstra. Other topics covered include his time in the Utah legislature and as a bankruptcy judge, functions of the court, important cases, plea bargaining, his relationship with the bar association, and his family and travels.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1993
4
No.429 Delbert V. Groberg
In this interview with William L. Knecht, Groberg recalls his association with Mission President B. H. Roberts
1997
5
No.430 Alan Engen
Alan Engin (b. 1940) talks about his father Alf, and uncles Sverre and Corey. He recalls how his mother and father were a team, talks about his father's employment with the Forest Service, and reminisces about his experiences in learning to ski. Other topics covered include avalanches, going to Norway as an exchange student, the University of Utah ski team, competing with the U. S. Ski Team, his career in business, the lives of his sons, Alta Ski Lift Company, the genesis of the Utah Ski Archives, and the Alf Engen Ski Museum.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1996
6
No.431 Merritt Sherman
Mr. Sherman, who was secretary to the Board of the Federal Reserve of the United States, recalls his employment with the board and officials he observed, including Dr. Goldenweiser, Marriner Eccles, Tom McCabe, the Federal Advisory Council, Ned Brown, the Federal Open Market Committee, the Federal Reserve Pension System, and Paul Volcker.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley, Gwen Gittins
1981
7
No.432 Howard Smith
Smith discusses his career as an engineer at KSL, both in radio and television.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1986

Interviews 433-437Return to Top

Container(s): Box 55

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No.433 John A. Dixon
Dixon (b. 1923) talks about his ancestry, childhood, and college experiences. He also discusses the medical school at the University of Utah both from the perspective of a student in the 1940s and as dean in the 1970s. He recalls his experiences with a MASH unit in the Korean war, as chairman of the Utah State Board of Health, and as a member of the Board of Regents for the University of Utah. He reminisces about working with various University presidents and faculty members and discusses the history of laser surgery and the artificial organ programs. Other topics covered include medical ethics, doctor/patient relationships, and malpractice.Interviewer: Robert Miller
1987
2
No.434 Frederick S. Buchanan
In this series of interviews, Buchanan (b. 1931) details his genealogy and recalls his childhood in Scotland. He talks about his motivation to come to the United States, his education at the University of Utah and Ohio State, and his lifelong interest in education and Mormon history.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1992-1993
3
No.435 J. D. Williams
Williams recalls his education in the Salt Lake City public school system, and at Stanford and Harvard. He talks about his early interest in politics and his tenure at the University of Utah. Other topics covered include academic freedom, the Vietnam War period on campus, and his relationship with various officials connected with the university and with the Mormon Church.Interviewer: Everett L. Cooley
1984
4
No.436 Linda C. Smith
Linda Smith (b. 1940) recalls her early dance training with Virginia Tanner at the Children's Dance Theater in Salt Lake City. She talks at length about the formation of the Repertory Dance Theatre, and about the relationship between the Rockefeller Foundation, the company, and the University of Utah dance department. Other topics covered include Joan Woodbury, Shirley Ririe, choreography, Wayne Richardson, Don Michaelis, Don Anderson, touring, balancing a career in dance with family obligations, the functioning of an artistic democracy, and the place of dance in our culture.Interviewer: Scott Marsh
1995-1996
5
No.437 Charles M. Pickett
Charles M. Pickett (b. 1918), a Utah-born attorney and employee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, discusses his childhood in St. George, Utah, and his education at the University of Utah. He also recalls his service in the Philippines and with the army of occupation in Japan. He served as both Washington county attorney and St. George city attorney before joining the FDIC. Pickett also talks about Utah politics and politicians.Interviewer: Ralph Hafen, Gregory C. Thompson
1999

Interviews 438-446Return to Top

Container(s): Box 56

Container(s) Description Dates
box
56
Folder
1
No.438 M. Lynn Bennion
M. Lynn Bennion (b. 1903), who served twenty four years as superintendent of the Salt Lake City School District, recalls district problems inherited from his predecessor, relations between the school board and the Teacher's Association, the merit system for teachers, the 1964 teachers strike, and the problems facing the current school superintendent.Interviewer: Fred Buchanan
1991
2
No.439 Alvin Cobabe
Cobabe (b. 1917) details his career as a broadcast engineer and his training at the University of Utah school of medicine at the age of forty-one. The bulk of the interview is about the development of Powder Mountain ski resort.Interviewer: Joe Arave
1990
3
No.440 Don Barlow
Don Barlow (b. 1935), assistant principal of Highland High School in Salt Lake City, talks about his Salt Lake City childhood, being a school social worker in the mid-1960s, John Bennion, Art Wiscombe, school boards, athletic coaches, the influence of the LDS Church in education, Don Thomas, closing schools, teacher quality, and current challenges in education.Interviewer: Fred Buchanan
1992
4
No.441 Al Brain
Brain (b. 1919) recalls his career in television and radio, discussing such subjects as Sid Fox, KDYL, the movie industry, being a stringer for KSL-TV, the Fisher/Taylor wedding, racing at the Bonneville Salt Flats, Art Kent, Roy Gibson, and covering the beginning of construction on the Glen Canyon Dam.Interviewer: Tim Larson
1988
5
No.442 Bruce Brodie
This taped monologue was prepared by Mr. Brodie in response to a request by Roy Webb for some biographical information on his mother, Fawn Brodie. Brodie talks about the McKay home in Huntsville, Utah, describes his Utah relatives, and speculates on his mother's attachment to the homestead. He describes his mother's education and her relationship with his father. He also talks about the relocation of the family to California, the illness and deaths of both parents, and his impressions of the biographies written by his mother.
1985
6
No.443 Robert Archuleta
Archuleta (b. 1930), discusses the Salt Lake City school district from a hispanic perspective. Topics covered include minority statistics, West High School, LDS Church programs, Title I, the board of education, the closure of South High School, and the Subversive Activities Control Board.Interviewer: Fred Buchanan
1992
7
No.444 Heber C. Snell
Snell (b. 1883) talks with Fred Buchanan, Max Rogers, and Dale LeCheminant about religion and education. Subjects include Brigham Young University, LDS Seminary, excommunictions, the place of religious studies in a university, Sterling McMurrin, Joseph F. Smith, conflicts between faith and knowledge, priesthood meetings, the excommunication of John Fitzgerald, an interview with B. H. Roberts, and Dr. Snell's personal religious beliefs.
1973
8
No.445 Florence R. Krall
Krall, professor emeritus of Educational Studies at the University of Utah, discusses her education, her Ph.D. dissertaion, the faculty of the Department of Education, her experiences as Chair, departmental politics, and the alternative teachers program.Interviewer: Fred Buchanan
1996
9
No.446 Don Kauchak
Kauchak details his educational background, being hired by the University of Utah, his impressions of the Department of Education, the culture shock in coming to Utah, courses taught, departmental personnel and politics, Florence Krall, Ralph Reynolds, academic freedom, and the current state of the department.Interviewer: Don Kauchak
1996

No.447 William R. Gould, 1994-1996Return to Top

Container(s): Box 57

In this series of interviews, Gould (1919-2006) discusses his childhood, early education, family and friends, years at the University of Utah, and his courtship of Erlyn Johnson. He also duscusses his naval training at MIT and Dartmouth, his service duty, and his employment with the Edison Company. Other topics covered include negotiating with utility unions, his thoughts on American corporations, California politicians, experiences as a CEO, the World Energy Conference, railroad history, Cold Fusion, architects, engineers, and artists.

Interviewers: Gregory Thompson and Floyd O'Neil

Container(s) Description Dates
box
57
Folder
1 1994-1996
1 1994-1996

No.448 Frances Jean Miles Westwood, 1987Return to Top

Container(s): Box 58

In this series of interviews, Jean (1923-1997) recalls her childhood in Price, Utah, and discusses her marriage to Richard Westwood, who is present during the interviews. Topics covered include mink farming in Utah, involvement in Democratic politics, the Mormon Church, Vietnam and the Great Society, the childhood and early life of Dick Westwood, raising their children, working for Dave King, national politics, involvement in the McGovern campaign, Watergate, events after the election, and being on the lecture circuit.

Interviewers: Gregory Thompson and Floyd O'Neil

Container(s) Description Dates
box
58
1987
1987
1987
1987
1987

Interviews 449-457, 1997-2008Return to Top

Container(s): Box 59

Container(s) Description Dates
box
59
Folder
1
No.449 Jerald and Sandra Tanner
Jerald (1938-2006) and Sandra Tanner discuss their early experiences in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, their meeting and marriage, and the events leading to requesting their names be removed from church membership rolls. Other topics include Modern Microfilm Company (later changed to Utah Lighthouse Ministry), doctrinal questions, Mark Hofmann, and researching Mormon history.Interviewers: Stan Larson and George D. Smith
1997
2
No.450 Shirley Russon Ririe
Ririe recalls her Salt Lake City childhood and education, her dance training, early career days in New York City, teaching at BYU and for Virginia Tanner, Joan Woodbury and the Ririe-Woodbury dance company, Repertory Dance Theater, University of Utah dance department, people she has worked with over the years, choreography, touring, and combining motherhood with dance.Interviewer: Scott Marsh
2002
3
No.451 Joan Woodbury
Woodbury describes her childhood in Southern Utah, her dance training, her marriage, the University of Utah, going to Berlin on a Fulbright scholarship, the Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company, choreography, and her children.Interviewer: Scott Marsh
2002
4
No.452 Peter Gibbs
Peter Gibbs (b. 1943) grew up in Salt Lake City, Utah. He attended Stewart School, an "experimental school," for his junior high school years, and then East High School. He received a PhD in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Utah in 1971. He was a member of the Boy Scouts of America (belonging to a troop sponsored by the Unitarian Church), where he learned to love the outdoors. He was also a member of the Ute Alpine Club and the Salt Lake Grotto. In the late 1950s he started a business called Gibbs Ascenders. In 1972 he started another business called Baja Expeditions. Gibbs has worked for several companies, including the National Geographic Society, Grand Canyon Expeditions, and Sevy Guide Service. His activities include hiking, caving, skiing, mountain climbing, and kayaking, which he has done all over the world.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: Elizabeth Shuput
2006
5
No.453 Margene Bullcreek
Margene Bullcreek (b. 1946) is a member of the Skull Valley Band of Goshute Indians. She talks about her upbringing, family life, and her identity as a traditionalist American Indian. One of the major opponents of the plan to store nuclear waste on her reservation, she describes her activism since1992. Bullcreek also explains the concept of environmental justice, discusses the dynamics of inter-tribal decision making, and talks about the organizations of which she is a member that helped her fight against nuclear waste on the reservation.Nuclear Technology Project.Interviewers: Samantha Senda-Cook and Danielle Endres
2007-2008
6
No.454 Dwight Butler
Butler (b. 1952) grew up in White Bear Lake, Minnesota. He and his brother, Charlie, moved to Salt Lake City, Utah, in 1972, where they founded Wasatch Touring, a retail business specializing in backcountry equipment. Butler recalls his childhood in Minnesota, learning to ski, and the development of cross country skiing.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: Erik Solberg.
2007
7
No.455 Leslie Ellison
Leslie Ellison (b. 1951) grew up in Connecticut, where he learned to climb. He received a degree in Anthropology from the University of Maine in 1973. In the early seventies he came out to Utah with his brother Bruce to ski, and came the next season with Kurt Ottman to climb.He fell in love with the granite in Little Cottonwood Canyon, and applied to to graduate school at the University of Utah, where he received a master’s degree in 1976 in Parks and Recreation Administration. Ellison discusses climbining with many famous Utah climbers, describes various climbs, and talks about first ascents. He has also climbed in South America, Canada, on Baffin Island, and in the Himalayas.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: Elizabeth Shuput
2006
8
No.456 Tony Guzman
Tony Guzman (b. 1980) grew up in San Francisco, California. He describes his move to Las Vegas, Nevada where he first learned about the Yucca Mountain Project. He became involved in nuclear waste issues in the summer of 2004. Guzman discusses his relationship to nuclear waste and other nuclear technologies in the American West, and talks about working for a non-profit organization called Citizen Alert. He also talks about his work with the Nevada Conservation League and Think Outside the Bomb. In March 2007, he moved to Salt Lake City, where he became involved with Utah Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons. He describes his role in the debate over nuclear waste, ethical considerations for nuclear waste disposal, and potential solutions for storing nuclear waste.Nuclear Technology Project.Interviewer: Samantha Senda-Cook
2007
9
No.457 Alexis Kelner
Alexis Kelner (b. 1938) was born in Rīga, Latvia. His family lived in a German Displaced Persons Camp after World War II. The family came to the United States in 1950, sponsored by the Unitarian Church in Salt Lake City.. He joined the Civil Air Patrol cadet program and attended the University of Utah. Kelner discusses skiing and mountaineering in the Wasatch Mountains, working at Saltair, being a research assistant for Cal Giddings at the University of Utah, and the Wasatch Mountain Club. He recalls fellow outdoorsmen such as Bruce Christenson, Gary Larson, Blaine Erickson, John McDuff, Dick Bell, Charles Leslie, and Harold Goodro. Also discussed are Larry Swanson, Dave Hanscom, Tom Stevenson, Karl Dunn, Dick Bass, and Tom Spencer. Kelner organized many touring trips in the Wasatch Range, and in recent years has been an opponent of wilderness development.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: Erik Solberg
2007

Interviews 458-, 1991, 2007-2008Return to Top

Container(s): Box 60

Container(s) Description Dates
box
60
Folder
1
No.458 Kim Miller
Kim Miller (b. 1952) grew up in Rexburg, Idaho. His dad was a farmer and his mother was a physical education teacher at the high school. He attended schools in Rexburg, including Ricks College, and graduated from BYU in 1977 in business communications. He was active in the Boy Scouts and worked as a hike master at a scout camp in the Tetons. Working near the Tetons progressed into climbing, and he describes favorite climbs, including the Polar Circus in Canada, Fairview Dome, Wolf’s Head, and The Nose. Miller also recalls friends Tom Frost, Brian Smoot, Mark Ward, and Jim Dockery. Other topics include soloing (his favorite way of climbing), ice climbing, the dangers of climbing, the stigma of being a climber, his dislike of bivouacking, speed climbing, injuries, and gear. In the second interview, Miller discusses guidebooks and the publication of Wasatch Granite. He also talks about what it means to do a first ascent and gives his definition of a true climber. Other topics include changes in climbing equipment, aid climbing, first ascents, the feeling of being in the mountains, access, differences in American and European climbing, physical and mental dangers, current attitudes, climbing with his kids, being baffled over the rating systems, and climbing fads today.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: Erik Solberg
2007
2
No.459 Esther Peterson
Esther Peterson (1906-1997) was born in Provo, Utah. Her father was Lars Eggerrtsen, a first generation American from Danish immigrants. Her mother was Annie Neilson from Veddham, Denmark, who crossed the plains with a handcart company. Esther describes her Utah childhood and talks about teaching physical education (dancing) for two years in Cedar City, Utah, at the Branch Agricultural College. She attended the Teachers’ College at Columbia to get her master’s degree in Administration of Physical Education. There she met her husband, Oliver. They married in 1932. Oliver encouraged her involvement in social issues. She taught at an exclusive girls’ private school, Winsor School, in Boston for six years. She also volunteered at the YWCA teaching dance to girls from the garment industry. After visiting the slums of Cambridge to observe the union movement these girls were associated with, Esther became involved in creating the International Ladies Garment Workers Union. She never stopped fighting for fair labor in America. She spent her summers at the Bryn Mawr College for women working in industry. Esher had four children, and balanced motherhood with teaching for Amalgamated Clothing Workers. She worked in Utah to organize the Utah Garment Factory, and was active in other labor causes. Oliver was a labor attaché, and later worked for the State Department. They spent many years in Europe. She continued working late into her life “on the Hill” in various departments. She has successfully influenced and established many of America’s labor and fairness policies.Interviewer: Floyd O'Neil
1991
3
No.460 Vanessa Pierce
Vanessa Pierce (b. 1980) discusses growing up in Colorado, going to college at Grinnell College, and her work with Green Corps. She talks about her upbringing, role models and ethical influences, and her relationship with nuclear waste issues as the Executive Director of HEAL Utah. Other topics include Energy Solutions, the Yucca Mountain High Level Nuclear Waste site, and the proposed temporary nuclear waste site at Skull Valley, Utah.Nuclear Technology Project.Interviewers: Samantha Senda-Cook and Danielle Endres
2008
4
No.461 John Reid
John Reid (b. 1939) has been an avid Wasatch Front mountaineer and skier for many decades. He attended Reed College, later joined the army, and attended the University of Utah on the GI Bill. Some of his climbing partners were George Lowe, Bob Bryan, Dan Grandusky (Clean Dad), and Ron Perla, with whom he climbed Mt. Whitney. Reid talks about tthe Ute Alpine Club, the progression of equipment, and the increasing popularity of rock climbing.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: Erik Solberg
2007
5
No.462 Dave Smith
David Smith (b.1951) developed an interest in the outdoors by hunting with his father and backpacking with the Boy Scouts. He worked at East Fork of the Bear River Boy Scout Camp, and was head of the winter program at Camp Steiner for a couple of years. After reading about climbing, and hearing about climbing in a junior-high school assembly, he hooked up with the Wasatch Mountain Club and attended their Thursday night climbing courses, although he was only fifteen at the time. He describes his first session at Storm Mountain, climbing in the Tetons and Wind Rivers, and tells a story about being the subject of a rescue effort by Deputy Sheriff Pete Kotolus and a rescue party of Ted Wilson, Court Richards, Dave Allen, George Lowe, and Dave George. Other topics include climbing equipment and clothing, the Ute Alpine Club, various climbs in the Tetons, the Wind Rivers, Canada, Mexico, and Europe, guidebooks, environmental issues, aid climbing, rating systems, and working in outdoor recreation businesses. Climbing partners have included Kim Miller, Mark Ward, Dave Lowe, John Glidden, Dick Grow, Kent Christiansen, Bruce Roghaar, Don Black, Tom Stevenson, George Lowe, John Reed, and Bob Irvine.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: Erik Solberg
2007
6
No.463 Larry and Steve Swanson
This interview is of two brothers talking about their climbing and skiing experiences. Larry (b. 1936) and Steve (b. 1938) both graduated from the University of Minnesota in engineering. Larry came out to Utah to work for Sperry UNIVAC and started climbing with the Wasatch Mountain Club in 1961. Two years later Steve moved to Utah to work in the aerospace industry. Both climbed and were weekend volunteers for the National Ski Patrol for thirty years, working a few years at Solitude and then at Park West (future Canyons Resort). They discuss the origins of their interest in the outdoors, climbing, ski touring and racing, and cycling.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: Erik Solberg
2007
7
No.464 Stephen Trimble
Trimble (b.1950) recalls his childhood in Denver, Colorado, as the son of a geologist who did field work in the summers, taking his family along. He discusses his family, his school years, and his early experiences with environmental activism. Other topics include the Sierra Club, David Brower, Friends of the Earth, Glen Canyon, the Galapagos, working with the National Park Service, Outward Bound, photography, oral history, and the politics of rhetoric. He also details how his books have come about and describes his relationship with other writers. Trimble discusses photography, his decision to sell two photographs to Marlboro Company for their cigarette advertisements, and how he came terms with that decision. He discusses the notion of eco-porn and the generation of photographers who made a living photographing landscapes in the West. He talks about his current work as a Stegner Fellow at the University of Utah.Utah Environmental Project.Interviewer: Rob DeBirk
2008
8
No.465 Ian Zabarte
Ian Zabarte (b.1964) grew up in the Bay Area, California. Zabarte is a Western Shoshone, who is part of the Western Shoshone National Council and has lived on the Duckwater Indian Reservation at various points in his life. Zabarte begins by discussing his Western Shoshone heritage, then moves to a discussion of his role in the controversy over high-level nuclear waste, particularly with regard to Yucca Mountain. Zabarte also briefly discusses the effects of nuclear testing on Western Shoshone and Southern Paiute people and the cultural resource studies performed by the Department of Energy in relation to the Nevada Test Site and Yucca Mountain.Nuclear Technology Project.Interviewer: Danielle Endres
2008

Interviews, 466-491, 2006-2009Return to Top

Container(s): Box 61

Container(s) Description Dates
box
61
Folder
1
No.466 Caine Alder
Caine Alder was born in Salt Lake City, Utah, on 14 December 1933. He grew up in the undeveloped foothills and enjoyed exploring caves, climbing mountains, skiing, and running rivers. He joined the Wasatch Mountain Club at a young age, was mentored by Jim Shane, and did many first ascents. Topics discussed include his exploration and measuring of Neff’s Cave, search and rescue operations, his love of mountaineering and friendship with Paul Petzoldt, he connection between the Ute Alpine Club and spelunking, environmentalism, skiing, and the history of hiking Timpanogos.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: Erik Solberg
2007
2
No.467 Jerry Anderegg
Jerry Anderegg attended Highland, East, and Olympus High Schools in Salt Lake City, where he participated in ski racing and climbing. His friends included Rick Reese, Dave Wood and Dick Wallin. After his LDS mission to Germany, he was no longer interested in climbing, but turned to skiing and family. He discusses climbing in the Wasatch range, the evolution in gear, the Alpenbock Club, early skiing at Ecker’s Hill, and the local attitude toward mountaineering.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: Erik Solberg
2007
3
No.468 Ross "Rocky" Anderson
Anderson discusses the awakening environmental movement in the 1960s and 1970s, and outlines his experiences after law school. Realizing that there was a lack of environmental leadership in Congress, he began a crusadet for alternative energy. He ran for Congress and won the primary but lost the election due to his stand on same-sex marriage. He ran for Salt Lake City mayor on a climate-change and urban-planning platform and won. As mayor, he implemented many energy-saving measures. He started with a sustainability study of every department in city government. Then changes were implemented: old light bulbs replaced with energy-efficient models, reduced size of fleet—eliminated inefficient vehicles and substituted natural gas and electric vehicles where possible, implemented light rail system, instituted citywide recycling program, and installed a methane-capture device at the waste-water treatment facility. He also discusses his fight against “sprawl mall” and the Legacy Highway project.Utah Environmentalist Project.Interviewer: Robert DeBirk.
2008
4
No.469 Dave Bastian
Bastian (b. 1974) was born in Provo, Utah, but the family moved California and eventually settled in San Juan Batista, just east of Monterey. He recalls his childhood and speaks of the Teatro Campesino, a theater for farm workers. He describes his affinity for western novels; Louis L’Amour and and Zane Grey. After a series of menial jobs which supported his lifeas a ski bum at Solitude and Snowbird Ski Resorts, he was hired at the Save Our Canyons Project and later by the Utah Rivers Counsel. He discusses the environmental movement in Utah and the westnern U.S.Utah Environmentalist Project.Interviewer: Rob DeBirk
2008
5
No.470 Larson R. Bill and Julie Cavanaugh-Bill
Larson Bill (b. 1948) is a Western Shoshone who was born in Ely, Nevada. He discusses his background, upbringing, and general relationship to nuclear issues. Nuclear issues are something that have always been in the background of his life because of how they had affected Western Shoshone People. He discusses how the nuclear testing and nuclear waste controversies have come up in relation to his roles in tribal government and in the Western Shoshone Defense Project. Larson discusses various aspects of the controversies over nuclear waste and nuclear testing on Western Shoshone land including the disproportionate affects on indigenous populations, who is responsible for nuclear waste, and how perceptions of the desert contribute to the placement of nuclear testing and nuclear waste in Nevada. He concludes by contrasting Western Shoshone spiritual beliefs with other religious beliefs, noting the uniqueness of land-based spirituality among Native Americans. Julie Cavanaugh-Bill (b. 1967) describes her Iowa background, role models, her to be involvement with Native American and nuclear issues. She talks about her interest in human rights, her education, and her experience as a lawyer before moving to Nevada to work full-time with the Western Shoshone Defense Project, which led her to act as a spokeswoman on nuclear issues at times.Nuclear Technology Project.Interviewer: Samantha Senda-Cook
2009
6
No.471 Roger Borgenicht
Borgenicht earned his B.S. degree in Urban Planning and Anthropology at Columbia, and then went to Berkley for graduate work in architecture. He worked in environmental concerns in San Francisco, California, for 14 years, moving to Salt Lake City, Utah in 1984. He went to work for Assist, one of the oldest community design centers in the country. He was involved in the planning of the I-15 expansion, including car pool lanes and light rail. Roger was very involved with a coalition of people concerned with the problems of the Legacy Highway. In the end, the settlement called for a Parkway with a continuous path along the whole length, only two lanes in each direction, no semi-trucks, 55 miles per hour speed limit and quiet pavement, all lessening the impact of the Parkway. Roger is currently involved in the fight over the proposed Mountain View Corridor.Utah Environmentalist Project.Interviewer: Rob DeBirk
2008
7
No.472 Frances Huddlestone Broadhead
Broadhead (b. 1931) was born in Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada. She discusses her family and growing up in that area. She contracted polio at age six during the fall of 1937. She has limited memory of her hospital stay and treatment, but discusses some follow-up physical therapy and her course of recovery, including crutches and massage therapy. Ms. Broadhead discusses the onset of, associated problemswith, and coping with post-polio syndrome. She tells of working in the family assay business until retirement and discusses her current medical care.Polio Project.Interviewer: Becky Lloyd
2009
8
No.473 Shirley Rae Olson Christensen Burggraaf
Burggraaf (b. 1926) was born in Salt Lake City, Utah. She graduated with an accounting degree from the University of Utah and worked locally until marrying. She and he husband moved to Schenectady, New York, for his employment and they had one child. She contracted polio around 1950, while in her early twenties. She was treated at a Schenectady hospital in an isolation ward for two or three weeks before being transferred by train to Salt Lake City, where she was cared for by family members. She discusses her treatment and therapy, along with her recovery, limitations, and post-polio syndrome. Shirley stayed in Salt Lake City and subsequently gave birth to two additional children.Polio Project.Interviewer: Becky Lloyd
2009
9
No.474 Charles Butler
Butler (b. 1950) recalls his childhood and the influence of his parents in the development of his love of the outdoors. Both his father and mother were instrumental in guiding Charles to skiing, hiking and sailing. He tells of following his then-girlfriend to California, where he attended school for one year in Santa Barbara. While working his way home he was invited by friends to stop by Salt Lake. These friends were students at the University of Utah. Butler loved the area and when the snow came he tried to find a place in Salt Lake that would rent cross-country skis to his friends. There was no on in the Valley. He went home to Minnesota and started painting houses with his brother Dwight. When winter came, he persuaded his brother to return to Salt Lake with him, and open a place that would rent cross-country skis. This business was called Wasatch Mountain Touring and was founded in 1972.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewers: Gregory C. Thompson and Erik Solberg
2007
10
No.475 Dick Carter
Carter (b. 1950) describes his early experiences with his dad, including a memorable trip to Mirror Lake in the High Uintas. He attributes his understanding of what wilderness meant to trips with his Dad when he was a young boy. Dick experienced an “awakening” in high school and college and knew he would be involved in wilderness somehow. Topics discussed include Cliff Merritt (described as “the elder of elders of elders” of the wilderness movement), the Wilderness Society, the Utah Wilderness Association, and the High Uintas Preservation Council. Carter currently concentrates all his efforts on the High Uintas wilderness.Utah Environmentalist Project.Interviewer: Rob DeBirk
2008
11
No.476 Forrest S. Cuch
Cuch (b. 1951) was born in Roosevelt, Utah. A member of the Ute Indian Tribe, he currently serves as the director of the Division of Indian Affairs for the state of Utah. Cuch begins by discussing his upbringing and experiences crossing between the “Non-Indian world” and the “Indian world.” He then moves to a discussion of the controversy over high-level nuclear waste storage on the Skull Valley Band of Goshutes Reservation. Cuch emphasizes the sovereignty rights, fairness issues, and hypocrisy in the controversy. This discussion expands to a more general discussion of the role of American Indians in Utah and the United States. Throughout the interview, Cuch discusses the importance of knowing and understanding history.Nuclear Technology Project.Interviewer: Danielle Endres
2008
12
No.477 Riley Cutler
Cutler (b. 1952) begins by sharing his childhood in Preston, Idaho. He lived in a farming community, and he explains just what that meant to him and to his friends. They worked the farms, sometimes along side of immigrant farm workers. He had an active outdoor childhood, learning to ski among his many activities. The family moved to Panama City, Panama, and Riley went to the American High School in the Panama Canal Zone. He returned to Utah after graduating from high school and enrolled in the University of Utah. He recalls getting into cross country skiing, his friendship and working relationship with the Butler brothers of Wasatch Touring Company.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: Erik Solberg
2007
13
No.478 Craig Denton
Denton grew up on the east side of Salt Lake City. He attended Highland High School. A non-Mormon, he had the perspective of being on the outside looking in. Topics discussed include empty spaces like vacant lots that have since been filled in, the concept of wilderness, proposed wilderness areas of Utah’s West Desert, the Las Vegas water grab, his love of fishing and the Bear River, his career at the University of Utah, and the fight against the MX missile. Denton also talks about literature that influenced his thinking, including the works of Thoreau, Emerson, Walt Whitman and Rachel Carson. He also talks about the photography of Ansel Adams, Eliot Porter and Philip Hyde.Utah Environmentalist Project.Interviewer: Rob DeBirk
2008
14
No.479 Carrol Firmage
Firmage camped throughout Utah as a child with her family. She married Ed Firmage whose educational pursuits took them to Berkeley, California, and then to Israel on an Albright Fellowship. When they returned to Salt Lake City, they began to take weekend trips to the Escalante-Boulder area in southern Utah. Inspired by the scenery, they became interested in landscape photography. Ed’s father was an activist who opposed the MX plan to put nuclear weapons in the West Desert. Ed and Carrol followed in his footsteps and became active in the Divine Strake project when the government talked about doing more testing in the West. They were also involved in issues over water rights in Utah involving Las Vegas. Her Master’s Thesis at the University of Utah studies historic farming practices in Utah and modern urban gardening in an effort to increase sustainability by growing more food locally.Utah Environmentalists Project.Interviewer: Robert DeBirk
2008
15
No.480 David George
George (b. 1946) was born in New York and attended school in Massachusetts before the family moved to Colorado, where he became interested in climbing. He studied engineering at the University of Utah and climbed in the Wasatch with Joel Brown and Jock Gliddon. He recalls climbs in the Tetons and Wind Rivers. Later climbs took him to Canada, the Alps, the Hindu Kush in Afghanistan, and Nepal. Topics discussed include the Ute Alpine Club, Das Berghaus, the Wasatch Mountain Club, the Alpenbock Club, competition between climbers, equipment and gear, snow and ice climbing, caving, search and rescue, development in the Wasatch Canyons, and guidebooks.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: Erik Solberg
2007
16
No.481 Scott Groene
Groene discusses why he attended law school and how he became a paid “enviro.” He started his law career working for Indians in Mexican Hat, Utah. He also lived in Bluff and Moab, Utah and Washington D.C. while working for the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance. He is now executive director of that organization. He describes some of the environmental issues he has worked on over the years, such as livestock grazing, wilderness designation, military missile-testing operations, Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, and cultural resources, and he talks about the politics surrounding these issues.Utah Environmentalists Project.Interviewer: Robert DeBirk
2008
17
No.482 Vai Hafoka
Hafoka (b. 1959) tells us about her young life in the Tongan Islands, then her move to San Mateo California. She describes, with excitement, her trip from Tonga to the United States in 1970, and shares the importance to her of her Tongan traditions. She describes her family’s relationship with the LDS church, including her arrival at Brigham Young University at the age of 17, with a book and tuition scholarship, a small government grant, and no other support. She thought at the time that she was the only Tongan woman at BYU, where she graduated at the age of 19.Pacific Worlds Project.Interviewer: Savani Aupiu
2008
18
No.483 David Hanscom
Hanscom (b. 1941) grew up in Rumford, Maine. His father introduced him to skiing at an early age and he skied for his high school ski team. He skied the Nordic Combined events, which were comprised of combined scores from cross country skiing and ski jumping. He talks about older equipment, such as pine-tar cross country skis, and skis that had no camber and just dragged. He went to Middlebury College prior to coming to Utah in 1970. Hanscom talks about skiing with the Wasatch Mountain Club, avalanches, and his relationship with Alexis Kelner, which resulted in the publication of a ski touring guide entitled "Wasatch Tours." Other topics include avalanche awareness and safety, preparation for the 1985 Salt Lake City Olympic bid, and bringing activities like the World Cup Skiing and World Cup Cross Country to Utah. David speaks about the political nature of the committees, and the people involved. He describes the ‘Little Dell’ site discussions and the eventual rejection as the proposed site for the Winter Games cross country and biathlon events. David was also concerned about the ‘legacy’ of the choice and the selection of a permanent site was at Wasatch Mountain State Park, which was called Soldier Hollow. The interview concludes with a review of the technological improvement of ski gear from wood skis with leather boots and toe clip bindings, to engineered metal skis and plastic boots with specialized bindings for telemark skiing.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewed by Erik Solberg
2007
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No.484 Ronald Soren Hanson
Hanson (b. 1931) recalls growing up in Logan, where he contracted polio in the fall of 1937 at the age of six. He was sent to the Los Angeles Children’s Hospital for nine months. He relates his experiences with daily physical therapy, hospital food and care, his fellow patients, schooling and overall care, a return to Los Angeles for a series of follow-up corrective surgeries, and the use of orthotic devices to compensate for differences in leg size. Other topics include his resumption of full activity (including high school sports), residual effects of the disease and post-polio syndrome.Polio Project.Interviewer: Becky Lloyd
2009
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No.485 Marc Heileson
Heileson grew up in Provo, Utah, where his experiences with camping and backpacking left him with a love for Utah’s wilderness. He grew up watching the political scene change, allowing more encroachment into the wilderness for oil and gas development, He was introduced to the Sierra Club while working on the senatorial campaign of Wayne Owens. After he received his degree in Natural Resources from Utah State University, he went to work for the Sierra Club. Heileson was involved in the Legacy Highway/Parkway debates leading to some compromise decisions that left the project much better than had been initially planned in terms of protection of the resources and the impact of a highway on the community. He is still involved in the Legacy phases II, III & IV. He explains how important the Clean Water Act has been in fighting the Legacy plan.Utah Environmentalists Project.Interviewer: Rob DeBirk
2008
21
No.486 Hina Hunkin
Hunkin begins by telling a bit about her education at the L.D.S. Church College of Hawaii and at Brigham Young University. She was the youngest of eight children, and says that she was lucky to grow up tri-lingual; speaking English, French, and Tahitian. She recalls her conversion to the L.D.S. church, growing up with servants and the view that this was common and a way of someone employment, her pride in Tahitian traditions, and the importance of education in her family. Her husband is currently serving his 11th term as the U.S. Representative for American Samoa.Pacific Worlds Project.Interviewer: Savani Aupiu
2008
22
No.487 Jon Jensen
Jensen (b. 1975) attended college in Oregon and Utah, majoring in environmental studies. After college he traveled in Mexico. Jensen discusses the literature that shaped his views, political and geographical boundaries, traditional cultures, Edward Abbey, Henry David Thoreau, the culture of thrift, protest culture in Seattle, and toxic waste.Utah Environmentalists Project.Interviewer: Robert DeBirk
2007
23
No.488 Allison Jones
Jones is a conservation biologist with the Wild Utah Project. She was born in California to "a couple of hippies," and recalls hiking and camping with her family in various national parks. She attended the University of California, Santa Cruz, and the University of Nevada, Reno, as a student of Environmental Studies. Among topics discussed are the animal rights movement, the impact of grazing, the Utah Wolf Conservation Management Plan, the Utah Black Bear Management Plan, the process of agreements between environmentalists and ranchers, the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance, and the Utah/Nevada Snake River Valley Water Agreement.Utah Environmentalists Project.Interviewer: Robert DeBirk
2008
24
No.489 Leki Kalamafoni
Kalamafoni (b. 1984) was raised in Portland, Oregon, a member of one of the three Polynesian families in Portland. When he was eleven years old, his father took him and his older brother to live in Tonga, to be, as he says, “raised there in a humbler environment." He explains how difficult it was to go adjust to the Tongan traditions and culture. Kalamafoni spent two years in the U.S. Navy and then two years serving a mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Johannesburg, South Africa. The remainder of the interview concerns Mr. Kalamafoni’s membership and activities in the LDS church.Pacific Worlds Project.Interviewer: Savani Aupiu
2008
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No.490 Salome Vehikite Keller
Keller (b. 1947) growing up in Tonga, her education, and cultural differences between Tonga and the United States. She left Tonga at the age of twenty-five and, after learning English, met and married her husband. She followed her husband, who was in the military, to Germany. While in Europe they traveled to Italy, France, Switzerland, and the Holy Lands.Pacific Worlds Project.Interviewer: Savani Aupiu
2008
26
No.491 Alexis Kelner
Kelner (b. 1938) recalls hiking with his parents while they were in a post-World War II displaced persons camp in Germany. The family eventually came to Utah under the sponsorship of the Unitarian Church. Kelner's outdoor activities in Utah included caving, hiking, and rock climbing. He describes various climbs in the mountains of Utah, Wyoming, and Colorado, and details his participation in environmental controversies in the 1960s and 1970s. Other topices include the Lone Peak wilderness area proposal, Deedee Corradini, the Olympics Feasibility Committee, climbing Shiprock in New Mexico, kayaks, Cal Giddings, the Wasatch Mountain Club, the Ute Alpine Club, and the Save Our Canyons organization.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: Liz Shupet
2006

Interviews, 492 - 521, 2006-2009Return to Top

Container(s): Box 62

Container(s) Description Dates
box
62
Folder
1
No.492 Gerhart Laun
Gernhart Laun (b. 1941) born in Frankfurt, Germany. He learned English from his nanny, a Russian pediatrician that his father hired during World War II. He received a Master's Degree in Philosophy from Frankfurt University, and graduated from the Jesusit School of Saint George (mentored by Hans Wolter). He worked a teaching assistant in the English department. Theological studies followed next, with an emphasis in the New Testament and Jesuit studies. He was mentored by Hans Wolter. Father Wiseman put him on the path to become an Anglican Priest, becoming a postulate under Bishop Stephen Bayne. He worked with Bishop Chilton Powell in Oklahoma teaching classical languages at Cassidy School. He was ordained in 1971 in the Diocese of Oklahoma, serving in the Cathedral Parish initially. Then after ordination to the priesthood, he served in the western Oklahoma City, Indian mission for the Diocese. Later he taught in the Bishop's School of Theology. After he was ordained Deacon in January 1970 and Priest in 1971, he served in Oklahoma for ten years. Laun came to Utah in 1978 and stayed for thirteen years at St. Mary's in Provo. During this time he dealt with issues such as Gary Gilmore's execution, the ordination of women and gays, and the closing of USX. he was particularly known for his musical Evensongs. After being elected Chairman of the Board of the United Ministry of Higher Education, he supervising the support of campus ministries at the University of Utah, Logan, and Southern Utah, and supported developing ministries in St. George and Cedar City and working with LDS leaders from BYU. He accepted a call to St. Elizabeth's in Honolulu, and continued there until he retired.Interviewer: Reverend Doctor Frederick Quinn
2006
2
No.493 Larry Love
Love (b. 1940) was born in Oroville, where he grew up playing outdoors and enjoying sports. His dad was a plumber and his mother was a cook. After his parents were divorced, he and his mother moved to Salt Lake City where he attended the Sherman Elementary, Granite Junior High, Granite High, and Olympus High Schools. Right after high school he entered the Army Reserve, where he served for eight years. He attended the University of Utah and Brigham Young University, graduating in 1968 in physical education with a coaching emphasis and a minor in German. He played volleyball for the “Y” for four years and substituted the deep powder skiing class. He first climbed in Jackson Hole at age sixteen and was one of the originators of the Alpenbock Club. He talks about climbing with Ted Wilson and discusses the advancement in equipment.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: Erik Solberg
2007
3
No.494 Gavin Noyes
Noyes (b. 1974) grew up in Salt Lake City, Uah. His family was quite outdoors oriented. His family took many fishing and camping trips, Mirror Lake was a preferred location. He recalls being involved in the Scouting program, and reaching the rank of Eagle Scout. After attending college at the University of Michigan, Anne Arbor, he came back to Utah and got involved with the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance (SUWA). He spoke out against the Olympics for Salt Lake and was involved in the production of the “This Is Not the Place: 2002 Olympics” bumper sticker. Noyes also discusses the Save Our Canyon organization in Salt Lake City and explains that the strength of Save Our Canyon comes from the combination of a completely volunteer board, and a very solid grass-roots activist membership. He also discusses his involvement with the Round River Conservancy, and the upcoming Colorado Plateau project for Round River.Utah Environmentalists Project.Interviewer: Rob DeBirk
2008
4
No.495 Dave Pacheco
Pacheco was born in California, but was raised and educated in Salt Lake City, Uah. He attended the University of Utah. While on vacation he was introduced to canvassing. Through his canvassing for environmental causes, he became interested in many aspects of environmental studies. After graduating, he approached the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance and offered to raise money for them, even agreeing to raise his own salary. He left after eleven years and founded his own organization, the Utah Backcountry Volunteers. This volunteer group sets up service projects, and have completed many projects in Utah.Utah Environmentalists Project.Interviewer: Rob DeBirk
2007
5
No.496 Vanessa Pierce
Pierce (b. 1980) grew up in Colorado Springs. She attended Grinell College in Iowa. Following graduation she went into the Green Corps, a program of training and hands-on experience in how to run an environmental campaign. After training, she came to Utah to take a job with HEAL Utah - the Health Environment Alliance of Utah. This organization was instrumental in stopping the Fernald nuclear waste from being sent to Utah. Vanessa discusses the methods used, particularly the work they did with the Utah legislature. Other topics covered include the relationship between the legislature and the L.D.S. church, plans proposed by Energy Solutions to bring more nuclear waste to Utah, and the proposed nuclear waste dump on the Goshute reservation.Utah Environmentalists Project.Interviewer: Rob DeBirk
2007
6
No.497 Brian Smoot
Smoot (b. 1960) recalls growing up in Salt Lake City, outdoor activities in scouting programs, and summers at the family cabin in Woodland, Utah. He and his brother hiked regularly in the Wasatch mountains and began climbing on a small crag found on one of their hikes. Although self-trained, they took climbing very seriously and were able to climb both Half Dome and El Cap in Yosemite National Park when they were 18 years old. Smoot talks about climbers he admired at Yosemite, including Royal Robbins, Tom Frost, Yvon Chouinard, Chuck Pratt, and Warren Harding. Local climbers he admired include the Lowes and Mark McQuarrie. Improvements in climbing technology discussed include cams, TCUs, FriXions, Five Ten shoes, ice axes, and the express ice screw. He also talks about climbing ethics and environmental issues.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: Erik Solberg
2007
7
No.498 Bob Springmeyer
Springmeyer (b. 1943) was raised in Salt Lake City, Utah, where he was introduced to the outdoors through family fishing and camping trips. He was also involved in the scouting programs through the L.D.S. Church. He describes his education in Salt Lake City, an illegal fraternity in high school, the Alpenbock Club, climbing friends, experiences with improvement in technology, and clean climbing (recovery of equipment on the way down). He also shares his favorite climbs, both in the Jackson, Wyoming/Grand Tetons and the Salt Lake City Canyons areas. He also talks about doing the Gannett climb (also in Wyoming), but backing off as he felt his safety was threatened by weather and equipment issues. Springmeyer concludes with a discussion of fellow climbers from the Alpenbock Club and making ‘clean’ climbs easier.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: Erick Solberg
2007
8
No.499 Bridget Stuchly
Stuchly (b. 1978) describes growing up in Riverside, a suburb of Chicago. Her parents were fostered a love of the outdoors and a connection with the environment. An advanced biology class in high school about "biology on the level of ecosystems, different organisms and their place in the environment” really opened her eyes. She enrolled at Loyola University, majoring in environmental studies, later transferring to the University of Colorado at Boulder. Thinking she had come to an environmental Mecca, she was suprised at all the superfund sites around Boulder. Currently Bridget is working as regional manager for ReDirect Guide, a guide to resources and information about living sustainably. She is also involved with the Utah Clean Air Alliance.Utah Environmentalists Project.Interviewer: Rob De Birk
2008
9
No.500 Jack Turner
Turner (b. 1942) was raised in a rural setting outside of Washington, D.C., until his parents divorced and his Mom took him to San Diego, California. He didn’t care for school, and describes many of his school failures. He learned to surf, and spent a lot of time surfing instead of going to school. Turner spent time in the upper Green River basin as a "jug hustler," and began climbing with a friend after taking some classes at the Exum Climbing School in Wyoming. He describes his years traveling around the west, attending Cornell on a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship, attending anti-war rallies, backpacking through Europe, being trapped in Greece during a conflict with Turkey, trekking in Nepal, guiding in the Tetons, exploring Zen, and writing. Turner has published many essays and his books include The Abstract Wild and Travels in the Greater Yellowstone.Utah Environmentalists Project.Interviewer: Rob De Birk
2008
10
No.501 Savannah Wake
Wake (b. 1979) grew up in Utah, California, and Virginia. She was introduced to the outdoors by her father on camping trips. A chance meeting while on vacation at Denali National Park led to the founding of the Student Conservation Association (SCA). Wake spent some time doing seasonal work for the National Park Service and attended the University of Utah, graduating with a B.S. in Parks, Recreation, and Tourism. Currently, she works for the Swaner Nature Preserve at Kimball Junction, near Park City, Utah.Utah Envrionmentalist Project.Interviewer: Catherine Ashton
2007
11
No.502 Sonja Wyckoff
Wyckroff (b. 1938), a gynecologist, has been an active leader at the St. Jude's Episcopalian Church in Cedar City since 1978. She is a graduate of the University of California, Los Angeles and Irvine. As the church approaches its 25th Anniversary, she discusses some of her early memories. The church grew from a Morning Prayer group that met in the Jim Mittenzwei home. They grew the church mostly without outside help. In 1981 they moved into a storefront location. It was at this location that the church was named St. Jude's. The congregation was very close. The storefront was sold, and they met in a house off of 100 West, but the house burned down, destroying the records. A photo album and collection of newspapers clippings is also missing. She mentions Ron Belnap, Winchell, Jackie Witherspoon, and George Bates. She discusses living in a Mormon community. She left in 1990 and went to South Dakota to practice medicine.Interviewer: Reverend Doctor Frederick Quinn
2006
12
No.503 Yvonne (Bonnie) Campbell VanRoosendaal
VanRoosendaal (b. 1935) grew up in Eureka, Utah. She contracted polio at age four around Thanksgiving time and was hospitalized at the Shriner’s Hospital in Salt Lake City, where she stayed for approximately 11 months. She discusses her experiences there, including visiting her parents through a window while in quarantine, receiving daily chocolate syrup with a yeast cake tonic along with a sponge bath. When she was discharged, she came home on crutches and braces. Her mother routinely massaged her legs and back with cocoa butter. She continued in braces for approximately four years. She returned to Shriner’s at approximately age 13 for surgery to “set” her ankle by orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Pemberton. She was left with a lifelong limp and her right leg slightly shorter than her left. Mrs. VanRoosendaal describes her schooling and adult life, including her marriage and birth of four children. Mrs. VanRoosendaal discusses her current problems with post-polio syndrome.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2009
13
No.504 Marlin Nile Shields
Shields (b. 1933) discusses his childhood and schooling growing up in a Utah farming community. He attended Utah State University in Logan, Utah, on an athletic scholarship, majoring in physical therapy. He graduated from USU in 1956 and completed a one-year advanced physical therapy certification program at Stanford University. He describes his training and work with polio patients and provides detailed descriptions of patients, their treatment and outcomes. He describes a breathing technique taught to patients called “glossopharyngeal breathing”. He discusses the treatment course of a couple of specific patients he worked with at Stanford, who later returned to Salt Lake, where he continued treatment throughout their lives. Mr. Shields returned to Salt Lake and worked as a physical therapist for the University of Utah and later Intermountain HealthCare in both clinical and administrative duties.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2009
14
No.505 Mike Trube and Ebon Robinson
Mr. Trube was raised in southeastern Idaho. He discusses his outdoor experience with rock climbing and conservation of land used for outdoor recreation. He was employed at Backcountry.com in West Valley City, Utah.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: Erik Solberg
2008
15
No.506 Tarris Webber
Webber (b. 1981) grew up in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho. She discusses her experience with bouldering and climbing and discusses her expertise as a guide. She discusses her views of the impacts of outdoor recreation on environmental preservation.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: Erick Solberg
2008
16
No.507 Mindy Knoles
Knoles (b. 1979) is from Bountiful, Utah. She discusses her recreation experience from indoor climbing gyms to rock climbing on international terrain. In addition to the United States, she has climbed in France and Spain. She was a member of the Solvay Climbers Alliance.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: Erik Solberg
2008
17
No.508 Christopher Call
Call (b. 1978) was born in Manila, Philippines. He discusses his experiences and techniques of climbing. He coached a kids’ climbing team during college while attending Southern Oregon University in Ashland, Oregon. He instructed youth from Club U at the University of Utah, and the Boy Scouts of America.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: Erik Solberg
2008
18
No.509 Dennis Berryrieser
Mr. Berryrieser was born in Salt Lake City, Utah, in 1990. He discusses his family history of outdoor recreation and his experience with becoming an avid rock climber. He was a climbing instructor at Rockreation in Salt Lake City, Utah.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: Erik Solberg
2008
19
No.510 Sione Latu
Mr. Latu was born in Tonga and moved to the United States at the age of seventeen. He discusses his education, heritage, and religious beliefs. He relocated to the United States to pursue and further his education. He graduated from Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah.Pacific Worlds Project.Interviewer: Savani Aupiu
2008
20
No.511 Mafile 'o Latu
Ms. Latu was born in Provo, Utah. She discusses Polynesian culture, the importance of education, and her passion for music. Her family relocated to Utah from Tonga to benefit from the availability of education. Her parents were alumni of Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. She served a mission from 2001 to 2003 in Morris Town, New Jersey. She attended the University of Phoenix and taught piano.Pacific Worlds Project.Interviewer: Savani Aupiu
2008
21
No.512 Tema Hunkin
Ms. Hunkin was born in Tahiti, French Polynesia, and raised in Washington, D.C. and American Samoa. She discusses her education and religious beliefs, and the importance of both within her lineage. She graduated from BYU Hawaii and she is a real estate agent. She began the BYU Hawaii Alumni Chapter in Washington, D.C. She has worked for LDS Philanthropies and real estate while residing in Provo, Utah.Pacific Worlds Project.Interviewer: Savani Aupiu
2008
22
No.513 Lotopu'e Aupiu
Mr. Aupiu was born on January 20, 1983, in Provo, Utah. He discusses his family, his schooling and the importance of education in his family, and his involvement with the LDS Church. He was raised in Compton and Torrance, California. He played football at L.A. Harbor College and served an LDS mission in Osorno, Chile. At the time of this interview, he was a student at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, and he married with children.Pacific Worlds Project.Interviewer: Savani Aupiu
2008
23
No.514 Cherise Udell
Ms. Uddell was born in San Antonio, Texas, and raised in Laguna Beach and Mission Viejo, California. She discussed her education and experience with environmentalism and cultural homogeneity. She graduated from University of California at Berkeley and attended graduate school at Yale University.Utah Environmentalists Project.Interviewer: Rob DeBirk
2008
24
No.515 Ken Sanders
Sanders (b. 1951) discusses the cultural and environmental changes of Utah since the 1960s. He founded Dream Garden Press in 1980 and Ken Sanders Rare Books in 1990. He received the Salt Lake City Mayor’s Award for Contributions to the Arts in 2005.Utah Environmentalists Project.Interviewer: Rob DeBirk
2008
25
No.516 Pepper Provenzano
Mr. Provenzano was born in Princeton, New Jersey. He discusses his experience as an environmentalist and as Founder of TreeUtah in Salt Lake City, Utah. He has lived in Arizona and California, and worked as a journalist for the Salt Lake Tribune. Mr. Provenzano also discusses some of the intricacies in forming an environmental nonprofit organization. He is married with children.Utah Environmentalists Project.Interviewer: Rob DeBirk
26
No.517 Travis Harvey
Mrs. Harvey was born in 1973 in North Carolina. She attended Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, and participated in BYU’s environmentalist club, Eco Response. She discusses her environmental experience through international travels and local political campaigns. She was a founding member of Utah Moms for Clean Air.Utah Environmentalists Project.Interviewer: Rob DeBirk
2008
27
No.518 Lynn De Freitas
Ms. DeFreitas was born in Mammoth County, New Jersey, in 1949. She graduated from Montclair State College, now Montclair State University, in 1971, with a degree in biology and an emphasis in education, and then relocated to Utah the same year. She received a Master’s of Education degree at the University of Utah. She discusses her employment with Save the Canyons and her major involvement with such Friends of the Great Salt Lake.Utah Environmentalists Project.Interviewer: Rob DeBirk
2008
28
No.519 April Day
Mrs. Day was born on March 23, 1977. She discusses her beliefs and practices with regards to environmental conservation, including gardening. She also discusses her views on governmental roles in environmental upkeep. She married with children.Utah Environmentalists Project.Interviewer: Catherine Ashton
2007
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No.520 Keith Bartholomew
Mr. Bartholomew is an Assistant Professor of Urban Planning for the College of Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of Utah. He discusses the era in which he was raised, his choices throughout his path of education, and his involvement and planning withenvironmental initiatives in Utah, including the Legacy Highway Project.Utah Environmentalists Project.Interviewer: Rob DeBirk
2008

Interviews, 521 - 539, 2008-2010Return to Top

Container(s): Box 63

Container(s) Description Dates
box
63
Folder
1
No.521 Brent Huff
Huff (b. 1981) was born in West Valley City, Utah. The exact date is uncertain because he was adopted. He grew up in an outdoorsy Mormon family and became interested in climbing by reading magazines and rappelling with friends. He went to Snow College in Ephraim, Utah, where he was a rock climbing TA in Maple Canyon. Huff is very technically and safety oriented, with an emphasis on trusting your partner. Topics discussed inlcude the popularity and ethics of climbing, technology, gear, a military class called "Assault Climbers Course," and the environmental experience.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: John Worsencroft
2008
2
No.522 June K. Lyman
Lyman (b. 1912) talks about her family and growing up in Sykeston, North Dakota, a small farming community. Her father owned a mercantile, and she lived in a Frank Lloyd Wright house. She attended the Saint Elizabeth's School of the Benedictine Order until eighth grade, and then attended the public high school. She talks about the economic changes that came to the family because of the Depression. She remembers the flu of 1918. The Lawrence Welk Band sometimes came to the surrounding community to play for the Friday night dances. Lyman worked at the Sykeston Opera House (upstairs in the mercantile her father owned) as a pianist for the silent movies while in high school, and graduated co-valedictorian of her class. She attended St. Catherine’s College in St. Paul, Minnesota in 1929. She attended North Dakota State University in Fargo, North Dakota, where she graduated with a BS in History. She worked at Lake Minnetonka as a waitress at the summer camps, and was a member of Phi Mu Sorority, Kappa Delta Phi, and Pi Gamma Mu. Her first job after graduation was as an elementary teacher for the upper grades, she became the principal at twenty-one. She received her Master’s Degree in History Teaching from Columbia University, New York, 1939, and married Stan Lyman in August 1942. They had two children. Stan worked for the Bureau of Indian Affairs and they moved quite often, so Lyman taught at the Pine Ridge Indian School, Belle Fourche High School, and Sturgis School. In addition she spent four years as principal in Vale, South Dakota, was Dean and matron at the State Correctional Institute for Girls in Plankinton, South Dakota, worked at Oglala Community High School as a teacher and counselor, and was a child welfare workerin Aberdeen, South Dakota. She continued in child welfare work in Denver, Colorado.Interviewers: Floyd O'Neil and Greg Thompson.
2008-2009
3
No.523 Fredrick Brent Eldridge
Eldredge (b. 1941) discusses his family, schooling and growing up years. He contracted polio at age 9 in 1951, and was initially treated at the Salt Lake County Hospital, where he was in isolation for two weeks prior to being sent to LDS Hospital for rehabilitative treatment. His total hospitalization time was approximately three months. During the acute phase of the disease his vocal cords were damaged, producing a very deep voice for life. In addition, he was paralyzed from the chest down and was treated with hot pack therapy. He returned home with crutches and a lift in one shoe and received physical therapy and home schooling for some months. He started to develop scoliosis and was sent to Primary Children’s Hospital for two corrective spinal fusion surgeries that prevented further growth. He was in that hospital for nine months, wore a body cast, and recalls a number of experiences and memories from that time. He describes his recovery and re-assimilation with his neighborhood. He was left with a noticeable permanent limp and paralyzed stomach muscles. He discusses the effects of post-polio syndrome.Mr. Eldredge’s career is in the printing industry.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky Lloyd
2010
4
No.524 Dixie Lee Davis Edwards
Edwards (b. 1939) was born in Leland, Utah, but contracted polio at age three while living in California. She was hospitalized at General Hospital during the acute phase, having lost her ability to walk, and later transferred to White Memorial Hospital. The disease mainly affected her right side. She relates her experiences in the hospitals, including her memories of quarantine, the nurses, brief iron lung therapy and some activities. Her recollection is being in the hospital from eight to possibly eighteen months. She was discharged from the hospital with a noticeable limp and was treated at home by her mother with hot packs. She later moved back to Utah and subsequently had two surgeries. The first was at age twelve for placement of a screw in her left knee to stop the growth on that side. She was placed in a cast from hip to foot. The orthopedic surgeon was Paul R. Mulligan. Her second surgery occurred during her senior year of high school when surgeons lengthened her heel cords. She was required to wear “ugly, big special shoes” for a period of time, and also a leg brace for some length of time. Ms. Edwards reports an active life while growing up, including dancing and gymnastics. She was left with a residual limp that was slightly noticeable. She relates an interesting story about participating in an MGM March of Dimes promotional newsreel with Clark Gable and Greer Garson. Ms. Edwards gave birth to seven children. With age her limp has become more persistent and pronounced, and she has developed other health complications.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky Lloyd
2009
5
No.525 Jonathan Hughes Horne
Horne (b. 1935) was born in Salt Lake City, Utah. He contracted polio at age 4, and tells what he remembers about getting sick, experiencing nausea and a painful headache. He was treated at home and was immobilized in bed for several days with paralysis in all four limbs. He recalls receiving spinal taps. His father, a physician, arranged for gamma globulin to be shipped into Salt Lake from California and Jonathan received several intrathecal injections. He feels this contributed to his recovery. His house was quarantined and he remembers seeing people cross the street as they neared his house and cross back again once they had passed. He recalls no other specific treatment or therapy, but continually improved until regaining movement in all limbs, with only residual weakness in his leg muscles, which continue to the present. He reports no incidence of recognizable post-polio syndrome. He led an active live and became an orthopedic surgeon operating in the Salt Lake Valley area.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky Lloyd
2010
6
No.526 Ellen Elizabeth Hancock Jerominski
Jerominski (b. 1925)grew up in San Bernardino, California. She graduated from San Bernardino High School at age sixteen and moved to Utah for nursing school at the University of Utah. She describes her work experiences and training, principally at the Salt Lake County Hospital (2100 South State) during the early 1940’s. She graduated from the University of Utah in 1945. Shei relates her experiences working with polio patients of all ages for approximately one year. She describes using Armstrong respirators (iron lungs), hot pack therapy, feeding and caring for polio patients. She recalls certain specific patients. Ms. Jerominski’s career was as a nurse, working with newborns, at the University of Utah.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky Lloyd
2010
7
No.527 Gordon O'Donnell Johnson
Johnson (b. 1938) was born in Salt Lake City, Utah. He discusses his family and early schooling. He contracted polio at age 14 in early September of his ninth-grade year. He describes what he remembers about getting sick. He had a spinal tap at the doctor’s office and was taken to Salt Lake County Hospital, where he remained for six months. He was having difficulty clearing his throat of mucous; he received a tracheotomy, spent some time in an iron lung, and later used a chest respirator. He had paralysis of his vocal cords, neck and throat muscles, the left side of his body and right side of face. He couldn’t swallow, so received liquid nourishment through a nasogastric tube until April. Johnson describes therapies used in hospital, including hot packs and stretching. He received a daily shot of penicillin throughout his hospital stay. He discusses experiments they wanted to try, but he didn’t complete. Eventually he started swallowing and was released from hospital. He never used crutches or braces. The residual effects of polio include a closed tracheotomy, weakness in neck muscles, difficulty speaking, weakness in his legs and a limp (left leg shorter than right). After returning home from the hospital, he never participated again in scouting or sports. He graduated from high school, went on an LDS mission to California, and graduated with a degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Utah. He relates that he is beginning to experience what may be possible post-polio related symptoms. He worked for Utah Power for 38 years before retiring. He married and has five children.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky Lloyd
2010
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No.528 Carol Jean Masheter
Masheter (b. 1946) was born in Santa Monica, California. She discusses her family and childhood. She (along with her younger sister) contracted polio at age six while visiting relatives in Wichita, Kansas. Both girls were sent to a nearby hospital for spinal taps and were admitted. She remembers receiving intravenous horse serum and then becoming violently ill for a period of time. She describes receiving hot-pack therapy twice a day and remembers being burned by the hot blankets on a couple of occasions. She describes her experiences, activities and physical therapy in the hospital. After discharge, she returned home to California, where she continued home therapy. She wore corrective shoes to age 13 for what she heard described as “weakness” in her legs, although she was very physically active in a variety of activities. She has had no residual effects from polio. Masheter completed a baccalaureate degree in Chemistry at UCLA and later completed a PhD. She taught at the University of Utah for ten years and currently is employed with the Utah State Department of Health. In 2008, she summited Mount Everest, and was, at the time, the oldest US female to so do. She has no identifiable effects of post-polio syndrome.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky Lloyd
2010
9
No.529 Lois Hunter Moser
Moser (b. 1935) was born in Providence, Rhode Island. She discusses growing up in Cranston, Rhode Island. She entered the Children’s Hospital School of Nursing in Boston in 1953. She discusses her school program, classes, requirements, living arrangement, duties, and their uniforms.She began working with polio patients her first year of school and rotated through departments caring for patients in the isolation, acute, and rehabilitative phases of the disease. She discusses topics such as working in warm pools with physical therapists, Stryker beds, working with patients in casts, iron lungs, chest respirators, tilting beds, and applying hot pack therapy and feeding patients in iron lungs. She has retained her course manuals from the time and reads a few sections on specific care for patients. She graduated in 1956 and stayed in full-time nursing until 1963. Ms. Moser is credited with starting the first US all children’s recovery room at Boston Children’s. She later worked as a nurse volunteer in various activities, including administering polio vaccines to school children. Ms. Moser married and raised two children.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky Lloyd
2010
10
No.530 Joan Marie Peters Vandeventer Ogden
Ogden (b. 1944) grew up in Chicago, Illinois. She discusses her family. She contracted polio at age seven. She recalls being sick with a sore throat, getting sicker, and being taken to the hospital for a spinal tap. She developed difficulty breathing, was transferred to the Children’s Hospital in Boston and was placed in an iron lung for about 24 hours initially. She thereafter was in and out of an iron lung for short periods of time as was needed. She was in the hospital for a total of three weeks and recalls the care she received there. Therapies included hot pack treatments and, having lost the ability to swallow, therapy to regain that ability. In addition, she received speech therapy to relearn how to properly make certain sounds. She came home from the hospital with smaller muscles and weakness on her left side, for which she wears a lift in her left shoe. She had also lost the ability to properly cough, sneeze and laugh. She engaged in self-administered physical therapy at home to retrain and regain those lost abilities, a process that took many years. She discusses the challenges of returning to school. Ms. Ogden studied and earned degrees in mathematics and works as an actuary. She is married and gave birth to one child.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky Lloyd
2010
11
No.531 Marcia Edgley Packer
Packer (b. 1946) was born in Preston, Idaho. She tells about her early family life. She contracted polio at age six, inSeptember 1952. She describes what she remembers about getting sick. At home she received heat treatment, which she describes. She was taken to a doctor for a spinal tap and sent to St. Anthony’s Hospital in Pocatello when polio was suspected. She remembers experiencing pain and fever for some time, which she describes. While in the hospital, she was given penicillin. She was in an iron lung for a period of time, of which experience she has no direct recollection.After ten days she was sent to the Elk’s Convalescent Home (rehabilitative hospital) in Boise and was treated there from September 1952 to April 1953. At the time of her admission, her legs were completely immobile. She received a variety of therapies there, including stretching, resistance exercises and soaking in a Hubbard tank. She began to regain mobility by first learning to crawl. She was fitted with braces and crutches in October and received training in uses of those, including how to fall and get back up again. She describes her hospital recollections, activities and experiences.After discharge from Elk’s, she continued with exercises at home. She started a series of corrective surgeries at Primary Children’s Hospital in Salt Lake beginning at age ten, and continuing each summer until age sixteen. She discusses those surgeries and her recollections of Primary Children’s.Ms. Packer discusses post-polio syndrome, it effects and manifestations.She completed a degree in social work, married, and gave birth to three children. She has served in numerous political and community volunteer positions throughout her adult life.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky Lloyd
2010
12
No.532 Richard William Sline
Sline (b. 1947) was born in Scranton, Pennsylvania. He discusses his family life and schooling. He contracted polio in 1950 at age three in Allentown, Pennsylvania. He combines his own recollections with stories he was told about getting sick. His family home was quarantined with a large red “P” sign on the front door while Rick was in the hospital (approximately three months). After the hospital, his arm was in a brace with a built-in pulley system for a period of time. His mother diligently kept up physical therapy for about three years. He remembers some water therapy in a pool as an outpatient at the hospital with his mother. The polio settled in his right arm, where he has had lifelong residual weakness and diminished range of motion. He discusses playing baseball through high school, although the polio limited his performance. He relates the difficulties of his family in dealing with his disability. Mr. Sline’s career has been in various positions in higher education.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky Lloyd
2010
13
No.533 Barbara Greenlee Toomer
Toomer (b. 1929) was born in Pasadena, California. She discusses her family and schooling. She graduated from St. Monica High School in 1947, where she was on the basketball, tennis, and swimming teams. She attended Santa Monica Junior College, graduated from El Camino College, and graduated from St. Joseph’s College of Nursing in San Francisco. She discusses her school experiences and training during this three-year program. After graduating, she accepted a job at St. John’s Hospital in Santa Monica in the surgery department. She joined the Army Nursing Corp in April 1953, taking basic training at Fort Sam Houston before assignment to Fort Bragg, North Carolina, in a variety of posts. She met and married her husband (also in the Army) and completed her Army commitment in 1955. She gave birth to a daughter in 1955. Transferred to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, in 1956. Barbara contracted polio in September of that year, along with five others from the base. She was hospitalized until January 1957 and recounts her hospital experiences, physical and occupational therapy. All of her limbs were affected and for a time was immobilized from the neck down. She regained considerable use of her arms (which are now quite limited with post-polio) but her legs never regained usefulness. After a series of moves around the country, she with her family moved to Utah in the early 1970’s. Barbara has become an effective community activist, holding several paid and volunteer positions with various advocacy organizations, particularly for the disabled and disadvantaged. She discusses her interests, activities, accomplishments and continuing challenges in these areas.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky Lloyd
2009
14
No.534 Harold A. Decker, MD
Decker (b. 1932), born in Salt Lake City, Utah, discusses his family, growing up and schooling. He contracted polio while in medical school at the University of Utah. He describes getting sick, including overall painful spasms through his body. He was admitted to the hospital for a spinal tap, which he describes. He was put in isolation for a period of time, then bed rest for one month. He received hot pack therapy during that time, then was placed on a general medical ward for 3 weeks at St. Marks Hospital in Salt Lake City, and started physical therapy, which he describes. When he left the hospital with crutches, he could walk short distances. He also had weakness in his arms, ongoing body spasms (continuing to today) and diaphragmatic cramps (also continuing). With continued therapy he regained full ability in his legs. Decker completed medical school and internship, and served four years of military service in the US Public Health Service, mostly in Ohio, then on a HOPE mission to Vietnam in 1961. He describes these experiences, which included delivering vaccines of all types and participating in “Sabin Sundays.”Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky Lloyd
2010
15
No.535 Sharon Ann Jensen Duram
Duram (b. 1939) discusses growing up in Brigham City while working in her father’s general store until her early twenties. She contracted polio at age twelve in early September 1951. She describes getting sick. She spent ten days in the hospital and relates what she remembers of her experiences there. After hospitalization, she received physical therapy at Dee Hospital in Ogden, along with heat pack therapy, which she describes. She missed several months of school before returning. Ms. Duram started to develop symptoms of post-polio syndrome at approximately age 40. She describes the progression of symptoms that finally led to full-time use of a wheelchair in 2009. Ms. Duram received a nursing degree and worked as a nurse for many years until taking medical retirement.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky Lloyd
2010
16
No.536 Christopher Lynn Hill
Hill (b. 1947) was born in Los Angeles, California. He discusses his family and neighborhood. He contracted polio in September 1953 at the age of five. He was hospitalized and was in an iron lung for a period of time. He relates what he remembers of getting sick and his hospital experiences. He received hot pack treatments and some physical therapy. He talks about being ostracized in the neighborhood and at school due to his illness. He was fitted with and used two leg braces (to the upper thigh) and two crutches for a number of years. Later he regained some use of his legs and was fitted with high top heavy duty boots for support. He started to develop symptoms of post-polio syndrome in approximately 2000. He talks about his difficulties with the onset and progression of this condition. He has been instrumental in developing an online polio support group and is involved with various disability groups. Mr. Hill received his college degree and worked in aerospace, water quality control and school district maintenance until taking medical retirement in 2006.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky Lloyd
2010
17
No.537 Sandra Lee Day Johnson
Johnson (b.1940) was born in Bremerton, Washington. She discusses her family and growing up years. She contracted polio at age eight. She talks about getting sick, going to the hospital for a spinal tap, and being admitted to the isolation unit. She spent approximately three months in St. Benedict’s Hospital in Ogden, Utah. She relates hospital conditions and treatments received, including hot packs, the Hubbard tank and physical therapy. Her legs were paralyzed and she had difficulty swallowing, which necessitated consuming only pureed food while in the hospital. She was left with a slight limp and weakness in her hands. She continued with outpatient physical therapy for approximately one year and eventually regained enough strength and ability to lead an active lifestyle. In the early 1990’s Ms. Johnson started to experience increased weakness and fatigue. She was diagnosed with lupus. Ms. Johnson received a college degree, married and gave birth to two children; she worked in the advertising industry throughout her career.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky Lloyd
2010
18
No.538 Joylene Kelsch Eves and Carol Kelsch
Ms. Kelsch (b, 1942) and Ms. Eves (b. 1947) are sisters. Both were born in Heber City, Utah, and grew up in Provo, Utah. Ms. Kelsch contracted polio at age ten. Ms. Eves was told as an adult that she had apparently suffered from a mild case of polio while a youngster.In the interview, both women discuss family, growing up and schooling. Carol contracted polio at age ten in early September 1952 just prior to the start of her fifth grade. She describes getting sick. She was sent to the Salt Lake County Hospital where she received a spinal tap and was placed in isolation for about a week. (Her family was also quarantined for the first month of her illness; her siblings were kept from attending school during that month. Additionally, her family was instructed to burn all of Carol’s clothing and possessions). She was later transferred to LDS Hospital in Salt Lake City. She describes her recollections of the hospital conditions and her experiences. Carol’s treatments included hot pack therapy, hydrotherapy in a Hubbard tank and straight board therapy with her braces. She was paralyzed from the neck down, but gradually regained use of left arm and limited use of her right. She used a wheelchair and received outpatient physical therapy for a year after discharge. She discusses challenges in accommodation issues at school, including during college at Brigham Young University. After high school graduation, she spent three months at the May T. Morris clinic in San Francisco, California, for advanced occupational therapy. Carol completed her Master’s degree in speech therapy and worked in that career for thirty-seven years. She discusses her challenges in adapting to post-polio syndrome symptoms, which eventually forced her into a motorized wheelchair in 2005. Joy discusses various surgeries to correct orthopedic problems, and the associated breathing and mobility complications following those surgeries. Her physicians made the diagnosis post-polio syndrome, the details of which she relates.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky Lloyd
2010
19
No.539 Dale John Lambert
Lambert (b.1946) was born in Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada. His family moved shortly thereafter to California. He discusses his family. He contracted polio at age three. He relates what he has been told about getting sick. He was hospitalized in San Diego from early August 1949 to spring 1950. He recalls some hospital memories. While there he received some physical therapy, which continued on an outpatient basis after discharge. He left the hospital with two full-length leg braces that continued up to his torso and two crutches. He credits the March of Dimes for helping with medical expenses; in return, he, his mother and brother helped fundraise for the March of Dimes. He has complete paralysis of his left leg, partial use of his right leg and full use of both arms. He had five or six subsequent surgeries, which he described, after his initial hospitalization. He reports no effects from post-polio syndrome. Mr. Lambert attended public schools. He served a LDS mission in Florida and later graduated from law school. He currently practices law in Salt Lake City, Utah, and is involved in local politics. He is married and has three children.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky Lloyd
2010

Interviews, 540-558Return to Top

Container(s): Box 64

Container(s) Description Dates
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No.540 Keith B. Farr
Farr (b.1939) was born in Taylor, Utah. The family moved to Nyssa, Oregon, in 1955. He had a first class license at 16. Gordan Kapps "took a chance" on him, and started him in the radio business in 1957. His first job was at KSRV, Ontario, Oregon. Stations he worked for included KKOG, Ogden; KBUH for Art Fishler; KVOG-TV, Ogden, for Art Webb; KLGN with John Hart in Logan; and KIFI in Idaho Falls, where he worked with Phil Riesen. Farr went to Lodi Lake, California at KCVR (KEEN/KBAY) in 1968, and did ten years of "The Coffee Club," in Sacramento. He also worked for the Oakland A's sales office in San Francisco. Farr lists many famous people he has interviewed.Interviewers: Greg Thompson and Tim Larson
2008
2
No.541 Joel Bown
Bown (b.1946) talks about his ski mountaineering experiences that began with the Ute Alpine Club. Equipment was bought from the Deseret Industries and Vibram added to the soles of the old boots. Few people ski toured in the sixties, unlike today. Mountaineering trips included Cardiff Pass, Deseret Peak, Uintas, King's Peak, Colorado Rockies, the Tetons, and eventually south to Mazatlan or Baja. He talks about the evolution of equipment and the sport, environmental issues, the dangers of mountaineering, and what the Wasatch has to offer. He mentions canoe trips in the Tetons and British Columbia, and talks about the friendships developed because of the sport.Utah Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewed by Erik Solberg.
2007
3
No.542 Bret Wojciak, Micah Renfeldt, and Christian Dean
John Worsencroft interviews OARS (Outdoor Adventure River Experts) river rafting guides Christian Dean, Micah Renfeldt, and Bret Wojciak on the banks of the Colorado River in Cataract Canyon. Dean, Renfeldt, and Wojciak discuss how they were introduced to river rafting and commercial guiding. They discuss safety on and off the river and the value of preparation and knowledge to recreation in the wilderness. The guides share their thoughts on the valuable attributes of a successful river guide, including sociability, and how guides work to maximize the positive experiences of their clients. They discuss specific challenging and rewarding experiences as guides and identify their favorite rivers or stretches of river. The interview concludes as Dean, Renfeldt, and Wojciak share their thoughts about environmentalism and their responsibilities as educators on nature and conservation.Utah Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: John Worsencroft
2009
4
No.543 Steve Bloch
Bloch grew up in the suburbs outside of Cleveland, Ohio, and got his degree at Miami University with a focus in Botany and Political Science. The summer before his senior year of college he took a job in Burns, Oregon, and first experienced the west and so after graduation he took a job with the Forest Service in Washington State. He attended law school at the University of Utah and became an attorney for SUWA. He first focused on off-road vehicles and America’s Red Rock Wilderness Act. He thinks more is accomplished when an organization is site-specific in their actions; for example his work with off road vehicles. He likes to think that SUWA does both reactive and proactive work. SUWA believes that lands are managed for all people, which is difficult for local people to accept.Utah Environmentalist Oral History Project.Interviewer: Rob DeBirk
2008
5
No.544 Hans Ehrbar
Ehrbar is from Munich, Germany, and has a Ph.D in both mathematics and economics. He is self-proclaimed socialist and Marxist. He works for the University of Utah and teaches classes in economics, Marxism, and environmentalism. He thinks that our society wouldn’t be able to just become socialist, so his argument is to reform capitalism to create a social demographic capitalism, but he’s not sure if it’s possible. He believes that “every class we are teaching should be an environmental class” and that’s not happening. We’re not being extreme enough in our efforts and that we need an organized movement, from the people,government is too involved.Utah Environmentalist Oral History Project.Interviewer: Rob DeBirk
2008
6
No.545 Lawson Legate
Legate was born in Sacramento, CA and spent his childhood in the Sierra Nevadas and at Lake Tahoe. He was student body president at Cordova Senior High School in Rancho Cordova, California, during the April 1970 earthquake and he helped organize an Earth Week Conference. Joined the Sierra Club while living in British Columbia and helped start the chapter in Nelson, BC. He went back to school in 1980 to get his masters in Forestry and Range at Washington State University and got involved with the Sierra Club group in Pullman, Washington. He’s a firm believer in learning from others and learning by doing. Lawson likes the Sierra Club because it’s a large-scale effort and that’s beneficial. He moved to Utah in 1987 and started working on desert wilderness. He discusses what it’s like to live and raise a family in Utah and not be LDS and the struggles for him and especially his kids. He believes that air quality, water usage, and transportation are very important issues in Utah. He speaks about the idea of “resilient habitat” and how it’s more holistic than wilderness.Utah Environmentalist Oral History Project.Interviewer: Rob DeBirk
2008
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No.546 John Urgo
Urgo is from Brooklyn, New York, and joined Green Corps, after studying Environmental Science in college, which moved him around the country a lot until he applied for a job with HEAL Utah in 2005 (which tends to focus on nuclear issues). He believes that environmental problems are justice problems and is active in power relations. His work in Green Corps involved a lot of organizing and volunteer recruitment, so then he became the Outreach Director for HEAL. As an organization they don’t come up with plans and policy but more so educate the public to work towards change and watchdog big industry such as Energy Solutions. They’re trying to keep nuclear waste and reactors out of Utah. He is a strong believer in renewable energy.Utah Environmentalist Oral History Project.Interviewer: Rob DeBirk
2008
8
No.547 Kathy Vandame
Vandame is a retired nurse who has dedicated her life to air quality in the Salt Lake Valley after reading a Wasatch Clean Air Coalition newsletter in 1997. She would go to Utah Air Quality board meetings and attended the Western Regional Air Partnership, which was the successor organization to the Grand Canyon Visibility Transport Commission, and that organization became the seed of the Western Climate Initiative. She works newsletters and talks to legislators about air quality and is affiliated with HEAL, League of Women Voters, and Luther Carbon Free Nuclear Free Freedom. Kathy also thinks that our society has a disconnect in our lives, especially when it comes to food, class, and sexuality.Utah Environmental Oral History Project.Interviewer: Kathy Vandame
2007-2008
9
No.548 Jared Roth
Roth (b. 1982) was born in Salt Lake City, Utah. He was raised by his mother, originally from New Orleans, and his father, originally from Indianapolis; and was introduced to climbing at fourteen years of age. He gives a contrast between indoor and outdoor climbing, and discusses the progression and classification of climbing and bouldering over his twelve years of experience. Roth was spokesperson for Black Diamond during climbing competitions.Utah Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: Erik Solberg
2008
10
No.549 Ben Folsom and Maura Hahnenberger
Ben is a tree climber in Salt Lake City and owns his own business. He’s done some tree climbing competitions but rock climbing is his real passion. The two sports are intertwined though--one prepares him for the other. Ben likes to do his climbs in a traditional style, using as little fixed gear as possible. He says that there are different rules and etiquette in different locations and also there are lots of different types of rock and they should be climbed in different ways. When he establishes a new route he says he wants to do it right and will sometimes take weeks to complete it. Maura is currently getting her doctorate in meteorology at the University of Utah with a focus in mountain meteorology and forecasting. She’s very interested in the Salt Lake Valley temperature inversion and pollution episodes. Ben and Maura have done a lot of first ascents and established new routes, primarily in the state of Utah. They have both had some pretty close calls while climbing, but love it so much that they say it’s worth it.Utah Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewers: Erik Solberg and John Worsencroft
2008
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No.550 Jim Catlin
Jim Catlin is a native Utahn who has been active in public land issues for more than 25 years. His PhD from the University of California at Berkeley focused on GIS and land use planning. His MS in regional land use planning at the University of Utah analyzed Wasatch Front air quality. Jim began his work in conservation as a volunteer for the Sierra Club. His skills and love of adventure propelled him toward pivotal conservation victories for public lands in Utah. He is articulate and engaging. In addition to his long-time work with the Sierra Club, Jim was essential to the Utah Wilderness Coalition’s effort to protect wilderness-quality lands in Utah. In this interview, he offers an in-depth, behind-the-scene look at the machinations of government with striking examples and good humor. In 1996, Jim founded the Wild Utah Project to support the work of other Utah conservation activists. His awards include the John Muir Award, the Sierra Club's highest conservation award, and the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance Conservation Award.Utah Environmental Oral History Project.Interviewer: Robert DeBirk
2008
12
No.551 Andrea Heidinger
Andrea was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania but spent her childhood in Salt Lake City, Utah. In high school she was aware of the poor air quality in the valley and started to bike to school, “Inversions are natural, but what the inversions trapped, the smog and pollution, was not.” Her classes and teachers at Judge Memorial High School were instrumental in her environmental mindset. She has worked for both the Parks Service and the Forest Service at the Grand Canyon. Andrea is very knowledgeable about multiuse issues and working with various shareholders in public lands. She went to graduate school for art at the University of Idaho and decided then that she is a post-consumer artifacts artist, meaning nothing was thrown away. She believes that art should be assessable and benign to the environment, there’s a lot of waste that comes out of art. She started teaching environmental education at Red Butte Garden and has been incorporating that into her art. Andrea and her husband also started the Eat Local Challenge here in Utah. Currently she is working at the Green Building Center, the host of a lot of workshops for the layperson on green living.Utah Environmental Oral History Project.Interviewer: Rob DeBirk
2007
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No.552 Steve Frishman
Frishman (b. 1944) was born in Washington D.C. He is a technical consultant for the law firm representing the State of Nevada in its contention of the Department of Energy’s application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for a license for the Yucca Mountain repository. Prior to this, Frishman worked as a Technical-Policy Coordinator for the Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects. He discusses graduate school in Texas, running a local newspaper, serving as a commissioner on the Texas Coastal and Marine Council, and working for the Texas state government when a site in Texas was being considered for a high level nuclear waste repository. He first came to Nevada to work as a consultant for the Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects, and was involved in the fight against the Yucca Mountain repository. Fishman describes some of the technical problems with the Yucca Mountain site, and the differences between Department of Energy science and independent science on the site. He ends by taking about some of the alternatives to the Yucca Mountain site.Nuclear Technology Project.Interviewer: Danielle Endres
2009
14
No.553 John Edumund Hadder
Hadder (b. 1960) was born in Allentown, Pennsylvania. He currently lives in Reno and works as a staff scientists for Great Basin Resource Watch. Hadder begins with a discussion of his upbringing, role models, and education. He recalls his involvement in various nuclear issues in the Great Basin region, and recounts his evolving role in nuclear activism. Hadder then discusses the nuclear waste controversy including his role in it, potential solutions, and who is responsible for nuclear waste.Nuclear Technology Project.Interviewer: Samantha Senda-Cook
2008
15
No.554 Reinhard D. Knutsen
Knutsen (b. 1964) was born in Taiping, Malasia to Methodist missionaries. He describes his upbringing (particularly his consistent work with disenfranchised communities) and how he became involved in nuclear issues, starting with his participation in a New England Walk for Nuclear Disarmament. He went on to work on nuclear testing, nuclear power, and nuclear waste issues. Knutsen discusses his time with Shundahai Network and how he came to his current job at the American Civil Liberties Union. Other topics include the nuclear waste problem in the US, ethical issues associated with nuclear waste, who is affected by nuclear waste, and who is responsible for managing nuclear waste.Nuclear Technology Project.Interviewer: Samantha Senda-Cook
2009
16
No.555 Kim Townsend
Kim Townsend was born in Owyhee, Nevada, and currently lives on the Duckwater Western Shoshone Reservation. She recalls the many Western Shoshone people who have died of cancers and discusses how this lead her to work on the NUKERISK project to assess radiation doses in American Indian populations from nuclear testing. She describes her role in the NUKERISK project. Townsend also briefly discusses the role she played in the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste controversy.Nuclear Technology Project.Interviewer: Danielle Endres
2008
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No.556 Judy Treichel
Treichel was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota. She discusses her background, upbringing, ethical influences, and general relationship to nuclear issues. She explains that she began working on nuclear testing issues, but shifted to nuclear waste in the late 1980s, when Yucca Mountain became the sole contender for a national nuclear waste repository. Treichel describes her position on the Nevada Nuclear Waste Task Force. She then discusses the role of the public in the nuclear waste siting process, the problems with nuclear waste, the potential solutions to nuclear waste, and the future of the Yucca Mountain repository (including a discussion of President Obama’s pledge to stop Yucca Mountain and create a Blue Ribbon Commission to study nuclear waste siting options).Nuclear Technology Project.Interviewer: Danielle Endres
2009
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No.557 Charles Cutler Esplin
Charles Esplin (b. 1918) recalls herding sheep in the 1930s near Bunkerville, Nevada, on the Arizona Strip. He talks about the life (and sometimes death) of sheep herders, BLM permits, the canyons and general terrain, weather challenges, and the habits of sheep and cattle. The sheep were sheared in April,then were returned to North Fork for lambing in early May. He discusses counting the sheep by using markers (black sheep), and describes his daily routine, the use of dogs, the threat of coyotes, and the isolation. Details are given on the docking and shearing of lambs, the death of Jonathan Heaton, and the modernization from horses to pickups, and from pioneer trails to paved roads. Branding is also discussed.Interviewer: Fred Esplin
2005
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No.558 Edward I. Hashimoto
Hashimoto (b. 1911) was born in Salt Lake City, Utah. He relates stories heard from his father, who came to the United States in 1896 as a railroad worker and became wealthy as an investor in various western companies. He describes his early life in the Japanese section of town, going to the Stewart School and East High, and graduating from the University of Utah. Other topics include treatment of the Japanese during World War II, his years as a physician and professor at the University of Utah, living the best of both the Japanese and American cultures, and ethnic prejudice.Interviewer: Leslie Kelen
1984

Interviews, 559-576Return to Top

Container(s): Box 65

Container(s) Description Dates
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No.559 Anna Maria Bennett
Bennett (b. 1952) discusses her family and early memories of Costa Rica. She contracted polio at sixteen months and spent a short time in an iron lung. She received treatment at the Shriners Hospital in San Francisco, California. She describes her treatment, permanent disabilities, and post-polio health issues.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2010
2
No.560 Brent Manning
Manning describes the climbing culture in Boulder, Colorado in the 1970s. He recalls climbing in Colorado, Europe, Alaska, and the Himalaya region. He describes his expedition to Mt. Everest in 1990, which was special to him because of his son's presence at base camp.Utah Outdoor Recreation Project. Interviewed by Matt Driscoll.
2009
3
No.561 Rick Reese
Reese (b. 1942) graduated from East High School in Salt Lake City, Utah, then joined the army reserve and served active duty in response to the Berlin crisis. He worked for the National Park Service as a climbing ranger at Jenny Lake in Grand Teton National Park. His first great climbing experience was Mount Rainier, where he was a part of the youngest unguided climb up to that date. He became a part of the Alpine Buck Climbing Club, and was very active in the Wasatch, which has some of the best climbing and backcountry skiing in the world. Reese talks about improvements in technology and rescue technique. His closest friends in life are climbers and he acknowledges that sometimes his family and climbing relations weren't always in balance.Utah Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: John Worsencroft
2008
4
No.562 David Clayton Dunford
Dunford (b.1939) discusses his family and the family business, Dunford Bakery.He contracted polio at age 8 in February 1947. He describes getting sick. He and his two brothers contracted the disease at the same time and were all treated at home. They enlisted the services of Dr. Ted Robinson for a unique treatment method: liquid deprivation and sucrose injections. He describes the treatment. David also had bulbar polio and was unable to talk and swallow. He was fed through a naso-gastric tube for a period of time. He had no paralysis in his legs, but his right arm and upper respiratory functions were affected. He returned to a normal, active life, with a few physical limitations, although not immediately noticeable. He discusses possible post-polio syndrome symptoms he is now experiencing.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2010
5
No.563 Michael P. Collins, M.D.
Collins (b. 1945) was born in San Francisco, California. He discusses his family and early memories. He contracted polio at age five and tells about getting sick and being taken by ambulance to an isolation unit at San Francisco General Hospital. He recalls the hospital conditions and activities. He couldn't walk and had difficulty breathing. He was in an iron lung for a period of time. After isolation, he moved to a general ward and started physical therapy, which included exercises, massages and hot pack treatments. Collins left the hospital with crutches and braces above the knee. He was fitted with special high-top boots with a metal sole for the braces. He had a significant limp and dragged his right foot. His mother continued his physical therapy at home for a period of years and eventually he regained use of his legs. He still has a noticeable limp when he's particularly tired. He discusses being teased at school and challenges faced during that time. He had several surgeries throughout high school, which he describes. He discusses post-polio challenges. Collins graduated from medical school and practices medicine in Salt Lake City, Utah.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2009
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No.564 Bruce Tremper
Tremper (b. 1953) grew up in a large Catholic outdoorsy family in Missoula, Montana.His father was a working class businessman and his mother was an academic. Bruce was a ski racer for the University of Montana, was on the Junior National Ski Team for three years and the US Ski Team Talent Squad until he decided that he could not continue for financial reasons. In college he worked trail maintenance every summer for Glacier National Park. He got his degree in Geology and joined the Ski Patrol at Bridger Bowl, where he first started working with avalanches. He later studied with John Montagne, who he credits as a huge life influence. Tremper started the Utah Avalanche Center and works on how to give people the avalanche information they need in a simple and straightforward way. He thinks that the human influence in avalanches needs to be acknowledged and that having a system is the only way to stay safe.Each avalanche is the same story, different person. He wrote a book called Staying Alive in Avalanche Terrain.Outdoor Recreation Oral History Project.Interviewer: John Worsencroft
2008
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No.565 Paul Horton
Horton (b. 1948) grew up in Salt Lake City. He was fascinated with climbing, and spent a great deal of his youth hiking with the Wasatch Mountain and Ute Alpine clubs. He discusses the two clubs extensively, stressing the effect they had on his development as a climber and providing background on who was climbing in Utah in the sixties and seventies. After college, Horton guided in the Tetons during the summer. He eventually became a partner in Jackson Hole Mountain Guides.Outdoor Recreation Oral History Project.Interviewer: Erik Solberg
2007
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No.566 Susan Schoer
Schroer was born and raised in Missouri and majored in journalism and psychology at Drury University. She discovered how rewarding it was to work with disabled children during a college internship. After college she did an AmeriCorps position with Splore, a nonprofit organization in Salt Lake City that provides outdoor recreation opportunities for people with disabilities. She is still working there. Splore takes kids and adults out into nature on an adventure, expanding their experience and fostering a sense of empowerment. The programs include rafting, indoor and outdoor rock climbing, canoeing, snowshoeing, nordic skiing, dog sledding, camping, and hiking. Splore works with all different types of disabilities and underwrites about eighty percent of the costs so that anyone can participate.Utah Environmental Oral History Project.Interviewer: Rob DeBirk
2008
9
No.567 Garth B. Myers, M.D.
Myers (b. 1921) was born in Salt Lake City, Utah. He discusses his family, growing up years, and schooling. He served an LDS mission to Los Angeles, California, while simultaneously attending school at the University of Southern California. He graduated from the USC medical school. While working as a resident at the Los Angeles County Hospital, Myers contracted polio. He was thirty years old. He describes his symptoms and treatment. He emerged from the disease with no noticeable disability. He describes possible post-Polio symptoms. Dr. Myers worked at Primary Children's Medical Center as a pediatric neurologist until his retirement.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2010
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No.568 Cerre Francis
Cerre (b. 1979) was born in St. Louis, Missouri, and suffered from hip dysplasia. Treatment for her condition involved multiple surgeries and a body cast during her first year. Her family was not particularly oriented to the outdoors so early in her life she was limited to taking lessons that her parents signed her up with. Her high-energy nature led her to more adventures in the outdoors when her family moved out of urban St. Louis. She first experienced climbing when a friend, who was an experienced climber, took her to a cliff. She surprised her friend by making the climb without any falls on the first try. From that point her desire to climb played a larger part in shaping her life. To get around her parents' restriction against overnight trips she fabricated a high school sponsored climbing club. At eighteen she convinced her parents to let her go to school in Steamboat Springs to be closer to the mountains of Rifle. Shortly after she moved on to Salt Lake and the climbing opportunities it offered. Her experience and drive led her to enter into competitive climbing. Cerre believes that climbing is losing its label as an extreme sport as it becomes more popular with people left with fewer available activities.Utah Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: John Worsencroft
2008
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No.569 Garry Jack Marshall
Marshall (b. 1946) was born in Salt Lake City. He discusses his family and recalls contracting polio in 1951 or 1952. He was hospitalized at Primary Children's Hospital in Salt Lake City. He has no recollection of getting sick, nor of his time spent in the hospital on this first visit. After the summer of 5th grade he went to St. Marks Hospital for surgery. He describes his surgery and hospital stay. He left the hospital on crutches with a cast. His mother guided his physical therapy work at home, including learning to walk again. He reports no effects related to post-polio syndrome, although he has a residual limp that increases with fatigue. Mr. Marshall works as a software engineer. He has five children.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2010
12
No.570 Roger Richards
Richards (b. 1947 ) was born in Salt Lake City, Utah. He discusses his family, particularly his father's battle with polio. Roger contracted polio at age 5 in 1952. He was sent to the Salt Lake County Hospital for a spinal tap and was placed in isolation. He relates his memories of the hospital stay, including a short time spent in an iron lung and later an oxygen tent. He discusses what he terms a miraculous experience that cured his polio. He left the hospital shortly after that incident and had some follow-up physical therapy at home for approximately one year. He wore no braces, special shoes, used crutches and had no noticeable residual effects. He has had persistent difficulty swallowing and weakened lung muscles. Mr. Richards discusses his difficulties with post-polio syndromeand its effects. His career has been in continuing the family business, Granite Furniture.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2010
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No.571 Daniel L. Reilly
Reilly (b. 1936 )was born in Salt Lake City. He contracted polio in 1951 at the start of his 9th grade school year. He describes getting sick. He was taken to LDS Hospital for treatment and placed in an iron lung for six weeks. His body was paralyzed from the neck down. While in the hospital he was treated with hot pack therapy and, once out of the lung, water therapy. In total, he was in the hospital just over two months. He describes getting physical therapy from a married nurse/doctor team, who used electrical stimulation in conjunction with traditional therapy. He regained most of the use of his arms, and very limited use of his legs with the assistance of braces and crutches. When in college he decided to use a wheelchair full time. He completed his primary schoolingat home and graduated from the University of Utah. He describes the effects of post-polio syndrome, including the need for a tracheotomy in 1996 and a tracheostomy in 2000. Mr. Reilly worked for the State of Utah as a statistician for over thirty years. He is the father of two sons.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2010
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No.572 Charles Hilmon Castle
Castle (b. 1928 )was born in Webster County, Mississippi. He discusses his family, schooling and growing up in rural Mississippi. He contracted polio in 1936 at age eight. He felt ill for several days and afterward carried an abnormal gait. His father took him to Warm Springs, Georgia, to consult with an orthopedic physician there. They refused the physician's proposed treatment of tendon transplantation. He received no additional treatment, therapy or medical care related to polio. He reports residual weakness in both feet, although he was able to participate in a variety of sports throughout his life. Due to deteriorating ankles, he had fusion surgery in 1985 and 1994. He reports no noticeable post-polio syndrome effects. Dr. Castle graduated from high school in 1945 and completed undergraduate studies at the University of Mississippi. He attended medical school there for two years before transferring to Duke University in North Carolina. He completed a medical internship at Duke and residency in internal medicine at the University of Utah. He was drafted into the Air Force in 1954 and for two years served active duty as a base physician in Madrid, Spain. He returned to Utah and completed a fellowship in cardiology and practiced at the University of Utah until retiring in 1998. Dr. Castle discusses his work providing care for polio patients. While serving as commander of the dispensary for the Utah Air National Guard, he oversaw distribution of the polio vaccine to Guard members.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2010
15
No.573 Jonathan Knight
Knight (b. 1972) was born in Twin Falls, Idaho. His first exposure to the mountains was skiing and hiking in the Sun Valley/Ketchum area. When he was nine his family moved to Las Vegas where, despite missing skiing, he developed his climbing skills. He started climbing at sixteen during a family vacation in the Southern Sierras and improved his skills with his friend at the Craft Boulders and Red Rocks. While in Las Vegas he first encountered the issues between traditional climbers, like himself, and bolters. After taking the initiative to meet with groups of "bolters" he realized that the two groups, while operating under different philosophies, could coexist. At seventeen he moved to Salt Lake City to attend the University of Utah. Despite being disappointed at not being able to attend school in Colorado he encountered an active climbing scene in Utah with a diverse environment to explore. The Salt Lake area offered him a metropolitan area surrounded by continuous series of climbing opportunities.Outdoor Recreation Oral History Project.Interviewer: Erik Solberg
2008
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No.574 Nathan Smith
Smith (b. 1986) was born in Big Sur, California. His father was in the oil industry so the family moved around a lot. He first started climbing in California when he was eleven and ended up moving to Utah to attend college at the University of Utah. He started traveling around the state and, during his freshman year, got a job with the Outdoor Program on campus. He started leading trips right away and then got his American Mountain Guide Certification the following summer, which is a very difficult course. He was one of the youngest to take the AMGC and now teaches it. In the course you learn how to teach climbing, establish sites, build anchors, and rescue techniques. In fall of 2007, while was still am undergraduate, the University of Utah decided to change their academic rock courses. He applied for a teaching job and got it, but had to co-teach since he was still too young. Spring of 2008 he introduced ice climbing to the university, which had never taught it before, and created a mentorship program for students who wished to learn to teach. He helped the University of Utah to be the first university to earn American Rock Guide Association accreditation. His current goal are to get International Federation of Mountain Guides Association (IFMGA) accreditation and to finish his PhD. He's currently working on expanding the University of Utah's rock and ice climbing classes.Outdoor Recreation Oral History Project.Interviewer: Matt Driscol
2009
17
No.575 Jerry Dixon
Dixon (b. 1948) was born in Washington, DC but his parents soon moved back to Salt Lake City, Utah where his family has lived for seven generations. He skied for the Alta ski team and has skied fifty six consecutive years there. He attended Whitman College and then transferred back to the University of Utah. He skied at both schools, then skied for the University of Grenoble in France. He has degrees in Philosophy and Biology, with minors in French, English, and Humanities. He did graduate school at Idaho State University. He's been a smoke jumper, river ranger, Chief of Rescue, Fire Management Officer, and a school teacher in Alaska. He talks about the poor state of education in Alaska. He has skied, traversed mountains, had first ascents, and run rivers all across the west, Canada, and Alaska. Many of his "firsts" have not been repeated. He's the vice president of the Seward Iditarod Trailblazers and fought for the Alaskan Lands Act. He's one of the few people who has ever survived a double malfunction with his parachute. He calls Seward Alaska home, and lives with his wife and two sons. He and his wife started taking their kids outdoors when they were really young because he thinks it's important for their development. "The greatest gift a parent can give a child is that child can grow up and live the dreams of their youth and this I've done." Outdoor Recreation Oral History Project.Interviewer: John Worsencroft
2009
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No.576 Tom Santoro
Santoro is a Michigan native living in Salt Lake City and working for Black Diamond. He discusses his introduction to climbing during his college years at the University of Michigan. Following his freshman year in college, Tom worked for the US Forest Service as a wilderness ranger in the High Uintas Wilderness Area. During his college years, he worked for an outdoor retail store in Ann Arbor, climbed at a local gym, took weekend trips to Kentucky's Red River Gorge and West Virginia's Seneca Rocks, and enrolled in the Colorado Mountain School. His passion for climbing eventually brought him West, first to Jackson Hole, Wyoming, and then to Salt Lake City. Santoro discusses his experiences working for Black Diamond,the importance of safety in climbing, and the importance of trustbetween climbing partners. The conversation concludes with his reflections on the uniqueness of climbing in the Wasatch, with specific attention to the access to several different climbing areas.Outdoor Recreation Oral History Project.Interviewer: Matt Driscoll
2009
19
No.577 Lynn Frank Pett
Pett (b. 1940) was born in Payson, Utah. He spent the first ten years of his life in Eureka, Utah, where his family was involved in the mining industry. The family then moved to Murray, Utah. He discusses his family, schooling and growing up years. Pett began working with the Murray Parks and Recreation Department when he was sixteen years old as a part-time, seasonal worker. Eventually he became a full-time employee of the department, and at age twenty-three (1963) was appointed as the Superintendent of the department. He continued in this position until 1988, when he was appointed as Murray City's Assistant Mayor. He was elected Mayor of Murray in 1990, serving two terms until 1998. Pett describes his tenure as park superintdent, including the development of the Ken Price Ballpark. During his time as assistant mayor, He relates what he considers to be his most significant work as assistant mayor: development of the Jordan River Parkway and golf course. Pett's time as mayor was marked by several important projects. He was a leading advocate for the light rail mass transit system planned for the Salt Lake Valley. His close relationship with the EPA was renewed when the old Murray smelter land was slated to become a Super Fund site. He tells about his negotiations with EPA officials, and the landowners of the site, to come to a mutually agreeable solution for a cleanup of the area, thus averting a Super Fund designation. He facilitated the successful acquisition of the property by Intermountain Healthcare, where they constructed a large medical campus. He and his wife, Kathleen, live in Murray. They are the parents of two children. Mayors Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2010

Interviews, 578 - 602Return to Top

Container(s): Box 66

Container(s) Description Dates
box
66
Folder
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No.578 Carrie Dann
Dann was born at the homestead in Crescent Valley, Nevada in the 1930s. She discusses her background, upbringing, and ethical principles. She talks about her time as an activist, particularly with regard to nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site and the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository. She states that she was more active in opposing nuclear testing, but has done some activist work to oppose nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain. Carrie describes her role in the debate over nuclear waste, who is affected by nuclear waste disposal, and who is responsible. She also talks about her role in fighting for sovereignty and what it means to be a traditional indigenous person. Carrie's interview ends with her comment about traditional ways compared with Western ways. Nuclear Technology History Project.Interviewer: Samantha Senda-Cook
2009
2
No.579 Helen Julene Butler
Butler (b. 1948) was born in Price, Utah. Her family moved to Dragerton (East Carbon) in 1950. She contracted polio at age three and a half years of age in August 1951. She was transported to the Salt Lake County Hospital, where she remained in isolation for three weeks. She was transferred to Holy Cross Hospital in Salt Lake City and was treated there from September to December of that year. She entered Shriners Hospital in Salt Lake City in early 1952 and stayed there for therapy for eighteen months. She thereafter periodically returned to Shriners for lengthy stays, receiving various surgical procedures—thirteen in all—until she was sixteen years old. Ms. Butler recalls time spent in the hospital, details of her surgeries, and various treatments and therapies received.Butler was paralyzed in all four limbs at the time of her illness. She recovered some use of her left side. She was outfitted with full-length leg braces and crutches and has used a wheelchair in public since 1954. Around her home she used crutches and eventually shed first the left leg brace, then later the right. Ms. Butler discusses post-polio syndrome effects, difficulties and necessary adjustments. She has exclusively used a wheelchair since 2002. Butler received both a master's degree and a PhD in Library Science and currently serves as the Director of the Brigham Young University Library. Polio Oral History Project. Interviewed by Becky B. Lloyd.
2010
3
No.580 John Prescott
Prescott (b. 1948) was born in Pocatello, Idaho. After contracting polio at age 15 months, he was hospitalized and spent time in an iron lung. His entire body was paralyzed, but he regained function in his upper body. He had leg braces until age eight and used crutches his entire life until his early fifties, when he moved to full-time wheelchair use. He talks about his school experiences and difficulties. He discusses post-polio syndrome and its effects. Mr. Prescott served a LDS mission to Texas, married, had eight children, and worked as an accountant.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2010
4
No.581 Constance (Connie) Elaine Vellekoop
Vellekoop (b. 1945) was born in Lorain, Ohio. Her parents were serving as missionaries in Indonesia when Connie contracted polio at age 18 months. She describes what she's been told about getting sick and the course of treatment, first in a hospital, then at home with the "Sister Kenny" treatment administered by her father. She was afflicted in both legs up to her mid torso. She used a left leg brace built by her father. The family returned to the US in 1953, and Connie received several surgeries in a Los Angeles children's orthopedic hospital between ages eight and eleven. She used full-length braces for years after her surgeries. She describes the surgeries and hospitalizations and She discusses post-polio challenges. Connie completed her music degree. She teaches piano and is a published writer.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2011
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No.582 Cathy Beloeil
Beloeil grew up in France and climbed for the first time when she was 12 years old. Although she was involved in many sports as a child and adolescent she did not consider herself very good at them. She did not like the rules and restrictions that were a part of organized sports. The natural rhythm of climbing and the freedom it offered over other sports were what attracted Cathy. The clarity required during climbing brings an almost meditative calm over her mind. Utah Outdoor Recreation Oral History Project.Interviewer: Erik Solberg
2007
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No.583 Rosie and Clay Cahoon
Rosie is from Oregon, went to the University of Oregon, and came to Salt Lake City through AmeriCorps. Clay Cahoon is from Los Angeles ,but was raised in Utah. They both believe that climbing is a major part of their relationship and their lifestyle. They're always "chasing the dream" of new climbs and routes. They know they don't make a lot of money but they think it's more important to enjoy life. They agree that the ethics of climbing have changed over the years. It's gotten really crowded,and it seems as though people put routes everywhere. Rosie believes that women climbers have a more competitive,yet close relationship and feels that sometimes it's hard for her to have friends who aren't climbers. Rosie likes to have a balance climbing and other things, while Clay believes he could climb every day and be happy.Outdoor Recreation Oral History Project.Interviewer: Matt Driscoll
2010
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No.584 Collette McInerney
Colette (b. 1982) was born in Nashville, Tennessee, and attended college at Fordham University in New York City, during which time she began climbing in gyms in Connecticut and New Jersey. She discusses her introduction to climbing, primarily bouldering and sport climbing, and the evolution of her passion for climbing during road trips out West and throughout her relationship with professional climber Joe Kinder. Colette responds to questions about the growing population of female climbers, offering her insights about women's influence and presence in the greater climbing community. She shares her thoughts on current route development and bolting and explains the challenges taken on by the small portion of climbers who develop routes.Outdoor Recreation Oral History Project.Interviewer: Matt Driscoll
2010
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No.585 Bill Ohran
Ohran (b. 1971) was born in Provo, Utah, where he honed his skills, beginning in Rock Canyon. He benefitted from the guidance of Jeff Pedersen, with whom he would later run Mountain Works, a climbing gear shop located in Provo. Mountain Works responded to the need for specialized gear for sport climbers and, like Salt Lake City-based IME, served as a place for the climbing community to assemble to discuss gear and climbing beta. Bill discusses the developing popularity of sport climbing. He also shares his thoughts on the challenges and rewards of bolting sport climbing routes. In the 2000s, he moved to Saint George, Utah, with his wife and climbing partner Misty Murphy. Bill continues to be responsible for putting up well-thought of routes in such areas as Zion National Park, Utah Hills, and the Virgin Mountains.Outdoor Recreation Oral History Project.Interviewer: Matt Driscoll
2010
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No.586 Jeff Pedersen
Pedersen is the owner of the Momentum Climbing Gym in Sandy, Utah, and was a key figure in the rise of sport climbing in Utah in the late 1980s and early 1990s. As the owner of Momentum and The Quarry, Jeff is uniquely able to discuss the role climbing gyms have played in the growing popularity of climbing during the last two decades. He shares his experience with these climbing gyms and their aim to appeal to a larger demographic while also supporting the training of dedicated climbers. He also comments on the challenges and successes of climbing gyms as an industry. Jeff discusses his relationship with Boone Speed and Bill Boyle, who along with Jeff were largely responsible for the development of challenging routes in American Fork, Santaquin, and Rock Canyons. The interview concludes with Matt Driscoll asking Jeff a series of questions about his influences and the leading figures in current Utah climbing.Outdoor Recreation Oral History Project.Interviewer: Matt Driscoll
2010
10
No.587 Yvette Young
Yvette (b. 1971) was born in Norway, Maine, and went to college at BYU after being raised Mormon. She started climbing at the Rock Garden Climbing Gym in Provo, Utah, in 1994 and thinks that climbing is the reason she stayed in Utah. She compares climbing to dance in the area of strength and technique, but says that people are much stronger now then when she first started. Yvette thinks that climbing was a little more clique-ish when she started. It was harder to be accepted then. She also thinks that climbers tend to be more short-focused now (like with bouldering). When she first started, climbers would have projects that they'd work on for weeks or months. She does mostly sport climbing and thinks Utah is special because you can pretty much climb year-round with a vast variety of rock. Her favorite climbs are mostly in St. George.Outdoor Recreation Oral History Project.Interviewer: Matt Driscoll
2010
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No. 588 Michelle Kamahauoha
Kamahauoha (b. 1983) was born in Kahuku, Hawaii. Her father grew up in California, Idaho, and Utah, and her mother was raised in Utah. They met at a school dance and moved to Hawaii to attend the University of Hawaii. Her mother became an RN and her father became an entrepreneur. Michelle grew up in Hawaii and moved to Utah to attend BYU. She recalls growing up in Hawaii, rebelling as an adolescent, Mormon culture in Hawaii, and being white in Hawaii.Pacific Islanders Oral History Project.Interviewer: Savani Aupiu
2008
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No. 589 Mary Dickson
Dickson (b. 1955) was born in Joplin, Missouri. She moved with her family to Salt Lake City, Utah, as a child and has spent the majority of her life in the Salt Lake Valley. Dickson discusses her experiences being diagnosed with thyroid cancer before the age of 30 and losing a sister to cancer. She believes that both her and her sister's illnesses were caused by exposure to nuclear fallout while living in Salt Lake. As an activist and playwright, Dickson works to increase awareness of the harm done to human health and the environment by governmental nuclear tests and to prevent future testing that could incur more damage.Nuclear Technology Project.Interviewer: Samantha Senda-Cook
2009
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No. 590 William Lockhart and Terri Martin
Lockhart (b. 1933) is a law professor at the University of Utah and has been active in the litigation of a number of environmental conflicts. Terri Martin is an activist and consultant with organizations such as Don't Waste Utah, Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance, and Women Protecting Wilderness. Together they describe their respective roles in working to deny the placement of nuclear waste near Canyonlands National Park and in other sites throughout Utah. They also discuss the major forces and stumbling blocks surrounding siting decisions, including political factions/alliances, funding, and value placed on the West.Nuclear Technology Project.Interviewer: Danielle Endres
2009
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No. 591 Noah Bigwood and Kirsten Dockstader
Bigwood (b. 1969) was born in Claremont, California, but moved to Colorado where he became what he describes as a "compulsive and addictive climber." He moved to Moab, Utah, where he was involved in route development in Southern Utah. He and Dave Medara started a guiding company, Moab Desert Adventures. Kirsten (b. 1972) is from Irondequoit, New York. She discovered her passion for climbing while working as a guide on Lake Superior during her college years. She abandoned a career in engirneering to pursue climbing throughout the country. She is involved in HERA: Climb for Life, an organization that raises money for breast cancer research. Noah and Kirsten are married and have a son, Benjamin, who makes several appearances over the course of the interview.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: Matt Driscoll
2010
15
No. 592 Bill Boyle
Boyle (b. 1949) was born in Kentucky. His father was in the military and he was raised in the South. In 1976 he moved to Utah to attend the University of Utah and pursue a graduate degree in psychology. He quickly developed an interest in skiing and then, climbing. He describes trips to the City of Rocks, the first place he was involved in bolting sport climbing routes. While Boyle is an accomplished traditional climber, having climbed extensively in Yosemite and other traditional climbing destinations, it is the development of sport climbs in American Fork during the late 1980s, that cement his place in Utah climbing history. He talks about the challenges and rewards of bolting sports routes.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: Matt Driscoll
2010
16
No. 593 James Garrett
Garrett (b. 1951) was born in Duluth, Minnesota, started skiing when he was around six or seven years old, and eventually moved to Montana, where he continued to pursue skiing. He moved to Switzerland, met his wife, Franziska, and discovered climbing under the influence of the Von Kämel brothers, Swiss mountain guides. James returned to the States in 1980 and worked as a ski patroller in Colorado before eventually settling in Salt Lake City with his wife in 1981. James draws frequent comparisons between the American and European climbing ethic, noting the support provided to climbing by government institutions in Europe. He is an accomplished first ascensionist, having developed new routes in the Wasatch and the West Desert, among other places. He discusses the development of climbing in Utah's West Desert, specifically an area called Ibex. James wrote a guidebook on climbing in the West Desert and responds to questions about the qualities that a good guidebook should have, alluding to the Ruckman guidebook on Wasatch climbing as a model text. He continues to climb actively, often traveling international to climb in new places and experience different cultures.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: Matt Driscoll
2010
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No. 594 Bob Irvine
Irvine grew up in Salt Lake City. He started climbing in 1957 when he was working in Grand Teton National Park. He was a member of the Alpenbock, one of the three main climbing clubs in Utah, along with the Ute Alpine Club and the Wasatch Mountain Club. Irvine sold tickets at the Moose entrance before moving to Jenny Lake, where he worked as a ranger for thirty-three years. He believes Grand Teton is one of the most beautiful places in the world, but everywhere in the park he is reminded of rescuing someone, or picking up a body. Since moving back to Utah he's become active in the Ogden ski community and the Utah Nordic Alliance.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: Matt Driscol
2009
18
No. 595 Misty Murphy
Murphy (b.1970) grew up in Salt Lake City, Utah, and currently resides in Saint George with her husband, Bill Ohran. Misty's father started the Ski Jumping Program at Alta, and she was a committed skier before she began climbing at the age of 27. She is also a musician, and discusses the connections she experiences between climbing, music, and dance. She often plays music at climbing events and fundraisers. Misty discusses the development of the climbing community during the past fifteen years with specific commentary on the growing involvement of female climbers. She prefers climbing with women because of the comfortable dynamic between female climbers and their shared understanding of the different way women tend to move on rock. Misty maintains an active blog spot about climbing, which gained publicity from Rock and Ice Magazine for its playful jabs about climbers and the climbing community. She has put up a number of first ascents in the Saint George area, an area she heralds for its year-round climbing and the variety of rock available to climbers.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: Matt Driscol
2010
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No. 596 Bob and Jonathan Springeyer
Robert (b. 1943) was born in Provo and raised in the Salt Lake area. He took up skiing when he was twelve or thirteen. He joined his neighborhood buddies and younger brother and skied on Saturday mornings. Skiing was just a part of his love for the outdoors, which came to include climbing, hiking, fishing and canoeing. During his life he has witnessed great changes in how people can access the natural areas of the United States. The increase in the popularity of outdoor activities has widened choices, but has also seen the rise of regulations and crowds. Coming from a time where the opportunities to turn ones avocation into a vocation were very limited and difficult he lives by a simple rule: keep those parts of his life separate. Jonathan (b. 1970) is the son of Robert Springmeyer and shares his love for the outdoors. He started skiing at three years old, back when there was no ski equipment made for young children. He broke his leg during his second ski season, at the age of four, at Chickadee Shoots. Reminded of the trips he took with his father as a kid, he recalls innocently breaking park regulations during a canoeing and fishing trip to Yellowstone Park. He is trying to teach his kids to respect the outdoors, especially since they live in a place where the outdoors can literally be in your backyard. Like his father, he believes that the best way to destroy an avocation is to make it a vocation.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: John Worsencroft
2009
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No. 597 Paul Tusting
Paul Tusting was born in Miami and grew up in Cambridgle, Massachusetts. He originally became interested in the outdoors and in climbing at a private school which had an Outward-Bound type program. He moved to Salt Lake in 1999, hoping to work for Black Diamond. He worked for HR on various tech and design projects, but the majority his time was on the C4s and C3s. Tusting talks at length on the history of Black Diamond and Chouinard Equipment. Tusting has done a number of first ascents and some guidebook writing. He says he has a moral dilemma about writing guidebooks because increased traffic hurts the rock.Outdoor Recreation Project.Interviewer: Matt Driscol
2010
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No. 598 Wayne Boyce
Boyce (b. 1926) was born in Tuckerman, Arkansas. He attended The Citadel for one year (1943-44) before volunteering for the Army infantry in September 1944. He received basic training at Camp Robinson and additional training as an infantry rifleman. He was shipped to the Philippines with the 31st "Dixie" Division, 124th Regiment, Company E. Later assigned as a medic to his unit, he discusses his activities and experiences there. After boarding a ship to return to the States, he developed polio that affected his arms and legs. Placed in isolation onboard ship, he was immobilized and received around the clock care. After landing in San Francisco, Boyce was treated for a time in the hospital at the Presidio, then was transported by hospital train to the hospital at Fort Sam Houston, where he started physical therapy. Later he was transported by train in a Pullman car to Malvern, Arkansas, then by ambulance to the Army Navy Hospital in Hot Springs, Arkansas. He describes his care, therapy (including hot packs) and the hospital. Upon discharge he returned to school, where he earned a law degree and practiced law until retirement.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2011
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No. 599 Kaaron Jorgen
Jorgen was born in San Francisco, California. She contracted polio at age 10. She describes getting sick and her symptoms. She was hospitalized in the Children's Hospital in San Francisco, and recalls her treatment and therapy, including after leaving the hospital. She was mostly affected in her left leg, which is shorter than her right and has a "drop foot." She discusses post-polio symptoms and challenges. Ms. Jorgen's career was as a psychotherapist.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2010
23
No. 600 Catherine F. Larsen
Ms. Larsen (b. 1940) was born in Chicago, Illinois. She talks about her family and describes contracting polio at age 6 in Kenosha, Wisconsin, along with two of her siblings. Although sick, she was not hospitalized, but was quarantined in her home where she was treated by her mother. She discusses therapies and treatments used. She emerged from the sickness with no apparent residual effects. Ms. Larsen concludes by discussing possible post-polio complications and challenges. Polio Oral Project.Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2010
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No. 601 William Howard Moss
Moss (b. 1935) was born in Rock Springs, Wyoming. He contracted polio at age four and was hospitalized in the Wyoming General Hospital in Rocks Springs. He discusses getting sick and his memories of time in the hospital. He was transferred to Holy Cross Hospital in Salt Lake City, Utah. Both legs were paralyzed and he used leg braces and crutches for a time, which he describes. He talks about difficulties with schooling, work and accommodation. He describes the challenges of post-polio symptoms. Mr. Moss had a successful career in the drilling business.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2010
25
No. 602 Fernando Torres-Gil
Torres-Gil (b. 1948) was born in Salinas, California. He was six months old when he contracted polio while living in Castroville, California. He was initially sent to Monterey County General Hospital in Salinas for treatment. His parents were immigrants from Mexico and were agricultural workers in California. He discusses his immediate and extended family, the family dynamics related to his illness, recovery and subsequent surgeries, and the support system developed with his family. He was locally treated by his physician, Dr. Englehorn. When initial treatments proved ineffective, Dr. Englehorn, a Shriner, arranged for Torres-Gil's treatment at Shriners Hospital in San Francisco. His first hospital stay was at age 2 in 1950. He left the hospital after that stay using braces and crutches. He was subsequently hospitalized, for lengthy stays ranging from three to nine months, for various surgeries between 1954 and 1966. He describes these surgeries and his recollections of care and activities while in the hospital. He continues to use braces and crutches. He has never regained use of his right leg.Torres-Gil discusses his schooling, both while in the hospital and through the public school system. He talks about his progress, challenges and accommodation. He earned Associate and Bachelor degrees in California; Master's and Doctorate degrees at Brandeis University. He has served on various councils for three US presidents, including currently on the Council on Aging.The interview concludes with Dr. Torres-Gil discussing the onset of, challenges with and adapting to post-polio syndrome.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2010

Interviews, 603 - 627Return to Top

Container(s): Box 67

Container(s) Description Dates
box
67
Folder
1
No. 603 Marian Johnson Gray
Gray (b. 1945) was born in Salt Lake City, Utah. She contracted polio when she was nearly six years old, in August of 1951. She talks about her memories of getting sick, being hospitalized, and time spent in an iron lung. She discusses therapies and treatments used during the course of her disease, memories of various surgeries (including a spinal fusion and several muscle "transplants" that continued into her early college years) and using braces, crutches, and frequently a wheelchair in certain settings. Other topics include her schooling in Salt Lake City and at the University of California at Berkeley, the challenges and obstacles she faced throughout her schooling experiences, and her year in the VISTA program in the St. Louis area. She also relates her thoughts and perceptions about medical treatment received by polio survivors, and about post-polio syndrome as it relates to her current medical condition. Polio Orah History Project.Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2010
2
No. 604 Verl Lambert
Lambert (b. 1912) was born in Alberta, Canada. She discusses her family, work, schooling and marriage. Her son, Dale, contracted polio at age 3 while living in California. Verl talks about his illness, hospitalization, the family being quarantined and Dale's treatment. She was restricted in hospital visits during Dale's 7-8 month stay. Their family moved to Salt Lake City, Utah, where Dale received surgery and further treatment. She discusses these as well as his schooling challenges and their work with the March of Dimes.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2010
3
No. 605 George William McCraw
McCraw (b. 1930) is from Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He discusses his family life. He contracted polio at approximately age six, and tells about getting sick. He was taken to a Shriners hospital in Louisville, Kentucky, about 200 miles from his home. He discusses his hospital experience, including treatments and therapies. He was discharged from the hospital in full-length braces and an arm extension. His left leg and right arm were both permanently affected. He had subsequent surgeries and hospitalizations through his twenties. Mr. McCraw was an auto mechanic and ran a successful business in the Chicago area before retiring and returning to the family home in Kentucky. He has not experienced post-polio syndrome.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2010
4
No. 606 Chase Nebeker Peterson
Chase N. Peterson (b. 1929) was born in Logan, Utah, to Elmer George Peterson and Phebe Nebeker. His grandparents on his father side were Gus Peterson and Agusta (Aggie) Steward Geddes, and his maternal grandparents were Hyrum Nebeker and Phebe Almira Hulme. His father attended Utah State Agricultural College and then went to the University of Chicago for his masters, and then on to Cornell for his PhD in Baceteriology. Chase was named after an uncle who died at one year of age from "winter disease." His father became president of Utah State University at the age of thirty-three, and Chase grew up in the president's home. He enjoyed mixing with classes, sports teams, the marching band, and the dairy. He learned to play tennis quite well. He spent his summers at the family ranch near Laketown, Utah, mostly working in the hay fields.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2010
5
No. 607 Hugo Rossi
Rossi was born in Boston, but his parents moved the family to the Bronx when he was three months old. He explains that his parents moved because of the free public universities available in New York and their knowledge that they would not be able to afford private universities for him and his brother. He credits his brother with convincing him to stick with mathematics over English when he attended the College of the City of New York. He discusses his support, as part of the Brandeis faculty, of the student telephone networks during 1960s activism against the war in Vietnam. The work of a close friend and his fondness for the West led him to come to the University of Utah in1974. He goes on to discuss the creation of the ACESS Program to train and retain women in the sciences and how it has fared. He and his wife attempted to become "Californians" after his retirement from the faculty in 2003 but decided to return to Utah two years later.University History Project.Interviewer: Anne Peterson
2010
6
No. 608 Pierre Sokolsky
The son of a professor of Russian literature and language, Dr. Sokolsky had originally wanted to study medicine but serendipitous events led him to study physics at the University of Chicago. Of his projects he is most proud of the Fly's Eye project and his current project, the Telescope Array, where he is part of a group of 130 scientists. He discusses ACCESS, the University of Utah program to train and retain women in the sciences. He sees the lack of women pursuing science and mathematics as a continuing problem and hopes the program will be recreated throughout Utah. He has been Dean of the College of Science at the University of Utah for five years and explains that it was the amazing quality of the faculty that made him want to be Dean. Project.Interviewer:
2011
7
No. 609 Marion LaVelle Walker
Dr. Walker was born in Columbia, Mississippi, in 1942. Most of his time growing up was spent in Clinton due to the moves necessitated by his father's military obligations. He was a very good student in high school as well as an athlete, receiving a scholarship to play at BYU. He played fullback at BYU and undertook studying pre-med. Once he returned from his LDS Church mission he dedicated most of his time to his studies rather than football because he knew he wanted to be a physician. Later at the University of Tennessee medical school he became excited about neurology. He finished his residency in Phoenix, then joined the faculty at Primary Children's Hospital in 1976 as a pediatric neurologist. He later came back to the University of Utah as a full-time faculty member in 1981. He was Division Chief for twenty eight years and served as chairman of the American Board of Pediatric Neurological Surgery. Currently he is serving as chairman of the accreditation council for the ABPNS. University of Utah Project.Interviewer: Anne Peterson
2010
8
No. 610 Robert J. Deitz
Deitz (b. 1932) was born in New Jersey. He describes his enlistment in the Navy after the start of the Korean War, and his service as a corpsman with the medical corps of the Marines. It was during his travels for the military that he visited Salt Lake City and was positively influenced by the people and environment. This experience later influenced his decision to attend the University of Utah, where he completed his bachelor of science in 1957. He then studied immunology at Rutgers University where he met his wife. They left for Temple University, where he studied from 1961 to 1965, while they also raised a family. In 1970 he started his private practice in San Francisco and also worked as a rheumatologist for the 49ers football team. Currently he is an allergist for the San Francisco Giants. He credits the intense training he received throughout his life, especially at the University of Utah, for his success.Interviewer: Anne Peterson
2011
9
No. 611 Ashley Patterson
Ashley Patterson grew up in Yakima, Washington. Her parents were from the midwest, but they moved west and took advantage of the resources for outdoor amusement. Ashley grew up knowing the benefits of the outdoors. Her parents were also very environmentally conscious and passed that along to their daughter. She feels a strong connection to the west. She went to college in the east and took an environmental history course and decided she wanted to be involved with environmental issues in her career. After a brief stint in the book fair business, she decided to put her environmental studies background to use. She took a class on solar panels and discovered a love of building green homes and shelters. While visiting friends in Portland, she came across a green building supply business and decided that was what she wanted to do in Salt Lake, so she started the Green Building Center. Ashley describes becoming a green business owner and navigating the local business scene as well as the local environmentalist scene. Mostly, she does things her own way, though, and doesn't participate very often in business organizations or green events. Her concerns as a business owner are not only to be green, but to also be conscious of social justice issues behind the products she buys and sells. It's important to her to know where the products are coming from, what's in the products, and who's making them. She talks about opening a second store in Park City, and the difference between customers there compared to customers in Salt Lake City, who seem to be on more of a budget. Ashley also discusses her involvement with Wasatch Community Gardens. She took a class there, saw a class being taught for children, and realized how important the work they're doing is.Utah Environmentalists Oral History Project.Interviewer: Rob DeBirk
2010
10
No. 612 Anne Yeagle
Yeagle (b. 1962) was born in Utah and attended Westminster College. She started climbing with friends while attending graduate school at the University of Utah. She had an ex-boyfriend who climbed, and her brother was in a climbing accident when he was young, so she had a bad association with the sport for quite awhile. She thinks there is a climbing culture that consists of "innies" and "outies," and that it can be very hard to be accepted, especially as a woman. She's not sure if the male dominance and ego have changed over the years or if she's just gotten older and wiser about who she surrounds herself with. She knows a lot of people who are judgmental towards her for being an older woman climber who still climbs hard, because most give up by her age. Anne speaks about the importance of finding a good climbing partner and how you have to want and help them to succeed. The relationship with your belayer is an intimate one. There are too many climbers out there who don't want you to succeed because they want to be better than you. When the ego is involved in climbing you find yourself only enjoying the successes, rather than the other all experience. She found that sometimes her succeeding as a climber put a strain on her relationship with her husband, who was also her climbing partner and sometimes she'd find herself purposefully failing. She has put up a lot of routes, especially in the Swell and a remote backpacking location in Wyoming. Mentors are very important in introducing people, especially new types of people, to the sport. She had mentors which encouraged her. She thinks that is how the sport should access minorities, it's not just an economic barrier. She wishes the climbing community had a mentoring program to encourage minority kids to start.Outdoor Recreation Oral History Project.Interviewer: Matt Driscoll
2010
11
No. 613 Andrew Burr
Burr (b. 1977) grew up in Sonoma County, California. He is currently the Senior Contributing Photographer for Climbing Magazine. He started climbing while he was living in Tempe, Arizona, after finishing high school. Andrew moved to Salt Lake City in 1999 and immediately began to climb in the Wasatch Mountains. He discusses his first climbs in the Wasatch, including the West Slabs of Mount Olympus and the Schoolroom in Little Cottonwood Canyon. After earning a degree in Geological Engineering from the University of Utah and working for the USGS, Andrew decided to pursue a career as a climbing photographer. He discusses this difficult but rewarding transition and describes the recent evolution of No Star Tuesdays, an effort by a group of climbers to rediscover forgotten and out-of-the-way crags and climbs in the Wasatch. He professes a great interest in the history of climbing in the Wasatch, explaining how its depth of history more than makes up for its fractured rock.Outdoor Recreation Oral History Project.Interviewer: Matt Driscoll
2010
12
No. 614 Nancy Feagin
Feagin (b.1966) was born in Washington, D.C., but spent her formative years in San Francisco, California, and Jackson, Wyoming. When she moved to Jackson, she competed as a ski racer for her high school, and around the same time, she learned to climb in the Tetons. After graduating from Duke University with a Bachelor's degree in Engineering, she returned to Jackson, worked briefly for a software company, and then decided to pursue her passion for climbing. She traveled for a number of years and began to climb big walls in Yosemite and other places. Nancy moved to Salt Lake City in 1991 to work at just-opening Rockreation. Since she has lived in Salt Lake, she has made numerous significant climbing trips, most notably a solo ascent of Aconcagua in South America and a 2001 ascent of Mount Everest. Nancy speaks about a number of her climbing partners, as well as the numerous transitions in her climbing career.Outdoor Recreation Oral History Project.Interviewer: Matt Driscoll
2011
13
No. 615 Tom Kimbrough
Born in Nashville, Tennessee, Kimbrough (b. 1938) spent his teenage and young adult years in Chattanooga. The area was rich in sandstone formations which gave him a lot of cave exploring activities as a youth. He started exploring caves across the region of Tennessee, Alabama and Georgia but eventually wanted to also climb. He started climbing in 1960 and got drafted shortly after. In the army he found a friend, Steve Roper, that was also an avid climber. After the army he spent years climbing from a recommended list Roper gave him. In 1973 he started working for the Park Service in the Tetons, generally doing upkeep, patron safety, and rescues. He has witnessed the development of equipment improvements and a widening of the climbing community with more women becoming involved. He has always balanced the risks with the rewards of climbing and still believes you have to stick your neck out. At the same time, he worries when he sees his son doing the same sort of things he did.Outdoor Recreation Oral History Project.Interviewer: John C. Worsencroft
2008
14
No. 616 Ron Olevsky
Olevsky (b. 1954) was born in New York City, and grew up in rural Connecticut, where he developed an enthusiasm for the outdoors. Ron spent a summer in Switzerland in 1968 and was exposed to climbing for the first time. In 1970, he worked on a ranch in Wyoming, and eventually he hitchhiked to Boulder, Colorado, enrolling shortly thereafter at University of Colorado-Boulder and climbing extensively in Rocky Mountain National Park. Ron describes his new route development in Rocky Mountain National Park and Zion National Park. He identifies some of the key figures in route development in southern Utah and shares his observations on the Utah climbing culture and community. The interview concludes as Ron describes his experiences as a climbing guide in southern Utah.Outdoor Recreation History Project.Interviewer: Matt Driscoll
2010
15
No. 617 Stuart Ruckman
Ruckman (b. 1966) was born in Salt Lake City, Utah. Stuart shares how his family, particularly his father, played a significant role in introducing him to the outdoors. Some of his initial explorations included a hike to the top of Mount Olympus when he was five years old, backpacking trips in the Wasatch and Uinta Mountains, and a successful summit attempt on the Grand Teton when he was twelve. Stuart discovered technical rock climbing due to the influence of his older brother Bret, five years Stuart's senior. Bret learned under Dennis Turville, a well-respected Salt Lake climbing instructor. Stuart shares his observations on the Salt Lake climbing community of the late 1970s and 1980s, noting the intimacy of the community, while also pointing out the significant influence of a handful of climbers, including Merril Bitter, Les Ellison, and Brian Smoot. He briefly describes the proliferation of new-route development in the Wasatch during his first decade in climbing. In collaboration with his brother Bret, Stuart published comprehensive guidebooks on climbing in the Wasatch Mountains. Stuart's contributions as a first-ascensionist and co-author of Rock Climbing the Wasatch Range attest to his lasting impact on Utah climbing.Outdoor Recreation History Project.Interviewer: Matt Driscoll
2010
16
No. 618 Rachel Mathey
Mathey grew up at the base of the Wind River Mountains in Green River, Wyoming. Her parents took the family camping and she spent a lot of time in the outdoors when she was young. She credits those experiences camping with her family as the most influential factor in developing her passion for environmental issues. Her parents encouraged her to develop her spiritual side by connecting with nature. Rachel also took part in the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) when she was young. During her first summer with the school, she had an epiphany, and knew that she was connected to nature and that she wanted to do something to help preserve the environment. She moved to Salt Lake City to go to school because she had family there, and studied at Westminster College. She took all the courses they provided for geology and then all the courses with environmental as a prefix. For one of her courses it was required that the students volunteer for a local organization. She volunteered for SUWA and developed an interest in keeping wild areas wild throughout the country. Her volunteer work at SUWA provided her with the opportunity for an internship at Save Our Canyons, which led to a job at Utah Environmental Congress, where she works doing the same thing she did at Save Our Canyons. Rachel discusses the differences between the two organizations: each organization has a different member base and works on different issues.Utah Environmentalists Oral History Project.Interviewer: Rob DeBirk
2008
17
No. 619 Blaine Miller
Blaine (b. 1947) was born in Richfield, Utah, but spent his early childhood moving around as his father continued his education and took up student teaching employment. They eventually settled in Layton. He graduated from Weber State with a major in history and a minor in anthropology. He has worked for the Park Service in Montana and with the Bureau of Land Management as an archeologist. The loss of archeological sites to construction, drilling, and dam flooding upsets him but he appreciates the remaining sites in the Southwest.Utah Environmental Oral History Project.Interviewer: Desiree Beaudry
2009
18
No. 620 Pam Miller
Pam was born in Lovell, Wyoming. She is the oldest of 5 children. Her parents' struggle because of their lack of education provided her incentive to pursue higher education. She remembers visiting her grandmother at work at the library and always reading many books. Her grandmother would also give her cast off books which she read. Her father died in an accident when she was in high school and the family struggled. Her high school counselor helped her to apply for enough grants and scholarships to attend Ricks College. She transferred to BYU where she became interested in archeology. She remembers the archeology fieldwork she did without sunscreen and not too worried about drinking from streams. Her and her husband Blaine have spent a part of the life working to protect and preserve the Nine Mile Canyon.Utah Environmental Oral History Project.Interviewer: Desiree Beaudry
2009
19
No. 621 Michele Straube
Straube (b. 1952) was born in Toronto, grew up in New Jersey, and now resides in Utah. She was a practicing lawyer for over fifteen years in Pennsylvania, Alaska, and Utah with emphasis upon environmental issues. For the last decade, she has focused her efforts on dispute resolution, mediation, and facilitation. Straube specializes in collaborative problem-solving. She is currently the director of Salt Lake Mayor Ralph Becker's collaborative government initiative, Salt Lake Solutions and teaches in the S.J. Quinney College of Law at the University of Utah.Utah Environmental Oral History Project.Interviewer: Michele Straube
2010
20
No. 622 Janice Lee Cootey
Cootey (b. 1945) was born in Somerville, Massachusetts. She contracted polio at age nine in Wilmington, Massachusetts. She describes getting sick and being taken to Boston Children's Hospital. She talks about the treatments she received there, which included penicillin injections, and relates her vague recollection of an iron lung. She talks about her physical condition upon discharge, which mostly affected her right side. Ms. Cootey received physical therapy from Boston Children's until age fifteen and talks about that experience. She wore a back brace during her early teen years to help reduce a curvature of the spine. She also discusses the effects of the disease on her and her family. She received a degree and worked as a radiology technologist until age thirty, when the effects of post-polio syndrome forced her out of the field. She discusses the challenges of post-polio syndrome.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2011
21
No. 623 Jefferson James Jarvis
Jarvis (b. 1944) was born in Hollywood, California. His family was in California while his father served in World War II. After the war, they returned to their family ranch in Texas, where Jeff grew up. He discusses his family and childhood. He contracted polio at age five; describes getting sick, and his time spent in the city-county hospital of Fort Worth, Texas. He discusses treatments and therapies received, including physical therapy in a warm water bath. He describes hospital activities. The disease rendered him with paralysis in the legs, and some arm paralysis, with slow improvement over time. He discusses his recovery. Mr. Jarvis attended the Air Force Academy. He served in Intelligence, including overseas duty in Vietnam. He retired from the military and worked in private industry before retirement. He discusses the onset of and his challenges with post-polio syndrome.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2011
22
No. 624 Jay Kohler
Kohler (b. 1944) was born in Pratt Kansas. He grew up in Rochester, New York, where he contracted polio at the age of four and a half. He describes getting sick. He was taken to Strong Memorial Hospital in Rochester, New York, where he remained for more than three months. He was placed in an iron lung, and relates his memories of his time and treatment there. The polio mainly affected his lungs and his left side. He tells of the types of physical therapy used to treat him in the hospital. He was discharged from the hospital to a convalescent home, where he remained for a period of less than one year, while they continued with intensive physical therapy. His physical therapy continued once he returned home. Mr. Kohler led a very active life with no immediately noticeable residual effects of polio, until the onset of post polio syndrome, which he describes. Mr. Kohler's career has been as an educator and entrepreneur.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2011
23
No. 625 Julie Palfreyman
Palfreyman (b. 1949) was born in Logan, Utah. She discusses growing up on a farm in Cache Valley, where she contracted polio at the age of three and was treated at home. She relates her memories of getting sick and the treatments received, including regular injections and hot packs. She was left with permanent immobility in her left leg and endured several surgeries over a number of years, which she describes. These included bone shortening and muscle transplants. Ms. Palfreyman has used various types of braces and crutches off and on throughout her life. She discusses her health difficulties during recent years and their possible connection to post-polio syndrome. Ms. Palfreyman studied nursing and received her LPN license. She worked for several years as a bedside nurse.Polio Oral History Project.Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2011
24
No. 626 Paul T. Brinkman
Brinkman (b. 1942) was born in Minnesota. He received both an undergraduate and a master's degree in philosophy. He taught for a few years at St. Benedict's in Minnesota before earning his doctorate degree in economics from the University of Arizona. He worked for the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems for a number of years. Mr. Brinkman joined the University of Utah in 1990 as the Director of Planning and Policies Studies. He was later promoted to the Associate Vice President of Budget and Planning. In this interview, Mr. Brinkman discusses the economics of higher education; budget planning and management for a university; his work-related publications; the intricacies of enrollment management; the complications of determining and managing tuition; and the impact of the University of Utah's entry into the PAC-12. Mr. Brinkman was named emeritus Associate Vice President of Budget and Planning in September 2011.University Oral History Project.Interviewer: Anne Peterson.
2011
25
No. 627 Edwin Brown Firmage
Transcript in process.Interviewer: Stan Larson.
2011

Interviews, 628 - 649Return to Top

Container(s): Box 68

Container(s) Description Dates
box
68
Folder
1
No. 628 Russell Jacobs
Salt Lake City based climber Russell Jacobs recounts his global experiences as a climber and shares his views of the climbing scene. Going into great detail, Jacobs describes climbs in South American, Europe and throughout North America. His stories include descriptions of the changes in the landscape and the people who climb. He feels that there has been an improvement in how the nation protects its natural wonders and that those who climb are more cognizant of preserving the environment that they use as well as taking better care of themselves. Jacobs also discusses his reasons for climbing and the additional challenges it has posed. He feels he has been fortunate in having jobs that allowed him to climb. He also feels that if more people would go out and experience nature it would transform their lives. Climbing allows him to get away from the negative aspects of urban living. Balancing his life between climbing and his other responsibilities is an ever-present challenge and one that motivated him not to raise children. He discusses how other climbers have dealt with balancing their different passions.Outdoor Recreation Oral History Project.Interviewer: Matt Driscoll
2009
2
No. 629 Tyler Phillips
Phillips (b. 1976) was raised in Salt Lake City, Utah. Tyler discovered his love for the outdoors through the influence of his parents, as well as early experiences with the Boy Scouts. As a child, he skied at Solitude, but by the time he was in his teens he began to explore the backcountry. He also began climbing when he was seventeen years old with his close friends, who learned under the tutelage of local guide John Johnson. After high school, Tyler briefly attended Dixie State University and then lived for several years in Cedar City, where he and a handful of friends became involved in developing first ascents. Tyler describes some of his early efforts as a first ascensionist. Eventually, after honing his skills as a climber, Tyler returned to Salt Lake City and continued to pursue first ascents in the Wasatch Range. One of Tyler's great accomplishments, "Stiffler's Mom" in Little Cottonwood's Coalpit Buttress, received criticism due to debates about whether it had been climbed before. He remarks on the significant place of internet climbing websites in the ethical conflicts that sometimes develop in the climbing community. Tyler continues to be an avid climber and backcountry skier, while working at as a Facilities Manager at Snowbird.Outdoor Recreation Oral History Project.Interviewer: Erik Solberg
2008
3
No. 630 Mike White
Born in Denver, but raised in Salt Lake City, climber Mike White recalls his start as a climber, specific climbs and the development of climbing gear. The interview focuses on his prolific re-bolting of traditional routes in the Wasatch and other areas. This involves details about the technical, geological and social parameters of re-bolting. Out of this discussion, White's account of climbing ethics becomes prominent. White illustrates his perspective, remembers some close calls and tells of the controversy surrounding re-bolting. Additionally, White recalls his affiliation with various climbing organizations and his self-imposed moderation between conflicting sides.Outdoor Recreation Oral History Project.Interviewer: Matt Driscoll
2009
4
No. 631 Jerilyn McIntyre
McIntyre (b. 1942) was born in Fairbury, Nebraska. Both her parents were teachers. They moved to Pasadena, California when she was seven so her dad could work for the California Teacher's Association. Jerilyn discusses her early education. Her two years of high school were on the Pasadena City College campus. After high school she attended Stanford where she majored in history. She describes living on campus and her realization that she could handle studying at Stanford. She talks about her life-changing study abroad experience in Italy. She studied with professors from Stanford while there, as well as Italian language teachers. She learned to mellow out and not fill the entire day with work and took that lesson with her back to the States. Jerilyn received her Master's in journalism at Stanford. She talks about her Master's thesis and the professors with whom she studied. After receiving her Master's, she worked for the McGraw Hill publishing company as an editorial assistant and then later a correspondent. Jerilyn left McGraw Hill to study for a PhD, but before going to the University of Washington for her PhD, she taught at Chico State College for two years. She describes working at Chico State and being the only woman teacher there. Jerilyn then went to the University of Washington. She describes her dissertation and the professors she studied with. She was interested in the way communication systems develop in developing communities. After earning her PhD at Washington, Jerilyn was hired at the University of Iowa. She describes the overwhelming workload she had to take on because of departmental turmoil and changes. When the University of Utah approached her with a job offer, she agreed. She did not like the Iowa weather and she was excited at the job she would have at the University of Utah. Jerilyn discusses her hesitations and finally her decision to move to Utah. She describes her work at the University of Utah, the classes she taught, the responsibilities she had, and the promotions she received over the years.University Oral History Project.Interviewer: Anne Peterson
2011
5
No. 632 Edwin Firmage, Jr.
Firmage (b. 1958) was born in Provo, Utah. He discusses his childhood, family, education and young adult years, including a mission for the LDS Church in Germany. He details experiences while attending Princeton, and completing his undergraduate degree at the University of Utah. He pursued graduate studies at Berkeley. He worked in sales for a number of years before turning to a vocation in photography. Mr. Firmage provides an account of his travels and experiences that helped shape his thinking and activism toward environmental issues. He discusses his current activities in working with the LDS Church, local universities and local and national organizations to raise awareness of and a commitment to principles of sound environmental living. He also relates his interest and activism in promoting an anti-nuclear agenda.Utah Environmental Oral History Project.Interviewer: Robert Debirk
2008
6
No. 633 Phyllis Haskell-Tims
Haskell-Tims is a former dean of the College of Fine Arts at the University of Utah. She describes her family and her childhood at Yankee Farm near Santa Barbara, California. She recalls beginning dance lessons at age three with Madame Maria Kedrina who had trained in the Imperial Ballet Company in Russia. She describes performing all through public school and attending the University of Arizona, where she was introduced to modern dance. After college she became a stewardess with American Airlines, moved to New York, and danced before attending the University of Utah graduate school of dance. Other topics include touring and teaching with Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company, her faculty appointments at Arizona State and the University of Hawaii, her return to the University of Utah as chair of the Department of Modern Dance, and her career and subsequent retirement at the University of Utah.Interviewer: Scott Marsh
2008
7
No. 634 Moana Angilau
Moana Angilau (b. 1973) talks about her childhood before she moved to Tonga; she compares her experience of going to school in Utah to her experiences in Tonga. Religion was a main focus in school but the children took part in diverse religions. The family would travel to Hawaii regularly to visit family and keep up to date with American culture. She talks about her love for Tonga and Tongan culture. She tried to fit in with native Tongans as much as possible while there because she was self-conscious of her American background. Moana now lives in Utah and she describes feelings of discrimination at her job. She feels that in Utah people judge you based on the color of your skin. Moana feels she has to act according to a higher standard so that she doesn't reflect poorly on her culture. The Polynesian culture is thriving in Utah and she wants to support and perpetuate knowledge about that culture to both Polynesians and Utahns.Pacific Worlds Project. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu
2008
8
No. 635 Dennis Sizemore
Dennis Sizemore talks about good and wildlife practice. He recounts an incident involving a bear that he looks to as the one thing he's still repenting for through all his work for wilderness areas. He studied wildlife at New Mexico State and later attended the University of Montana for graduate school to work on grizzly bears and black bears. Dennis tells about his experiences on the Blackfeet Reservation in Montana. He believes working with local and native people is the best way to ensure that wilderness areas will be preserved. After taking eight years off, Dennis started an organization called Round River, which works with local and native people to help them preserve wilderness areas. Dennis has Round River operations in Namibia, British Columbia, the Colorado Plateau, Ecuador, and is beginning work in southern Utah. Dennis talks about how the image of the environmentalist being a "tree-hugger" is weakening their efforts, and discusses ways to improve the image and improve the environmentalism effort itself.Utah Environmental Project. Interviewer: Rob DeBirk
2008
9
No. 636 Vaueli Johnson
Vaueli Johnson grew up in American Samoa until she was four. Her family then moved to Laie, Hawaii. After she graduated from high school Vaueli moved to Utah to attend BYU. Vaueli talks about the various jobs she's had. She mostly worked for her father's business, a variety store called Country Baby. She wasn't taught to speak Samoan when she was young but she can understand it and speak it fairly well. Her father now regrets not teaching them the language because it's part of their culture. She talks about charity and generosity as aspects of Samoan culture she's learned from her father. She also talks about the importance of education in her life. Vaueli feels that she is treated differently as a Samoan in Utah. Most people mistake her for being Hispanic and she doesn't feel welcome because of that. She talks about the differences between her experience of Samoan culture growing up, and her husband's experience growing up Samoan. Vaueli discusses being raised Mormon, and how her parents were converted. She talks about the differences between Samoan LDS churches and white churches.Pacific Worlds Project. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu
2008
10
No. 637 Alexis Lesa
Alexis Lesa was born in North Carolina on a military base. She grew up all over the states because her parents were both Marines and she talks about traveling and moving often. She describes her relationship with her parents and her siblings. Alexis talks in detail about moving to Hawaii, living with extended family, and going to school there. Alexis is half Puerto Rican, a quarter white and a quarter Samoan. She talks about her ethnicity and culture, specifically the cultural experiences she had in Hawaii. After high school she went to BYU where she earned an English degree in 2006. She is married and has an eighteen month old son.Pacific Worlds Project. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu
2008
11
No. 638 Thomas Arnold
Thomas Arnold (b. 1977) grew up in Bountiful, Utah. When it became time for him to find a way to pay for college he decided to join the Marine Reserves. Thomas values the discipline he learned in boot camp as well and the hard work ethic it instilled in him. He recalls feeling very comfortable in his reserve group Fox Company 2/23. He went on a mission for his church and started a family prior to the events of 9/11. Thomas was deployed to California in 2002 as part of a quick reaction force. His unit was deployed as part of the 1st Marine Division in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom in 2003. Thomas' unit was first deployed to Kuwait. He vividly recollects the shock of seeing his first dead body lying in an Iraqi urban area. One of his most intense firefights occurred in Baghdad against the Iraqi secret service. He describes the rest of his service in Iraq as a military presence to provide security. While he settled back into life at home in Utah Thomas did not mind that everyone knew he was a veteran but felt it got old after a while. He does not regret what he did but is very happy his service is over.Interviewer: John Worsencroft
2009
12
No. 639 Susan and Robert Fitts
Botanist Robert Fitts was born in Glendale California and grew up in Parowan, Utah. He worked with Vince Tepedino at the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Bee Lab where he served as a plant specialist. He had spent much of his career trying to preserve the native, especially the endangered, species of plants in Utah and throughout the West. Susan Fitts was born in Manhattan, Kansas and grew up in Clovis, New Mexico. She received a degree in microbiology from Kansas State and a Masters in agronomy from New Mexico State University. She worked briefly with the Forest Service as a plant pathologist and then helped form a new chapter of the Native Plant Society in Utah County. Both Robert and Susan have worked to preserve plant species and habitat in Uinta Basin. They discuss the difficulties posed by energy development and recreation in the area as well as how the demographics of the nearby towns and cities positively and negatively affect their efforts.Interviewer: Desiree Beaudry
2010
13
No. 640 David Spencer Chapman
David Chapman (b. 1942) was born in the small town of Comox on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. He has studied and taught at the University of Zambia, the University of Michigan, and the University of Utah, among others. Chapman is Distinguished Professor of Geophysics and Dean Emeritus of The Graduate School, Department of Geology and Geophysics, at the University of Utah. In 2009, he was awarded the Utah Governor's Medal for Science and Technology. Chapman has been instrumental in furthering studies regarding global warming and climate change. He and his wife live in Salt Lake City where they are avid cyclists and long-distance walkers.Interviewer: Desiree Beaudry
2010
14
No. 641 Zac Robinson
Zac Robinson (b. 1983) was born in 1983 in Fort Worth, Texas. Zac discusses his introduction to climbing as a student at Texas A&M and his subsequent development as a climber in Colorado and Utah. Zac initially moved to Salt Lake City in 2006 to ski at Alta and Snowbird and has lived here ever since. His first experiences in Utah include climbing at Indian Creek, where he honed his skills as a traditional climber. Zac worked at the Front climbing gym during his first year in Utah and immediately became involved in the climbing community through his acquaintances there. He discusses the effects and impact of guidebooks on the climbing culture and the adventuring aspect of climbing. Through his affiliation with No Star Tuesday, a group of Salt Lake climbers who climb no-starred routes from the Ruckman's guidebook, and the SLCA (Salt Lake Climbers Alliance), Zac has been deeply involved in assembling and mobilizing Salt Lake's climbing community.Outdoor Recreation Oral History Project. Interviewer: Matt Driscoll
2010
15
No. 642 Michael Friedrichs
Michael Friedrichs (1959) was exposed to climbing during his high school years, mentored by his swimming coach and regional climbing great Layne Kapischka. Mike attended the University of Wyoming, studying Statistics, and during his college years, he climbed at Vedauwoo, in Wyoming, also making a number of trips to Yosemite to climb big walls. He describes the "regional" climbing culture of the 1970s, identifying this characteristic as one that has changed over the years. He moved to Salt Lake City, Utah, in 1988 and discovered Utah climbing at an exciting and transitional moment, as route development burgeoned with the use of rappel-bolting and the development of sport climbing. Mike has been involved in new route development in Longs Canyon, near Moab, and was a key figure in new route development in the San Rafael Swell. Mike shares his thoughts on the supportiveness of the local community, identifying inspiring climbers as those who remain humble and kind even as they push the limits of climbing.Outdoor Recreation Oral History Project. Interviewer: Matt Driscoll
2010
16
No. 643 Lamont Heaps
Lamont Heaps (b. 1945) was born in Salt Lake City. He graduated from Skyline High School in 1963 as part of Skyline's first graduating class. Lamont talks about his early outdoor experiences in the Canyon Rim area of Salt Lake. He spent a lot of time exploring caves across the Wasatch Front. After spending time in the National Guard, Lamont got involved with Search and Rescue while working at a grocery chain called Warshaw's. He describes his involvement with a group that eventually became Alpine Rescue, which started setting standards for rock climbing and rescue in Utah. Lamont talks about techniques and equipment used in rescues he was a part of. The organization slowly disbanded as the members graduated from college and went into their professions.Outdoor Recreation Oral History Project. Interviewer: Matt Driscoll
2010
17
No. 644 Neal Carroll
Neal Carroll (b. 1971) was raised in Atlanta, Georgia, but moved to Salt Lake City, Utah to attend the University of Utah in 1990. He is currently a Ph.D. candidate in British/American Literature at the University of Utah. Neal describes working at Alta during his college years, detailing the developments to the Alta facilities and culture since he began to work there and sharing some general observations on Salt Lake City ski culture. Neal also worked for the Alta Ski Patrol in 1997 and worked full-time as a ski patroller until 2002. Neal was introduced to climbing at a fraternity rush event, but then began to develop a passion for climbing while working at Alta, learning to trad climb at the Hellgate in Little Cottonwood Canyon with friend Tony Calvert. Neal describes his development as a climber, explaining how he came into route development, and also sharing stories about his employment at Salt Lake climbing shop IME. The interview concludes as Neal tries to articulate why climbing remains an important part of his life.Outdoor Recreation Oral History Project. Interviewer: Matt Driscoll
2010
18
No. 645 Doug Heinrich
Doug Heinrich (b. 1962) was introduced to climbing when he was twelve years old by a classmate. Early on he took climbing lessons with Jim Dockery, a local legend, and during his first year in climbing he achieved the summit of the Grand Teton on a guided climb. He quickly developed an interest in summiting alpine peaks. Doug discusses the Salt Lake climbing community of the late-70s and '80s, identifying some of the key figures involved in pushing grades and new-route development. He shares his opinions about the fascination with first ascents, explaining how this was not a priority or fascination for him. That said, Doug has developed some classic new routes, specifically on Big Walls in Zion National Park. He describes himself as not particularly good at any aspect of climbing but certainly able at all aspects: rock climbing, Big Walls, mountaineering, ice climbing, etc. Doug tells stories of working with Conrad Anker at The North Face store in Salt Lake City prior to Conrad's rise to stardom. Doug climbed with many of Salt Lake's most prominent mountaineers, a number of whom have tragically died in the mountains. After working at TNF, he went on to manage IME before moving to Black Diamond, where he continues to work. Doug describes the history of Black Diamond and also provides an overview of some of its more significant efforts in product development.Outdoor Recreation Oral History Project. Interviewer: Matt Driscoll
2010
19
No. 646 Heather Suker
Heather Suker (b. 1987) has been involved in political activism for about three years, beginning with her participation with Peaceful Uprising and its support of Tim DeChristopher's civil disobedience. She served on the Board of Directors of Peaceful Uprising and learned about Occupy Wall Street and Occupy Salt Lake City through her involvement with this group. After learning about Occupy Wall Street, Heather traveled across the country and spent about a week at Occupy Wall Street. She describes how her experience in New York City inspired her to play a significant role in the unfolding Occupy Salt Lake City movement. Heather spent several days camping on the sidewalks outside of Salt Lake City's Federal Reserve building, and she outlines the struggle of Occupy Salt Lake City to claim a permanent space from which to protest. She details the cooperation between protesters and the Salt Lake police force, highlighting Police Commissioner Burbank's willingness to negotiate with protesters. Heather expresses her optimism for the movement's future and the changes it might lead to.Occupy SLC Oral History Project. Interviewer: Erin Halcomb
2011
20
No. 647 Noel Song
Noel Song (b. 1991) moved to Salt Lake City to attend the University of Utah. Noel was unable to afford the tuition for the fall 2011 semester and subsequently became interested in the Occupy Wall Street movement through internet research. Faced with having to move out of his parents' house, Noel chose to take part in the Occupy Salt Lake City movement. He attended the initial organizational meeting and took part in the march from the Capitol building to Pioneer Park. As of the interview date, Noel was camped at the Federal Reserve front, an unused property located at 147 South State Street. He articulates the political and economic issues that inspire his activism and expresses his idealist, "utopian" hopes for the movement's future.Project: Occupy SLC Oral History Project. Interviewer: Erin Halcomb
2011
21
No. 648 Jack Brittain
Jack Brittain (b. 1953) was born in Colorado Springs, Colorado and was raised in California. He discusses his early family life and his family’s educational background. He talks about going to school in San Jose, the teachers that were critical to his development, and his passion for math and science. He describes his involvement with the Junior Achievement program. After high school he went to Berkeley where he graduated with a triple major in operations research, quantitative analysis and business management. Jack talks about the different jobs he had while attending Berkeley, and his involvement with the social and political trends at Berkeley. After graduating he went on to study for an MBA at Berkeley where he eventually earned his doctorate. Jack describes the business environment in California and the rise of Silicon Valley. Jack’s has worked at the University of Texas at Austin and in Arizona and Dallas before being hired as dean of the business school at the University of Utah. Jack talks about the opportunities and challenges he faced in his new position. He describes his involvement with the university venture fund in 2005 and with the Lassonde New Venture Development Center.In his second interview, Jack talks about the process of hiring new business teachers at the University of Utah. He describes the business school’s involvement with information systems studies. Jack discusses his involvement with the Christensen Center. He talks about his push for an “engaged student movement.” He discusses his fundraising efforts and his relationships with donors. Jack talks about his administration and the people he worked with at the University of Utah that were integral to his projects. Jack later worked half-time as dean and half-time as vice president for technology transfer. He talks about the process of commercializing research at the university.
2011
22
No. 649 Ronald Apfelbaum
Ronald Apfelbaum was born in Atlantic City, New Jersey, where he stayed until leaving for college. He talks about growing up and going to school in Atlantic City. Ronald attended Cornell University for three years as an electrical engineering student. He then opted for early acceptance into medical school at Hahnemann Medical College in Philadelphia. After finishing medical school Ronald took an internship in Chicago at Presbyterian St. Luke’s Hospital where he decided to go into neurosurgery. He did his residency at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx where he eventually became Associate Professor in the Department of Neurological Surgery. Ronald talks about his time as a captain in the US Air Force and his time in the New York Air National Guard. He was recruited to the University of Utah as a professor of surgery in 1986. Ronald discusses his career and his achievements while a surgeon at the University of Utah.
2011

Interviews, 650 - 673Return to Top

Container(s): Box 69

Container(s) Description Dates
box
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No. 650 Robert Gilbert
Robert Gilbert (b. 1967) was born in Red Bank, New Jersey and spent his childhood in Fairhaven, New Jersey. He began skiing with his father at the age of three and began coaching racing when he was sixteen. At twenty three, following knee injuries from racing and several friends from his Belleayre days, he moved to Salt Lake City, Utah and began to mountain climb. He was largely self-taught, and struggled a great deal with the mental strain of climbing and leading. He eventually began to set routes in new climbing gyms that were being built along the Wasatch Front, and eventually entered into a partnership with Dave Bell that resulted in the Wasatch Front Rock Gym in 1992. During that construction process and after, Robert and Dave went into the business of making holds using the materials and technology Robert had been using to cast holds for the walls he was setting at Rockreation and Wasatch Front and in space essentially donated by Peter Metcalfe of Black Diamond. That company eventually became Pusher Holds.Project: Outdoor Recreation. Interviewer: Erik Solberg
2007
2
No. 651 Jessica Taverna
Jessica Taverna developed a love for the outdoors when she spent a semester working on a farm in Vermont during junior high school. In college, a friend of hers took her climbing and she loved it. She moved to Washington DC to work and became involved with the climbing community there. Jessica chose to come to graduate school in Salt Lake City because of climbing. She talks about her climbing experiences in Utah and the climbing community. She describes the climbing industry’s impact on the sport and on the environment.Project: Outdoor Recreation Interviewer: John Worsencroft.
2007
3
No. 652 Kirk Ririe
Kirk Ririe grew up in Ohio, upstate New York, Wisconsin, Illinois, and Nebraska because his father was an engineer who worked on projects all over the country. His family moved to the west when Kirk was in junior high. Kirk talks about his high school experience and his first interest in science. He then recounts his experiences as a Mormon missionary. When he returned from his mission he immediately went to Utah State to study science, specifically organic and biochemistry. He talks about his love of explosives and building devices. He started a farming equipment business with his father, and another business, Idaho Technology, with two of his friends. He is currently the CEO of Idaho Technology.In the second part of his interview, Kirk talks about research done and products developed at Idaho Technology. He talks about his company’s relationship with the US government and military. After amassing about 250 credit hours at four different universities Kirk earned a degree in chemistry at the University of Utah in 2006.Project: University Oral History Project. Interviewer: Anne Peterson
2011
4
No. 653 Sidney Rudolph
Sidney Rudolph was born and raised in Reading, Pennsylvania until he was twelve. His family then moved to Dayton Beach, Florida, and back to Philadelphia after two years. Sidney talks about his high school experiences in Philadelphia. After high school, Sidney got his undergraduate in chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania. He then went on to do graduate studies in physics at the University of Michigan. After finishing at the University of Michigan he taught lower division physics and math classes at Northwestern Michigan College. He talks about working with a computer assisted instruction program. Sidney describes setting up lower division physics courses at the University of Utah as well as earning his PhD at the university. He also talks about his involvement with the ACCESS program and the American Association of Physics Teachers.Project: University Oral History Project. Interviewer: Anne Peterson
2011
5
No. 654 Christopher R. Johnson
Christopher Johnson (b. 1960) was born in Kansas City, Kansas. His father was in the Air Force so he and his family moved around a lot when he was young. He went to high school and did his undergraduate in Dayton, Ohio. Christopher then earned his master’s in physics and a PhD in biophysics and computing from the University of Utah. Before working at the University of Utah, he was a professor of physics at Westminster for four years. He describes several positions he held at the University of Utah. Christopher talks about his time working at Sperry Corporation. He describes his involvement with the ACCESS program at the University of Utah.In his second interview, Christopher talks about his time as a research assistant professor, assistant professor, and then associate chairman of the department of computer sciences at the University of Utah. He describes research projects he was involved in. Christopher explains interactive scientific visualization. He talks about his time as director of the Center for Scientific Computing and Imaging. He also worked for the Department of Energy. He talks about his involvement with the University of Utah’s school of computing. Christopher talks about the start-up he founded, Visual Influence.Project: University Oral History Project. Interviewer: Anne Peterson
2011
6
No. 655 Kirk Nichols
Kirk Nichols (b. 1956) was born in Salt Lake City, Utah. When he was growing up, Kirk would spend a week at his family’s ranch every summer. He talks about growing up in the Salt Lake Valley and the outdoor activities he did with his friends. He describes his experiences with the Boy Scouts as well as his experiences at school. Kirk worked as a guide on the Snake River and then later worked for the Teton Peaks Council. He describes the boats and paddling equipment he used. Kirk talks about getting involved with skiing in Utah. He worked at Brighton Touring Center while attending university.In his second interview, Kirk talks about his climbing experiences and his job as a climbing instructor. He describes his equipment and the climbing community and culture in Utah. Kirk also talks about ice climbing. After having his son, he became more cautious in his outdoor activities. Kirk talks about studying geography at the University of Utah. He took an instructor course from the National Outdoor Leadership School.Project: Outdoor Recreation Project. Interviewer: Erik Solberg
2011
7
No. 656 Sitela Muamoholeva
Sitela Muamoholeva (b. 1949) was born and raised in Neiafu in Vava’u, Tonga. She comes from a family of nine children. She talks about her elementary school and her experience at Liahona High School. After high school she went on a Mormon mission in Tonga. When she returned from her mission she attended BYU Hawaii. She talks about her and her family’s religious background. While going to school she worked at the Polynesian Cultural Center. She met her husband at BYU Hawaii. Sitela and her husband moved to Provo. They have four children.Project: Pacific Islander Oral History Project. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu
2008
8
No. 657 Molonai Muamoholeva
Molonai Muamoholeva(b. 1948) was born and raised in Mu’a, Tonga. He is the oldest of four children. He talks about growing up Mormon in Tonga. His grandfather and his family converted to Mormonism when the first Mormon missionaries visited Tonga. Molonai describes the schools he attended while growing up. He worked as a teacher’s assistant at Liahona after graduating high school and saved money to go to Hawaii and attend BYU Hawaii. He was the first of his family to move. While he was attending school he worked at the Polynesian Cultural Center.Project: Pacific Islander Oral History Project. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu
2008
9
No. 658 Justin Bancroft
Justin Bancroft (b. 1978) was born in Anaheim, California where he spent most of his childhood. His family moved to Utah in 1989. He never felt he was the best student in school and looked to the armed service as an option after school. Furthermore, he discusses his early respect for the armed forces. After meeting with several recruiters from different branches of the military, he decided to enlist in the U.S. Marine Reserves. Upon completion of boot camp he checked into Fox Company 2 / 23. He was able to serve an LDS Church mission and start a family before 9/11. Shortly after news broke of the attacks he was packing his equipment and getting ready for deployment. Though eager to start his service, it was mainly with the thought of getting it done and returning to his new family as soon as possible. His unit deployed as a quick reaction force in California for a period of about ten months. Most of this time he and his fellow Marines were filled with uncertainty and he recalls the monotony of drills, physical training, and classes. When he returned home, he felt it would not be long before he was deployed again. He was correct and in 2003 he was shipped overseas as a part of the 1st Marine Division in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.Justin’s unit arrived in Kuwait and the initial experience reminded him of his time in California except with sandstorms. When his unit finally crossed the border into Iraq he was scared to death but excited to get the job over with. He remembers seeing U.S. aircraft and tanks attacking buildings but the reality of war did not hit him until he started seeing the dead bodies. He talks about how there was no way to prepare himself mentally for the brutality of war. His unit was one of the first to enter Baghdad. Upon entering the city, he remembers feeling as if he was being attacked from every direction. Once the intense fighting subsided his unit needed to find ways to keep themselves entertained such as playing baseball. Justin’s journey back home went very smoothly. He was thanked by many people, had his meals paid for, got to march in a few parades, and most importantly was reunited with his family. However he feels that many Americans under-appreciate their freedoms and wishes that people would show more respect for their country.Project: Saving the Legacy. Interviewer: John Worsencroft
2009
10
No. 659 Nicholas Dutkiewicz
Nicholas Dutkiewicz(b. 1984) was born and raised primarily in Bristol, Connecticut. Despite not having any family history of service in the military, he was drawn to the military to fulfill his desire for service and to see the world. His mother convinced him to join the U.S. Army Reserves. He went to Fort Benning and Fort Gordon for basic training and the School of Infantry and quickly grew to like being in the Army. Later he did become dissatisfied with having joined the 405th combat support hospital in West Hartford, Connecticut instead of an infantry unit.In 2003 he was deployed with the 319th Signal Company and was stationed at Camp Bucca in Southern Iraq. Nicholas explains his experiences during this tour and the problems he faced. He ran patrol and guard missions and still felt like he wasn’t getting the combat experience he had desired. When he came back to the States, he decided to go on active duty. After he made the change, he was stationed in Fort Lewis, Washington with the 12th Stryker Calvary regiment. The regiment was originally going to go to Europe and work with NATO forces but instead it diverted to Iraq. Most of the soldiers in his unit were Iraq war veterans. His unit worked closely with helping put down factional resistance in Baghdad. Nicholas describes the various strategies that the US military took against the Mahdi army and the part his unit played in these strategies. On his way home he toured Europe and in 2009 he decided not to reenlist. In retrospect he feels he learned many important things in the military such as a sense of discipline, a good work ethic, both of which he is using now that he is going to school at the University of Utah.Project: Saving the Legacy. Interviewer: John Worsencroft
2009
11
No. 660 Duane A. Smith
Mr. Smith discusses his involvement with the Western History Association (WHA). He talks about some of the important founders of the organization and interesting personalities he’s associated with through the WHA. He relates how the program has evolved over the years. He talks about his personal research interests and his hopes for the future of WHA.Project: Western History Association. Interviewer: Greg Smoak
2011
12
No. 661 Jo Tice Bloom
Ms. Bloom talks about the history of and her involvement in the Western History Association (WHA), particularly the role and acceptance of women in the organization. She discusses the key people who were involved in the WHA and how their activities contribution to the development of the organization. She relates how her husband’s involvement in WHA leadership positions impacted her own involvement. Ms. Bloom notes changes in the WHA over the years and the impact of those changes on the association.Project: Western History Association. Interviewer: Greg Smoak
2011
13
No. 662 John Porter Bloom
Mr. Bloom talks about the history of and his involvement in the Western History Association (WHA). He discusses the founding of the organization, important individuals connected to the WHA and the annual meetings. Mr. Bloom served as secretary-treasurer and as president of the WHA, which he discusses. He details his educational training and experiences, as well as his work on the Territorial Papers of the US at the National Archives. Mr. Bloom relates the changes he’s observed in the WHA during the span of his involvement.Project: Western History Association. Interviewer: Greg Smoak
2011
14
No. 663 Edwin Brown Firmage
Mr. Firmage begins this series of interviews with a discussion of his family history and heritage. His grandfather started Firmage’s Department Store in Provo, Utah, which origins and organization he relates in detail. Firmage’s father also made his career in the store.Firmage discusses in depth his childhood, his roots and genealogy in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS), and his educational pursuits leading to and including the study of law.Throughout the interviews, Firmage discusses several controversial issues relating to the LDS Church, including polygamy; Church leadership; priesthood as it relates to blacks and women; succession of the Church president; ongoing animosities with Boyd K. Packer, a prominent LDS church leader; and his discussions with Church leadership regarding the Mountain Meadows Massacre.Through his scholarship and work in international, constitutional and human rights law, Firmage talks about his activist work representing the socially disenfranchised. He details his time spent working on Hubert Humphrey’s staff in Washington, DC, in the 1960’s; the Dalai Lama in Dharamsala in the 1980’s and 1990’s; as a Fulbright Professor in Russia; and on the reparation of families in Vietnam. He also explains his involvement in the MX Missile debate as part of his interest in nuclear weaponry and peaceful dispute resolution, and specifically his activities with the LDS Church in that work. He joined the faculty of the law school at the University of Utah, during which time he discusses his work and activities in defending First Amendment rights.Firmage talks about the development of two books he authored: Zion in the Courts: A Legal History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and To Chain the Dog of War.Firmage concludes by discussing his “…personal, religious and spiritual journey and lessons learned…” over his lifetime.Interviewer: Stan Larson
2010
15
No. 664 Rosemary Gray
Rosemary Gray was born in Tynemouth on the northeast corner of England. Her parents, who were avid bird watchers, spent a lot of time gardening and taking her and her brother out into the nature of northern England. This is where she developed a passion for science and nature. Rosemary’s family then moved to Cincinnati, Ohio when she was nine, then moved back to England for two years, then back to Cincinnati for two years, and then to Mexico City. She attended high school in Cincinnati and Mexico City. In Ohio she had a great biology teacher who facilitated her skills as a blossoming biologist.She earned her Master’s in biology at Texas A and M and went to the University of North Carolina to finish her PhD. She worked as a researcher and taught in a minority advancement program. After she had her first child, Rosemary decided she would be able to raise her daughter more easily if she were a teacher because research takes up so much time. She took a job at the University of Utah, and her family moved to Utah. She was hired to be the director of the Bioscience Undergraduate Research Program, but because of another teacher’s accident she was asked to teach biology for the ACCESS Program.The ACCESS Program is a seven week program during the summer designed to help gifted high school girls transition from high school to university. Rosemary loves being able to watch these students develop from high school through their first year of college. She’s able to give them advice about classes, careers, and help them decide what path they want to take.It’s important for Rosemary to help young women have access to scientific study because she believes there is less opportunity for women than for men. This has changed since she started, but there is still work to be done to allow young women more opportunity to have careers in the sciences. She feels she is doing her part to bring about that equality for women.Rosemary describes the details of the ACCESS Program – what the students do, the benefits it creates for their future, the networking and job opportunities it presents young women. It guides students through university and beyond: students learn to apply for jobs and how to write personal statements and resumes, etc. She provides examples of what students have researched and what they’ve gone on to do after taking part in the ACCESS Program.Project: University Oral History Project. Interviewer: Anne Peterson.
2011
16
No. 665 Iris Engstrand
Iris Engstrand discusses her involvement with the Western History Association. As a graduate student, she was involved in the conception of the organization. She talks about the many people she worked with at that time. Iris was one of the very few women working to develop the organization. She talks about her experiences as a woman historian and the other women she’s worked with throughout her career. She discusses the many roles she’s taken on as a part of the Western History Association, specifically her time as president of the organization.Project: Western History Association. Interviewer: Greg Smoak.
2012
17
No. 666 Seth Neily
Seth Neily(b. 1980) was driving past Pioneer Park in Salt Lake City and saw the tents set up. He stopped to ask about the Occupy movement, and after going home and researching it himself, decided to join the demonstration. His time in political science classes influenced his decision. Seth talks about the roles he’s taken on at Pioneer Park, which include site manager and police liaison. He talks about Occupy SLC’s relationship with the city. Seth talks about the differences between Occupy SLC and other Occupy movements.Project: Occupy Salt Lake. Interviewer: Erin Holcomb.
2011
18
No. 667 Brian Taylor
Brian Taylor(b. 1969) decided to join the Marine Corps when he was twenty-six years old because he wanted to do something more than sell houses. Brian talks about his recruitment and his training. He had a real estate career and would sell houses for the whole month and then go to drill weekend. He describes drill weekend.Brian talks about 9/11 and knowing he would be going to war because of the attacks. He was mobilized to a quick reaction force mission in California at Camp Pendleton. They had to be ready to respond to another attack and trained accordingly. Brian was stop-lossed and stayed beyond his enlistment date. He talks about setting an example for the Marines he lead and the relationship he had with the Marines in his company.His company was attached to the 1st Marine Expeditionary Force and mobilized to Iraq. While they were in Kuwait preparing to invade Iraq Brian’s wife gave birth. He talks about the formation of his fire team before they were deployed. He describes preparations for the invasion and the plan as he understood it, which was a race to Baghdad. He first saw fighting in An Nasiriyah. They arrived in Baghdad and patrolled on foot and were eventually involved in a firefight. After that they cleared the UN complex. The company then moved to Al Diwaniyah for several weeks where Brian felt he lost the energy he had had during battle. He describes his return to Camp Pendleton, reuniting with his family, and readjusting to civilian life back home.Project: Saving the Legacy. Interviewer: John C. Worsencroft
2012
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No. 668 Jonathan Toone
Jonathan talks about his decision to join the military. Jonathan considered joining the military after high school because his grandfather was a chaplain for the US Army in World War II, Vietnam and Korea, but he did not join until 2000. After earning his Associate’s degree in Japanese he joined the military as a counterintelligence agent in the National Guard. He talks about his basic training experience at Fort Leonard Wood in Missouri. Then Jonathan moved to Monterey, California with his new wife to learn Chinese at the Defense Language Institute. Jonathan was then moved to Fort Huachuca in Mesa, Arizona for counterintelligence school where he was the honor graduate and platoon leader.After counterintelligence school Jonathan and his wife and child moved back to Utah and Jonathan attended SLCC. Jonathan was then put on active duty and sent to Fort Carson in Colorado to prepare to be sent to Iraq. They were sent to Kuwait where they set up for about a month. He ended up in a place called Bushmaster about 90 miles from Baghdad. Jonathan describes his job monitoring HUMINT reports and doing country studies and city studies. He was also able to learn a bit of Arabic. His unit then moved to Anaconda Air Base in a place called Balad. Jonathan was then transferred to Mosul where he spent the rest of his time in Iraq interviewing locals for intelligence.Jonathan talks about returning home and transitioning back into his family life. In 2006 he volunteered to go to Louisiana and help the victims of Hurricane Katrina. He talks about the job they had and how they spent their down time. Then Jonathan did a month and a half stint for the military at Camp Zama in Tokyo doing translation. In January 2008 Jonathan was mobilized to go to Afghanistan. His job was to gather intelligence from people on the ground. He talks about training at Fort Lewis in Washington. Jonathan was finally deployed to Gardez, Afghanistan. Jonathan worked to set up a database for the intelligence they were gathering and helped train the others to interview the locals. He describes the conditions and working with other units.Jonathan and his wife found this deployment easier because they knew what to expect and were prepared. He got used to being away but missed having a civilian life and being with his family. He talks about transitioning back into life at home. He says he would do it all over again but admits he had a problem with the politicized aspects of the military.Project: Saving the Legacy. Interviewer: John C. Worsencroft
2010
20
No. 669 Joan Degiorgio
Joan Degiorgio was born in Ogden, Utah. She spent over two decades working as a natural resources planner in the private sector and for various state and federal agencies, including the Forest Service. She is currently the Northern Mountains Regional Director at the Nature Conservancy. Much of the interview deals with her experience working governmental and private sector agencies with regards to public lands, in particular those in the Uinta Basin and the surrounding area, and what shifts have occurred in the way agencies go about assessing public lands. Degiorgio is a plant specialist so her responses mainly concern the role of plants in the public’s perception and treatment of land and how they figure into legislation concerning public lands.Project: Utah Environmental. Interviewer: Desiree Beaudry.
2009
21
No. 670 Losaline Hafoka
Line mostly describes her home life growing up. Education was the most important thing to her parents and they instilled the same belief in their children. Her parents believed knowing English was extremely important and only spoke English, never Tongan, with each other and their kids. Line’s parents made her take piano lessons, even though she didn’t want to, because they believed that’s what girls do. They didn’t want her to go to the beach or to go out at night because traditionally Tongan girls don’t do these things. Line Hafoka was born and raised in Hawaii. Her family moved to Hawaii from Tonga when she was very young. Both her parents were going to school while they raised the children. They believed their children needed to do well in school and go on to college. Line wasn’t able to date and go out as much as she would have liked because her parents wanted her to focus on her studies instead. She did well and after high school moved to Utah to get a Masters degree in social work from BYU. Line is now married and has one child. She’s taking a break from school in order to stay home and raise her child while her husband goes to school.Project: Pacific Islander. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu.
2008
22
No. 671 Fatafehi Tuavao
Fatafehi Tuavao was born in Reno, Nevada, lives in Orem, Utah, and has three children. She’s Tongan and grew up in Tonga and Samoa, as well as Nevada. She grew up speaking Samoan and Tongan and talks about learning English. Fatafehi discusses her family’s culture and the traditions they kept. She talks about her experiences, and her parents’ experiences, with education. She also talks about her membership in the LDS church.Project: Pacific Islander. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu.
2008
23
No. 672 Eleni Toluta’u
Eleni Toluta’u is a senior at Kahuku High School in Laie, Hawaii. She plans to apply to college at BYU or another Utah school so she can be with her family. Eleni was born in Tonga and her family moved to Hawaii when she was two months old. She talks about growing up and living in Hawaii. Her father was an example of the Tongan culture for Eleni and her family. She talks about her experiences at Kahuku High School. Eleni discusses the role religion plays in her life as a member of the LDS church. She talks about her experiences and travels as a dancer.Project: Pacific Islander. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu.
2008
24
No. 673 Jeff Lowe
Legendary Utah-based climber Jeff Lowe talks about his experience and observations on the development of climbing gear. Lowe did not just observe major significant developments that pushed the sport further; he was an innovative and driving force behind them. From shoes to portaledges, and his first soft-shell jacket which changed everything for regulating body temperature, Lowe maintains that all along climbing and the desire to climb in new places remained the primary motivation to create new gear. Working with Lowe Alpine, Lowe Pro, Asolo, La Sportiva and Latok, Lowe mentions specific projects, other climbers like Chouinard, and particularly how he enjoyed working with his brother Greg over the years. Lowe recounts his early climbing instruction through family members, clubs and work with Colorado Outward Bound. Lowe began the International Alpine School, the American Mountain Guides Association, created climbing festivals and competitions, authored instructional books and videos and asserts the importance of teaching an appropriate attitude as well as technique. Lowe made several big mountain climbing films with his brother Greg and addressed any challenge. He became the father of ice-climbing at the Winter X Games by virtue of creating the first artificial ice wall for competition. Unable to find equally capable peers to climb with, Lowe eventually began to mentor and climb with some of the world’s most talented younger climbers like Alex Lowe and Catherine Destivelle. Lowe also gives his take on indoor climbing gyms and the real experience.Project: Outdoor Recreation. Interviewers: Matt Basso, Greg Thompson, John Worsencroft, Cheri Daily.
2009

Interviews, 674 – 701Return to Top

Container(s): Box 70

Container(s) Description Dates
box
70
Folder
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No. 674 Sean Forsgren
Sean Forsgren was born in Tremonton, Utah and grew up in Garland and Salt Lake City, Utah. Sean comes from a family that has a history of serving its community and country ranging from military service in Korea to municipal roles as firefighters and police officers. He describes his childhood in Utah as rough because of family, legal and community problems. Because of these difficulties he sought out his own sense of community in the Junior ROTC program at East High School. When he was a senior in high school he attained the position of Battalion Commander of East High’s ROTC battalion. In 1997 he decided to enlist in the Army National Guard. In November 1998 he left for basic training, and never looked back. During basic training, he was a squad leader based upon his credentials in ROTC. Headquarters Battery, 1st Corps Artillery was the unit he joined and he immediately felt at home. He felt that the military had helped to transform him into a fully capable man and he was very proud of it.When Sean returned to Utah in 1999 he didn’t have a job and didn’t know what to do with himself. For the next few years he began scavenging for any possible service opportunities he could undertake for the National Guard. During this time he did several counter-drug operations with the FBI and helped run the youth Camp Freedom at Camp Williams. Sean then joined two operations in Japan where he was able to learn about Japanese culture while making several new friends. Back in Utah for 9/11, Sean packed his bags in anticipation of being deployed. No call up was forthcoming so he began to educate himself more on recent events. During the next several years he tried to attend school at the University of Utah but was forced to withdraw from three semesters due to different military operations he became involved in. He was mobilized with the 222nd field artillery but the unit was not deployed. Eventually the commitment that the National Guard expected from him was too disruptive to his life and he ended his six and a half years in the Guard. He believes that his experience has opened many doors for him and has helped him to love his country more. Sean now works at Spy Hop Productions, working with and advising youths.Project: Saving the Legacy. Interviewer: John Worsencroft.
2010
2
No. 675 Lawrence Lopez
Lawrence (b. 1970) decided to join the military in order to pay for school. He enlisted in the Army to become a tanker after talking with a recruiter and watching a recruitment video. He describes his training, what a shock it was, and how much he liked firing the tank. From basic training he went to Fort Bliss in El Paso, Texas. In June 1990 he was deployed to Saudi Arabia for Desert Shield. He talks about the staging process in Kuwait. Lawrence then describes the push into Iraq and the little fighting he saw. He describes the cease fire and the process of going home. On the way out of Iraq their tank was in an accident and Lawrence injured his shoulder. After having his shoulder fixed he was separated from his unit and had to find his way back. He reunited with his unit and a week later they returned to Fort Bliss.He describes getting home and the big homecoming his family held for him. He had 30 days leave and then, after talking with the retention NCO, decided to stay in. While in training he had an accident in which he lost a quarter of his shin. Because of his injury he had to reenlist and became a supplier en route to Korea. After his enlistment in Korea Lawrence went to the Colorado National Guard where he did supply. He then transferred to the Utah National Guard where he became the NBC specialist. He was then deployed to Afghanistan where he was able to travel all over providing support to teams.Lawrence talks about his long career in the military. He does not regret anything in his military career and talks about what he wants to do in the future.Project: Saving the Legacy. Interviewer: John Worsencroft.
2010
3
No. 676 Howard Lamar
Howard Lamar(b. 1923), Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale and 1972 president of the Western History Association, remembers his career at Yale and involvement in the Western History Association, and shares his thoughts on the state of Western History and directions the Association might take. Dr. Lamar, a Southerner who went North to do Western history, mentored a number of the major voices in the field including William Cronon, Patricia Nelson Limerick, and Philip DeLoria. A friend of historian Ray Allen Billington, Lamar emphasizes Billington’s importance in giving Western history an aura of legitimacy in the East that it had previously lacked. Emphasizing the need to reach out to amateur historians and the public, he remembers his role as a mediator in the Association, especially between the older generation and the New Western History’s proponents.Project: Western History Association. Interviewer: Greg Smoak.
2012
4
No. 677 Robert M. Utley
Robert M. Utley (b. 1929), former Chief Historian of the National Park Service and a founder of the Western History Association, remembers the WHA’s founding and reflects on its subsequent evolution from an organization created as a bridge between academic historians and history buffs to a strongly academic group with a professional journal. Deprecating his role founding role by saying that he was chosen because he had no reputation to ruin, Utley recounts the organization’s genesis at Santa Fe in 1961, and its formal creation in Denver in 1962. He focuses on the interplay between the different founders, remembering the key role that famous Western historian Ray Allen Billington played, along with K. Ross Toole of the Museum of New Mexico and, later, John Caughey. Most early members, Utley recalls, were members of the Mississippi Valley Historical Association as well. He also emphasizes historian John Alexander Carroll’s major, but unsung, role in founding and maintaining the WHA in its early years. The split between academics and history buffs receives particular attention, as Utley relates the tribulations of the WHA’s journals. The interview also contains numerous anecdotes, including the memorable “Jesus” incident in Denver.Project: Western History Association. Interviewer: Greg Smoak.
2012
5
No. 678 Barry Wessler
Dr. Barry Wessler, a pillar of the telecommunications and supercomputing community, talks about his career in information technology. With a bachelor’s and a master’s degree from MIT, he worked for three years at ARPA, before coming to the University of Utah for his PhD in computer science. Dr. Wessler’s work at ARPA was in the Information Processing Techniques Office. After completing his degree at the University of Utah and creating the groundbreaking animated film “Not Just Reality,” he joined Telnet Communications Corporation. Dr. Wessler holds a patent in network base disc redundancy storage system and method, but deemphasizes the patent’s importance. He prefers to focus on the collegial atmosphere at the University of Utah and credits it with his success.Project: University of Utah Oral History Project. Interviewer: Anne P. Peterson.
2012
6
No. 679 Don Olsen
Don Olsen(b. 1930) was born in Bingham Canyon, Utah. His father was a miner in Bingham city until economic circumstances forced them to move in with his father’s parents in Axedale, Utah. There they raised vegetables and a cow. The mines reopened in nineteen thirty seven but his father couldn’t find a job there, so he found a job in Park City. His father was diagnosed with silicosis of the lung, so they moved back to Axedale and started a small farm.Don talks about growing up on the farm. His father wanted him to be a farmer but he wanted to go to school to study veterinary medicine. Don joined the Future Farmers of America and studied samples of milk from eight to fifteen cows for an FFA project. He became a state farmer and earned a scholarship to Utah State with his project. He started to breed cows artificially in his senior year of high school at Brigham Young University and when he got to Utah State he helped them do the same.He studied animal nutrition and chemistry at Utah State because he wanted to be a veterinarian and these would look best on his application to schools. He applied and was accepted at Colorado State’s veterinary school. Don talks about his studies at Colorado State where he was consistently top of his classes and lead study groups with the other students. He wanted to become a private practice veterinarian in Cache County, Utah helping cows so he had tunnel vision when it came to his veterinary studies at school. He did not care about learning how to treat cats and dogs. After Don graduated he and his family moved to Cache Valley and he set up a veterinary practice. Because large animal practice is so physically exhausting, Don stopped after five years. He contacted a former teacher who had advised him to go into research and asked if there were any research opportunities. There was one in Nevada and Don and his family moved to Reno so he could work at the University of Nevada, Reno. While there he started doing heart experiments with Doctor George Smith. He was asked to be vice president of research at University of Nevada’s two year medical school. Don wanted to get a PhD before doing that so he returned to Colorado State to do a post doctoral fellowship.Before he went on to work towards his PhD, Don did research on cardiovascular systems in calves. He studied the changes in the hearts of calves before and after they were just born. He also worked to install pacemakers in sheep. After three years of research, Don returned to Colorado State to earn his PhD. He had to take algebra and trigonometry courses at the University of Denver. Don talks about how difficult his physical chemistry course was. While putting together proposals for his dissertation Don starting running out of money so he decided to get a job instead of finishing his PhD. He got a job at the University of Utah with Doctor Kolff.Don helped with research and monitored surgeries on calves and sheep. His main goal there was to know more about a calf on an artificial heart than anybody else. After the surgeon was fired, Doctor Kolff hired Don as the surgeon for their research. They were implanting artificial hearts into calves. Don estimates he was implanting artificial hearts in about fifty five calves a year. He describes the facilities in which they did their surgical research at the University of Utah. When their building burned down, Don was in charge of finding a new building for research. After searching for a while, Don found the old Saint Marks Hospital and decided it would be perfect for their research.He talks about his work with the artificial heart. They found that calves were the perfect size to test artificial hearts on. Don talks about the controversy in naming the artificial hearts. He describes Doctor Jarvik as a doctor who did not do a single surgery and who was taking credit for a lot of work he did not do.Don discusses the year he spent in Germany. He was invited to Berlin to implant one of the artificial hearts developed in Utah into a calf, and then to implant one that the Germans had developed into a calf. Don figured out the mistake the Germans were making in surgery, fixed it, and his calves survived. While in Germany he was also invited to travel all over eastern Europe to help other researchers with their artificial heart research. He also came up with an idea for a more effective blood pump and started developing the idea.Project: University of Utah Oral History Project. Interviewer: Anne P. Peterson.
2012
7
No. 680 Melissa Moeinvaziri and Christopher Begue
Mr. Begue (b. 1960) was born just outside of New York City. His first climbing experience was in Chamonix, France when his au pair took him to the Pyrenees. He loved it and he knew he was good at it. Growing up his family also lived outside of Chicago, in North Carolina, Wisconsin and Minnesota. He sought out any way to pursue his passion for climbing. He moved to Colorado to go to school. There he found a community of climbers who taught him a lot about climbing. His family moved to Utah because his dad got a job there. He fell in love with the state because there are so many opportunities for outdoor recreation in any season. He describes the culture, the risks, and the etiquette and unspoken rules of climbing.Community is important to climbers and to Chris, an important aspect of climbing is mentoring, as well as learning from, other climbers. Melissa Moeinvaziri is one of the climbers Chris has taken under his wing.Ms. Moeinvaziri (b. 1989) grew up in Utah and has always loved the outdoors. Her parents often took her to southern Utah when she was younger, and in the winter her father would take her skiing so she developed her passion for the outdoors early in her life. She’s always loved climbing up things – trees, bookshelves – and she always wanted to try climbing. A friend suggested she start at Dick’s Sporting Goods in Salt Lake City. That’s where Melissa met Chris, who saw that she had a knack for climbing. She describes what it’s like being a newcomer to climbing, and getting help from Chris, who’s a veteran. Her first experience climbing outdoors was at night and Chris told her to lead. It was difficult but she learned a lot through Chris’s trial by fire method. Project: Outdoor Recreation. Interviewer: John Worsencroft.
2009
8
No. 681 Richard Normann
Richard Normann, professor of bioengineering at the University of Utah and former department chair, remembers his childhood, education, and his long career at the University of Utah. He pays particular attention to his background, and to his scientific accomplishments, most saliently the Utah Electrical Array.Born in Oakland, California, in 1943 to Danish parents, Normann first got into engineering helping his father repair the pinball machines that ensured the family’s livelihood. Normann focuses on his father’s background including his immigration to the United States, his education, and his rise to a prosperous walnut farmer, underpinned by a jukebox and pinball machine business.Normann’s own high school education left him ill-prepared for the rigors of the University of California at Berkeley, yet through hard work and odd jobs on the side he achieved a PhD in electrical engineering, as the field of bioengineering did not yet exist, despite his lack of interest in conventional electrical engineering. Time as a technician in the Berkeley physiology department shaped his interest in bioengineering. He details his odd jobs, including a stint at Crown Zellerbach paper company, and focuses on the powerful influence his thesis advisor, Frank Werblin, exerted on his career.Following his time at Berkeley, Normann completed a small postdoc at University of California at San Francisco medical school, and a stint as a staff fellow at the Bethesda, Maryland, National Institute of Health where he met his wife, distinguished retinal anatomist Helga Kolb, who moved with him to the University of Utah in 1979. He covers the development of the Utah Electrical Array, first tried in 1989, in great detail, including contributors, inspirations, and funding sources, and shares his thoughts on the artificial heart project and on the evolution of bioengineering both now and in the future. Normann also reflects on the Department of Bioengineering’s locational split between the Merrill Engineering Building and the biopolymers building near the Moran Eye Center.Normann spends some time covering his relaxed teaching style, emphasizing the professor’s reliance on good students to achieve success. He credits some of his good fortune with the fact that bioengineering is a growth industry with high student interest.A repeated theme throughout the interview is Normann’s emphasis on serendipity. As he remembers it, his career largely consisted of, besides hard work, being in the right place, at the right time, with the right students. He spends some time exploring his teaching career and salient students. The tireless Normann completed another doctorate, in education, at the University of London Institute of Education in 2009.Project: University of Utah Oral History Project. Interviewer: Anne Peterson.
2011
9
No. 682 Lindsay Tuaileva
Lindsay Tuaileva (b. 1988) has lived in Orem, Utah her whole life. Her father is Tongan and her mother is from Tooele, Utah. She has three brothers and four sisters. Her father moved to Hawaii to take advantage of better opportunities for work, and then later moved to California to go to college and play football. He met his wife at an LDS church gathering while in California and they moved to Utah together and got married.Growing up, Lindsay danced a lot. She did ballet, jazz, tap, hip-hop, modern, lyrical, and break dancing. Some of her brothers and sisters went to the same dance school. She decided to stop dancing because it was taking up so much of her time and she wanted to be with her friends more often. She started to play sports because she would be able to play with her friends more. She played volleyball, softball, and basketball.She worked at the mall at a Greek restaurant for a while. Then she worked for her dad at his carpet cleaning business with her brothers but the hours didn’t fit her school schedule. After that she worked at a boutique in the mall. Now she works for Vantage, which installs home security systems.Lindsay’s parents didn’t expose her or her siblings to the Tongan culture very much when they were growing up. It wasn’t until they moved to a Tongan LDS church that they became interested in the Tongan culture. Lindsay also spent a summer in Hawaii working for the Polynesian Culture Center, where she gained a greater appreciation for her ancestry. She does feel like an outsider in the Polynesian culture in Utah because she’s only half Tongan, and because most of the other Tongans know the customs and culture better than she does because they were born in Tonga.Right now she’s studying elementary education at UVU and hopes to teach in the future. The company she works for may let her train new employees so she’ll be able to use her teaching skills there. She’s also part of the Legacy dance group at UVU. She enjoys learning about her culture and sharing Polynesian culture with a wide audience.Lindsay concludes the interview by saying she feels blessed to be a part of both American and Tongan culture, and she wants to make a difference in both worlds. In the future, she wants to start a family, and she would like to raise her family in Utah.Project: Pacific Islanders. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu.
2008
10
No. 683 Gaylene Fale
Gaylene Fale (b. 1978) was born in Tamavua, Fiji. She was raised in Fiji but her ethnicity is Rotuman. She has a twin sister and two brothers. Gaylene and her sister moved to New Zealand to live with her uncle and attend high school. After high school they moved to Hawaii to attend university at BYU Hawaii. Gaylene and her sister wanted to go to universities in New Zealand but her mother insisted that they try BYU Hawaii. While there, Gaylene got a job as a Tahitian dancer at the Polynesian Culture Center. She was then recruited to dance with the promo team, a dance group that traveled the world dancing. With the promo team, Gaylene traveled to China, Japan, Korea, and other states in the US. Gaylene and her husband moved to Utah so he could attend law school at BYU.Gaylene discusses the differences between Fiji and Rotuma. Rotuma was placed under Fiji so that the British could more easily rule both. The cultures and languages are distinct though.She talks about going to school and growing up in Fiji. Gaylene and her sister weren’t very good at Rotuman dances and her mother made them take lessons. Her father committed suicide when she was four so her mother took care of the family. Gaylene’s mother told her children it was important to do well in school because if you didn’t do well in school, you wouldn’t do well later in life. There was no other option for Gaylene and her siblings but to go to college after high school.She talks about growing up as a twin, and the differences between her and her sister. Gaylene is more quiet and introverted, while her sister is very outgoing.At the end of the interview, Gaylene and her children sing a traditional Rotuman song. Rotumans sing this song at a Fara, which is always during Christmas and New Year’s. The youth and single adults in the community sneak into their neighbors’ yards at night and dance and sing this song, and the neighbors come out and throw powder and perfume on the singers.Project: Pacific Islanders. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu.
2008
11
No. 684 Charles Law
Charles Law, U.S. Air Force Chief Master Sergeant (retired), discusses his military service, with particular focus on his time as an atomic monitor during test shots on the Marshall Islands and at Camp Mercury, Nevada, in the 1950s, where he witnessed over forty atomic detonations. He describes the shots and decontamination procedures in detail, along with environmental contamination and hazards in Nevada and the Marshalls, and effects on himself, other military personnel and civilians. Mr. Law served thirty-one years in the Air Force before retiring with full disability due to cancer, and shares much of his time during the Korean War and in Australia as an aircraft mechanic, his primary military skill. He also describes his experience as ground crew for polar overflights, and discusses memorable airplane crashes he witnessed among other asides. He ends with a description of a U-2 spyplane flight and landing.Project: Utah Environmental Oral History Project. Interviewer: Jim Kichas.
2012
12
No. 685 Ted Major
Ted Major (b. 1920), born in Salt Lake City, remembers his long life, with an emphasis on skiing, his Teton Science School, and ecology. Born to a Mormon pioneer family with roots in Denmark, Major grew up skiing, particularly at Alta. A graduate of East High School in Salt Lake City, he was friends with Ginny Huidekoper, who had such a large impact on Jackson Hole skiing and belonged to Mr. Major’s Little Kandahar ski team. As early as 1934 he visited the Tetons to ski. Following his service as an officer in the U.S. Army’s 10th Mountain Division during World War II, he ranched in Wyoming, Idaho and Utah with his wife, whom he met in 1938. The Majors even built a ski lift at the White Pine ski resort near Pinedale, Wyoming. After receiving a master’s degree in science teaching from the University of Utah, Mr. Major taught school in Alaska for two years during the Rampart Dam controversy, and then, in 1967, founded the Teton Science School. With Terry Tempest Williams, he co-authored The Secret Language of Snow. His interview recalls the TSS in great detail, and focuses as well on early skiing. Mr. Major knew many of the early Rocky Mountain skiing greats such as Alf Engen. He also describes early ski equipment. A substantial portion of the interview addresses Mr. Major’s brother Jack, an ecologist at the University of California-Davis and his strong ally in the TSS. Mr. Major’s interview is informed by his strong environmental sensibility but contains substantial information on his personal and family life, including his family’s struggle with cystic fibrosis.Project: Utah Environmental Oral History Project. Interviewer: Anne Peterson
2012
13
No. 686 Bill Conrod
Bill Conrod, born in Germany in 1948 to an American soldier and his family, grew up in Salt Lake City. He began skiing at an early age, and toured with the Wasatch Mountain Club. He spent his youth climbing and skiing, and pursued a career with the National Park Service. He was also a president of the Ute Alpine Club at the University of Utah. Conrod first discusses skiing methods and equipment, and backcountry skiing in Utah. But his real focus is rock climbing, in Utah and in the Tetons. He remembers the absence of climbing gyms along with the more easygoing, less competitive nature of climbing in the 1960s. He ties the old method of climbing to the milieu of the 1960s, and equates it to a young man’s game that older men would move past. The Vietnam War and the draft strongly affected Conrod and the climbing culture by taking young men out of the climbing pool during their prime years. Conrod avoided the draft by attending the University of Utah and later receiving a high draft number.At twenty-one, in 1969, after years of climbing in the Tetons, Conrod began working as a climbing ranger in Grand Teton National Park. He mentions a number of other people working there at the time, and recalls that in perhaps 1970, the culture began to shift toward a serious climbing and outdoor lifestyle that rejected a conventional career. Conrod did some of both, becoming a biologist in 1972. He spent time in Nepal climbing with Arlene Blum, who he discusses briefly. In 1974 Conrod returned to the Park Service at Grand Teton National Park. He remembers that Salt Lakers were serious climbers in the Tetons. He also discusses the ill-fitting cultures of climbing and the old law enforcement-oriented Park Service, which allowed him to get a job as there were few other qualified candidates. Conrod met his wife, a summer Park employee, at Grand Teton. His Park Service career culminated in his retirement from White Sands National Monument in 2005.Though there are numerous asides, the bulk of the interview addresses climbing, from the draft’s impact on climbers, to climbing footwear, to the physical experience of climbing. He relates climbs to the Cirque of the Towers, Pingora and other destinations in Utah, Wyoming and California. His early mentors were his brother Charlie, and Charles Leslie of the Ute Alpine Club, and especially Dave Allen of the Wasatch Mountain Club, who also taught him how to write an excellent cover letter. Conrod’s experience as a climbing ranger in the Tetons sobered him, and took some of the fun out of climbing, but he remembers having excellent supervisors. His last reminiscences focus on the Ute Mountain Club, and its strong fraternal bonds, naming a number of members and officers.Project: Outdoor Recreation. Interviewer: John Worsencroft.
2009
14
No. 687 Drew Bedford
Drew Bedford was born on August 2, 1964 in Toronto, Ontario, but grew up in Seattle, New Jersey, and upstate New York before his family settled in Charlottesville, Virginia during his teen years. Drew skied throughout his childhood before discovering a passion for climbing when he was thirteen years old. Throughout his high school years in Virginia, Drew climbed as much as possible, despite a relative shortage of quality crags in the Southeast. He moved to Utah in the fall of 1982, enrolling at the University of Utah, and developed his climbing under the tutelage of Les Ellison, Brian Smoot, and Bret and Stuart Ruckman, among others. With routes in traditional climbing, Drew describes the growing pains involved as sport climbing and rappel-bolting entered the scene in the mid- to late-80s. He shares some of his more memorable first ascents, including the first route he put up in Ferguson Canyon and the first free ascent of the Monkey Finger Wall in Zion National Park. He also identifies the lasting influence of a number of climbers from his generation.Project: Outdoor Recreation. Interviewer: Matt Driscoll.
2010
15
No. 688 Stacey Allen
Stacey Allen runs the kitchen for Occupy Salt Lake. She is not politically involved with the protests. She got involved as a volunteer because she was living at Pioneer Park with her husband and saw that they needed help with the kitchen. Because she has experience working in kitchens she decided to take over. The protest has a lot of support from local businesses who donate food, tents, blankets, and supplies. Local people are also donating supplies as well as volunteering and protesting. Because they don’t have electricity or water much of the food must be cooked away from the park and brought back. The police and government have been supportive. People from other Occupy protests across the country come to help and swap stories.Project: Occupy Salt Lake City. Interviewer: Jennifer Meredith.
2011
16
No. 689 Jesse Fruhwirth
Jesse Fruhwirth, a journalist, activist, and prominent member of the Occupy Salt Lake City movement, shares his memories of the early period, the occupation of Pioneer Park and the subsequent police raid. Mr. Fruhwirth’s comprehensive interview begins with his background as an activist, liberal son of Republican parents in North Dakota, who became increasingly disillusioned with the American political establishment. After moving to Salt Lake City to be near family, he spent time as a journalist, particularly for Salt Lake City Weekly. Mr. Fruhwirth’s interview is a blend of narrative, covering Occupy Salt Lake from his involvement beginning in the movement second week and culminating in the raid on Pioneer Park, and of philosophical and political commentary on the movement in particular and on American society as a whole. He discusses the Occupy movement’s lack of unity and what he sees as a tension between cautious and more intense participants. The interview focuses especially on the movement’s relationship with the Salt Lake City government and police. Along with eighteen others, Mr. Fruhwirth was arrested during the police raid on Pioneer Park, after participating in a symbolic tent setup. He discusses such disparate angles to the movement as the mission’s perceived vagueness, connection between Salt Lake Occupiers and other Occupy movements, and its relationship with the Salt Lake homeless population.Project: Occupy Salt Lake City. Interviewer: Erin Halcomb.
2011
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No. 690 Kimberly Kasey
Kimberly Kasey was born in 1970 at Walson Army Hospital in New Jersey, and moved to Utah as a child when her grandfather took an assignment as a contractor for the Air Force. Kimberly became involved with the Occupy Salt Lake movement, taking part in marches and rallies. After Pioneer Park was closed to the movement, Kimberly became a liaison between Occupy Salt Lake and Occupy Ogden. She describes the excitement involved in starting the Occupy Ogden movement from the ground-up and also speaks to the logistics of the small Ogden camp, as of the date of the interview located on the front lawn of the Universalist Unitarian Church. She summarizes her issues of concern relative to the Occupy movement, which include: corruption in the government and monopolization of economic sectors. Kimberly also traces the intersection of the homeless population, and other disenfranchised groups, and their involvement or lack of involvement with the movement.Project: Occupy Salt Lake City. Interviewer: Erin Halcomb.
2011
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No. 691 Ryan Pleune
Ryan Pleune talks about when he first decided to become politically active. He describes his involvement with the Occupy Salt Lake City movement and the Occupy camp that was set up in Pioneer Park. Ryan also talks about his work for the Move to Amend movement.Project: Occupy Salt Lake City. Interviewer: Anna Thompson.
2012
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No. 692 Seth Walker
Seth Walker, a traveling poet and activist, traveled from Michigan to join the Occupy Salt Lake City movement and is currently part of the Federal Reserve front. Though he has spent a number of years on the road, Seth views Salt Lake City as a sort of home. He speaks to the diversity of tactics of the protesters and the consensus model practiced by Occupiers at the Fed. More importantly, Seth shares abstract philosophical commentary on his personal ideals and how they influence his current activism. The concrete political issues that concern him as a participant in the Occupy movement are corporate personhood and lobbying practices, which in his view indicate a moral decline in the American political and global economic systems.Project: Western History Association. Interviewer: Michael McClane.
2011
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No. 693 Sarina Brown
Sarina Brown grew up in Hawaii. Her family moved to Oregon when she was in ninth grade and she now lives in Utah with her husband and four boys. She describes growing up in Hawaii where her family lived two miles from civilization. When her family moved to Oregon she experienced culture shock because it was so different from Hawaii. Sarina has six sisters and seven brothers. She talks about growing up in a huge family. Her father was a teacher and the family struggled financially because there were so many children to support. The whole family played music together. Sarina explains the cultural differences between herself as a child and her children. She talks about her membership in the LDS church and her parents’ conversions to the LDS church. She discusses being Polynesian in Oregon and in Utah. Though she has not felt discriminated against she has felt different because of her ethnicity. She has liked living and Utah and thinks they will be in Utah for a while.Project: Pacific Islanders. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu.
2009
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No. 694 Anne Butler
Emeritus professor of history at Utah State University, Anne Butler, remembers her academic career with emphasis on her membership in the Western Historical Association and her time as editor of the WHA’s organ the Western Historical Quarterly. Raised in Massachusetts, Dr. Butler discovered her love of the West and Western history in childhood, and, as a single mother of two in the 1960s, embarked on a college career that started at Towson State University and led her to a PhD at the University of Maryland. She worked closely with Walter Rundell and Richard Farrell at Maryland, and throughout the interview discusses Rundell’s scholarship, his manner with students, and his work in the WHA. Dr. Rundell was responsible for Dr. Butler’s own entry into the WHA, and she gave her first paper at the San Diego conference in 1979. She replaced Chaz Peterson at Utah State University in 1988 with Clyde Milner’s encouragement, and indeed credits him with making her academic experience and her entire time in Logan until his departure wonderful. Dr. Butler retired from USU to give David Lewis room to grow as editor, but also because Dr. Milner had already left. Her work for the WHQ spanned fourteen years, and she professionalized the establishment as well as gearing the journal up for online access and publication. She remembers the WHQ being the only small journal to join History Co-op at first, alongside the bigger names. Dr. Butler also made a concerted effort at the WHQ to reach out to Hispanic and women scholars. She mentions the journal’s emphasis on cutting-edge research and notes the rise of graduate students’ work in the publication. She mentions a number of fine graduate students the WHQ sponsored with fellowships, and discusses the process. In 2012 Dr. Butler received the WHA’s Award of Merit.Project: Western History Association. Interviewer: Greg Smoak
2012
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No. 695 Skylar Church
Skylar Church, activist son of an understanding but hardly radical family, discusses the Occupy Salt Lake City movement. He recalls that the movement grew enormously following the creation of an Occupy Salt Lake Facebook forum, reporting that the movement grew by five thousand people in one day. His interview especially stresses the harmonious aspect of the movement, and he discusses the Occupiers’ democratic organizational structure, equating Occupiers with LDS missionaries, as ambassadors of their movement. He talks about the Occupiers’ attempts to educate themselves and the homeless people they shared Pioneer Park with, down to having an “Ask an Occupier” booth for the public. As a self-described public relations man, his attention is very much on the way the community interacted with the Occupiers, and he mentions Seth Walker and Seth Neeley as key public relations men for the movement. Mr. Church’s view of the Occupy movement’s roots and growth in Utah is closely tied to Utah history—he asserts that Utah was, in a sense, founded by activists, and believes its squatter’s rights provision protected the occupiers, though he expresses hopes that the LDS Church might play a major supporting role in the future. He touches briefly on education and immigration as national themes as well, and mentions the movement’s cross-state nature as some Salt Lake City Occupiers came from Portland and other cities.Project: Occupy Salt Lake. Interviewer: Michael McLane
2011
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No. 696 Peter Corroon
Mr. Corroon (b. 1965) was born in New York City, grew up in Long Island and later Connecticut. He describes his family. He graduated from Carnegie Mellon University, where he studied civil engineering. He studied real estate development and investment at New York University and received his master’s degree there. He later graduated from law school in San Francisco. He describes his employment and activities during this time. Mr. Corroon moved to Utah and began practicing law. He later started a real estate development firm with his brother. During this time, he married, completed a fellowship in Washington, D.C., and moved back to the Salt Lake Avenues. Mr. Corroon ran for a seat on the local Avenues Community Council but was defeated. Shortly thereafter he was recruited to run for Salt Lake County mayor and was elected in 2004, defeating Ellis Ivory, and replacing Nancy Workman. He talks about that election and the conditions under which he assumed office.Mr. Corroon served as County Mayor for eight years. Using his annual State of the County addresses as the basis for this discussion, he details the priorities for and achievements of the county during his tenure. These topics include broad issues surrounding public safety, corrections, transportation, environment and water, development, diversity, health, services to the people of the county, incorporation issues, arts, and county governance, among others. He talks about his relationships with other government bodies, officials and entities, as well as working with individuals and a variety of groups and organizations. Mayor Corroon ran for governor in 2010 and was defeated by Gary Herbert. He relates the events of the campaign and talks about his observations of election activities. He concluded his term of office in 2012, having previously declared his intention not to run for a third term. He talks about changes in the county during his tenure and the accomplishments of his team.Project: Mayors Project. Interviewer: Becky Lloyd.
2012
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No. 697 Gale Dick
Gale Dick (b. 1926), former professor of physics at the University of Utah, talks about the history of Salt Lake area activist group Save Our Canyons, which he has been involved with since its inception. Born and raised in Oregon, he served two years in the Navy at the end of World War II and afterward attended Reed College in Portland, Oregon, where he fell in love with the mountains and embarked on his career and his avocation. Professor Dick remembers the academic climate following World War II, when students were particularly eager to learn and also began skiing and mountaineering in earnest. He chronicles his self-described love affair with mountains from its start in Oregon, to the Alps while he studied abroad, to Wyoming, and at last, to Utah, where he took a job in the University of Utah’s physics department in 1959. Professor Dick spends a substantial amount of time discussing the mechanics of leadership in Save Our Canyons, and discusses the group’s efforts since the 1970s to combat both the spread of development in the Wasatch Mountains and the exclusivization of wilderness. He remembers working with Floyd Sweat, Alexis Kelner, and Cal Giddings, all key players in Save Our Canyons, among others.Project: Environmentalism. Interviewer: Gavin Noyes.
2009
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No. 698 Steve Erickson
Mr. Erickson was born on February 28, 1953 in Libertyville, Illinois. He discusses his early life including memories of the Cuban Missile Crisis and the assassination of John F. Kennedy. He discusses his activism as a student at Columbia during the Vietnam years and his eventual move to Salt Lake City. Describing himself as a “gunslinger for peace” he sees the most pressing issues of the world today as those surrounding war and peace. He became active in opposing the MX missile plan, founded the Citizens Education Project, and foresees future work lobbying for a test ban treaty in the Utah Legislature. Mr. Erickson has also done previous work in oral history; creating a special archive, the Steven G. Erickson Archive at the American West Center at the University of Utah, relating to the nuclear past.Project: Nuclear Technology. Interviewer: Samantha Senda-Cook.
2009
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No. 699 Ipo Hemaloto
Ipo Hemaloto (b. 1968), daughter of a Samoan man and a Japanese, Hawaiian and German mother, grew up in American Samoa. Her father was a lawyer, and her mother, a teacher and ultimately a PhD in history. Her family is Mormon; she believes her grandparents on both sides were converted. Her parents met at BYU-Hawaii. Ms. Hemaloto remembers growing up somewhat better off than her fellows, perhaps because her mother was from Hawaii and expected certain American amenities, she thinks. Ms. Hemaloto remembers growing up speaking English and associating with the few other English-speaking children at school, a separate and, in hindsight, somewhat envied social group. Her father suffered discrimination in the US due to his accent and did not want his children, for whom he and their mother had high educational expectations, to suffer also. Ms. Hemaloto, one of eleven children, moved to Utah with her family when she was in junior high and finished high school at Jordan High in Sandy. She recalls some racism, and remembers being thought of as too white in Samoa and black in Utah. However, she focuses on her father’s negative experience more than her own. She married briefly, returned to Samoa for a time, and then, regarding Hawaii as a second home, attended college at BYU-Hawaii and took a degree in English. She met her Tongan husband Sepho there, and at the time of the interview had six children with him, lived in Orem and attended Utah Valley University. Ms. Hemaloto misses Samoa terribly, and hoped at the time of the interview to shortly return to Samoa with a nursing degree.Project: Pacific Islanders. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu.
2009
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No. 700 Sarah Hendrickson
US Ski Team jumper Sarah Hendrickson (b. 1994) grew up in Park City, Utah. She was inspired by the 2002 Winter Olympics, and started jumping at Canyons Resort near Park City because Park City was full for the Olympics. She describes her routine, her life growing up and finally switching from public school to the Winter Sports School, and competition. She won a World Junior Championships bronze medal in 2010, and won a World Cup as well. Ms. Hendrickson describes the supportive atmosphere that helped her succeed, and credits her brother, a Nordic combined skier, for his support as well as women’s ski jumping pioneer Lindsey Van for inspiration. She also discusses the struggle to get women’s ski jumping recognized as an Olympic sport, but was too young to be closely involved in it. At the time of the interview Ms. Hendrickson had plans for college, and was interested in medicine, but she loves ski jumping. Her interview also discusses the training regimen, the equipment she uses, and her mindset when jumping.Project: Outdoor Recreation. Interviewer: Erin Halcomb.
2012
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No. 701 Tuailoto Ioane, Jr.
Tuailoto Ioane, Jr., was born in Virginia, spent his first five years in Panama, and then grew up in Virginia, following his father’s military career. The only boy in a three-child family, he was the son of a Samoan man and a Canadian or Vermont woman. He joined the LDS Church in his teens, and spends some time discussing his and his family’s conversion and their relationship to the Church and religion in general. He remembers no particular discrimination in Virginia, just having to spell his name a lot. When he graduated high school, Mr. Ioane served a mission to Guatemala, which he remembers as a tremendous experience. He moved out to Utah shortly after coming home, seeking a closer tie to the Church, an education, and a little more independence. He attended Utah Valley State College, transferred to BYU, and received a degree in communications, advertising and marketing. He soon followed with a master’s degree in public administration, and now works for LDS Philanthropies. He speaks at some length about his family relationships, his parents’ desire for their children to get an education, and discusses his father’s separation from Samoan culture but recognizes that despite the fact that he never learned Samoan, certain aspects of the culture stayed with his family such as firm discipline. Mr. Ioane also discusses the cultural phenomenon of fa’asamoa. He wishes he had grown up with more Samoan culture, and wishes to pass it onto his children.Project: Pacific Islander. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu.
2008

Interviews, 702 – 727Return to Top

Container(s): Box 71

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No. 702 Janet Kotra
Janet Kotra (b. 1955) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission discusses the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste disposal site. A scientist with a PhD from the University of Maryland, Dr. Kotra was born in Tacoma Park, Maryland, and aside from living in Hawaii as a young woman and while pursuing her bachelor’s degree, has lived in the DC area for much of her life. Dr. Kotra’s interest in public policy and abiding sense of justice took her to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, where she spent her entire PhD career. Her husband is Indian, and his uncle was involved with the Indian independence movement, and Dr. Kotra feels particularly close to the ideals MK Gandhi espoused. Most of the interview deals with the function and history of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the independent watchdog arm of the federal nuclear establishment. She explores the relationship between the development arm, the Department of Energy, and her own regulatory body, and its roots in the Atomic Energy Commission. The interview spells out in great detail the NRC’s duties, moral compass as Dr. Kotra sees it, and the commission’s commitment to working with stakeholders, including Native American tribal governments, whether on the Yucca Mountain project or others.Project: Nuclear Technology. Interviewer: Danielle Endres
2008
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No. 703 Clyde Milner
Clyde Milner, longtime editor of the Western Historical Quarterly and professor of history at Utah State University and then Arkansas State University, remembers his career and his time at the WHQ. Professor Milner started at Duke University in religious studies, received a PhD in American Studies from Yale, and worked with famous Western historian Howard Lamar. Hired before he completed his degree, he taught at Utah State University for a quarter-century. When he became part of the WHQ editorial staff he also became active in the Western History Association, the journal’s parent organization, and received its Award of Merit in 2012. Professor Milner also explains the WHQ’s shift to keep pace with trends in scholarship, particularly the New Western History. He attributes much of the journal’s success in the New Western era to Charles Peterson, and talks at some length on the politics of WHQ editorship and teaching at Utah State in general, as well as dwelling on the perceived influence of Howard Lamar’s students in Western history.Project: Western History Association. Interviewer: Gregory C. Thompson and Greg Smoak
2012
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No. 704 Gustav L. Seligmann
Gustav L. Seligmann, professor of history at University of North Texas and a lifetime member of the Western History Association, remembers his career and relationship with the WHA. A military brat, he attended school in Bremerhaven, Germany, Virginia, Oklahoma, and the New Mexico Military Institute. Dr. Seligmann’s family came to new Mexico in the 1850s and he remembers his father describing a scene when he was a boy, when Sheriff Pat Garrett was brought into town dead in the back of a wagon. However, he had little interest in Western history at the time, and even now claims he teaches history of political parties instead. He was recruited into a program at White Sands Missile Range out of high school, and soon revised his family’s aim that he be a West Point graduate and a civil engineer by taking a history degree at New Mexico A and M and an ROTC commission instead. He credits his high school teacher in Germany, a Mr. Warren, and New Mexico historian Ira Clark with turning him toward history, which he loves. Indeed, Dr. Seligmann speaks highly of both Dr. Clark and his scholarship. A guided missile officer at Fort Bliss, he also became friends with Western historian John Porter Bloom, who taught in El Paso. He earned an MA in history at New Mexico A and M in one year with Ira Clark and Burl Noggle, then left the Army and pursued a PhD under Jack Carroll and Russell Ewing at the University of Arizona, receiving his degree in 1967.Dr. Seligmann remembers the first WHA conference in Santa Fe vividly, and relates both a lurid story and his amazement at meeting so many professors whose names he had encountered in bibliographies. He shares his views on Jack Carroll, whom he describes as a “polarizing figure” but nonetheless gives great credit for helping found the WHA. Dr. Seligmann was also active in the WHA’s administration, serving during the early 1980s on the site selection committee for future meetings. He observes that conferences must be held in large venues due to the organization’s size, though that means shutting out some significant but smaller Western venues. A founder of H-Net, he speaks at some length on its value as an online sounding board for the WHA and Western history issues in general.On his own approach to history, Dr. Seligmann sees himself as a New Mexico historian working in a larger region and nation. He comments on the increased professionalization, atomization and political bent of the WHA and bemoans its evident loss of touch with the “buffs,” amateur historians he feels add color to the program. He emphasizes historians’ need to relate to ordinary people rather than a solely academic audience.Project: Western History Association. Interviewer: Greg Smoak
2012
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No. 705 Edward Swift
Edward Swift was born in Massachusetts on June 1, 1960, but currently resides in coastal Oregon. Following the tragic passing of his wife Renee, Edward traveled to Massachusetts to spend time with his sister. On his way back to Oregon, he stopped in New York City to learn about Occupy Wall Street. He became involved in the movement, and continuing his trip westward, he visited Occupy encampments in Saint Louis, Chicago, and Denver. Edward has been involved in Occupy Salt Lake City from its early moments and considers the Salt Lake protest and encampment to be a model for the overall movement due to the cooperation among protesters as well as the cooperation between protesters and the larger Salt Lake community. More than anything else, Edward praises the spirit of the movement and the ideals of togetherness and unity.Project: Occupy Salt Lake City. Interviewer: Erin Halcomb
2011
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No. 706 Amy Tolutau
Amy Tolutau, daughter of a Hawaiian and Filipino man and a white woman from Alaska, was born in Arizona and grew up in a small town, Wickenburg. The youngest of seven children, she remembers being the only Polynesian family in town, a matter of some novelty in a town whose ethnic makeup was almost exclusively Hispanic and white. Her father's family did not approve of his marriage, and Ms. Tolutau grew up far from Hawaii and Polynesian influence. She describes her father, who initially shunned all things from his previous life, gradually returning to some of his Pacific roots, but only later in her childhood. He was in Vietnam, but never speaks of it. After high school Ms. Tolutau attended BYU-Hawaii, and later married a Polynesian man. At the time of the interview she had two children, lived in Orem, Utah, and was attending Utah Valley University. She remembers her childhood in some detail, and describes her mother, an educator, and her possibly exaggerated tales of Alaskan life. The interview explores domestic roles and family life, including a strong expectation on her parents’ part that the children would attend college, somewhat of an anomaly in Wickenburg. Ms. Tolutau also discusses her position as a Polynesian person raised outside that culture and her relationship with it.Project: Pacific Islanders. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu
2008
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No. 707 Jennifer Viereck
Jennifer Viereck was born in Plymouth, New Hampshire in 1952. Shortly after her birth she moved with her parents to southern Alaska where she spent her early years. Viereck discusses the ethical, moral and cultural impacts that correspondence with her “name father” John Olaranna (same as her middle name) had on her as he taught her to be a “good Inupiat” in his letters. Based on that background she describes her history and general relationship to nuclear issues. Labeling herself as a jack-of-all-trades, specifically an administrative consultant for non-profits and small businesses, Viereck tells how her early work on native sovereignty issues evolved into a position wherein she helped organizations illuminate and overcome cultural barriers between native and non-native communities. Working closely with Shoshone leader and nuclear activist Corbin Harney her focus gravitated to nuclear issues surrounding Yucca Mountain. True to her early Inupiat ties as well as Shoshone spiritual practices, Viereck describes a vision for nuclear waste siting that considers life forms other than humans and focuses on changing people first to eventually change the world (specifically in her work with HOME). She also discusses her focus on scientific data, including water testing near Yucca Mountain. Included are some tips for encouraging young people to become involved in anti-nuclear activism. The interview concludes as Viereck describes how her work is largely turning toward educating people about the potential harm of exposure to radiation in medical tests. Project: Nuclear Technology. Interviewer: Danielle Endres
2009
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No. 708 John Gregory Francis
Mr. Francis (b. 1943) was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on July 10. He discusses his growing up years in Sacramento, California, as well as his educational experiences. He received his undergraduate degree from Stanford University and a doctorate from University of Michigan, with post graduate work at the University of Essex and Oxford. He discusses his educational experiences and influences. Mr. Francis joined the University of Utah faculty in 1974. He relates his teaching experiences and movement into administrative responsibilities, including president of the academic senate, associate vice president, dean of undergraduate studies, and finally Senior Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs. During this interview Mr. Francis discusses the challenges and opportunities he faced in his career, including, academic dishonesty and establishing an honor code; internationalization opportunities and programs; enrollment management; course and faculty evaluations; the value of education at a research institution; admission standards; student engagement; and faculty governance.Project: University of Utah Oral History. Interviewer: Anne Peterson
2011
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No. 709 Crystal Hafoka
Crystal Hafoka was born in 1987 in Frankfurt, Germany. Her father was German-Hungarian and her mother is of Maori and Tahitian descent. Both her parents were in the military so Crystal and her siblings were raised in both Germany and Hawaii. Crystal has maintained a close connection to her South Pacific heritage through dance and she has performed all over the U.S. and internationally with troupes from the Polynesian Cultural Center in Laie, Hawaii. She is a fourth generation member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Crystal currently attends Brigham Young University with her husband, Spencer Hafoka. Project: Pacific Islanders. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu
2009
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No. 710 Tevita Hafoka
Tevita Hafoka (b. 1965) was raised by his aunt and uncle in Tonga. He grew up all over Tonga. When he was a teenager his family moved to Hawaii to take advantage of better opportunities there. Tevita describes what it was like to arrive in Hawaii. He lived in Maui because his brother-in-law had a business there. Tevita then moved to Texas to live with his sister. A job opportunity came up in San Diego and he took it. He moved to San Diego on his own. His wife and six kids moved to Burley, Idaho to live with their grandparents. Tevita wanted to live with his family again and his family wanted to live in Burley so he looked for jobs there. He couldn’t find jobs there so he started looking in Utah. He found a job and moved his family to Herriman, Utah. Tevita now lives in Orem, Utah and works in American Fork, Utah. Tevita describes his family life and talks about growing up with his aunt and uncle rather than his mother and father. He grew up with a lot of cousins around. Tevita considered his cousins his siblings. He worked instead of going to high school. He did yard work and worked in restaurants. Eventually he studied to become an electrician and has worked as an electrician ever since. Tevita talks about school. He ran away from one school because he experienced so much physical abuse. He discusses his difficulty learning English as a second language. He has struggled with it his whole life. He discusses the aspects of Tongan culture that he remembers growing up with. Respect was the most important thing. Tevita talks about the importance of respecting women and respecting elders. He talks about his religious background. His aunt raised them in the Tongan Free Church but she also had Mormon missionaries over for meals often. Tevita eventually decided to get baptized to please his aunt. He went to both the Mormon and Free Tongan churches but he became more and more active in the Mormon church as he started to attend church functions. Tevita discusses the importance of the Mormon church in his life now.Project: Pacific Islanders. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu
2008
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No. 711 Karalyn Henderson
Karalyn Henderson (b. 1983), of Honaunau, Hawaii, was born at LDS Hospital in Salt Lake City. Her mother is Hawaiian and Filipino, and her father German and Tongan. Her parents met at Sea World, where they both worked, married, and her mother, raised Catholic, soon converted to her father’s Mormonism. Ms. Henderson spent most of her childhood in Utah, until her family briefly moved to California to help her father’s old band, the Jets, get together. After only a short stay she moved to Hawaii because her grandfather was dying. She remembers being a tomboy as a child, and relates a story her mother told her, that her grandfather blessed her before she was born and told her mother she would have a boy. She loved moving to Hawaii, and felt much more at home there. Ms. Henderson relates having some trouble reconciling her religious and cultural identity, but feels that thanks to an LDS mission she went on (because she didn’t feel it was fair to require boys but not girls to go on missions) she understands herself much more completely than before. She attended BYU in Provo, Utah, because, as she relates, since the seventh grade she has wanted to make movies and BYU-Hawaii had no film program. However, Ms. Henderson is far more comfortable in Hawaii, wants to help Hawaiians patriotically, and soon returned to Hawaii. She discusses her parents’ lives, her family relations, and her sense of ethnic otherness at some length. Her future goals are to make films, have a family, and most of all, be happy in the gospel and helping Hawaiians.Project: Pacific Islanders. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu
2008
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No. 712 Robert “Lono” Ikuwa
Robert Ikuwa (b. 1977) was born in Honolulu, Oahu. He is the youngest of four children. They grew up in Kona, Hawaii. Robert left to go to Kamehameha schools. He joined the Mormon Church and served a mission in Japan. He did his undergraduate at BYU Hawaii, his Master’s at BYU Provo and is currently studying for his PhD at BYU Provo in education leadership. He teaches Hawaiian at BYU and Japanese at the Missionary Training Center in Provo, Utah, and often travels to Japan to teach the Hawaiian language and hula. He talks about the origins of his names. He had his name legally changed to Child and Ikuwa after meeting his grandpa. He did not want to carry on his grandpa’s name so he took his grandmothers’ names instead. Robert is now the only male carrying on the Ikuwa family name. Both his parents worked so his maternal grandmother played a big part in raising him and his siblings. He talks about what it was like growing up with her. He describes attending Kamehameha, a private school for native Hawaiians. Kamehameha is a boarding school so he had to move away from home and live on campus. Robert hated school because it was so strict and structured.Robert talks about his musical education. He was very talented and for a time wanted to become an opera singer. He studied viola, violin, and singing. He traveled to New York, Washington DC, Scandinavia, and Europe with the Festival of Pacific Arts. One of his teachers was so strict and tough, though, he drove Robert to stop singing and playing music. After high school Robert started teaching Hawaiian in an immersion school. But after he met a financial advisor who suggested he become an institute director or seminary teacher and who told him he needed a Master’s degree, he decided to go back to school. He finished his Bachelor’s at BYU Hawaii in two years. After earning his Master’s at BYU Provo he returned to Hawaii and worked as a Hawaiian language director of a school, and a curriculum developer. Then, after talking with professors and students in the PhD program at BYU Provo he decided to go back.He tells the story of how he came to be a member of the Mormon Church. He spent a summer with his uncle’s family, who were Mormon, and was exposed to their way of life. He also had a lot of Mormon friends. Robert decided that he was happiest when he was with his Mormon friends and family so he prayed about it and decided to attend the church. Eventually he talked with missionaries and decided to be baptized. Robert has a dream to open a Hawaiian culture academy in Japan. He wants to get married and start a family. He would like to serve more missions. And he hopes to have residences all over Hawaii and in Utah.Project: Pacific Islanders. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu
2009
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No. 713 Sarah Ioane
Sarah Ioane (b. 1984) was born in Provo, Utah, and at the time of the interview had spent her whole life there. One of eight children, her parents were Mormon converts who met in Virginia when her father was in the Navy. Her mother is mostly white but one eighth Choctaw, and her father, from Kailua, Hawaii, is Hawaiian, Chinese and Japanese. Her parents suffered substantial racial unpleasantness from family when they got married. Sarah remembers always having foster children in the house, and her parents ran a day care as well. She got her first job at thirteen, working at Data Pad, and held several other jobs before settling down with her husband.Racially, she thought of herself as white growing up but faced discrimination from both sides as being neither “white enough” nor Polynesian enough.” Her father was not interested in transmitting Hawaiian, Japanese or Chinese culture to her, but her uncle Bobby Tau’o introduced Sarah to Hawaiian culture. Sarah participated extensively in dancing and Polynesian culture events in high school, and at the time of the interview was a part of the Living Legends dance troupe. She was very active in school activities and even served as a Utah culture ambassador to the Nagano, Japan, Olympic games. She discusses her high school time at some length.She discusses family life extensively, and remembers a tumultuous childhood but gets along with her siblings well now that all are grown. In her discussion of family roles and expectations, Sarah relates that her parents were very pro-education and pro-activity, and helped her and her siblings do anything they could. She took a degree in public health from BYU, after three years of nursing, and would like to return to nursing one day.Deeply religious, Sarah talks about her faith, her parents’ faith, and her unease with seeing family members falling away from the LDS Church. Sarah is very committed to serving others, and would like to one day join the Peace Corps.Project: Pacific Islanders. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu
2008
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No. 714 Randall J. Olson
Dr. Randall J Olson (b. 1947), CEO of the University of Utah’s Moran Eye Center, discusses his life and career in four interviews. The first two cover his childhood, education and early career; the last two, his time on the faculty of the University of Utah. He was born in Glendale, California, to a father from Utah and a mother from southern California. His father served in the Pacific Theater of World War II. A sickly child, he moved with his family to Salt Lake City when a teenager to follow his father’s appointment in the metallurgy department at the University of Utah. Dr. Olson graduated from Highland High School, where he me Pat Shea, though he likes to say he dropped out since he left high school a year early to attend the University of Utah. He served an LDS mission to Sweden, where he discovered running, and then went to medical school at the University of Utah. He met his wife in the 1960s and was married in 1970. Dr. Olson was in Sweden for a medical fellowship during the “Seven Crown Crisis,” and graduated in 1973. He moved on to ophthalmology at UCLA in 1974, and nearly forty years later is still thrilled with his decision to pursue that field. Dr. Olson spent time in Honduras on another fellowship, worked at LSU in New Orleans helping them set up a premium eye care facility, and then returned to the University of Utah in 1979, for which he credits Herb Kaufman. Made Chief of Cornea, he aggressively expanded his tiny division and has never stopped. Early programs involved outreach into neighboring states and his successful drive to make ophthalmology a department. He discusses numerous colleagues, remembering especially David Apple and Alan Crandall from his early years at the “U.” In the mid-1980s Dr. Olson spent some time in Saudi Arabia at the King Khalid Eye Specialist Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and operated on the King’s stepmother. The late 1980s found the Department of Ophthalmology needing to expand, and Dr. Olson worked closely with philanthropist John A. Moran to create the Moran Eye Center, which first opened in 1993 and then in 2003 upgraded to a much larger facility. Dr. Olson discusses fundraising at great length, but also spends time discussing the role of Wayne Imbrescia, currently the ambulatory care director for the entire University of Utah health sciences operation, in making the Moran function. He discusses the process of funding and building the new Moran Eye Center and describes the Center’s research and international outreach programs in detail, but also shares memories of his son’s cancer and of his own experience with eye surgery.Project: University of Utah Oral History. Interviewer: Anne Peterson
2013
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No. 715 Sam Porter
Sam Porter was born in West Chester, Pennsylvania. He talks about joining the Marine Corps while he was attending junior college. He joined because he wanted an air contract but because of health reasons switched to a ground contract after graduating Officer Candidate School in Quantico, Virginia. He was commissioned as a second lieutenant and went on active duty after graduating college. He ended up as a signal intelligence officer, training in Florida and Hawaii. He describes signal intelligence and his first job as radio reconnaissance, which he greatly enjoyed because of the pace and the group he led.Sam went off active duty in December 1999 but after 9/11 decided to return. He joined Fox Company in Salt Lake City. He describes how he prepared to become an infantry officer and his first impressions of the company. The company then traveled to southern California where they trained and waited to be deployed. He talks about his philosophy of leadership during that training period. The company was then deployed to Iraq in 2002 after a year of training.He describes waiting at the Iraq-Kuwait border, preparing before invading Iraq. Then he talks about invading Iraq, driving north through the country, the exhaustion and hunger he and his troops felt, and the first tense situation they had going through An Nasiriyah. He discusses his understanding and thoughts of the Marine Corps’ mission to get to Baghdad as fast as possible. He describes a situation in which they were fighting at night and one of their vehicles crashed into their own position, severely injuring Sam and killing his staff sergeant. He talks about his injury and his journey to the field hospital. After about three weeks he returned to the States to recover.Project: Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans. Interviewer: John C. Worsencroft
2010
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No. 716 Clark Spence
Clark Spence, well-known Western historian and retired professor at the University of Illinois, remembers his early academic career, how he became interested in Western history, and his long association with the Western History Association. A Montanan by birth, raised in Idaho, Dr. Spence had planned to be an engineer but came home from World War II with different ideas. He credits Colin Goody Koontz at the University of Colorado with turning him toward Western history. Dr. Spence attended the second WHA annual conference in Denver in 1962, and most meetings since until the last ten years. He also served as president of the organization, and was involved in the turn away from the more profit-driven, popular American West magazine to the academic Western Historical Quarterly. He discusses the role of women in the WHA over the years, the tension between “buffs” and academics, and the changing organizational dynamic.Project: Western History Association. Interviewer: Raquel Escobar
2013
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No. 717 Mary Lee Spence
Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Illinois and first woman president of the Western History Association, Mary Lee Spence, discusses her role in the WHA and shares her thoughts on the organization. A physics major at the University of Texas, she soon switched to history and later became interested in Western history, particularly influenced by her advisor at the University of Minnesota, Ernest Osgood. She joined the WHA in 1962 with her husband Clark C. Spence, but did not attend for perhaps ten years due to her children. She mentions a number of prominent historians involved in the WHA early on, including Martin Ridge, Vernon Carstenson, and Francis Paul Prucha. Having served several leadership roles in the WHA, Dr. Spence became president in 1981. She remembers the organization early on being almost entirely white, and notes its growing diversity over the decades. She also mentions that non-white professional historians’ numbers have increased and that they are more welcome at the WHA now than in the past. Dr. Spence also discusses the role of women in the organization and notes their increasing roles over the years. She feels the WHA’s mission is the same as it was in the early years—to explore the history of all facets of the West. Project: Western History Association. Interviewer: Raquel Escobar
2013
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No. 718 Christopher Spurrier
Mr. Spurrier was born in Provo, Utah. He discusses his family. He joined the National Guard in Utah while in high school. He describes his boot camp experiences at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. He was assigned to be a combat engineer with the Utah National Guard’s 1457th Engineer battalion, Headquarters Company. He relates his experiences with his unit, including working during the 2002 Olympics in Salt Lake City, and how the atmosphere changed after 9/11.Mr. Spurrier also describes his call up for deployment and preparation at Fort Lewis, Washington, starting in February 2003. He arrived in Kuwait in April 2003. His unit drove in a convoy to Baghdad, which he describes. He worked supplying the 1st Armored and the 3rd Infantry Divisions. He describes the working and living conditions during that time, and was in country approximately one year.He talks about returning home and reenlisting for another six-year term.Project: Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans. Interviewer: John C. Worsencroft
2010
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No. 719 Pasi Suguturaga
Pasi Suguturaga (b. 1983) was born and raised in Makakilo, Hawaii. Her father is Fijian and Tongan, and her mother is Tongan, Samoan, Swiss, German and Jewish. When Pasi was twelve she moved to California with her father. After high school Pasi went to the University of Utah for a short time, then moved back to Hawaii to go to a community college there. She then decided to go on a mission for the Mormon Church and went to Arizona. After her mission she decided to attend BYU in Provo, Utah, and that’s where she is living now. Pasi talks about her parents getting divorced and why she decided to live with her father instead of her mother. She talks about her family life after the divorce. Her father took in a lot of their relatives so Pasi grew up with a large family, as many as fifteen people in their home at one time. She discusses how her family ended up in Hawaii. Her mother and father both moved from Tonga to Hawaii to attend BYU Hawaii. She recalls childhood memories. She experienced culture shock when she first moved to California. She describes the differences in culture between what she experienced in Hawaii and what she experienced in California. There were no other Polynesians in her neighborhood in California. Pasi talks about the aspects of Tongan culture she learned growing up. Because she is part Fijian she was conscious of the fact that she was different than her Tongan relatives and friends. She describes a Fijian ceremony put on for her to usher her into womanhood. She discusses her parents’ attitudes towards education when she was growing up. Education was important and Pasi received rewards for doing well and punishments for doing poorly. Pasi was raised Mormon, but she didn’t become truly active until she decided to go on a mission for the church. She discusses her parents’ religious backgrounds. Pasi describes her inspiration for deciding to go on a mission. She talks about her most memorable experience as a missionary. Pasi describes what it’s like to be Polynesian in Utah. She has felt discriminated against because she’s different. She prefers to spend time with Polynesians from Hawaii because she feels more connection with them. Project: Pacific Islanders. Interviewer: Savani Aupia
2008
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No. 720 Norman Thompson
Norman Thompson was born in Honolulu, Hawaii. He is married with two children. He currently lives in Hawaii and attends BYU Hawaii, where he majors in English and minors in political science. He is part Maori, part Hawaiian, and part Samoan. His father’s family is from Samoa but he grew up in California and Hawaii. His mother is from New Zealand. His parents are divorced. He is the oldest of three brothers and one sister. Norman talks about his parents’ divorce. Because he was the oldest he was more aware than his siblings of what was happening. He became a father figure to his younger brothers and sister. Norman now sees the benefit of staying with his mom after the divorce. She remained active in the Mormon Church and he became more involved with the religion while living with her. He identifies most with Hawaiian culture because he was raised in Hawaii. His family would spend all their time at the beach. Norman loved to surf. He grew up as part of the Laie Boys, a group of friends who grew up together in Laie. Norman’s father was a singer in Hawaii. He became popular singing reggae songs and eventually got a record deal. He has recorded six albums. He feels that his parents did the minimum when it came to his education. They supported and encouraged him, but he feels he did not gain the practical knowledge he would have liked to gain, and he was not encouraged to aspire to anything more than finding a good job. After he graduated high school, Norman went to BYU Hawaii. He did not do very well there and decided to go on a mission in West Virginia for the Mormon Church in order to straighten himself out. He had to prepare to go on his mission on his own. His father was not very supportive and his mother did not do much to help him with the process. He tells the story of how he and his wife met. He kept seeing her on BYU Hawaii campus because he was doing construction work there at the time. He found out who she was and got her number and called her every day after that. Norman’s goal is to finish his Bachelor’s degree and go on to law school. He wants to become a better spiritual example for his children. He would like to stay in Hawaii but knows that it might be more financially sound to move to the States and buy a house. Project: Pacific Islanders. Interviewer: Savani Aupia
2009
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No. 721 Rena Thompson
Rena Thompson was born and raised in Kahului, Hawaii. She is the middle child in between two sisters. She is married and has two children. She works at Kahuku Elementary School. She is Hawaiian, Filipino, French, Irish, Polish, and Portuguese. Her dad is Hawaiian, Portuguese, and Caucasian and her mom is Filipino and Caucasian.Rena talks about going to Kamehameha High School in her senior year. She discusses the differences between Kamehameha and her previous high school, Castle. In order to get into Kamehameha a student must have Hawaiian heritage, must take a test, and have an interview.She talks about her parents’ educations. Her dad finished high school and her mom went to BYU Hawaii and studied to be a teacher. Growing up her mom encouraged good study habits and enforced rules for school, and her dad encouraged her and her sisters to have fun as well as to focus on school. She went to school at BYU Provo for two semesters and studied art. She did a field study in New Zealand. After her field study she transferred to BYU Hawaii and finished her studies there. Rena and her family spent a lot of time on the beach. Her dad surfed and they would travel to Tonga and Tahiti to visit the beaches there.She is a member of the LDS church. Her dad converted her mom to Mormonism. She tells her mom’s conversion story. Though her mom’s side of the family is Catholic they are respectful of her decision to become Mormon. She talks about working while raising her children. She likes staying at home to watch the children and take care of the house. She tells the story of meeting her husband. She saw him working construction on campus every day. She was working at the Polynesian Culture Center and his brother, who also worked there, started asking her questions for him. He eventually asked her friend if he could call Rena. She said yes and he and Rena started to talk and then started to date. She discusses growing up with her two sisters. She got along with both her younger and older sisters, but they have trouble getting along with each other.Rena would like to pursue her art, but she has also always dreamed of opening a bakery. Right now though, she wants to focus on raising a family. She would like to have two or three more children. She wants to stay in Hawaii because she wants her children to grow up in Hawaii in the culture she was raised in.Project: Pacific Islanders. Interviewer: Savani Aupia
2009
21
No. 722 Elsie Toluta’u
Elsie Toluta’u was born in Hamilton, New Zealand. When she was three her family moved to Utah. They then moved to Tonga when she was five and they lived there for five years. Then her family moved back to New Zealand for nine years. After she graduated from high school, her family moved back to Utah. Elsie also lived in Tennessee for a year and a half while on a Mormon mission and she lived in Hawaii for four years. She lives in Utah with her husband and two children.She discusses moving around a lot. Her parents wanted to live in America because there were more opportunities here for their family. She was excited to move to America because she felt there were not a lot of opportunities for her in New Zealand. At school in New Zealand Elsie felt like a lot of the teachers and coaches favored their own children over other students and so she and her siblings did not like it there. She did enjoy some of the extracurricular activities at the high school. She talks about living in Tonga.In New Zealand Elsie’s family grew up with aspects of the Maori culture. When they moved to Utah, though, they took part in Tongan culture because there is such a large Tongan culture there. The transition to Utah was made easier because of the Tongan culture in Utah. Elsie describes Maori cultural activities they took part in while in New Zealand.Elsie talks about her parents’ attitudes towards education. She describes her parents’ educational backgrounds. Education was expected in their home. Her parents led by example when it came to education. Her father came to America for an education and worked hard to earn it and her mother earned hers while raising their family.She talks about growing up in a big family. The girls had to share a room and the boys had to share a room because they lived in a small house. They all worked to support the family. She was very close to her sisters and did everything with them.Elsie discusses being Tongan in Utah. She has not felt discriminated against but feels she has learned to love all people since moving. She was reluctant to make friends with white people but has learned to get along with everyone.She talks about her family’s religious background. She is a fourth generation Mormon. She went on a mission in Knoxville, Tennessee. She recounts her most memorable experience as a missionary. Elsie believes that everything good in her life has stemmed from being a part of the Mormon religion.In the future Elsie wants to serve missions with her husband. She wants to move to Tonga. She wants to be a marriage and family counselor.Project: Pacific Islanders. Interviewer: Savani Aupia
2008
22
No. 723 Ted Wilson
Ted Wilson (b. 1939) discusses being hired to work at the Grand Tetons. He was chosen to be a part of the Tetons rescue team because of his rescue skills. He describes a few rescues he was a part of. After one rescue, the sheriff’s office, who hadn’t done anything to help, took all the credit for rescuing a group of kids.The most harrowing, and most famous, rescue Mr. Wilson took part in was a three day rescue on the north face of Mount Owen in 1967. A man and woman were signaling for help on the mountain. The rescue team assembled and put together a plan. It took them two days to plan the rescue and get to the victim. They got the woman off the mountain, but the man was very badly injured. Mr. Wilson stayed up with the victim during the first night, discussing climbing in Europe and trying to keep his mind off the pain. In the morning a helicopter brought morphine for the victim. On the third day, the team decided to go down the mountain with the victim, which was a very complicated process. At one point two of the rescuers (mathematicians), worked together to estimate the distance to a ledge beneath them by listening to the sound of a rock falling onto it. They succeeded in saving the victim, but the victim, a narcissistic and strange man, according to Mr. Wilson, was upset. He told the press it shouldn’t have taken the rescuers that long. All the rescuers were extremely upset, and some still are, though Mr. Wilson doesn’t think about it anymore. He did his job and he got paid for it and he saved a life.Mr. Wilson then describes life after working at the Tetons. After the rescue in ’67, Mr. Wilson had more confidence in accomplishing goals because he had overcome such a difficult task. He also learned to appreciate the aesthetic qualities of climbing, instead of only thinking of it as climbing. Mr. Wilson considers mountaineering to be the most challenging and rewarding form of climbing, but believes that other, newer forms of climbing have value as well. He then, discusses advances in gear and equipment and talks about some of the climbers that he admires most.Project: Outdoor Recreation. Interviewer: Matt Driscoll.
2011
23
No. 724 Bonnie Baxter
Bonnie Baxter is a professor of biology at Westminster College in Salt Lake City and the director of the Great Salt Lake Institute. Fascinated by science from a young age, she pursued work in genetics and DNA. Her interest has always been in liberal arts education, which is how she found Westminster College and in turn began her relationship with Great Salt Lake. She studies halophiles (salt loving bacteria) and works with people of widely divergent backgrounds who are also interested in the Lake. Through the Great Salt Lake Institute she has encouraged interdisciplinary relationships between people all over the world. Dr. Baxter discusses her work with the Lake at some length, and shares her favorite areas. She also emphasizes the importance of interaction with the ecosystem and believes strongly that children need to be involved with that interaction.Project: Great Salt Lake Oral History Project. Interviewer: Greg Smoak.
2013
24
No. 725 Mata Brown and Finau Conklin
Twins Mata Brown and Finau Conklin were born and raised in Fiji. Their uncle, Sitiveni Rabuka, was the prime minister of Fiji. They attended college in Hawaii and Utah, starting at BYU-Hawaii and the Polynesian Cultural Center. Mata received a BA from BYU in political science, and Finau took hers in social work. Both are LDS and describe their conversion to that faith, including their experiences with the Methodist and Adventist churches in Fiji. Mata is married to a man from Idaho and Finau to a man from California. They discuss growing up in Fiji at some length, including politics and Indian-Fijian ethnic relations and describe life in Utah and Hawaii. Both mention having been subjected to some discrimination. The interview is full of detail on Fijian life, religion, and Polynesian experiences in Utah.Project: Pacific Islander Oral History Project. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu.
2008
25
No. 726 Semisi Brown
Semisi Brown was born and raised in Salt Lake City. He has eleven brothers and two sisters. He is married and has four boys and his family currently lives in Provo, Utah. Both of his parents are Tongan. He works for a web design company.He talks about the name Brown and where it came from. Semisi talks about what it was like to grow up in a large family. He had a lot of hand-me-downs and had to learn how to share at an early age.His parents moved to Hawaii from Tonga, and then moved to Salt Lake City where Semisi’s grandparents had been established for a while. Semisi’s parents moved because of the opportunities available to them in Salt Lake City and to be closer to the LDS church’s headquarters. He talks about the stories his parents and his brothers would tell him about moving from Tonga. His parents encouraged them to participate in the American culture. Semisi’s family spoke English in the home, but he understands Tongan. Some of his brothers speak Tongan because they were raised in Tonga for a time.He talks about his parents’ education and how they supported his education. He earned a Bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Utah. Semisi and his brothers had to work hard because they were going to school, playing sports and helping to support the family by working. Both Semisi’s parents worked to support the family.Semisi describes the different responsibilities the boys and girls had. Boys generally did outside work and girls generally did domestic chores, but their parents also taught the boys to cook and clean. Their parents wanted them to become Americanized so they jumped into the new culture.He says he struggled with his identity as a Tongan, especially in high school. He had friends from both cultures. He has felt people treat him differently because he is Tongan. People expected him to be a gangster because a lot of students in his high school participated in that culture. Semisi wants to continue to exhibit the unselfishness and humbleness of the Tongan culture and to teach it to his children.Semisi talks about his religion. He was born and raised in the LDS church. He talks about the history of Mormonism in his family and how it has helped him in his life. He served a mission for the church in Spain.He wants to earn a graduate degree in the future but the most important thing for him is to raise his boys to be good people. Semisi thinks his family will probably stay in Utah, but they would move if the opportunity was right. Project: Pacific Islander Oral History Project. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu.
2009
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No. 727 Janet Fireman
Janet Fireman, past president of the Western History Association and California public historian, talks about how and why she became a historian and how and why she chose to study the American West. She describes her relationship with her father, who was a journalist interested in Western history and also taught at Arizona State University. Dr. Fireman talks about her education and the traveling she has done for school and for research. She talks about the jobs she has had throughout her career, from teaching at Fresno State University to editing the journal California History. She discusses her experiences with the Western History Association throughout the years, her participation in the Association, and her time as president. Dr. Fireman describes the changes she has seen in the WHA, including the development of public history as a field of study, and the changes she has been a part of. She also discusses creating the Bert M. Fireman Award for graduate students in honor of her father.Project: Western History Association Oral History Project. Interviewer: Greg Smoak
2013

Interviews, 728 – 757Return to Top

Container(s): Box 72

Container(s) Description Dates
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No. 728 J. Wallace Gwynn
J. Wallace Gwynn (b. 1940) was employed by the Utah Geological Survey (UGS) for thirty-four years as the geologist primarily assigned to the Great Salt Lake. In this interview, Dr. Gwynn talks about his experiences with the UGS and his work with the Great Salt Lake, including topics on the brine, lake minerals, salt mining, oil exploration and the impact of the mid-1980 high water years on the lake and his work.Dr. Gwynn edited two anthology publications on the Great Salt Lake. The first published in 1980, Great Salt Lake: a scientific, historical and economic overview; the second, Great Salt Lake: an overview of change, was published in 2002.Dr. Gwynn received bachelor’s and PhD degrees from the University of Utah in mineralogy and allied fields. He worked for a few years in industry before joining the UGS.Project: Great Salt Lake Oral History Project. Interviewer: Becky Lloyd
2013
2
No. 729 Peter Iverson
Regents’ Professor of History at Arizona State University Peter Iverson talks about his youth, his academic career as a historian of Native America, and his presidency of and involvement with the Western History Association. Dr. Iverson took his PhD at the University of Wisconsin, and taught at Navajo Community College and the University of Wyoming before finally settling at Arizona State University. He discusses his relationship with other scholars and students at some length, particularly at the University of Wyoming. Dr. Iverson also discusses his views on and history with the WHA, emphasizing his view on the importance of including a wider number of people and peoples in both the WHA and Western history as a whole, and avoiding the distractions of symbolic politics.Project: Western History Association. Interviewer: Greg Smoak.
2013
3
No. 730 Mary Latu
Mary Latu (b. 1981) was born in Hawaii and lived there until she was nine years old when her family moved to Provo, Utah so her dad could attend BYU. When she was seventeen her family moved back to Hawaii because her dad got a job at BYU Hawaii. She now lives in Provo with her husband and two children.She describes growing up in Hawaii with her family, going to school, and the culture. She compares growing up in Hawaii and living in Utah and talks about the differences between the schools. She talks about the importance of education in her family.Mary is a member of the Mormon Church. She talks about her family’s history with the LDS religion. Both of her parents are converts. Mary served a mission for her church in El Salvador and she describes her experience of the culture and language there.She talks about meeting her husband and starting a family. They are happy in Utah but may move so that her husband can pursue his education.Project: Pacific Islanders. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu.
2009
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No. 731 Aselika T. Lolohea
Aselika Lolohea was born and raised in Tonga. She remembers corporal punishment in school, and how she liked attending Liahona High School because there was no more corporal punishment. She discusses her youth in Tonga in the 1950s and 1960s. She graduated Liahona High in 1970, and served an LDS mission all over the Tonga area from 1971 to 1972. She recalls not being allowed to speak Tongan at Liahona. In 1976 Ms. Lolohea moved to the United States, because a Tongan-American family her mother had helped agreed to repay her kindness by bringing her children back with them. Ms. Lolohea lived in San Mateo, California, at first, and worked as a live-in assistant for an older woman. She got married in 1978 to a man she had met at a young adult conference in Tonga, and subsequently lived in both Utah and California. Ms. Lolohea brought her mother to the US not long after her marriage.Project: Pacific Islanders. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu.
2009
5
No. 732 Janella Moala
Janella Moala (b. 1983) was born in Provo, Utah. In 1983 her family moved to Texas were she spent most of her life. She went to school in Hawaii. She is Mormon and went on a mission to Brazil.Janella’s father is Tongan and her mother is English, Dutch, Danish, and Scottish. Her father went to medical school in Fiji and then to moved to Hawaii to go to school there at twenty. Her mother was raised in Idaho.Her family moved to Texas because there was an opportunity for a job there for her father. Janella talks about living in Texas. They lived in a suburb of Dallas and traveled to Euless to participate in Tongan culture and visit Tongan friends and relatives. She talks about the Mormon community in her home town.Janella talks about her father growing up in Tonga. She believes the way he grew up influenced the way he raised his children. He used intimidation and physical discipline to raise Janella and her siblings. Janella rebelled against her father’s strictness. Her father was particularly strict when it came to boys. He also taught them to be very disciplined in sports. He calmed down a lot when he became active in the Mormon Church again. Janella works as a residential treatment center unit counselor. She counsels kids with drug problems and kids who come from bad home situations. She talks about going to school at BYU Hawaii and how much she loves Hawaii. She likes the culture, the people, and the environment. Janella hopes to move back there someday but cannot right now because it is too expensive. Janella discusses her relationships with her siblings. She was close with her sisters, though they did fight sometimes, but she wasn’t very close with her brothers. Boys and girls were strictly separated in the home.She describes her religious upbringing. Her father says he joined the Mormon Church to get a scholarship for school, but when they moved to Texas he became more active. Their family hosted seminary lessons in their home. Janella talks about her mission to Brazil. Her mission is one of the hardest because of the environment. She talks about the culture and the language. Though their parents did not emphasize their Tongan culture growing up, Janella has always been proud to be Tongan. She has felt discriminated against because of the color of her skin, but she has always been confidant about her culture and heritage.Project: Pacific Islanders. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu.
2008
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No. 733 Katerina Moala
Katerina Moala (b. 1977) was born in Tonga. She lived there for about two years and then her family moved to Samoa so that her mother could take care of Katerina’s grandparents and she was raised there her whole life. She has also lived in Hawaii, California, and currently lives in Utah. Her dad is Tongan and her mom is Samoan.Katerina grew up speaking Samoan in the home. She was required to learn English in school. Because she is around a lot of Tongans in Utah she has also started to learn Tongan as well.She went on a mission in Cincinnati for the Mormon Church. She became friends with Utahns at the mission and when she finished in Cincinnati decided to move to Utah. Katerina talks about moving to Utah and adjusting to the weather and meeting family that lives there. Katerina talks about growing up in Samoa. They would play outside and swim a lot because the weather was always nice. Because she was part Tongan she was teased a lot growing up in Samoa. At first she was embarrassed but she got used to it. She will always consider Samoa her home but in America she has much more opportunity and so she plans to stay in Utah.She describes the tension that exists between Tongans and Samoans. She thinks it will always exist. Although her family was initially treated differently, they were accepted into the community and were well liked. When she first moved to Utah she felt people were staring at her all the time, but now she feels people are more welcoming.Katerina explains Samoan Flag Day. Samoans celebrate their national independence on Flag Day. She describes the celebrations and talks about how the celebration in Utah differs from the celebration in Samoa.Education was very important to Katerina’s parents when she was growing up. They pushed their education and made sure they were attending and doing homework. Her father didn’t go to school after elementary school so he wanted Katerina to get a good education.She talks about her religious background. Her family attended church at the London Missionary Society when she was young. One of her father’s cousins then converted Katerina and her brother to Mormonism when she was about eight. After her father was hired at a mission home their whole family became converts and started attending church regularly. The lessons the missionaries gave her and her family inspired her to go on a mission herself.Project: Pacific Islanders. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu.
2009
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No. 734 Sela Nock
Sela Nock was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and raised in the eastern United States. Her mother is Tongan, born in Hawaii, and her father a Caucasian from Pittsburgh. Her mother’s family were traveling dancers, and Sela also grew up dancing. Her family moved a lot due to her father’s work. She moved to Utah as an adult and at the time of the interview attended Utah Valley University. Ms. Nock discusses her family life and upbringing, mentioning that her parents are happy to support her education, but most especially discusses her sense of being between two cultures and her relationship with her family and other people both in the East and in the Utah Polynesian community. She was raised with little Tongan cultural influence and regrets that.Project: Pacific Islanders. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu.
2008
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No. 735 Alan Prasad
Alan Prasad was born to a family of mixed Indian-Portuguese-Anglo descent and raised in Fiji. He attended BYU-Hawaii and received a business degree, moved around the United States, and at the time of the interview was in a medical diagnostic program at Weber State University. He came to Utah in 1992. Mr. Prasad met his wife at BYU-H. He converted to the LDS faith as a child, though his parents remained Hindu. He discusses religion a little, but spends much of his time talking about language, education and ethnic identity.Project: Pacific Islanders. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu.
2008
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No. 736 William D. Rowley
Bill Rowley (b. 1939), Griffen Chair of History at the University of Nevada Reno, was born in Iowa, then moved to Washington with his family as a child. He attended the University of Nebraska before arriving at the University of Nevada Reno, where he stayed his entire career. In 1973 Dr. Rowley took over the executive secretaryship of the Western History Association, a post he held for sixteen years. He discusses his work with the WHA at some length, touching on themes ranging from the WHA’s changing balance between academic historians and buffs to the controversy over different organizational publications.Project: Western History Association. Interviewer: Greg Smoak.
2013
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No. 737 Laina Said
Laina Said was born in Raiatea, French Polynesia. Raiatea is part of the group of islands that includes Tahiti. It is the second most important island in French Polynesia because the hospital is located there and people from the surrounding islands go to Raiatea for medical attention. Laina lived in Raiatea with her family of six brothers and sisters until she went to university in Tahiti. She didn’t do very well in high school and college because she liked to party and go clubbing with her friends instead and she didn’t focus on school. She decided to get back on the right path so she moved to Hawaii to go to BYU. That’s where she met her husband. Laina and her husband moved to Utah so he could go to school. After he graduates they plan to move to France because he has family there and she can go to school for free.She describes growing up in Raiatea where she and her friends would play in the mountains and in the rivers. Her town was very small and simple. At school, the teachers were very strict and would physically punish students for misbehaving. Her parents didn’t really expose her to Tahitian culture growing up, and she thinks it’s because they were ignorant of the benefits of knowing and experience one’s cultural heritage. She loves to dance, but growing up in Tahiti, she was afraid to dance traditional Tahitian dances because she would have had to show too much skin and shake her bum in front of people. But when she was attending BYU Hawaii she worked for the Polynesian Culture Center and her passion for dancing was unleashed.Laina talks about the mix of cultures in Tahiti and Raiatea. The French colonized Tahiti so there is a very strong French influence on the islands. Tahitians were forced to adopt French culture and customs, sometimes at the expense of their own culture and traditions. There is also a strong Chinese population. Laina was ashamed to speak Tahitian, and so doesn’t know the language as well as she knows French and English. She felt that it was more important to learn French because it was the dominant culture.Laina describes her experience moving to Utah. She feels that the people in Utah are hypocritical and that they only act nice towards her. They aren’t genuine. As a Mormon, she feels that other Mormons in Utah are only nice to her at church, not outside of church. She describes being treated differently for being Polynesian. She feels that the Polynesians in Utah, though, are much more welcoming and warm than Tahitians. When she visited Tahiti, people thought she was strange for being so warm and outgoing, and Laina thinks she acted that way because she’d been in Utah for so long.Project: Pacific Islanders. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu.
2008
11
No. 738 Dave Shearer
Mr. Shearer is currently the harbormaster at the Great Salt Lake State Park Marina. He has been serving in that post since 1998. He moved to the marina in 1998, living on a boat docked there, and began volunteering with the Park Service on search and rescue until his appointment as harbormaster. Dave grew up in the Salt Lake area and first came to Great Salt Lake on a field trip in elementary school. He started sailboating with his family when he was ten. Eventually, along with his father and brother, he began sailboat racing and competed for many years all over the world. In this interview, Dave talks about his life and work at the Marina. He describes the business of running the marina. He discusses his search and rescue activities on the lake. He shares his thoughts about the lake, along with his hopes and vision of the lake’s future.Project: Great Salt Lake. Interviewer: Becky Lloyd.
2013
12
No. 739 Helen “Ginger” Tuilevuka
Helen Tuilevuka (b. 1986) was born in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. She moved to California and also lived in Utah. She spent most of her life in Gallup, New Mexico. She also lived in Las Vegas for a short time and in Ireland with her husband for a while. She moved to Utah her junior year of high school because she wanted to get used to Utah before attending Brigham Young University. Her mother is Tongan Samoan and her father is Cherokee. She was raised by her grandma and her aunts and uncles as well as her mother. She is married to a Fijian man and they have one daughter.Helen talks about her mother’s life. Her mother’s family was in a Polynesian music group that toured the country. Helen’s mother ran away from the group and ended up as a singer in Tennessee. She met Helen’s father at a recording session.She learned Tongan from her grandmother when she was little but does not know it well now. She had a lot of responsibility as the oldest in her family. From her Samoan aunts and uncles she learned the importance of coming together as a family and the importance of respecting elders. She learned most of her cultural traditions from her grandma and her aunts and uncles.Helen talks about struggling to find her cultural identity. She has never fully delved into her Cherokee side and she did not really learn about her Polynesian culture until she was living away from her mother. In New Mexico, she wanted to be Hispanic because that was the dominant culture. There were no Polynesians in her high school in New Mexico and people did not even know what Polynesian was. Since moving to Utah she has been interested in learning about Polynesian culture from her elders.She describes meeting and dating her husband. Her husband is from Fiji and has different ideas of dating and culture that surprised Helen. They practice a lot of Fijian traditions in the home now.She learned the importance of education from her grandparents. Her parents were lax when it came to school so she had to stay motivated on her own when she was living with them. Her family always supported her and told her she could do whatever she wanted.Helen discusses her religion and her religious background. She was baptized in the Mormon church but was not very active until she moved to Utah in her junior year of high school. Her grandmother really reinforced the importance of religion. She became more active as a Mormon because she was tired of the lifestyle she was living and wanted to change.Project: Pacific Islanders. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu.
2008
13
No. 740 Jessica Unga
Jessica Unga (b. 1984) was born in Wailuku, Hawaii and raised in Laie, Hawaii. When her parents separated she and most of her siblings moved to Provo, Utah with their mother to be near their mother’s family. She is half Tongan and half white. She has six brothers and sisters and one half brother.Jessica talks about some of the jobs she has had. She did phone surveys with Teleperformance. She worked at a scrap-booking store. And now she works for Rise caring for special needs people in a home setting. Jessica would like to have a career in interior design.She describes the differences between living in Hawaii and living in Utah. She loves Utah but she would never trade her experience growing up in Laie. In the future she wants to raise her children in Laie.Though her father is Tongan Jessica mostly learned about her Tongan heritage from her grandparents because she lived near them growing up. Jessica’s grandparents moved to Hawaii from Tonga as labor missionaries for the Mormon church.Jessica talks about her religious background. She was raised Mormon. Her grandparents were converts to the church and she talks about her grandmother’s conversion. Religion was not strictly enforced in Jessica’s home but she did have to go to church every Sunday.Her grandparents also encouraged Jessica in her education. Jessica’s mother was a substitute teacher and was also very encouraging. Her father would always give Jessica and her siblings lectures about school. She describes the education her grandparents received as well as her parents’ education.She describes what she liked about growing up in Laie. She talks about experiences she had with her family and what her relationship was like with her siblings growing up.Jessica had very different cultural experiences growing up. She experienced her mother’s culture at home and Polynesian culture at school and with friends. She identified more with her Tongan side because she was surrounded by Polynesians in Hawaii. She has never felt discriminated against while in Utah, but she has witnessed racial prejudice and knows that it exists for Polynesians in Utah.Project: Pacific Islanders. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu.
2009
14
No. 741 Leslie Unufe
Leslie Unufe (b. 1968) was born in Kahuku, Hawaii. She grew up in Laie, Hawaii. She is part Hawaiian, part Samoan. Her family moved to Utah in 1981 so that she and her siblings could have a better education.Leslie describes what she expected Utah to be like and then her first impressions when she arrived. She talks about feeling a big culture shock when she arrived because she was not used to being around white people. Leslie wondered what it would be like to be white and spoiled, and not have people stare at her and treat her differently. She describes an incident when she was in junior high of being discriminated against because of the color of her skin.She discusses her life growing up in Hawaii. She lived near a lot of the white people who were teaching or working at BYU Hawaii, and tried to make friends with them. Her first impression of white people was that they were snotty, but she soon realized that it was only individuals who were snotty, not every white person. Leslie talks about the Hawaiian and Samoan culture that her parents exposed her to growing up. She learned a lot about her culture from her extended family. She remembers participating in Samoan cultural activities with her dad’s side of the family most.Education was very important growing up. Her mom encouraged her in her studies and enforced study habits, and her dad punished her if she didn’t do well in school. Leslie discusses her education as well and compares school in Utah to school in Hawaii. She talks about spending her time with the other Polynesians at school and at church.Leslie talks about her relationship with her siblings. She was very close to her sisters. She feels that her parents favored her brother more than her and her sisters.She describes her husband and talks about how they met and her parents’ reaction to marrying so quickly. She has been married for eighteen years. Her husband was deported to Tonga. Leslie does not want to live in Tonga so they are trying to get him back to the states.She talks about a gathering in Tooele, Utah on Memorial weekend that her family has attended every year since coming to Utah. The event is to remember Hawaiians who were shipped to Utah to build the temple. They were sent to Utah because they had leprosy. People from all over come to reunite with family and remember those who died.Leslie talks about her religious background. She was raised Mormon and continues to participate in the Mormon Church.Leslie worries that the Polynesian culture is weakened when Polynesians don’t pursue their educations. She thinks that it is very important to encourage her children’s educations because she wants them to strengthen the Polynesian culture.Project: Pacific Islanders. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu.
2008
15
No. 742 Uinise Wolfgramm Vaenuku
Uinise Wolfgramm Vaenuku was born in Palo Alto, California, to Tongan parents who came to the United States in the 1970s. She grew up in the Bay Area in a bilingual home with a strong Tongan cultural atmosphere, and married Jeff, a fellow Tongan American. She worked extensively with senior citizens, and at the time of the interview worked on reservations for JetBlue from home. She and her family moved to Utah to escape the rush of city life, and enjoy their family time more. She discusses Tongan mores, particularly those between men and women, and also describes Tongan funeral attire.Project: Pacific Islanders. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu.
2009
16
No. 743 Alaisea Fusi Johnson “Fusi” Williams
Fusi Williams was born in Tutuila, American Samoa. Her grandmother raised her in Pago Pago until she was twelve, when Ms. Williams went to join her birth family in Hawaii. Her father was in the US Navy. Her family is strongly religious, and Ms. Williams discusses her faith and she and her family’s LDS service at some length. She credits the Book of Mormon with helping her learn English. Ms. Williams graduated Farrington High School in Honolulu. She worked at a pineapple cannery after high school, then married a Navy man from Wenatchee, Washington, and followed him to San Diego in 1973. Her parents moved to Compton, California, in 1968. Ms. Williams and her first husband divorced. Her second husband, with whom she lived in Arizona, died in 1992, and she spent the next thirteen years caring for her mother, who died in 2005. At the time of the interview she lived in her mother’s house in Compton, and had three children, eight grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren. She talks about Samoan culture in the islands and Samoan LDS growth in California, discusses her sense of Samoan and American culture, and mentions that she wanted her children to learn Samoan.Project: Pacific Islanders. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu.
2009
17
No. 744 Mike Beck
Born in San Francisco, Mike Beck (b. 1969) moved to Salt Lake City with his mother when he was a small boy, after his father died. His stepdad introduced him to the outdoors, and he skateboarded and snowboarded extensively before embarking on his climbing career. Mr. Beck first climbed with Danny Kohlert and Conrad Anker, hung around the old North Face climbing shop, and acquired an immense respect for the climbers he met, particularly Merrill Bitter, Mugs Stump, Doug Heinrich and others. He competed at Snowbird and Castle Rock in the 1980s, and spent a lot of time climbing in France, where he also decided to go back to school. After a semester at INSEAD in France, he applied at the University of Utah, where he received a law degree in 2004. During law school Mr. Beck co-wrote the Bouldering Guide to Utah, with Jeff Baldwin and Mark Russo. At the time of the interview he did outdoor recreation-related legal work, including representing climber Chris Sharma. Mr. Beck talks extensively about the people he climbed with and knew between the 1970s and 1990s, and documents climbing’s shift from a rougher, surfing-type atmosphere to its current position as a sport encompassing a wide range of people with an industry backing it. He delves into the evolution and changing locations of Utah climbing, discusses climbers’ clothing styles, and notes the enormous increase in female climbers in the last thirty years.Project: Outdoor Recreation. Interviewer: Matt Driscoll.
2011
18
No. 745 Tim Begue
Mr. Begue talks about his early life and his first experiences at Great Salt Lake when he went sailing with his family. He worked as a river guide and his boss at one of the companies suggested they go into the brine shrimp business. Tim talks about starting to fish for brine shrimp and the beginnings of the business he started, Prime Artemia. He describes the overall process of brine shrimping, from the work and competition on the lake to the processing and distribution. Mr. Begue talks about closing industry on the lake and the process of acquiring a certificate of registration to fish. He sold his business in 1996. Finally, Tim describes some of his favorite places on Great Salt Lake and recounts some of his favorite experiences.Project: Great Salt Lake. Interviewer: Greg Smoak.
2014
19
No. 746 Dave Bell
Dave Bell was born on June 17th, 1970 in San Jose, California, but moved to Salt Lake City during his adolescent years. Dave began climbing in 1985, first bouldering at the Gate Buttress in Little Cottonwood Canyon and shortly thereafter climbing routes at the Dihedrals and the Green A Gully in LCC. Before long, he began to explore Big Cottonwood Canyon, Rock Canyon, and other local crags. Dave discusses some of the influential figures in Salt Lake climbing during the 1980s. He shares his observations on The Body Shop, which was formed in 1988 and functioned to a significant extent as a community hub. Dave eventually became the owner of The Body Shop. It moved to a new location in Sandy and was renamed the Wasatch Front Rock Gym (The Front) around 1994 and operated at that site until 1999. When he became interested in pursuing other interests, Dave and partner Rob Gilbert sold The Front. The Front is still operational today, owned by Dustin Buckthal and located near downtown Salt Lake City. In 1999, Dave began to make indoor climbing holds and formed Pusher. He discusses the benefits and challenges of working in the outdoor recreation industry, particularly in Salt Lake City. Dave also shares stories about his travels to climbing destinations in the Mountain West, Europe, and other places. He continues to climb today and owns Bell Organic Farms.Project: Outdoor Recreation. Interviewer: Matt Driscoll.
2014
20
No. 747 Phillip Bernal
Philip Bernal (b. 1944) was born and raised in East Los Angeles. He came to Utah as a gymnast for the University of Utah. After graduating he went back to California but returned to Utah to work at the university. Philip enlisted when he was 21 and explains his decision to join the Reserve. Towards the end of his career in the military, Philip went to Bosnia with a first armored division. He describes their mission of peace enforcement in Bosnia. He talks about the living conditions where they were stationed in Tuzla. Philip describes interacting with the people there and the type of engagements his unit saw. He explains how difficult it was for his family while he was gone because it was difficult to remain in contact with them.Philip’s unit returned after six months and shortly after that Philip retired. He was then appointed to a position at the Pentagon resolving issues between the Army, the Guard, and the Reserves. He remained in that position until the end of the Clinton administration.Project: Saving the Legacy. Interviewer: Michael McLane.
2012
21
No. 748 Merrill Bitter
Merrill Bitter (b. 1953), born in Salt Lake City, was first introduced to the outdoors in Michigan in the Boy Scouts. He got into climbing in the mid-1970s with a course at Timberline Sports instructed by Dave Smith and Mark Freed, and was hooked for life. In a lifetime of climbing he has climbed with numerous well-known Utah climbers, from Bret and Stuart Ruckman, to Jeff Newsome and many others. He remembers the big 1980s climbers, Brian and Jonathan Smoot, Les Ellison, the Ruckman brothers, and Kim Miller. Mr. Bitter talks about climbing styles, his favorite climbs in Utah and outside the state, and the value of travel in learning new styles and knitting the climbing community together. More interested in movement than in simply being outdoors, he discusses the evolution of the Utah climbing gym scene and also emphasizes the importance of diet in his own climbing.Project: Outdoor Recreation. Interviewer: Matt Driscoll.
2011
22
No. 749 Tony Calderone
Rock climber and guidebook author Tony Calderone (b. 1966) was born and raised in upstate New York. He learned rock and ice climbing as a boy, and mostly climbed the Gunks, though he traveled all over the East and some in the West before moving to Salt Lake City in 1991, inspired by Climbing and Rock and Ice magazines’ Utah coverage. A self-described traditional climber, Mr. Calderone remembers that in the mid ‘90s the climbing community was very close knit compared to the present. He worked for Merrill Bitter for ten years and admires him hugely, and feels a strong sense of history and continuity, of knowledge passed down, that he fears may be lost with the current climbing generation. Mr. Calderone discusses his own climbing philosophy at some length, particularly in regard to the ethics of climbing and rebolting, and provides a lengthy description of bolting methods. He holds a degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Utah and finds it interesting how many traditional climbers are engineers.Project: Outdoor Recreation. Interviewer: Matt Driscoll and Erin Halcomb.
2011
23
No. 750 Matt Coolidge
In this interview, Matt Coolidge (b. 1966) describes his early travels in and experiences of the west. He talks about becoming involved in the art world. Mr. Coolidge then discusses founding the Center for Land Use Interpretation in Wendover. He lists the people involved in the beginning and the process of starting the organization. Matt describes the Center and its environment. He talks about some of the artists who have been residents, the work they’ve done, and describes the residency itself. Through CLUI, Mr. Coolidge is also involved with centers and programs across the country. He details the center’s exploration of the Great Salt Lake area. He describes the Great Salt Lake Land Scan and the process of creating it. Matt then discusses artists who have worked at and around Great Salt Lake, specifically Robert Smithson and Nancy Holt. At the end of the interview, Mr. Coolidge gives the interviewers a tour of CLUI while talking about land use issues relevant in the west.Project: Great Salt Lake. Interviewer: Greg Smoak and Jared Farmer.
2011
24
No. 751 Gordan Douglass and Mindy Shulak
Longtime Utah climbers Gordon Douglass and Mindy Shulak talk about their origins, how they got into climbing, their climbing activities in Utah and the West, and the history of Utah sport climbing. Born in New Haven, Connecticut, Gordon grew up in Flagstaff, Arizona, and fell in lifelong love with skiing and climbing before he was out of high school. Mentored by Arizona climber Scott Baxter, he remembers hanging around The Alpinist, a nexus of northern Arizona climbing in the 1970s. He moved to Salt Lake City in 1979, took a degree in geography and Russian from the University of Utah, visited the USSR in the early 1980s, and then completed a master’s degree in geography at the U before embarking on a career in mapping for the State of Utah. In the late 2000s he moved on from the State to guide and work on the Alta ski patrol.Mindy Shulak grew up just outside Toledo, Ohio, and rode show jumpers and ran track. After her parents died, she began to go West on adventure trips with friends and ultimately moved to Bozeman, Montana, where she became a dedicated climber. She remembers help from Jack Tackle, Jim Kansler, Terry Kennedy, and other prominent climbers, and also recalls that in the 1970s women were a serious minority in the climbing community and considered less able than men. She moved to Salt Lake City in the 1980s to compete in climbing, and met Gordon, whom she married.Gordon and Mindy define themselves as Western and local climbers before anything else, and share their favorite routes. Gordon was heavily involved in the pioneering of sport climbing in Utah, and relates its history. He and Mindy share reminiscences of first ascents in Utah, Wyoming and Montana. Gordon was involved in putting on the first international climbing competition at Snowbird in the late 1980s, which he credits for putting Utah on the climbing world’s map. Both spend time discussing the nature of climbing, the community, and its developmental and spiritual side.Project: Outdoor Recreation. Interviewer: Matt Driscoll.
2010
25
No. 752 Craig Haskell
Haskell (b. 1953) describes growing up in Payson, starting his family and building a home in Payson. He talks about his career working for UDOT as well as Geneva. After being laid off at Geneva and before returning to UDOT he was recruited into the National Guard. He was thirty-one years old. He enlisted for six years and then decided to do more. He then considered joining the Air Guard but was declined because of health reasons so he returned to his Army Guard unit. He traveled to Germany, Japan, Alaska, Korea, Africa, and Honduras with his unit. He describes the work he did constructing and remodeling buildings and schools on bases and interacting with the locals.He talks about his experience at basic training where he was made platoon guide. He then went to the Tooele Army Depot to do survey work. Craig also talks about his job as construction inspector at Camp Williams, which he took in about ’97. He talks about his selection as the STARC winner of the state’s NCO of the year. He then became first sergeant of 115th Engineer Group and helped in preparation for the Olympics. Then the 116th Engineer Company needed a first sergeant because they were being deployed to Iraq and he was made their new first sergeant in 2003. The company did not deploy to Iraq until February of the following year.Craig talks about arriving in Iraq and the job his company did at Camp Anaconda. He went on fifty four convoys while there. He describes disciplining his company, setting an example as their first sergeant and the missions they were given. He talks about being fired at and the security they had on their missions. After a year in Iraq Craig returned home. He talks about adjusting to civilian life. Craig was promoted to staff sergeant major and then was eventually made a battalion command sergeant major. He volunteered to go to Louisiana and help the Katrina cleanup efforts.Project: Iraq and Afghanistan. Interviewer: John C. Worsencroft.
2010
26
No. 753 Sheldon Holgreen
Sheldon had an interest in the military since he was a boy. In high school a recruiter took him and some others to Camp Williams to blow up demolitions and drive Humvees and Sheldon was hooked. He signed up on his eighteenth birthday and showed up for basic training at Fort Jackson, South Carolina in July 2003. Sheldon found it difficult to train with some of the less disciplined people but he enjoyed training and was put in a leadership position. Sheldon then talks about combat engineer training. In December 2003 he was called up to go to Iraq with 116th Engineer Company and deployed to Kuwait in February.He talks about the staging process in Kuwait and then entering Iraq. He describes his thoughts and emotions traveling through the country and through Baghdad. They arrived at Balad Air Base and started getting assignments to fix up the base. Their next mission was setting up a Captured Enemy Ammunition point in Tikrit. Then Sheldon started running supplies between Balad and Tikrit. After six months his company was sent to the air base in Nasiriya to work on the ROM-RON site. Sheldon describes transitioning back into civilian life. In 2006 went to Louisiana to do graveyard recovery after Hurricane Katrina.Sheldon transferred to a military intelligence unit and was sent to Monterey, California to learn Chinese Mandarin. He reclassified to Human Intelligence Collector and was able to go to the course in Utah. He was then deployed to the Korengal Valley in Afghanistan with 173rd Infantry as a Human Intelligence Collector. The Korengal Valley saw difficult fighting with insurgents every day. Sheldon talks about the living and working conditions. Every day they were involved in a firefight and Sheldon describes some of them. 1st Infantry then replaced 173rd and Sheldon was able to form a stronger bond with them. They lost a lot of soldiers and Sheldon talks about Nathan Cox, who every one respected and loved, being killed by an IED.He describes what it was like coming home. He describes his leave and spending time with his wife for two weeks. Returning to Afghanistan after his leave was harder for him and his wife than when he first left. Then he talks about coming home from Afghanistan for good. He earned a degree through online classes and he now works for the Guard.Project: Iraq and Afghanistan. Interviewer: John C. Worsencroft.
2010
27
No. 754 Hikmet Loe
Hikmet Loe is an artist, writer, and teacher who draws her inspiration from the land. Born and raised on the east coast, Loe moved to Utah in the early 80’s. In the 70’s, Loe received her undergraduate degree in Art History from Penn State, and later received her master’s in Art History from Hunter College in New York City. Loe master’s thesis, An Intermittent Illusion: Local Reaction to Robert Smithson’s Spiral Jetty, sparked her lifetime involvement with Robert Smithson’s work, and with land art in Utah. Currently, Loe works as a professor at Westminster College in Salt Lake City, as well as with CLUI (Center for Land Use Interpretation) and the Dia Art Foundation. Loe speaks at length about her involvement with the Spiral Jetty, as well as with Nancy Holt’s Sun Tunnels, and about her interpretation of Utah land and beauty.Project: Great Salt Lake. Interviewer: Greg Smoak.
2013
28
No. 755 Clayton Miller
When Clayton was fourteen he was very interested in and affected by Desert Storm. He served a mission for the LDS church in Arizona and he talks about the importance of service in his life. He moved to Utah and was influenced by conversations he had with a coworker to join the National Guard in 1998. Clayton talks about his basic training experience where he was appointed platoon guide. After that he went to Fort Leonard Wood to train as a heavy equipment operator. He describes coming home after basic training and feeling accomplished and more professional.He talks about finally getting to his unit and becoming a National Guardsman and reporting to B Company 1457th Combat Engineers. In 2000 he was called to work on projects in preparation for the Olympics. He was part of security for the athletes. In February 2003 Clayton found out he would be activated to go to Iraq. He describes arriving in Kuwait at the end of March and staging for the invasion of Iraq. After a couple of weeks they pushed straight through to the Baghdad International Airport where they were stationed. Clayton describes his duties fixing up the airport, clearing munitions, and providing force protection.Clayton describes the process of leaving Iraq after thirteen months. He talks about returning home to the US and to his family. Because of his experience serving in Iraq he decided to reenlist and he now works for the National Guard full time as a readiness NCO.Project: Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans. Interviewer: John C. Worsencroft.
2010
29
No. 756 Dee Rowland
Dee Rowland talks about her early life and the experiences that led her to become an environmentalist. She discusses her work as the government liaison for the Catholic Diocese and the Catholic Church’s stance on environmental issues. Mrs. Rowland also describes the work she has done with the League of Women Voters. She talks about her involvement with Peace Links in opposition to nuclear weapons and nuclear testing. Mrs. Rowland traveled to the Soviet Union and also hosted a group of Soviet women who visited the United States. She discusses working with the Nevada Desert Experience and the peaceful protests she took part in at the Nevada nuclear test site.Project: Environmental Oral History Project. Interviewer: Rob DeBirk.
30
No. 757 Janine Smith
Janine Smith was born in Price, Utah, lived in Colorado, Illinois, Alabama, and Mississippi, but mostly lived in Arizona and Utah. She was enlisted in the Air Force for nine years up to master sergeant, which she spent at Hill Air Force Base. She was commissioned about four years prior to the interview at McChord Air Force Base in Washington, which is her unit presently. She is a second lieutenant. Janine describes her mission in the Air Medical Evacuation Squadron providing medical aid to troops and civilians on the battlefield.She talks about deciding to join the Air Force and her basic training. She describes her deployment in September of two thousand eleven to Afghanistan. In Afghanistan she worked to train the Army to use the Air Force’s system of medical care, as well as directed the logistics of treating patients. She also worked with the British military. She describes working relations with the Army and with the British military and relations with the Afghani people.Janine discusses the difficulties in debriefing, returning to the States and reintegrating into civilian life. She finds it hard to be motivated after dealing with such harsh conditions. She currently works providing health education and care internationally to Ghana, Uganda, Peru, and China, among other countries.Project: Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans. Interviewer: Michael McLane.
2012

Interviews, 758 – 783Return to Top

Container(s): Box 73

Container(s) Description Dates
box
73
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No. 758 Clay Watson
Climber and physical therapist Clay Watson (b. 1971), born in Florida, grew up mostly in Georgia and Florida in an Army family. He got into climbing and river guiding while an undergraduate student at Brigham Young University, working for Worldwide Rivers among others, and fondly remembers intellectual conversations with his rafting passengers. He started climbing at Rock Canyon, and worked with Mark Kehoe and Dallin Ward. Mr. Watson continued climbing during graduate school in Georgia before returning to Utah and working as a physical therapist. His favorite Utah climbing locations are Little Cottonwood Canyon and Red Rocks. He talks about the climbing mentality, his use of climbing as a way to organize his thoughts, and the struggle to balance climbing with family life.Project: Outdoor Recreation Project. Interviewer: Matt Driscoll
2010
2
No. 759 Stephen Willis
Stephen Willis (b. 1983) was born in Shreveport, Louisiana, and though his family moved around when he was young he spent most of his time in Louisiana. He describes living in Shreveport. He joined the military right after high school and was shipped to Fort Carson Colorado. Stephen describes his experience at basic training and his training experience in Death Valley, California.Stephen was deployed to Iraq in March 2003. He describes his feelings about being deployed and the war itself. They were first shipped to Kuwait before the invasion of Iraq and Stephen describes that experience. In Iraq, they set up camp in a hydroelectric dam, which they were meant to protect. Stephen talks about relations between the troops and the Iraqis. He describes one of the raids they went on to clear a house from which they had been shot at. They were also in charge of traffic checkpoints.After seven months in Iraq Stephen’s contract ended and he was sent home. Since he returned he went to college, dropped out to become a ski bum, traveled around the country, and ended up in Salt Lake City where he is now studying English and philosophy at the University of Utah.Project: Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans. Interviewer: Michael McLane
2012
3
No. 760 Abinadi Burns
Abinadi Burns (b. 1985) was born and raised in Georgia. His father is African American and is from Georgia and his mother is Samoan. Burns’ mother was on a Mormon mission in Georgia when she met his father. He talks about how they met, dated, and got married. He goes to university at BYU in Utah. Burns has six siblings but three of them are half siblings.Burns’ mother was the first of her family to move to America. She was also the first to become a Mormon. He talks about his mother’s history in the Mormon Church and his father’s history in the Mormon Church.He talks about trying to learn Samoan growing up and his mother trying to teach him and his siblings Samoan. He and his siblings were never able to really learn the language.Burns and his siblings never had to be pushed or disciplined when it came to education. Their parents taught them how important education is and they understood and did well in school. He talks about the stories his parents would tell him about their educations. He discusses his father’s experience growing up in the segregated South. Burns decided to go to BYU because his brother was going there, it would be inexpensive, and he would get a good education. He discusses his first impressions of Utah when he moved there to go to BYU.Burns discusses being Polynesian in Georgia and Utah. He grew up in a predominantly white part of Georgia but there were more black people than there are in Utah. People didn’t even know what Polynesian meant in Georgia. In Utah, there is less diversity, but more Polynesians and Burns feels that the people are nicer in Utah.He talks about visiting Samoa. He wasn’t very impressed after his first visit because there had just been a hurricane. But every time after that he thought Samoa was beautiful. He talks about his experiences with the Samoan people and his Samoan relatives. Burns describes his involvement with Living Legends and talks about how he first started performing in the program. Burns went on a Mormon mission to Brazil. He loved learning the language and learned it quickly. He also loved the people and the culture of Brazil and found the people to be similar to the Polynesian people. He talks about his goals for the future. Burns wants to be an endontist and live somewhere warm. He’d like to have a big family with six to eight children.Project: Pacific Islander oral history project. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu
2012
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No. 761 Frances Darger
Frances Johnson Darger (b. 1924) played sixty-nine seasons with the Utah Symphony. Born and raised in Salt Lake City, she grew up in a very musical home with four sisters. Her mother was an opera singer. She learned violin and played in the Stewart School Orchestra, graduating in 1939. A friend of Walker Wallace, Darger attended East High School and then took a bachelor of arts in English from the University of Utah. She joined the Utah State Symphony in 1942, at the age of 17, and talks at some length about her experiences playing in the symphony, along with a brief stint in California, during World War II. She married her high school sweetheart, Bob Darger, after the war, and worked for the Salt Lake Tribune Telegram doing a society page column. Darger remembers Maurice Abravanel’s arrival in the late 1940s and discusses his impact on the Utah Symphony and its growth into a full-time orchestra at some length. Darger performed the Call of the Champions with the Symphony and the Mormon Tabernacle Choir at the 2002 Olympic Games, and remembers excellent cooperation between the LDS Church and the Symphony over the years. She also sang in the chorus and traveled around the world both playing and singing. She most fondly remembers playing with Van Cliburn and David Oistrakh in the Symphony’s early years.Project: University of Utah project. Interviewer: Anne Palmer Peterson
2012
5
No. 762 Jay Harland (pseudonym)
Jay Harland (pseudonym) was born in Salt Lake City, Utah in 1980, where he has spent most of his life. He joined the ROTC program at West High School and that is where his military career began. He joined the Marines because of their reputation for being the toughest military branch and he left for boot camp right after graduation. Jay describes his training experience at boot camp in San Diego and at Camp Pendleton, his interactions with his training officers and with the other Marines. These interactions opened his eyes to a diversity of worldviews because he was working with people he never would have met in Utah. His own worldview and faith was shaken because of his interactions with some of his NCOs, who Jay felt treated him and his fellow soldiers unethically and acted immorally.Ironically, Jay achieved sergeant and became an NCO on his second deployment. He talks about his leadership style and the way his leadership style was received by his fellow NCOs and commanding officers. He was taken off squadron leader after a few months. The NCO corps improved when Jay was in Okinawa and he discusses why it was better. Because it improved Jay decided to reenlist, but when he returned to Okinawa the second time the chain of command changed again and for the worse. Jay’s experience only declined further when he did winter warfare training in Bridgeport, California, which he describes as miserable.Jay talks about his desire to travel, which influenced his decision to reenlist. He was able to go to Europe and describes his time in Spain, Italy, Germany, England, and France. He says being exposed to different cultures and viewpoints was the greatest benefit of his to enlistments in the Marine Corps. He discusses whether or not he would have enlisted if he knew what he knows now and says he would not. He promotes volunteer work, community service, and education as an alternative to military service.Project: Iraq and Afghanistan oral history project. Interviewer: John C. Worsencroft
2009
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No. 763 Ula Inoye
Ula Inouye was born in Western Samoa and raised in American Samoa. She is from a family of thirteen. Her father is Samoan and her mother is Samoan Chinese. She is married and has a daughter. She lived in American Samoa until 2000 when she moved to Hawaii because her parents wanted her to have more opportunities, especially for a good education. After that she moved to Utah where she has lived since. She moved to Utah because she wanted to go to school there and also because she had broken up with her boyfriend. When she first moved to Utah she lived with her siblings.Ula talks about the differences between American and Western Samoa. American Samoa is more Americanized and Western Samoa continues more of the Samoan traditions and culture.She discusses what it was like growing up in such a large family. She was lucky to share a room with her twin sister because all the boys shared one room and her other sisters shared another. She talks about growing up with a twin. Being a part of a big family made it hard for Ula to distinguish herself from her siblings.School was a high priority in her family. Her mother was the enforcer and her father was the supporter. Every day they did homework, then chores, then worked at the store. If they did not do well in school, they were not allowed to play sports. If they did not go to seminary they could not go to school.Growing up the girls in the family were always taught to serve the boys food. Ula still serves her brothers to this day. If she would get in trouble, she would be sent to her grandma to be disciplined. Her grandma taught her a lot about Samoan culture. Ula spoke both English and Samoan growing up and is still fluent in Samoan.She talks about a social experiment she and her friends did at a mall. They watched her Polynesian friend shop in a mall store and the associate followed the Polynesian girl around the store as if she was going to shoplift. Most of the discrimination she has felt for being Polynesian has been customer service related.Ula’s father converted to the Mormon faith because he wanted to marry Ula’s mother. Her mother was raised Mormon. Ula was never forced to follow the Mormon religion but her parents encouraged her to pray and read her scriptures every day. Her father was an area authority for the Church. She wants to move to Samoa and start a nail parlor business there. She wants to move to Samoa because it is less materialistic than in the United States.Project: Pacific Islander oral history project. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu
2009
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No. 764 Jared Jones
Jared Jones was born in Alabama where his father was attending flight school for the Army. He grew up around aviation and developed an interest in it early. His family eventually moved to Park City, Utah. After graduating high school Jared went to the Air Force Academy but decided to come home to Utah to pursue different interests. He joined the National Guard and was in the same unit as his father. Jared describes his basic training, his education and his flight training. He talks about flying Apache helicopters and the many aspects of the machine and its operation. Jared’s unit was then deployed to Afghanistan. He describes the training he and his unit went through and the process of traveling to Afghanistan and adjusting to life there. Jared talks about his unit’s job in Afghanistan, how they spent their time and details what went into their missions. He was the unit historian and documented much of the unit’s activities. In addition to their duties for the National Guard, Jared and his peers started visiting Afghani hospitals to donate supplies and spend time with Afghani children.In his second interview Jared explains the motivations behind starting the Afghanistan Orphanage Project, which he and a few other members of his unit founded after returning home. He talks about navigating Afghanistan’s culture and bureaucracy, looking for funds, and working with the Afghan people to get the nonprofit started. Jared explains where the organization is and where they hope to be in the future.Project: Iraq and Afghanistan oral history project. Interviewer: John C. Worsencroft
2009
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No. 765 Alexis Kelner
Alexis Kelner recounts his family’s history. They left Latvia, lived in a displaced persons camp in Germany and then moved to the Utah. Alexis describes many mountaineering and ski touring experiences. He talks about his involvement in starting the Save Our Canyons organization. Alexis describes the early days, several of the important moments in the organization’s history, and its present status. He explains his many roles and responsibilities in Save Our Canyons.Project: Environmental oral history project. Interviewer: Gavin Noyes
2009
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No. 766 Stan Larson
In June and July 2011, Stan Larson, former curator of the Manuscripts Division at the Marriott Library, sat down with Karen Carver and Liz Rogers to complete Interview 251, which he had done in 1989. Dr. Larson spends these interviews reminiscing on memorable collections he was part of acquiring or worked with over his long tenure at the Marriott. In the first interview he briefly discusses the papers of vanished outdoorsman Everett Ruess and other smaller collections but spends the bulk of the interviews discussing collections related to the LDS Church. Dr. Larson was instrumental in publishing B. H. Roberts’ The Truth, The Way, The Life. He also relates an adventure involving Roberts’ 1830 Book of Mormon, the Marriott Library, and Sam Weller.The second interview continues in a similar vein, encompassing work with author Thomas Stuart Ferguson, acquisition of the Rudger Clawson papers, and several others including Utah historian Richard D. Poll and geologist Sterling B. Talmage, son of noted Mormon James E. Talmage. He spends some time relating the acquisition of LDS Church president David O. McKay’s papers including a humorous numbering incident. Dr. Larson was also closely involved with acquiring the William B. McLellin papers and a photograph album that once belonged to LDS Church president Joseph F. Smith.Project: University of Utah oral history project. Interviewer: Karen Carver and Elizabeth Rogers
2011
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No. 767 Sarah LeMire
Sarah LeMire (b. 1979) was born in Grand Rapids, Michigan. She studied English and Russian at University of Michigan Ann Arbor, and graduated in 2001, enlisting in the Army in January 2002. LeMire, who held the Military Occupational Specialty of 98G, took her basic training at Fort Jackson, then studied Arabic at the Defense Language Institute in Monterey, California, before attending further training at Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, and at Fort Huachuca, Arizona. She met her husband at the DLI and they married at Fort Hood, Texas, after she graduated. After a brief interval of garrison duty and Iraqi language training in Germany, LeMire deployed to Iraq in November 2005, with the 4th Infantry Division. She was stationed at Baghdad, doing language work. When she got back to the States in November 2006, LeMire left the Army and moved to her husband’s native Utah, where she received a master’s degree in English from the University of Utah. At the time of the interview she worked as a Research and Information Services Librarian at the University of Utah Marriott Library. LeMire discusses her attitudes toward the war, describes her experience as a female in the Army at some length, and shares how she coped with deployment both during and afterward. Project: Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans oral history project. Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2013
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No. 768 June K. Lyman
June and her children, Mary Lee Madison and Marty Lyman, discuss their experiences and impressions of life at Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota, starting in 1971, specifically the events of the American Indian Movement (AIM) insurrection at Wounded Knee. June’s husband, Stan, was superintendent of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. She was employed by the school district and worked at Chadron College. They retire to Phoenix, Arizona, where Stan works on his memoirs and writes a book, The Poor Bear Trail.This is the end of the Lyman interviews.Project: University of Utah oral history project. Interviewer: Floyd A. O’Neil and Gregory Thompson
2009
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No. 769 Paul Madsen
Paul Madsen (b. 1960) was born in Onekama, Michigan and moved around to several different states while he was growing up. Madsen’s father had served in the Navy and from a very young age he remembers being fascinated with mechanics in general. When Madsen was going to high school in Charlotte, North Carolina he applied to all the major military academies hoping to get into the air force academy. Finally Madsen was successful and got admitted to the academy in 1979. He discusses the experiences he had attending the academy and the various challenges he faced while going there. Madsen went to pilot training in Enid, Oklahoma and graduated in 1984. After graduation, he was stationed at Tucson, Arizona at Davis Monthan Air Base with the 23rd Tactical Air Support Squad. Madsen describes his early years as a pilot and the combat training he received. In 1989 Madsen switched to the reserves at Hill Air force base in Utah and began working at Southwest Airlines. Eventually he became the assistant officer of the 466th Fighter Squadron. On September 11, 2001 Madsen felt great that he was in a position to do something to help fight terrorism. Soon after the terrorist attacks Madsen was stationed at Ahmed Al Jaber in Kuwait flying sorties into Afghanistan. Madsen explains the dynamics of the sorties he flew and the complex technology he used when attacking targets that were mostly set up by CIA guys. He felt that his cause was very noble and felt very satisfied by his work in Afghanistan. Madsen was also stationed in Iraq during Operation Iraqi Freedom. Initially his job was to target SCUD missiles, but later his unit also would be support for soldiers on the ground. Madsen explains his happiness upon seeing his son coming home from Iraq and his unsettling feelings that he was not allowed to blow up as much as he should have in Iraq. In 2007 Madsen was sent back to Iraq and was given a chance to see General Patreas’s strategy in motion. In conclusion Madsen explains his opinion of the Air Force and the funding it receives today.Project: Iraq and Afghanistan oral history project. Interviewer: John C. Worsencroft
2010
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No. 770 John Reed
Lieutenant-Colonel (Ret.) John Reed, US Army Reserve, discusses his deployment to Iraq and service with MNSTC-I in 2007-2008. A combat engineer, LTC Reed was working as a history professor at the University of Utah at his time of deployment. He discusses his motivations for joining the Army Reserve and fills in some background before moving to the interview’s primary topic. He touches on his state of physical and military preparedness for deployment, living conditions and restrictions in his area, his time in Kurdistan and “outside the wire,” his redeployment to the United States at the end of his tour, and his reinsertion into the classroom. He also discusses his feelings regarding Kurdish and non-Kurdish Iraqis, his perceptions of the relations between different services, between active-duty and reserve components of the Army, and on his role as a field-grade officer in a combat zone without a command. Project: Iraq and Afghanistan oral history project. Interviewer: Leighton Quarles
2013
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No. 771 Josh Scheuerman
Josh Scheuerman was born in 1978 in West Valley City, Utah. He began snowboarding when he was thirteen years old on a plastic snowboard purchased from Shopko. He was one of the early riders at many of the resorts as they began to allow snowboarders on their runs. He worked for several resorts in Southern Utah and along the Wasatch Front and he taught and volunteered with the Burton Chill program that provides outdoor recreation opportunities, particularly snowboarding, to at-risk youth in the Salt Lake Valley. He currently lives in Salt Lake City and still snowboards voraciously. Project: Outdoor Recreation oral history project. Interviewer: Erin Holcomb
2011
15
No. 772 Joseph Earl Simmons
Joseph joined the Marine Corps after graduating from high school. He describes basic training and the initial shock of it. Joseph was in basic training on 9/11 and talks about the atmosphere after the attacks. After finishing School of Infantry Joseph’s unit was deployed on a Homeland Security mission in Southern California. Joseph describes his deployment at Camp Pendleton in Southern California. At the end of his deployment he found out they were being sent to Iraq in place of an active duty battalion. They were flown into Kuwait to prepare for the invasion of Iraq and he was chosen as a designated marksman. Joseph describes the initial push into Iraq. He did not see fighting until they reached An Nasiriya. After An Nasiriya he was part of a rescue effort to save a Marine artillery unit being held down by fire. He describes reaching Baghdad and patrolling the streets. At one point during their first day of patrolling the city they started taking fire. The fighting continued throughout the day. On the next day they took over a military complex. Joseph does not remember firing his rifle for the rest of the war. A few weeks after reaching Baghdad Joseph’s unit was sent to a camp somewhere between Iraq and Kuwait. He describes the conditions there and what he did while waiting to return home. Then he talks about getting home and reuniting with his family. Shortly after returning he went on a mission to Anaheim, California and then South Africa for the Mormon church. Joseph left his mission early because he was experiencing stress and mild PTSD. He then became an admin clerk in the 19th Special Forces while he went to school. After he finished ROTC he joined the Guard with his brother and he has been the company commander of Echo Company, 211th ever since. Project: Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans oral history project. Interviewer: John C. Worsencroft
2010
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No. 773 Ma’afu Suliafu
Ma’afu Suliafu (b. 1978) was born in Salt Lake City, Utah. His parents moved from Hawaii to Utah because Ma’afu’s mom went to law school at the University of Utah. Ma’afu’s parents weren’t expecting to have a child and they initially planned to give him up for adoption. They decided to keep him instead. When Ma’afu was four his parents sent him to Hawaii to be raised by his grandparents. After a year, though, his parents moved to Hawaii to help raise Ma’afu and raise a family. Ma’afu has three brothers and one sister. When he was seventeen, Ma’afu moved to California and went to college he moved to Utah for a job opportunity and has been there since. His father is Tonga Samoan from American Samoa. His father’s side originated in the States but eventually moved to Australia and he has Welsh blood as well. On his mother’s side, his grandpa is Tongan, Jewish and British. They originated in Boston but moved to Tonga. Ma’afu discusses his family’s ancestry and his interest in genealogy. His family came to the United States for opportunities and for education. He talks about working on his grandfather’s farm growing up. His grandpa was very influential in raising Ma’afu and his siblings. He lived with his grandparents for a year and a half before his parents came and he feels lucky to have been raised by both his parents and his grandparents. They learned discipline on the farm and Ma’afu gained skills and habits he has maintained throughout his life. He talks about what they would grow and how. Ma’afu was raised speaking Tongan in his home and then, later, English. He discusses the aspects of Tongan culture that he was raised with. They were raised with less of the luxuries that Ma’afu is able to have now. They didn’t have beds or much furniture for a lot of the time they lived in Hawaii so Ma’afu learned to appreciate those things. He considers himself to be a parental figure for his siblings. He had many responsibilities a parent would have and because of that he feels very close and protective towards his siblings. Ma’afu’s mother was a convert to the LDS church. He was exposed to many religions growing up, including Methodist churches and Catholic as well as Mormonism. He decided to stay with the LDS religion. He went on a Mormon mission in the four corners area. He talks about feeling as though he’s treated differently because he’s Polynesian. People will stare or won’t give them proper service when he and his friends go out. Ma’afu plans to stay in Utah because he’s able to earn enough money to support himself, he feels comfortable there, and he feels he could raise a family there. Project: Pacific Islander oral history project. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu
2008
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No. 774 Genevieve Atwood and Don Mabey
Genevieve Atwood and Don Mabey discuss their involvement with Great Salt Lake. They talk about their early experiences with the lake and when and why they became interested in it. Each describes their educational training and interests in science. Atwood discusses her career with the Utah Geological Survey, her contribution to several boards involved with Great Salt Lake, and her time in the Utah State Legislature. She describes many of the lake’s important historical and geographical features and the lake’s processes. She talks about her involvement in the management of the lake. Don talks about his work helping manage and plan for Great Salt Lake. Atwood discusses the high lake level times and many of the plans to control the lake level. In the second interview, Genevieve Atwood talks about the causeway and its effects on Great Salt Lake. She discusses the high lake level years. She describes the map of Great Salt Lake that she, Don Mabey, and Don Currey designed and produced. Atwood talks about leaving the UGS and her time in the legislature. She talks about the management of Great Salt Lake. She details the educational work she does with teachers and students about and at Great Salt Lake. Don and Genevieve talk about their favorite places and experiences at Great Salt Lake.Project: Great Salt Lake oral history project. Interviewer: Greg Smoak
2014
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No. 775 Kevin Ciampini
Snowboarding pioneer Kevin Ciampini reflects on his snowboarding life and the sport’s early days. Born in San Francisco, Mr. Ciampini grew up in Ogden. His father worked at Hill Air Force Base. He was always active and athletic, and raced BMX before he started boarding in 1978 with Wintersticks. He remembers that only Beaver Mountain allowed snowboards at first, and reminisces about selling his radio to go boarding because it had snowed. First sponsored by Ed Kalbach’s EK Enterprises as Team Cat Flap in 1985, Mr. Ciampini and his friend and snowboarding partner Tim Strong competed in four world championships at Breckenridge, Colorado, most of that time sponsored by Tom Sims. He worked at ski resorts and as a product representative, helped the first snowboarders at Park City certify, and helped the sport spread to multiple Utah resorts. The end of Mr. Ciampini’s professional career came in 1989 when he broke his back at Park West, but he never stopped boarding. The inventor of XBALM lip balm and owner of a construction company, Mr. Ciampini also married in 1997 and has two children, both of whom ski. He credits snowboarding’s popularity with saving the hitherto stuffy sport of skiing, and reflects on skiing’s evolution as a sport since the 1980s. Mr. Ciampini leaves few stones unturned with his interview, touching on aspects ranging from the attitude present in early snowboarding, to the people responsible for its spread in Utah, to the complete lack of concern for safety in the early days.Project: Outdoor Recreation oral history project. Interviewer: Erin Halcomb
2013
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No. 776 Lynn de Freitas
Lynn de Freitas is an avid birder and environmental activists who focuses on the ecosystem of Great Salt Lake. Currently she is the Executive Director of Friends of Great Salt Lake, a non-profit organization that works to preserve and protect the ecosystem of the Great Salt Lake and works to educate and create public awareness about issues concerning the Lake and its environments. Lynn began her involvement with Friends in 1994 and in 1996 she was promoted to President of the board. Lynn’s serves as a full-time volunteer. Prior to her involvement with Friends, Lynn worked as high school library Media Coordinator for public and private schools. Lynn was born and raised in New Jersey.Project: Great Salt Lake oral history project. Interviewer: Greg Smoak
2013
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No. 777 Randy Dryer
Randy Dryer, former chair of the University of Utah’s Board of Trustees, gave two interviews. The first focuses on his time as a trustee, particularly his application of crisis management, and the second on his teaching and work with the honors college. A journalism major at the University in the late 1960s and early 1970s, he soon encountered the occasionally uncomfortable relationship between the campus administration and the media. His career has been in internet and media law, and he also lectures, conducts crisis management courses, and works with the Honors College, all at the University of Utah. The first interview is more career-spanning, while the second focuses largely on a single class on privacy and transparency Mr. Dryer taught at the University’s Honors College.Project: Outdoor Recreation oral history project. Interviewer: Anne Peterson
2012
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No. 778 Richard Etulain
Richard Etulain discusses his early life and interest in western history. He describes his education and his early career as a western historian. Dr. Etulain then recounts his early experiences with the Western History Association, including his time as president of the association. He talks about some memorable sessions of the Western History Association annual meeting. Dr. Etulain also explains some tensions he has witnessed between different schools of western history.Project: Western History Association oral history project. Interviewer: Greg Smoak
2014
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No. 779 John Horel
John Horel (b. 1955) was born and grew up in Eureka, California. He attended Humboldt State, received his bachelor’s degree from San Jose State and a PhD in meteorology from the University of Washington. He worked as an assistant research professor at Scripps Institute of Oceanography before joining the faculty at the University of Utah.Dr. Horel’s research interests include weather and climate of the western United States, data assimilation, fire weather, Great Salt Lake studies, cold air pools, and periods of poor air quality in valleys and basins. In this interview, he talks about the combination of weather and atmospheric effects influenced by the Great Salt Lake and the Wasatch Mountains. Dr. Horel relates personal experiences he has had with the Lake. He also talks about his work with the National Weather Service and other entities during the 2002 Winter Olympics held in Salt Lake City.Project: Great Salt Lake oral history project. Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2013
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No. 780 Tiff Jackson
Tiffany “Tiff” Jackson is a Utah native, born and raised in Bountiful. She grew up with a perfect view of the Great Salt Lake from her east bench childhood home. Her family spent time horseback riding on Antelope Island and swimming on the south shore of the lake.She took her first sailing trip on the lake in the early 2000s and joined the Great Salt Lake Yacht Club the same year. She became involved with the club leadership first as the social director and then was elected Commodore in November 2013.Tiff talks about the history and purpose of the Great Salt Lake Yacht Club, the activities of the club, and her involvement with the group. She relates personal experiences she’s had on the lake along with favorite locations and memories.Project: Great Salt Lake oral history project. Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2014
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No. 781 Charles A. Evans
Dr. Evans discusses his early life and his time as a student at the University of Utah. He worked as a research assistant in the Bureau of Economic and Business Research. Dr. Evans was involved in obtaining land from Fort Douglas for the University of Utah. He describes his involvement with the development of Research Park over the years, his responsibilities and accomplishments and the people he has worked with. Dr. Evans details the many companies that work out of Research Park, as well as companies that have spun off from the universities. He talks about the process of obtaining land for Research Park and the Park’s future growth.Project: University of Utah oral history project. Interviewer: Anne P. Peterson
2014
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No. 782 Steve Kaufusi
Mr. Kaufusi was born in Nuku’alofa, Tonga, and moved in Salt Lake City in 1972 at age eight. He describes his early life in Tonga and his initial reaction to Utah. In Utah, his father worked in construction and landscaping; his mother worked occasional odd jobs until illness forced her to stop. He went through the Salt Lake City school system. He describes the Polynesian community in Salt Lake and his family's transported values. He describes issues of using the Tongan language as well as learning the English language.Note: the interview is not complete. The audio stops at 34:19.Project: Pacific Islanders oral history project. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu
2008
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No. 783 Ellen Labotka
Ellen Labotka (b. 1968) was born and raised in Riverside, Illinois. She graduated from Utah State University in Recreational Resource Management. She has worked as a ranger for the Utah State Parks department for more than twenty years.Ellen talks about her early interest in the outdoors and how she got involved with the Parks department. She tells about her time spent at Starvation Reservoir, Jordanelle State Park, Antelope Island State Park and Willard Bay State Park, including her duties and responsibilities.She relates favorite stories about her time at Antelope Island and reveals her favorite spots on the island, and closes the interview with her feelings about the lake and its value.Project: Great Salt Lake oral history project. Interviewer: Becky B. Lloyd
2014

Interviews, 784 – 790Return to Top

Container(s): Box 74

Container(s) Description Dates
box
74
Folder
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No. 784 Alexander Lemons
Alex Lemons (b. 1979) was born in Provo, Utah but spent most of his childhood in Colorado. Alex’s family moved back to Utah in 1994 and he graduated from Alta High School in 1998. He went to Westminster College and eventually graduated with a double major in History and English. After he graduated he began to think of going on to graduate school but wanted to do some kind of service first. Originally he looked to the Forest Service or Peace Corps but after the 9/11 attacks he felt a need to serve his country in the armed forces. Alex went to boot camp as an enlisted man instead of an officer because he wanted the enlisted experience. He explains feeling very isolated from others in boot camp because of his age, but also talks about the advantages of being older. Once he completed his School of Infantry he was assigned to 1st Battalion, 4th Marines, 1st Marine regiment, 1st Marine Division which he deployed with in February of 2003.From the moment he touched the ground in Kuwait, Alex describes the prominent feeling of urgency he felt in the drills and preparation. During his deployment, he perceived that the Iraqi military was so dilapidated it seemed as if it hadn't existed since 1991. Towards the end of his first tour he began to increasingly feel frustrated by the situation in Iraq because of the looting and the sense that he was in the position of a babysitter. When he got home, Alex decided he needed more independence than Alpha Company was giving him so he joined a sniper platoon and passed sniper school on his first try.He was deployed to Iraq with his Sniper Platoon in 2004 for a deployment that he describes as much more combat intensive than his prior tour. He explains the tactics and experience of fighting in cities such as Najaf, Ramadi, and Fallujah. Personal encounters with Iraqis and had become more hostile since his deployment in 2003. His return to the U.S. in 2005 was not easy as he recounts experiencing severe symptoms of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. He came close to going on inactive but was convinced by a junior Marine not to do otherwise. Once back with his unit he was deployed to Kuwait in February of 2006. He began to experience problems with older, cold war era veterans who out ranked the more experienced veterans of Iraq. He also explains the changing political situation in Iraq and the dynamics of the reintroduced elections. During this deployment his unit acted as a reserve unit in Kuwait, reinforcing other units.Upon his return to the U.S. Alex was offered a recruiter position and decided that he would not reenlist and instead go into the Inactive Reserves. Unfortunately, the Inactive Reserves was one of the places the Marines were getting the men they needed to fill ranks and he, for what would be the last time, was deployed to Iraq. He first went to Camp Lejeune in 2007 where he received a good deal of preparatory training for his new role in Iraq. During this deployment he worked with two other Captains reporting directly to General Petraeus. He worked closely with the 8th Division to improve the situation around Diwaniyah; maintaining control of the city and especially keeping the roads clear of IED’s. Alex did similar work, again under General Petraeus, in Basra and Sadr city.Project: Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans oral history project. Interviewer: John C. Worsencroft
2010
2
No. 785 Dennis Nazari
Dennis Nazari was born in California in 1963. He moved to Utah as a teenager and quickly became involved in the formative stages of snowboarding. He was the founder of the now legendary Salty Peaks snowboard shop in Salt Lake City and was a member of the original Salty Eight snowboard team. He received sponsorships from various companies and competed nationally and internationally. He currently lives in Salt Lake where he still runs Salty Peaks and collects rare and vintage snowboards and accessories.Project: Outdoor Recreation oral history project. Interviewer: Erin Halcomb
2012
3
No. 786 Moli Ngatuvai
Moli Ngatuvai (b. 1938) was born and raised in Tonga. He went to school and served a Mormon labor mission there. He attended BYU Hawaii and BYU Provo. He returned to Tonga and became a teacher in Liahona where he married his wife. They have six children. They moved to America so Moli could earn an advanced degree and decided to stay and raise their family. Moli talks about growing up in Tonga with his brothers and sisters. He talks about what it was like going to school. Moli went to a boarding school and he remembers the very strict schedule they had. He discusses his religious background. He is a convert to the Mormon religion. He was introduced to Mormonism by his neighbors and loved it. Though his parents were of different religions at the time, they supported his decision. Everybody in his family except one sister have converted to the Mormon religion. He talks about being the only Polynesian in church when he first moved to Utah. He talks about growing up in Tonga during World War Two. He remembers that supplies were scarce because ships weren’t going to Tonga and he remembers celebrating when the war was over. Moli remembers going to Hawaii for the first time and how much he liked it. The first year he was there he got a job working in the pineapple fields. He hated it. To make money and support himself while attending BYU Hawaii he worked construction. He and his family moved to Provo, Utah after their son told them how much he loved it. They live there still. Moli is retired and is trying to build a house in Salt Lake City. He would like to move back to Tonga but because all of his grandchildren live in Utah he thinks he will stay there.Project: Pacific Islanders oral history project. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu
2009
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No. 787 Sioana Ngatuvai
Sioana Ngatuvai (b. 1938) was born in Pangai, Ha’apai, Tonga. She talks about what it was like growing up in Pangai with her siblings and some of her experiences at primary school and high school. In primary school the students would get hit on the fingers with rulers if they misbehaved or answered a question incorrectly. Sioana misbehaved and had a lot of fun in high school because she was so far away from her parents and because her half brother was the principal. Sioana was born and raised in the Mormon Church. Her parents were both converts to the religion. She tells the story of how her father came to the church. He was attempting to disrupt a meeting when a tree limb fell on him. He listened to the entire meeting stuck under the limb and afterwards decided to find out more about the church, after which he decided he wanted to become a Mormon. She talks about growing up during World War II. She remembers they had to keep the lights out at night. Sioana was not very afraid though. They did not really know what was going on because the war was not televised the way it is now. She remembers celebrating after the war was over and going through the American soldiers’ food supplies after they were gone. The soldiers also had a lot of children with the Tongan women that they left behind. Education was very important in her home growing up. Her father told the children that if they wanted a nice house and nice things later in life they would need to do well in school. Sioana went to college in Hawaii. Her high school in Tonga, Liahona, paid for her to go so that she could go back to Liahona and teach. She studied home economics. She talks about her first plane ride to Hawaii. While in Hawaii she worked for a brief time at a pineapple cannery and then danced at the Polynesian Culture Center. Sioana and her family moved to Provo, Utah because after one of their sons moved to Utah and told them how much he liked it, their other son wanted to move to Utah and play football. She talks about teaching their kids English. She regrets not teaching them Tongan because now they cannot speak or understand it.Project: Pacific Islanders oral history project. Interviewer: Savani Aupiu
2009
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No. 788 Don Paul
In this interview, Don Paul talks about his formative years and his parents’ influence on his love of the outdoors. He describes his first experiences exploring the Great Salt Lake. Mr. Paul then discusses his education, which led him to a career as a biologist. He worked as a conservation officer for the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, and then later as an information specialist. Mr. Paul also worked on a television program called “Utah Trails” and participated in writing a book on raptors in Utah. He became the first non-game manager in Utah for the Division of Wildlife Resources. Mr. Paul was the principal biologist for the reintroduction of Peregrines to the northern part of Utah. He then became chief of the information education section before becoming a wildlife biologist for the Great Salt Lake area. Mr. Paul also became the first avian biologist with the Great Salt Lake Ecosystem Project. He describes his work with the Linking Communities program. He talks about the Great Salt Lake’s ecological diversity, complexity, and importance, and compares it with other, similar ecosystems elsewhere in the world. Mr. Paul discusses the changes he has seen to the Great Salt Lake and challenges to the ecosystem.Project: Great Salt Lake oral history project. Interviewer: Greg Smoak
2013
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No. 789 Eric Hodge and Nigel Roberts
Mr. Hodge, from Australia, and Mr. Roberts, from New Zealand, talk about traveling to Utah to climb King’s Peak. They describe preparing for the climb and the climb itself. Eric and Nigel also discuss their formative experiences as outdoorsmen and developing a love of climbing. They talk about traveling all over the world to climb numerous peaks, their goals, and the challenges they’ve faced.Project: Outdoor Recreation oral history project. Interviewer: John C. Worsencroft
2010
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No. 790 Terry Tempest Williams
Terry Tempest Williams talks about her family’s history in Utah and growing up near Great Salt Lake. She describes developing an interest in nature at an early age. Mrs. Tempest Williams discusses her self-education, her mentors, and her time as a student at the University of Utah. She talks about her work with the Utah Museum of Natural History and her career as an educator. Mrs. Tempest Williams talks about the process of writing her book Refuge. She also discusses her involvement with the University of Utah’s Environmental Studies Program. Finally, Mrs. Tempest Williams describes some of her favorite places and memories of Great Salt Lake.Project: Great Salt Lake oral history project. Interviewer: Greg Smoak
2014
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No. 791 Candice Kalamafoni
Candice Kalamafoni, the youngest of four, was born in Arcadia, California, and raised in Pasadena and, briefly, Hawaii, attending Kaiser High School in Honolulu for her senior year. Hawaiian and Samoan, she felt out of place in Pasadena where there were few Polynesians. After her senior year of high school, Candice returned to California and attended City College in Pasadena while working different jobs. Shortly after getting married, Candice and her husband moved to Utah so her husband could attend Brigham Young University. Candice talks about her family life and the Hawaiian and Samoan customs she grew up with, and mentions that she really started appreciated Polynesian culture when she got into dancing in high school. She describes feeling racism for the first time when she moved to Utah but feels comfortable now.Note: The interview is incomplete. The audio cuts off at 23:47.Project: Pacific Islander oral history project. Interviewer: Sauvani Aupui
2008
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No. 792 Elizabeth Mathias
Elizabeth Mathias talks about her first experiences with the military and her family’s history of military involvement. When she was a junior in high school she went to a summer camp at the Air Force Academy and decided to pursue a career in the Air Force. After her time at the Air Force Academy, she was assigned to earn her Master’s degree at Pennsylvania State University. Elizabeth talks about her experiences in the Air Force Academy and at Pennsylvania State University, particularly her experiences as a woman in the military. She explains her reaction to the events of 9/11. After earning her master’s she worked at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Elizabeth was also deployed to Kabul, Afghanistan from 2008 to 2009 where she worked in public affairs for the Air Force. Project: Iraq and Afghanistan oral history project. Interviewer: Matthew Basso
2014
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No. 793 Victor Method
In this series of three interviews Victor Method describes the things he has gathered for the visual archive. He then talks about events surrounding Vilamoura in 2006, one of which was a sponsorship deal the women ski jumpers earned with Visa.In 2008 the women ski jumpers were invited to jump at the inauguration of the Canadian National Championships, where Lindsey Vonn set the record for the hill. Victor then describes purchasing a billboard supporting women’s ski jumping outside VANOC headquarters. At a rally that year Victor talked to a lawyer who told him they should put together a lawsuit. He asked women from all over the world to be plaintiffs in the discrimination lawsuit.Victor talks about the world championships in Liberec in 2009 where Lindsey Vonn became the first American to win gold at a world championship. He describes working with the press to spread the word about the women and raising funds to support the team. Victor describes a particular fundraiser they held in New York.The team ended up losing the discrimination lawsuit. They took it to the Supreme Court of Canada but the Supreme Court would not hear their case. He then wrote to Vladimir Putin and President Medvedev of Russia to ask them to let the women jump in Sochi.He talks about his close relationships with Michael Lynch, Jamie Clyde and Armins Rusis, all of whom were instrumental in raising funds for the team. Jamie was a photographer who sold her photographs of the jumpers to support them and helped organize a fundraiser in New York. Armins, a Wall Street executive, donated and helped raise money and supported the team tremendously.Project: Outdoor Recreation oral history project. Interviewer: Erin Halcomb
2012
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No. 794 Joyce Mitchell
Dr. Joyce Mitchell, nationally prominent in the field of bioinformatics and retiring head of the University of Utah’s Department of Bioinformatics, discusses her life and long career, first at the University of Missouri and ten at the University of Utah. A Wyoming native, she attended Stephens College in Missouri and then earned a PhD in population genetics at the University of Wisconsin. She spent twenty-five years on the faculty of the University of Missouri, and left in 2005 for the University of Utah.The first interview covers Dr. Mitchell’s experience at Stephens, postdoctoral work, and her early and ongoing involvement with computer systems. Interview two explores her career at the University of Missouri, which ranged from working on artificial intelligence to IAIMS grants to Y2K compliance and beyond, and discusses Dr. Mitchell’s longstanding relationship with the National Library of Medicine and her service to the Board of Regents. The interview finishes with a look at Dr. Mitchell’s move to the University of Utah in 2005 and her work in linking the University of Utah’s medical infrastructure and its connectedness with the Veterans Administration, Intermountain Healthcare, and the Utah Department of Health and other institutions.The third and final interview continues with Dr. Mitchell’s work at the University of Utah. Dr. Mitchell focuses on key contemporary issues with health informatics, further discusses the cross-institutional medical record infrastructure she helped grow, and also discusses her work teaching summer intensive courses at the Woods Hole Summer of Science.Note: The interview contains supplemental materials. See enclosed speech “Health Science Library Anniversary Symposium Program, University of Missouri, Columbia,” Wednesday, September 28, 2011.Project: University of Utah oral history project. Interviewer: Anne P. Peterson
2012
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No. 795 John Netto
John Netto was born in New Haven, Connecticut and was raised between Connecticut and Utah. He is currently the CEO of Kenobi and he gives a brief history of the company and describes what they do there. John talks about his family and how they grew up poor.John explains how he came to be involved in activism. He started working with a Presbyterian minister, who is now his wife. He started working directly with the poor, the homeless, and in particular those who were mentally ill. John describes his involvement and his relationship with the homeless of Salt Lake City. He has developed a close relationship and has become a great advocate for them. This lead John to become involved in the Occupy movement because he was asked by the Salt Lake City mayor to communicate with the homeless at Pioneer Park when the Occupy movement was asked to leave. He describes his involvement in the process of moving people out of the park.Project: Occupy Salt Lake City oral history project. Interviewer: Michael McLane
2012
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No. 796 Walter Nugent
In this interview, Walter Nugent discusses his career as a western historian. He describes his early education and his introduction to western history. He discusses a few of his publications and the research that went into them. Dr. Nugent then talks about his affiliation with the Western History Association, including his time as president. He also talks about a few memorable sessions at the Western History Association Conferences.Project: Western History Association oral history project. Interviewer: Greg Smoak
2014
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No. 797 Tara Bueche Robbins
Tara Bueche Robbins is a realtor who became involved with Occupy Salt Lake City after reading about the movement, in New York City and elsewhere, on alternative news websites. Originally, she was drawn to the protest by its challenge to the “Big Bank” system that has played such a significant role in the decline in the American economy. Since her initial involvement, like most people participating in Occupy, she has developed a number of other points of contention, all brought to bear in her activism. Tara observes the changes that have taken place since the closing of the Pioneer Park encampment. She also criticizes the city and police department’s decision to close the park and the way that they went about dismantling the camp. Tara has a history of political activism, beginning with her support of women’s reproductive rights. Her grandmother died in an illegal abortion, and Tara and her mother have been involved in protests and other political efforts that support a woman’s right to choose.Project: Occupy Salt Lkae City oral history project. Interviewer: Michael McLane
2011
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No. 798 Tim Strong
Utah snowboarding pioneer Tim Strong credits his introduction to snowboarding to the Air Force, which put him in Utah in 1982, and an article in Playboy about Winterstick snowboards. An east coast surfer, he found the transition natural, and soon transitioned from a Swallowtail to the game-changing Sims 1500 FE with metal edges. Mr. Strong remembers that the first resort in Utah to allow snowboarding was Alta, for a bare two weeks, followed by Beaver Mountain, Brighton, and more.His interview focuses on the sport’s history in Utah, touching on equipment, the old days of hiking before resorts allowed snowboards, the politics of snowboarding in the early days such as the unease between Tom Sims and Jake Burton, and his own snowboarding career in the 1980s. He was involved in the early certification process that Chuck Panner pioneered, and persuaded Snowbasin, the first corporate resort in Utah to allow snowboarding, to accommodate the new demographic. Mr. Strong recalls the sense of brotherhood he felt with other Utah snowboarders like his friend Kevin Ciampini, Rich and Drew Hicken, Noel Walkinshaw, and others, attributing it to Utah’s long-lasting hostility to the sport. Mr. Strong’s own snowboarding career included three years’ sponsorship by Tom Sims, including his sixth-place finish at the 1986 Breckenridge, Colorado, world snowboarder championships in the men’s pro halfpipe competition. He spends some time recalling the rigmarole that ski resorts first put snowboarders through, requiring them to wear tiny skis over their snowboards to get on and off lifts.Project: Outdoor Recereation oral history project. Interviewer: Erin Halcomb
2013
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No. 799 Stewart N. Thorpe
Stewart Thorpe is a native of Salt Lake City. He is studying communications at the University of Utah. He became involved with the Occupy Movement when somebody invited him to an organizing meeting for Occupy Salt Lake City.Stewart talks about other activism groups and movements he has been involved with and explains why he is a part of the Occupy Movement. He feels it is a movement that is criticizing the core of the problem and that is bringing greater awareness to economic inequality.He discusses the Occupy Movement’s focus on consensus based decision making as opposed to making decisions by democratic majority. It has been difficult for people to understand the concept of consensus but Stewart has seen that change as he has been working with the Occupy Movement. People have also been slow to understand the idea of a leaderless movement and many people still attempt to lead or look for leaders.The movement’s relationship with the homeless community has grown over time. Many were hesitant about setting up in Pioneer Park or disliked the idea. Stewart also talks about the difficulties interacting with other communities in Pioneer Park, people that were there before Occupy Salt Lake City. Though the organizers did not want to interfere with the Pioneer Park communities, some of the protestors not involved in organizing the movement took it upon themselves to police the park, which created a hostile situation.Stewart’s main involvement at Pioneer Park was with the Peacekeeping Committee. He and the others in the committee trained in non-violent conflict resolution and mediation. Stewart had hoped that people would resolve conflicts on their own or learn to mediate conflicts, but he and the others in the Peacekeeping Committee were seen as authorities with the power to resolve conflicts. The Peacekeeping Committee disbanded because they never intended to police the park or exert authority, only to mediate conflicts peacefully. He discusses the movement’s relationship with the police and local government. Stewart never thought that the police or the government would be on the movement’s side. After they were removed from Pioneer Park, many of those who believed the relationship was a good one, felt betrayed and bitter. Stewart describes the day they were removed from Pioneer Park and the occupiers’ interactions with police.Stewart feels that the Occupy Movement has succeeded in changing the dialogue about the issues discussed in the media. He feels that there are not specific demands but there is a demand to be heard and to foster communities in order to voice dissent and disagreement with the current state of things.Project: Occupy Salt Lake City oral history project. Interviewer: Erin Halcomb
2012
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No. 800 Michael K. Young
Michael Young is a former president of the University of Utah. He was hired away from George Washington University Law School where he was the dean. He is currently the president of the University of Washington.Michael describes the University of Utah’s capital campaign, which he took over when he first arrived at the University of Utah. One of his focuses as president was to internationalize the university and he describes that process, as well as his involvement with the Asia Center and the Middle East Center. He talks about the importance of research and commercialization during his time as president. Then, Michael discusses his efforts to move the university to the PAC-10. He describes the development of the honors program and his attempts to strengthen the undergraduate community at the university. Michael then talks about his involvement with the university hospital and healthcare system. He emphasizes the importance of cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural work. One of the last projects he was involved in was the development and construction of the Natural History Museum and he discusses that process.Project: University of Utah oral history project. Interviewer: Anne Peterson
2012

Names and SubjectsReturn to Top

  • Subject Terms :
  • Athletics--Utah
  • Dance--Utah
  • Interviews--Utah
  • Radio broadcasting--Utah
  • Science--Utah
  • Television broadcasting--Utah
  • Theater--Utah
  • Personal Names :
  • Cooley, Everett L. (contributor)
  • Corporate Names :
  • Everett L. Cooley Oral History Project (contributor)
  • University of Utah. American West Center
  • University of Utah--History
  • Geographical Names :
  • Utah--Church history
  • Utah--History
  • Form or Genre Terms :
  • Oral history