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The William E. Stafford Archives, Series 1, Sub-Series 3: Documentary Copies of Poems, 1937-1993

Overview of the Collection

Creator
Stafford, William, 1914-1993
Title
The William E. Stafford Archives, Series 1, Sub-Series 3: Documentary Copies of Poems
Dates
1937-1993 (inclusive)
Quantity
17 boxes, (5 cubic feet)
Collection Number
OLPb101STA
Summary
William Stafford (1914-1993) was one of the most prolific and important American poets of the last half of the twentieth century. This subseries of the collection includes typed documentary copies of Stafford's finished poems that he used to track submissions, rejections, and acceptances. The Index to the entire Stafford Archives can be found at: http://nwda-db.wsulibs.wsu.edu/findaid/ark:/80444/xv83782
Repository
Lewis & Clark College, Special Collections and Archives
Lewis & Clark College Special Collections and Archives
Aubrey R. Watzek Library
0615 SW Palatine Hill Rd.
Portland, OR
97219
Telephone: 503-768-7254
Fax: 503-768-7282
archives@lclark.edu
Access Restrictions

This collection has no restrictions and is open for research.

Languages
English


Biographical NoteReturn to Top

William Stafford (1914-1993) was one of the most prolific and important American poets of the last half of the twentieth century. Among his many credentials, Stafford served as consultant in poetry at the Library of Congress, and received the National Book Award for his poetry collection Traveling through the Dark (1963). During his lifetime, Stafford wrote over sixty books of poetry that still resonate with both scholars and general readers. Stafford’s perspectives on peace, the environment, and education serve as some of the most articulate and engaging dialogues by a modern American writer about three of the most important issues of the second half of the twentieth century with lasting impacts on future generations. Howard Zinn, one America’s most iconic modern historians, was keenly aware of Stafford’s insight into modern American culture. Zinn claimed, “William Stafford’s prose and poetry, wise and eloquent, speak directly to the violence of our time, and to our hope for a different world” (from cover of Every War Has Two Losers).

The William Stafford Archives, donated to Lewis & Clark College by the Stafford family in 2008, contain the private papers, publications, photographs, recordings, and teaching materials of the poet William Stafford. The Lewis & Clark College Special Collections actively add to this collection by acquiring unique Stafford related materials.

Stafford wrote every day of his life from 1950 to 1993. These 20,000 pages of daily writings form a complete record of the poet’s mostly early morning meditations, including poem drafts, dream records, aphorisms, and other visits to the unconscious, recorded on separate sheets of yellow or white paper or when traveling, often in spiral-bound reporters’ steno pads. The archive also includes typescripts of poems submitted for publication and for use in readings. Stafford listed where he submitted each poem, and whether it was accepted for publication on the typescript. Each of his published collections, large and small, is represented by its gathering of documentary copies (typescripts), called by Stafford a “put-together.” Unpublished poems, poems published in journals, and reading copies of published poems were also gathered, in a virtually complete record from 1937 to 1993, totaling about 7,000 items. The collection also includes copies of all known Stafford books and translations. Stafford saved correspondence received, with an indication of the date of reply, and sometimes a copy of the reply, from the early 1960s to August 1993. Estimated at 100,000 sheets, the collected correspondence contains some full exchanges of correspondence initiated by WS. One such exchange is the correspondence with Marvin Bell on their sequence Segues. In addition to many photographs of and relating to William Stafford, the archive includes an estimated 20,000 photographs and negatives taken and developed by Stafford of fellow poets, family, friends, and Lewis & Clark College faculty. The archive provides documentation of Stafford's teaching career, including more than one thousand index cards, some dating from research at Iowa, others from later. These were much used in preparing for classes, workshops, and lectures. The files also contain scattered notes for workshops and lectures. The archive also includes course syllabi, and faculty documents relating to Stafford's teaching years at Lewis & Clark College.

Content DescriptionReturn to Top

Includes Stafford's typed revisions of his poems that were used to track publication submissions, rejections, and acceptances for publication.

Use of the CollectionReturn to Top

Restrictions on Use

Permission to publish, exhibit, broadcast, or quote from materials in the Watzek Library Archives & Special Collections requires written permission of the Head of Archives & Special Collections.

Preferred Citation

The William Stafford Archives, Lewis & Clark College Aubrey Watzek Library Archives & Special Collections, Portland, Oregon.

Administrative InformationReturn to Top


Detailed Description of the CollectionReturn to Top

The following section contains a detailed listing of the materials in the collection.

A1: Typed Documentary Copies of Published Poems, 1941-1960Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 1/Folder A1

125 items
Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 1/Folder A1
A1.1
"After Plotinus"
First Line: When a statue turns its real gaze.
Accepted by: Poetry.
December 1, 1959
A1.2
"After School: Room 3"
First Line: One pale goldfish patrols the globe on Teacher’s desk.
Accepted by: New York Times.
July 3, 1962
A1.3
"All White"
First Line: Without a door closing.
Accepted by: The Oregonian.
February 13, 1945
A1.4
"Amulet"
First Line: I held a quiet stone.
Accepted by: Liberation.
April 1, 1953
A1.5
"Anniversaries"
First Line: Ash, that pure wood, breaks from dirt.
Accepted by: Oakland Tribune.
August 1, 1957
A1.6
"Art and Evidence"
First Line: Where the man had camped, where he worked.
Accepted by: Etchings.
August 1, 1961
A1.7
"At a California College"
First Line: On a dark pivot the talk veers.
Accepted by: Recurrence.
July 26, 1954
A1.8
"At Benediction"
First Line: How to compose my face? My shoulders.
Accepted by: The Nation.
May 1, 1962
A1.9
"At Roll Call"
First Line: One day I stood, small shoes upon the sand.
Accepted by: Compass and published in Down in My Heart.
March 1, 1942
A1.10
"At the Custer Monument"
First Line: They buried the soldiers where they fell.
Accepted by: Saturday Review.
July 1, 1953
A1.11
"At the NCTE Meeting"
First Line: Trying to act out what really was wrong with the place.
Accepted by: College English.
December 1, 1955
A1.12
"At the U.N."
First Line: Among what the good world speakers were uttering.
Accepted by: New Orleans Poetry Journal.
May 1, 1956
A1.13
"Away from Here"
First Line: If there were cold for injustice.
Accepted by: Oregonian.
September 3, 1949
A1.14
"Beans in the Sack"
First Line: The way beans went by each other in a sack.
Accepted by: College English.
May 21, 1949
A1.15
"Blunt or Deep"
First Line: Pulling along the edge of cruel.
Accepted by: Etchings.
April 26, 1951
A1.16
"Breath"
First Line: Far up the canyon where the salmon leap.
Accepted by: Motive and published in Down in My Heart.
November 1, 1942
A1.17
"Buzzards over Arkansas"
First Line: Three sombre wheeling chips tantalize a vortex.
Accepted by: New Mexico Quarterly and New Signatures, and published in Down in My Heart.
March 2, 1942
A1.18
"By the Escalator"
First Line: There are faces you own.
Accepted by: Poetry.
December 1, 1959
A1.19
"Civ Lecture"
First Line: It was going to rain.
Accepted by: Pioneer Log.
November 1, 1960
A1.20
"Coming Toward a Mist"
First Line: Anyone’s face coming toward mist.
Accepted by: Etchings.
June 1, 1956
A1.21
"Cool World"
First Line: Along my river frogs like thought.
Published in Down in My Heart and Winterward.
March 21, 1944
A1.22
"Communion at Lunch"
First Line: Eating my sandwich (little but bread these days).
Accepted by: Poetry.
December 1, 1959
A1.23
"Contributions"
First Line: Aristotle invented.
Accepted by: Oregonian.
June 13, 1945
A1.24
"Country of Thin Mountains"
First Line: I tell you, friends, the mountains here are thin-.
Accepted by: Motive.
July 1, 1942
A1.25
"Divergences"
First Line: The sleeping of the stars will finally win,
Accepted by: Colorado Quarterly.
June 1, 1955
A1.26
"Down at the Beach"
First Line: It is not true that finesse will win”.
Accepted by: Etchings.
October 1, 1956
A1.27
"Elementary Civics"
First Line: At every level, down to duck feet on the pavement.
Accepted by: The Magazine, Lewis & Clark College.
July 29, 1952
A1.28
"Elevator"
First Line: Spoke? No. Nobody spoke.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
March 1, 1959
A1.29
"Encounter"
First Line: In the bright wind from the fields today.
Accepted by: Liberation.
March 1, 1956
A1.30
"Essai / the Civilized French"
First Line: Trying to act themselves, to be what they already are.
Accepted by: UCLAN Review.
April 1, 1960
A1.31
"Event"
First Line: At evening on Feb. 26, the long flat sunlight.
Accepted by: Feoh.
March 1, 1942
A1.32
"Faint Message"
First Line: This world, the chalice, held briefly the day.
Accepted by: Poetry.
July 9, 1947
A1.33
"Family Statement"
First Line: My brother, flying a plane in this war.
Accepted by: Retort and The Bridge.
August 11, 1943
A1.34
"Farewell to a Certain Student"
First Line: Kathleen, you may bear burghers. Goodbye...
Accepted by: Experiment.
July 31, 1950
A1.35
"Flowers and Rocks"
First Line: Attentive to the air, returning the rain’s touch.
Accepted by: Poetry Northwest.
July 1, 1959
A1.36
"From the Committee"
First Line: We plan to have slow wing beats.
Accepted by: Talisman.
April 1, 1955
A1.37
"Genius in Our Classroom"
First Line: The sun rose in a childs head.
Accepted by: Approach.
August 1, 1957
A1.38
"German Shepherd"
First Line: Maple in front of elm unsteady from storms.
Accepted by: Saturday Evening Post and Uclan Review 1964.
October 25, 1955
A1.39
"Glimpses"
First Line: By a simple bridge, a log, we cross.
Accepted by: Talisman.
June 1, 1961
A1.40
"Good Boy"
First Line: When the minister speaks.
Accepted by: New Orleans Poetry Journal.
June 2, 1949
A1.41
"Hero"
First Line: When he tasted the banquet.
Accepted by: New Orleans Poetry Journal.
January 1, 1948
A1.42
"Hero Learning to Leave Home"
First Line: Ordered by straight sounds.
Accepted by: Talisman.
March 1, 1959
A1.43
"High Water"
First Line: We saw the Sunday morning bodies.
Accepted by: Experiment.
June 4, 1948
A1.44
"Hudson River Vista"
First Line: A pride of Mohawks, their scalps all whiskied.
Accepted by: Beloit Poetry Journal.
June 1, 1956
A1.45
"Humanities 3: The Greeks"
First Line: Levering a hold like a shovel-handle.
Accepted by: Pioneer Log.
November 1, 1960
A1.46
"Immolation"
First Line: The murder was accomplished.
Accepted by: Prairie Schooner.
October 4, 1941
A1.47
"Incident"
First Line: While the sun is blaming Nevada.
Accepted by: Western Bookman.
February 3, 1953
A1.48
"Indian Summer"
First Line: In autumn-leaved, soft-moccasined September.
Accepted by: Ladies Home Journal.
September 22, 1945
A1.49
"In Eastern Oregon"
First Line: Down that wind from heights through desperate air.
Accepted by: College English and Oregon Journal.
December 1, 1955
A1.50
"In the Briars"
First Line: They shot the rabbit. Next night, back again,
Accepted by: The Magazine, Lewis & Clark College
January 26, 1952
A1.51
"In the Mirror"
First Line: Alone here with a stranger.
Accepted by: Western Humanities Review
February 20, 1952
A1.52
"In the Still Night"
First Line: Mixed in the signals around us.
Accepted by: Approach.
September 1, 1959
A1.53
"In the Study in the Morning"
First Line: On paper the color of rain.
Accepted by: Oakland Tribune.
March 1, 1957
A1.54
"In Trust"
First Line: I saw the gulls being gulls.
Accepted by: New Orleans Poetry Journal.
February 1, 1953
A1.55
"In Turning Land"
First Line: Railroads through Oregon follow a kind of need.
Accepted by: Oregon Journal.
March 1, 1957
A1.56
"Isaiah ‘54"
First Line: The people who tried to walk.
Accepted by: New Signatures and New Mexico Quarterly Review
September 16, 1944
A1.57
"Kinship"
First Line: I lean my cheek on palm.
Accepted by: Ladies Home Journal.
July 15, 1945
A1.58
"Like Opening a Package"
First Line: Like opening a package.
Accepted by: Etchings.
August 1, 1960
A1.59
"Little Stranger"
First Line: Walking away, bending his knee.
Accepted by: Houyhnhmn’s Scrapbook.
August 16, 1944
A1.60
"Lonely Feeling"
First Line: Locomotives voted to whistle.
Accepted by: Ladies Home Journal.
October 23, 1948
A1.61
"To a Cynical Lady Lover Meets a Cynical Lady"
First Line: A lady made of pemmican.
Accepted by: Etchings.
February 1, 1958
A1.62
"Love Song"
First Line: I do not find you so dreadful.
Accepted by: The Bridge.
December 30, 1952
A1.63
"In the Morning" [Malleable]
First Line: A train of clouds that formed somewhere.
Accepted by: Oregon Journal.
February 17, 1950
A1.64
"Marked by a Star"
First Line: They briefed the men for the mission.
Accepted by: Fellowship.
December 13, 1944
A1.65
"Meditations / a Careful Program"
First Line: Forgotten, the reason for change has been forgotten.
Accepted by: Talisman.
December 1, 1954
A1.66
"Meditation"
First Line: If I could remember all at once.
Accepted by: Poetry.
March 1, 1943
A1.67
"Midnight"
First Line: Down black trees on our land rain goes.
Accepted by: Experiment.
January 1, 1953
A1.68
"Moles"
First Line: Every day that the sky droops down.
Accepted by: New Yorker.
November 16, 1948
A1.69
"Moment, Instant, Flash"
First Line: The time the steering gear broke.
Accepted by: New Yorker.
December 7, 1948
A1.70
"Monday Again"
First Line: Turn on the toaster.
Accepted by: Oregonian.
January 22, 1954
A1.71
"More Than Bread"
First Line: I do not want to live here.
Published in Down in My Heart.
January 19, 1944
A1.72
"Mr. Conscience"
First Line: The meditative crane.
Accepted by: Grundtvig Review.
June 6, 1945
A1.73
"My Mind Awoke in a..."
First Line: My mind awoke in a shirt of flame.
Accepted by: Approach.
September 1, 1958
A1.74
"Before Anyone Spoke" [Near the Presidio]
First Line: Before anyone spoke.
Accepted by: Inland.
August 1, 1956
A1.75
"Night Light"
First Line: There is a footfall faintley every night.
Accepted by: Poetry Northwest.
October 1, 1955
A1.76
"No One Can Let Go"
First Line: To win by action is our age’s pride.
Accepted by: Colorado Quarterly.
February 1, 1957
A1.77
"North of the Ohio"
First Line: More and more like the river’s.
Accepted by: Approach.
October 1, 1955
A1.78
"Note"
First Line: The sparrows are as reckless as ever.
Accepted by: Reeds, Lewis & Clark College.
December 31, 1945
A1.79
"Observation"
First Line: Bending over, watching them quietly.
Accepted by: New Mexico Quarterly Review and New Signatures.
December 1, 1941
A1.80
"Old House by the Tracks"
First Line: Passing glances into this empty room.
Accepted by: The Bridge.
October 22, 1952
A1.81
"On an Island in the San Juans"
First Line: Rabbits here have chosen their holes.
Accepted by: Poetry.
July 1, 1961
A1.82
"On Location"
Not a poem.
undated
A1.83
"On Penitencia Creek"
First Line: Minnows nibble at my white feet.
Accepted by: Poetry.
March 1, 1957
A1.84
"On Reading a Newspaper Account of a Friend Shot by a Madman"
First Line: That picture all of us are dealt every day.
Accepted by: UCLAN Review.
January 1, 1961
A1.85
"On the Beach"
First Line: Only few, and they by grace.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
October 1, 1958
A1.86
"On the Way"
First Line: Perfectly anonymous I go up the stair.
Accepted by: New Orleans Poetry Journal.
April 30, 1951
A1.87
"Overhearing"
First Line: You will go away some time.
Accepted by: The Nation.
September 1, 1956
A1.88
"People"
First Line: Eating what they don’t like.
Accepted by: Grundtvig Review.
May 3, 1947
A1.89
"Perspective"
First Line: From far enough even a war a murmur.
Accepted by: Experiment.
August 31, 1949
A1.90
"Philosophy 1"
First Line: The bridge that really is here.
Accepted by: Fellowship.
June 24, 1948
A1.91
"Poet Bites Job"
First Line: The wisest thing after the wisdom of time.
Accepted by: College English.
January 25, 1956
A1.92
"Preparedness"
First Line: Knowing the explosion would happen.
Accepted by: Fellowship.
September 1, 1954
A1.93
"Project"
First Line: From up where beavers hold the river together.
Accepted by: Golden Gate.
March 1, 1955
A1.94
"Reflection"
First Line: Leaders of the world may pose for newspapers.
Accepted by: Ladies Home Journal.
January 2, 1953
A1.95
"Review"
First Line: The arm is bayonet good.
Accepted by: Fellowship.
December 5, 1945
A1.96
"Scenes at Yaddo"
First Line: In the music fountain filling the music room.
Accepted by: Inland.
June 1, 1956
A1.97
"Serious Separate Things"
First Line: Getting used to being a man.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
December 1, 1957
A1.98
"S. Freud, Alcove 7, U. Library"
First Line: Saved by forgetting or neglect...aloud.
Accepted by: Western Humanities Review.
January 25, 1952
A1.99
"Shepherd"
First Line: According to the silence, winter has arrived-.
Accepted by: Poetry.
July 16, 1957
A1.100
"Sight of the World"
First Line: Through the cat portal into the cave.
Accepted by: Experiment and published in the anthology Poems from the Iowa Poetry Workshop.
June 1, 1947
A1.101
"So Long"
First Line: Of the millions of rain.
Accepted by: Ladies Home Journal.
May 9, 1946
A1.102
"Sometimes Considering"
First Line: Sometimes considering.
Accepted by: Etchings.
May 1, 1960
A1.103
"Sort of Political Comment from a New Kind of Citizen"
First Line: A spaniel-heard combat boot comes near.
Accepted by: December.
September 1, 1958
A1.104
"Spring Interest"
First Line: Today, or maybe yesterday, the minnows returned.
Accepted by: New Yorker.
June 1, 1956
A1.105
"Stick Up"
First Line: Hands up! trees.
Accepted by: Ladies Home Journal.
December 31, 1945
A1.106
"Still Life"
First Line: On our way somewhere we sat at this table.
Accepted by: Approach.
June 6, 1956
A1.107
"Still Night"
First Line: If I should find a locomotive.
Accepted by: Ladies Home Journal.
February 2, 1945
A1.108
"Stray Thought"
First Line: In the center of the intersection.
Accepted by: The Oregonian.
March 1, 1956
A1.109
"Sunday Avenue"
First Line: There are no right ones married to wrong ones here.
Accepted by: Poetry.
March 4, 1948
A1.110
"Super Market"
First Line: Every bit of yellow cheese in the market.
Accepted by: Poetry.
February 15, 1947
A1.111
"Tall Animals"
First Line: For pigs the click of the pail is enough.
Accepted by: New Orleans Poetry Journal.
January 28, 1945
A1.112
"Temporary Monuments"
First Line: In my headache one steady light held on.
Accepted by: Kansas City Star 1962.
September 6, 1961
A1.113
"Testimony to an Inquisitor"
First Line: Mud through my toes I’m from this land.
Accepted by: New Orleans Poetry Journal.
June 25, 1954
A1.114
"That Early Spring"
First Line: When blizzards fought the redbud down.
Accepted by: Talisman.
September 1, 1957
A1.115
"That Emperor Who Wrote..."
First Line: He ruled a hard state, a capital of rock.
Accepted by: Emerson College Magazine.
August 1, 1958
A1.116
"Thought, the Pacifist"
First Line: While the bullet was coming.
Accepted by: Poetry.
December 1, 1959
A1.117
"Trace"
First Line: Raccoons leave designs to stare from daylight mud.
Accepted by: The Bridge.
October 1, 1955
A1.118
"Translated from Grandmother's Lesebuch"
First Line: On every merry-go-round there was one hideous....
Accepted by: New Orleans Poetry Journal.
September 6, 1951
A1.119
"Villain I Saw"
First Line: Wherever he went a cat beside him.
Accepted by: Poetry Northwest 1963.
August 1, 1960
A1.120
"We Call It the Chaparral"
First Line: We call it the chaparral.
Published in Down in My Heart.
March 1, 1943
A1.121
"Juke Joint"
First Line: When the chromium buds of America bloom.
Accepted by: Poetry.
April 23, 1945
A1.122
"West of Boston"
First Line: With steadfast lechery my parents loved each other.
Accepted by: Poetry Northwest.
March 18, 1962
A1.123
"Word for Mr. Wordsworth"
First Line: Going out to put a hand on the door frame.
Accepted by: College English 1958.
October 7, 1956
A1.124
"World’s Judgement"
First Line: When they unsort the world’s honesty...
Accepted by: The Bridge.
April 1, 1955
A1.125
"Writers’ Conference"
First Line: Can the speakers know how high the volume’s on?.
Accepted by: The Nation.
August 31, 1949

A12: Typed Documentary Copies of Mostly Published Poems, 1950s-1960sReturn to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 1/Folder A12

204 items
Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 1/Folder A12
A12.1
hand written index
undated
A12.2
“Accompanied by Pythagoras”
First Line: At odd places when the trees.
Accepted by: Jeopardy.
February 1, 1967
A12.3
“Adjustment”
First Line: Oh, suddenly we saw how easy.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
October 1, 1965
A12.4
“Agents”
First Line: At the last how many are there, clung.
Accepted by: Black Sun, Lewis & Clark College.
January 1, 1967
A12.5
“Age of Microfilm”
First Line: Remember those curls of.
Accepted by: The Goodly Co..
September 1, 1964
A12.6
“Airport”
First Line: At the fountain you bow to drink: that water.
Accepted by: Critical Quarterly.
April 1, 1965
A12.7
“Alarmists”
First Line: After they called and it was only a wolf.
Accepted by: St. Andrews Review .
May 1, 1965
A12.8
“All the New Mornings”
First Line: One song at a time we crossed.
Accepted by: This Issue .
May 1, 1970
A12.9
“All the Time”
First Line: We live in a town clocks hurt. They chase.
Accepted by: Tennessee Poetry Journal.
July 1, 1967
A12.10
“American Gothic”
First Line: If we see better through tiny.
Accepted by: Pebble.
July 1, 1968
A12.11
“Analysis”
First Line: The men wear the leather jackets, and their mates.
Accepted by: Jeopardy.
March 1, 1965
A12.12
“Art in California: Housing Project”
First Line: Here they worship Beauty and create the perfect mistake.
Accepted by: Granta.
July 1, 1961
A12.13
“Assurances”
First Line: Shepherding people all the time, a host.
Accepted by: Granta.
September 1, 1962
A12.14
“As the Song Says”
First Line: At first, the song says, Love is.
Accepted by: Concerning Poetry.
April 1, 1967
A12.15
“At a Humanities Conference”
First Line: To the man at the door I though my friend.
Accepted by: Prism.
March 1, 1962
A12.16
“At First National”
First Line: Every morning when day.
Accepted by: Westigan Review.
December 1, 1967
A12.17
“At the Advanced Placement Conference”
First Line: We teach ourselves how to teach others.
Accepted by: Special Libraries.
January 1, 1967
A12.18
“At the Observatory”
First Line: On a hill one night away down here in space.
Accepted by: Plainsong.
June 1, 1963
A12.19
“Augurer”
First Line: Around our city, around these right clocks.
Accepted by: University of Portland Review.
June 19, 1956
A12.20
“Augustine”
First Line: Following a dry creek without a bend.
Accepted by: Poetry.
February 1, 1957
A12.21
“Autumn”
First Line: Somewhere a signal jammed.
Accepted by: Poet & Critic.
September 1, 1960
A12.22
“Baby Ten Months Old Looks at the Public Domain”
First Line: Somewhere near the end of a snowshoe trail.
Accepted by: New Yorker.
July 3, 1949
A12.23
“Be Calm. God Has Offered Us Pretty Names”
First Line: Let fawn autumn come.
Accepted by: A Nosegay in Black.
August 1, 1965
A12.24
“Beginning”
First Line: Everyone lost that last bombardment.
Accepted by: West Coast Review.
July 1, 1965
A12.25
“Below the Border”
First Line: The Yaquis by the highway417.
Accepted by: Poetry Bag.
March 1, 1966
A12.26
“Bertha’s Guitar”
First Line: When cuando the dove la paloma.
Accepted by: Redstart.
September 1, 1966
A12.27
“Beyond the Casement”
First Line: Besides what happens, ther are.
Accepted by: Doones.
October 1, 1966
A12.28
“Biography”
First Line: Two days were walking down the street.
Accepted by: Cloud Maraude.
November 1, 1967
A12.29
“Bravery of Love”
First Line: If I should have that bravery of gaining love.
Accepted by: Poetry.
October 1, 1955
A12.30
“Bulletin" [1950]
First Line: At five o’clock one morning according to the chart.
Accepted by: Experiment.
July 31, 1950
untitled
A12.31
“Bulletin" [1962]
First Line: No one need bring back those ponies.
Accepted by: New York Times.
December 1, 1962
A12.32
“By the College Library”
First Line: One square of the walk says.
Accepted by: Roanoke Review.
August 1, 1967
A12.33
“Calendar Jottings”
First Line: Watch the career of blue.
Accepted by: Reeds.
January 1, 1953
A12.34
“Child’s Face in History Class”
First Line: It remembers. It welcomes.
Accepted by: Roadapple Review.
June 1, 1967
A12.35
“Clash”
First Line: The butcher knife was there.
Accepted by: Fair.
June 1, 1956
A12.36
“Day After Then”
First Line: He adjusted the blinds for the morning sun.
Accepted by: Kenyon Review.
February 1, 1963
A12.37
“Deaf Gardener”
First Line: While he worked he was absent.
Accepted by: Poetry Northwest.
January 1, 1966
A12.38
“Diary Entry”
First Line: The State has taught its men a new kind of organized.
Accepted by: December.
October 1, 1961
A12.39
“Dining Alone”
First Line: The centerpiece.
Accepted by: Human Voice.
July 1, 1968
A12.40
“Distance" [1968]
First Line: In the movies a horse.
Accepted by: Pebble.
November 1, 1968
A12.41
“Distance" [1964]
First Line: Suddenly it was Mexico that afternoon.
Accepted by: December.
October 1, 1964
A12.42
“Dog Asleep”
First Line: Dogs have dreams of Laika, her free soul.
Accepted by: Golden Gate / Creative Review & In Inside Outer Space .
July 1, 1958
A12.43
“Doodled While Counseling a Student”
First Line: They say we learn by judicious.
Accepted by: Westigan Review.
September 1, 1969
A12.44
“Dorothy Wordsworth”
First Line: A girl who lived in a house of stone.
Accepted by: Pebble.
July 1, 1968
A12.45
“Doves”
First Line: Doves are what belong when accepted.
Accepted by: Focus Midwest.
December 1, 1961
A12.46
“Dreamer”
First Line: Charging in the train across Utah.
Accepted by: Inland.
January 1, 1956
A12.47
“Driving the Big Loop”
First Line: We began to belong in the country.
Accepted by: Hawk & Whippoorwill.
August 1, 1960
A12.48
“Dust Bowl Years”
First Line: We had to see our farm despised.
Accepted by: Focus Midwest.
May 1, 1956
A12.49
“Elegy for Arthur L. Throckmorton”
First Line: Birds at the cemetery sing as wise as they can.
Accepted by: Little Review.
December 1, 1962
A12.50
“Extended Haiku”
First Line: Why did my wife buy for my desk.
Accepted by: Tri-Quarterly.
September 1, 1963
A12.51
“Extension”
First Line: Into the daylight I follow a blind man.
Accepted by: Wascana Review.
April 1, 1953
A12.52
“Faculty Bulletin Filler”
First Line: The seminar in logic meets under a fan.
Accepted by: Colorado Quarterly.
October 1, 1965
A12.53
“Faculty Portraits I: The Part-Time Teacher in English”
First Line: The old lady from the employment bureau.
Accepted by: Western Humanities Review .
October 1, 1961
A12.54
“Faculty Portraits II: Old Mrs. Berg in Foreign Languages”
First Line: Knitting two needles to make them.
Accepted by: Western Humanities Review .
October 1, 1961
A12.55
“Faculty Portraits IV: The Political Scientist”
First Line: People weren’t worth his politics, he felt.
Accepted by: Western Humanities Review .
August 1, 1961
A12.56
“Fall”
First Line: As the air thins - cold weather.
Accepted by: Nosegay in Black.
October 1, 1964
A12.57
“Family Drive”
First Line: Sweeping toward us over the hills.
Accepted by: Ladies’ Home Journal.
February 1, 1954
A12.58
“Father’s Things in the Attic”
First Line: The state forgot to forbid.
Accepted by: The Journal.
August 1, 1965
A12.59
“5 A.M. in Summer”
First Line: Day says, “Again.” A lost bird.
Accepted by: Poetry Australia.
May 1, 1966
A12.60
“For a Colleague Who Took His Life”
First Line: News of his death peeled off the yellow car.
Accepted by: Hudson Review .
August 1, 1966
A12.61
“For a Friend I Never Found”
First Line: This picture develops in absolute silence.
Accepted by: Kenyon Review.
November 1, 1966
A12.62
“For All Those Gone Who Bowed or Stopped”
First Line: Armies are marching with flags down a long street.
Accepted by: Carleton Misc..
December 1, 1960
A12.63
“For Certain Little Magazines We Won’t Bother to Name”
First Line: These bears that howl their wounds.
Accepted by: Satire Newsletter and Special Libraries.
February 1, 1964
A12.64
“Forest People [Whystop, Oregon/Two Towns in Oregon]”
First Line: Whystop, a town made with trees.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
January 1, 1964
A12.65
“For President Morgan Odell”
First Line: Students and faculty and Mr. President.
Accepted by: Lewis & Clark Voyageur.
January 1, 1949
A12.66
“For the Library in Liberal, Kansas”
First Line: Tranced like a cloud, that faint.
Accepted by: The Poetry Bag.
September 1, 1965
A12.67
“From a Contemporary Theologian”
First Line: In our home rocket, one part.
Accepted by: Southwester.
May 1, 1966
A12.68
“From a Train Window”
First Line: Shading my forehead I held our land.
Accepted by: Nimrod.
March 1, 1955
A12.69
“From Exile”
First Line: Going around in their slow day.
Accepted by: December.
December 1, 1954
A12.70
“From the Head Archer at Warwick”
First Line: Because we deal simply by arrivals.
Accepted by: Tri-Quarterly.
September 20, 1962
A12.71
“Galway’s New Poem”
First Line: Close, where the unborn eyes begin to swim.
Accepted by: Tennessee Poetry Journal and Stone Drum.
May 1, 1969
A12.72
“Gauguin”
First Line: Forth from all stone continents forever.
Accepted by: The Goodly Co..
March 1, 1954
A12.73
“Genesis”
First Line: This apple story - let it roll a moment.
Accepted by: Jeopardy.
April 4, 1952
A12.74
“Glass”
First Line: The perfect window is nothing. You.
Accepted by: Jason.
March 1, 1966
A12.75
“Glimpses, Medallions”
First Line: A possum caught its odd-shape breath.
Accepted by: Baby John.
May 1, 1965
A12.76
“Good Man”
First Line: Maybe a lawyer, you come to.
Accepted by: The Poetry Bag.
October 1, 1965
A12.77
“Greeting”
First Line: Sun at the door today: “Found you!”.
Accepted by: World Order.
July 1, 1961
A12.78
“Halloween”
First Line: It was a tall figure in a mask.
Accepted by: Roanoke Review.
November 1, 1966
A12.79
“Home Place”
First Line: That grit farm land grain by grain.
Accepted by: Colorado Quarterly.
February 1, 1953
A12.80
“How to Call the Universe”
First Line: Telephone and LIght, once on a journey.
Accepted by: Colorado Quarterly.
October 1, 1966
A12.81
“How to Live with a Volcano”
First Line: Be alert..
Accepted by: St. Andrews Review.
September 1, 1969
A12.82
“In an Old High School Album”
First Line: The light inside that camera accepted.
Accepted by: University Portland Review.
October 1, 1966
A12.83
“In Anthropology”
First Line: Backward and upside down, but with an.
Accepted by: Harper’s.
October 1, 1968
A12.84
“In Atlantis or New York”
First Line: They still do not have the right kind of money,
Accepted by: December.
June 1, 1961
A12.85
“In California”
First Line: Someone is running.
Accepted by: Southern Review.
August 1, 1969
A12.86
“In Certain Homes”
First Line: In certain homes people with keepsakes lean.
Accepted by: Spender.
June 1, 1955
A12.87
“In Chihuahua”
First Line: A sky like one-way glass persuades you.
Accepted by: Jeopardy.
November 1, 1967
A12.88
“In Hagenback Park”
First Line: For days I forget that stare in the zoo,
Accepted by: Iowa Review.
August 1, 1969
A12.89
“In School”
First Line: So the world can see into our eyes.
Accepted by: The Record .
July 1, 1968
A12.90
“In the Bronte Country”
First Line: Emily’s room looks out on the graves...
Accepted by: Iowa Review.
June 25, 1969
A12.91
“In the Postoffice”
First Line: Wanted: Al Halstead, alias Hal Alstead.
Accepted by: The Poetry Bag.
March 1, 1966
A12.92
“In This Traffic, in This Time”
First Line: Let the car turn, gleam, be the Cadillac.
Accepted by: Southern Review.
September 1, 1969
A12.93
“Isolationists”
First Line: In Kansas there wasn’t any tide.
Accepted by: Tri-Quarterly Review.
January 1, 1964
A12.94
“Karma”
First Line: Gandhi falling made the sign of faith.
Accepted by: Listen.
July 1, 1957
A12.95
“Late at the Hospital”
First Line: The candle so silent, then the sound.
Accepted by: Virginia Quarterly Review.
February 1, 1970
A12.96
“Laurie’s Choir”
First Line: Light from the suNorthwestard window hunts.
Accepted by: Poem.
February 1, 1967
A12.97
“Learning to Be Humble and Dumb”
First Line: Wyoming taught pioneers not to be clever,
Accepted by: Plainsong.
January 1, 1965
A12.98
“Lesson One Spring”
First Line: One spring when I was a boy.
Accepted by: Poetry Northwest.
November 1, 1964
A12.99
“Listen, My Children”
First Line: Before men made moons.
Accepted by: Expedition.
November 1, 1957
A12.100
“Local Item”
First Line: No heart hurt, but all reguarded,
Accepted by: Tennessee Poetry Journal.
November 1, 1966
A12.101
“Locality”
First Line: Rivers have rivers in them,
Accepted by: Critical Quarterly .
December 21, 1962
A12.102
“Long Cool Summers”
First Line: Look where summer was, long.
Accepted by: The Journal.
October 1, 1965
A12.103
“Love Is a Dangerous God”
First Line: Now that place on the back of your. A
ccepted by: Cafe Solo.
May 1, 1968
A12.104
“Lucy Poem”
First Line: In our little town before the day train.
Accepted by: Nimrod.
April 1, 1954
A12.105
“Map in the Dean’s Office”
First Line: Interviews follow a valley.
Accepted by: University of Tampa Poetry Review.
July 1, 1958
A12.106
“Meditation”
First Line: The man ahead of me in church.
Accepted by: Jeopardy.
March 1, 1963
A12.107
“Memorandum”
First Line: You’ll see some time.
Accepted by: New Yorker.
December 1, 1964
A12.108
“Translation of Longfellow, 'Milton'”
First Line: Once alone on the Coast I saw this Hell.
Accepted by: Northwest Review .
September 1, 1967
A12.109
“Milton Game”
First Line: We are lost with all that was best.
Accepted by: Tennessee Poetry Journal.
August 1, 1969
A12.110
“Minority Report”
First Line: A master sent this picture out. It won.
Accepted by: Satire Newsletter.
December 1, 1961
A12.111
“In the Manner of Vern Rutsala: Monday”
First Line: Awake like a hippopotamus with eyes bulged.
Accepted by: New Yorker.
September 1, 1963
A12.112
“My Application”
First Line: The committee bends over my trip.
Accepted by: Special Libraries.
September 1, 1969
A12.113
“My Head Apologizes to an Oldfashioned Teacher”
First Line: Emblems where your hat was - a cross,
Accepted by: Sou’ wester.
June 1, 1967
A12.114
“My Parents Were Simple Folk”
First Line: While the hunter plunged where he wanted to go,
Accepted by: Quarterly Review of Literature.
August 1, 1963
A12.115
“New Family from Chicago”
First Line: Their cat comes on little fog feet.
Accepted by: Special Libraries.
September 1, 1969
A12.116
“New Tombstones ”
First Line: They rush through the evening light.
Accepted by: Critical Quarterly.
September 1, 1967
A12.117
“Night Words”
First Line: My hand invented sorrow.
Accepted by: Fiddlehead.
January 1, 1947
A12.118
“Note for Historians of the Assassination of President Kennedy”
First Line: They wrote his life who write.
Accepted by: Critical Quarterly.
March 1, 1964
A12.119
“Notes from a Summer Abroad”
First Line: The moon, that had God’s name and wore.
Accepted by: Iowa Review.
August 1, 1969
A12.120
“Old Mountaineer Starts the Day”
First Line: Patient, I wait by the kitchen table.
Accepted by: Jeopardy.
September 1, 1966
A12.121
“On a Misty Morning”
First Line: Men who dream the world.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
August 1, 1964
A12.122
“On an Early Picture of the College”
First Line: Sentiment, or some other kind of ivy, won’t let.
Accepted by: Talisman.
January 1, 1956
A12.123
“On a Picture Sent by a Friend in Ohio”
First Line: This awakened water coming to touch.
Accepted by: Elizabeth.
November 22, 1968
A12.124
“On being Invited to a Testimonial Dinner”
First Line: We are trained and quiet intellectuals.
Accepted by: Liberation.
February 1, 1956
A12.125
“Once They Believed These Mountains”
First Line: And the wide forest surrounded.
Accepted by: Jeopardy.
October 1, 1969
A12.126
“On Earth”
First Line: In Wyoming, high, often cold or.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
June 1, 1966
A12.127
“Only Thing Pure Water Says Is ‘And’”
First Line: Just listen to the river, it’s long story.
Accepted by: World Order.
October 1, 1964
A12.128
“On That Farm”
First Line: Those birds came down their.
Accepted by: Tennessee Poetry Journal.
February 1, 1970
A12.129
“On the Freeway”
First Line: A late driver listens. Police.
Accepted by: University of Portland Review.
March 1, 1964
A12.130
“On the Haiku”
First Line: Haiku go this this.
Accepted by: The Activist.
June 1, 1966
A12.131
“On Winter Ridge”
First Line: I tense my shoulder. No one knows.
Accepted by: Poetry.
May 1, 1967
A12.132
“Orientations”
First Line: Thought, an instinct, wavers for policy.
Accepted by: World Order.
February 1, 1966
A12.133
“Penseroso”
First Line: When rain flies down wherever it can through the grass.
Accepted by: Experiment.
April 1, 1955
A12.134
“Phrases”
First Line: Slow as molasses” my mother called spring.
Accepted by: Tennessee Poetry Journal.
January 1, 1966
A12.135
“Picking Up Chores”
First Line: Picking up chores the first fall day.
Accepted by: Western Humanities Review.
September 4, 1952
A12.136
“Picture Man”
First Line: Somewhere in this town like broken jewelry.
Accepted by: Doones.
December 1, 1967
A12.137
“Placement of Material”
First Line: May the air somewhere find Marjorie.
Accepted by: Granta.
February 1, 1962
A12.138
“Plea by Way of the Ladies, from the Poets”
First Line: Like sorrow and their scarves, history.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
June 1, 1965
A12.139
“Portrait of a Refugee Musician”
First Line: He blinked awake, a child, a shriek.
Accepted by: Poetry.
August 1, 1965
A12.140
“Prodigal”
First Line: After Shakespeare the wandering tongue.
Accepted by: Another Poetry Anthology.
December 1, 1960
A12.141
“Prologue for a Tragedy”
First Line: This is the queen, who will die.
Accepted by: The Garret.
February 1, 1966
A12.142
“Puppy That Came for Nobody’s Hand”
First Line: Years later, on some far mesa, that dog would stand.
Accepted by: West Coast Review.
August 1, 1958
A12.143
“Quaker at the Worldly College”
First Line: I learn, like a limousine, Sir Wisdom through. Accepted by: Critical Quarterly and Poetry Northwest.
January 1, 1964
A12.144
“Quaker Meeting”
First Line: It is wrong for the world ever to be a picture.
Accepted by: Stand.
February 1, 1965
A12.145
“Questions to Ask in Salzburg?”
First Line: Are people outside the church ever honored.
Accepted by: Taratara.
August 1, 1969
A12.146
“Reading Wordsworth”
First Line: You earn the world back by.
Accepted by: Phoenix.
July 1, 1968
A12.147
“Real Truth But Not an Indictment of Any Governor”
First Line: Here comes the Governor’s limousine cruising at seventy.
Accepted by: Seattle Magazine.
March 1, 1963
A12.148
“Recall”
First Line: Image of me, I follow, eyes closed.
Accepted by: New Mexico Quarterly Review.
January 5, 1949
A12.149
“Report from Over the Mountains”
First Line: News that reaches a cliff and is answered.
Accepted by: The Garret.
April 1, 1968
A12.150
“Rescue”
First Line: Beside me perch all the birds we owned.
Accepted by: Medford Tribune.
April 1, 1955
A12.151
“Research”
First Line: Inside that blast where the deaf live.
Accepted by: Lillabulero.
May 1, 1966
A12.152
“Returning”
First Line: It starts at the state line, returning; “Torque”.
Accepted by: Tennessee Poetry Journal.
May 1, 1967
A12.153
“Reverberation”
First Line: The refrigerator talks, nudges the wall.
Accepted by: New York Times.
February 1, 1963
A12.154
“Riddles”
First Line: You are looking at me now.
Accepted by: The Human Voice.
September 1, 1968
A12.155
“R. L. Stevenson Tree on Oahu”
First Line: Here under the trade wind that breaks off.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
November 1, 1967
A12.156
“San Miguel”
First Line: That old man on two sticks in the plaza.
Accepted by: The Voyageur.
April 1, 1965
A12.157
“Sheep in a Ghost Town”
First Line: Sheep cried, then grayed near from hills.
Accepted by: World Order.
July 1, 1965
A12.158
“Sidelong at a Beach”
First Line: A steel chain binds an arm.
Accepted by: Preview.
September 1, 1965
A12.159
“Singers Near the Airport at Spokane”
First Line: When the sun touches the ground, larks.
Accepted by: Concerning Poetry.
July 1, 1967
A12.160
“Society Column”
First Line: At this party I picked the wrong.
Accepted by: The Nation.
May 1, 1966
A12.161
“Statement on regionalism”
First Line: All events and experiences are local.
Accepted by: Tennessee Poetry Journal.
August 1, 1967
A12.162
“Still Days”
First Line: All night we practiced being no one.
Accepted by: Dryad.
July 1, 1965
A12.163
“Subsistence”
First Line: Remember for good one little strange thing: last fall.
Accepted by: Poetry.
December 1, 1959
A12.164a
“Suburban Report 1: Our Situation”
First Line: Geese have taken to checking our town of late.
Accepted by: Approach.
September 1, 1963
A12.164b
“Suburban Report 2: At a Traffic Light”
First Line: Engines rehearse probability.
Accepted by: Approach.
September 1, 1963
A12.164c
“Suburban Report 3: A Memorandum About How to See the Old”
First Line: The poor, who own estates we hardly know.
Accepted by: Approach.
September 1, 1963
A12.165
“Suburban Report 4: A Conversation in Front of a Church”
First Line: Tradition is out. What was.
Accepted by: Approach.
September 1, 1963
A12.165
“Suburban Report 5: Distancing Our Town - An Early View”
First Line: At the edge of our woods one morning.
Accepted by: Approach.
September 1, 1963
A12.165
“Suburban Report 6: A Temporary Seeing: Piano Town”
First Line: In that land this land recedes from no one.
Accepted by: Approach.
September 1, 1963
A12.166
“Suburban Report 7: The Observer, On His Way, Continues to Search”
First Line: If I open my hand, the line there still says.
Accepted by: Approach.
September 1, 1963
A12.167
“Summer in Montana”
First Line: If we built on the slope.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
July 1, 1965
A12.168
“Summer Song”
First Line: Let the tide cream near. Why.
Accepted by: The Journal.
October 1, 1965
A12.169
“Sunday Morning Before Daylight”
First Line: Air all over valley through all hand.
Accepted by: The Oregonian.
February 1, 1957
A12.170
“Then”
First Line: It was all simple and square.
Accepted by: New Orleans Poetry Journal.
January 31, 1955
A12.171
“Thinking About Marriage”
First Line: We thought the wheels, then their.
Accepted by: St. Andrews Review.
December 1, 1968
A12.172
“Thinking of Herbert Burke’s Farm”
First Line: A certain chickenhouse, the way the door.
Accepted by: Carleton Misc.
February 1, 1964
A12.173
“Three Down the Middle 1: Faith”
First Line: Someone comes by and says they know.
Accepted by: The Activist.
April 1, 1967
A12.173
“Three Down the Middle 2: Storms”
First Line: Limbs fall. Wind garbles.
Accepted by: The Activist.
April 1, 1967
A12.173
“Three Down the Middle 3: Natural Rights”
First Line: You see a tent curve over a family.
Accepted by: The Activist.
April 1, 1967
A12.174
“Through Nature to Eternity”
First Line: A man taps a message out. A water pipe, say.
Accepted by: Alaska Review.
May 1, 1968
A12.175
“Thunder Clouds”
First Line: One by one people abandon caution.
Accepted by: The Fair.
December 1, 1966
A12.176
“To All Poets Today”
First Line: There was a bird that sang one time.
Accepted by: Driftwood.
October 1, 1955
A12.177
“To Friends in an Iowa Town”
First Line: Dandelions in that air where nothing.
Accepted by: Seven.
October 1, 1968
A12.178
“To a Colleague Fulbrighting in Finland”
First Line: Our near course ends with you gone far.
Accepted by: Voices.
September 13, 1957
A12.179
“To Post in World Capitals”
First Line: Under old newspapers in the park.
Accepted by: West Coast Review.
December 1, 1964
A12.180
“Transfusion”
First Line: Again, for months, you live by.
Accepted by: Jeopardy.
February 1, 1965
A12.181
“Trying Not to Write”
First Line: Sudden as red is, today arrives.
Accepted by: Elizabeth.
September 1, 1968
A12.182
“Two Generations - A Legend from Japan”
First Line: A boy cherished by his parents.
Accepted by: Quixote.
November 1, 1966
A12.183
“Two Kinds of Faith”
First Line: Some things I know hard.
Accepted by: Arizona Quarterly.
April 12, 1947
A12.184
“Two Poems from India about Bravery”
First Line: Yes, bandits carry tiger insurance here.
Accepted by: The Goodly Co.
December 1, 1965
A12.185
“Visit to Boston”
First Line: Too many ways to say “Truth” compete.
Accepted by: Satire Newsletter.
March 1, 1965
A12.186
“Walk in December”
First Line: Migrations of little positive things.
Accepted by: Portland University Review .
December 1, 1954
A12.187
“Walking with the Blind Girl”
First Line: We enter a hall in the music building.
Accepted by: Hudson Review .
January 1, 1966
A12.188
“Walking with Walter Mead at Santa Barbara”
First Line: Each time too late, we saw.
Accepted by: Temper.
July 1, 1964
A12.189
“Walk in the Wordsworth Country”
First Line: I walk their kingdom with my stupid feet.
Accepted by: Back Door.
September 1, 1969
A12.190
“War Season”
First Line: The birds that winter blew past our yard.
Accepted by: Oregonian.
April 18, 1945
A12.191
“Watchmen”
First Line: In rooms at night.
Accepted by: Tennessee Poetry Journal.
December 1, 1964
A12.192
“Way Rain Falls”
First Line: Fathers house towered.
Accepted by: Oregonian.
October 26, 1943
A12.193
“Way Rocks Fall”
First Line: The school fanatics run where.
Accepted by: Elizabeth.
March 1, 1957
A12.194
“Way to Say It”
First Line: We found a place for our town.
Accepted by: Friends of Seattle Market.
February 1, 1958
A12.195
“Western”
First Line: It all uncoils because the land humps real.
Accepted by: Denver Quarterly.
April 1, 1957
A12.196
“We Three”
First Line: My fat hog remember.
Accepted by: Sponsa Regis.
August 14, 1945
A12.197
“When no one Knocks”
First Line: You come to the door. Out there.
Accepted by: Cafe Solo.
January 1, 1968
A12.198
“When running is all you can do”
First Line: When running is all you can do.
Accepted by: World Order.
November 8, 1958
A12.199
“While the Clock Ticks”
First Line: Across the plain some doll goes. You.
Accepted by: Road Apple Review.
January 1, 1967
A12.200
“With Some Artists at Fort Rock”
First Line: A sundown after nothing - all that.
Accepted by: University of Portland Review.
May 1, 1965
A12.201
“Withdrawn from Circulation”
First Line: They are making new stories faster than people can read.
Accepted by: Critical Quarterly.
October 15, 1962
A12.202
“Emily”
First Line: On that page where the whole world moved.
Accepted by: Emily Dickenson Anthology.
April 1, 1961
A12.203
“Writing Early Any Morning”
First Line: When I was little, and bowed.
Accepted by: Pebble.
September 1, 1968
A12.204
“You Too”
First Line: Down from rock to shale to sand.
Accepted by: Saturday Review.
May 14, 1960

A2: Typed Copies of Poems in unpublished put-together titled Les Miserables, 1937-1943Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 2/Folder A2

31 items

Written in Los Prietos, California.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 2/Folder A2
A2.1
"Week End in Santa Barbara"
First Line: A girl smiles Eden; the wind blows Arabia.
June 1, 1942
A2.2
"Night Sound"
First Line: An acorn falls on our roof in the night.
September 2, 1942
A2.3
"Looking down from a Mountain"
First Line: Everyone in that town is bloat with a bitterness.
August 11, 1943
A2.4
"Executive"
First Line: He cooes his vast affairs thru looping wires.
July 1, 1942
A2.5
"World, Broken"
First Line: I am going away now, remembering.
April 14, 1943
A2.6
"Like Whitman"
First Line: If any time was used preparing.
August 27, 1943
A2.7
untitled
First Line: I had a comrade. I guess he lost his way.
July 6, 1943
A2.8
"Far Down, a River"
First Line: I held the little trees away.
January 15, 1943
A2.9
"Incident"
First Line: I lived an instant, leaning at rest.
November 3, 1942
A2.10
untitled
First Line: Insistent at the balconies of leaves.
May 2, 1942
A2.11
"Dark-Browed Rough Pacifist"
First Line: In these rooms where light curtains blow.
August 15, 1942
A2.12
"Exile (1)"
First Line: In this gray pine-held land of furtive eyes.
May 3, 1942
A2.13
"Circle"
First Line: I steeply think of you, then drag my breath.
November 2, 1942
A2.14
"Acacia"
First Line: I wanted to close her eyes, and went.
March 10, 1943
A2.15
untitled
First Line: It does not take a blaze to prove I’ve seen.
January 11, 1943
A2.15
untitled
First Line: Jack wore a bright red shirt today.
January 11, 1943
A2.16
"Face"
First Line: Many were the stealthy years, and caravans nosing. Accepted by: Illiterati.
December 27, 1943
A2.17
"Possibility"
First Line: My gull thoughts may swerve along a shore.
November 4, 1942
A2.18
F"rom the Sound of Peace"
First Line: Now is glass and an egg and gossamer in the wind.
October 18, 1942
A2.19
untitled
First Line: One day in youth with laughing friends surrounded.
January 1, 1938
A2.20
"Discovery"
First Line: One day turning, unresting in mountain sunlight.
October 1, 1941
A2.21
"C.O. Park Project"
First Line: On vehement-green Southern sod.
April 7, 1942
A2.22
untitled
First Line: Out of sleep I came with open eyes.
August 18, 1943
A2.23
"Likenesses"
First Line: Over the prairie birds fly high.
August 1, 1941
A2.24
"Truth Is Where You Find It"
First Line: She cried out and held me, but she did not love me.
October 10, 1941
A2.25
untitled
First Line: spoke about sacrifice.
November 7, 1943
A2.26
"Social Call"
First Line: The pale June garden was high green springtime.
August 14, 1942
A2.27
"Commonplaces"
First Line: They kill in this war, but not from a sickness.
August 12, 1942
A2.27
"Southwest"
First Line: This is the tangy land of wide, strong, sunlit places.
July 1, 1940
A2.28
"Then" [1942]
First Line: This low and beyond beauty voice of things.
December 1, 1942
A2.29
"For a Christmas Sonnet"
First Line: Though wind be iron against ringing hill.
September 1, 1942
A2.30
untitled
First Line: Time fills the canyon, stillness of dim bowl.
June 17, 1942
A2.31
"Names for Our Lives"
First Line: To give our lives a name, a realm to talk in.
October 6, 1941

A3: Typed Copies of Poems in unpublished put-together titled Collected Verse (1937 to 1943), 1937-1944Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 2/Folder A3

46 items

Written in Los Prietos, California.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 2/Folder A3
A3.1
“Instructions for Applicants”
First Line: Ella should live on a street like a song.
Accepted by: Ladies Home Journal.
October 5, 1941
A3.2
“Instructions for Applicants”
First Line: Ella should live on a street like a song.
Accepted by: Ladies Home Journal.
December 1, 1941
A3.3
“Current”
First Line: All braided into torrents falls.
August 15, 1943
A3.4
“Oh Never]”
First Line: Because we oh no never.
April 2, 1942
A3.5
“Experiment”
First Line: Blue, blue forever ever and ever falling.
April 8, 1942
A3.6
“Current Interest”
First Line: By chance the eyes nose mouth, the flat of jaw.
Accepted by: New Yorker.
January 1, 1940
A3.7
“Director”
First Line: Come down, branch, along the window. There..
August 16, 1942
A3.8
“Los Prietos”
First Line: Dear friends, the swarthy earth shoulders into....
June 20, 1942
A3.9
“Los Prietos”
First Line: Doves in the dust of our pacifist camp.
Accepted by: CPS Magazine.
August 18, 1942
A3.10
“Way Men Walk”
First Line: falling forward.
August 1, 1942
A3.11
“Puppy -- Cinnamon Lady”
First Line: I do not believe in those eyes, soundless.
October 19, 1942
A3.12
“untitled”
First Line: I do not know how that fine dust rises.
December 31, 1943
A3.13
“Meditation]”
First Line: If I could remember all at once -- but I have forgotten.
Accepted by: Poetry.
March 11, 1943
A3.14
“Prison Camp”
First Line: I heard the homeless laugh.
June 1, 1943
A3.15
“Stranger in Town”
First Line: I looked for the town.
June 8, 1942
A3.16
“Tragedy”
First Line: In a big plank room in the mountains.
March 12, 1943
A3.17
“untitled”
First Line: Into the light with a cry.
September 1, 1943
A3.18
“untitled”
First Line: I was there when it happened.
August 7, 1943
A3.19
“Search”
First Line: I went in every house and every room.
Accepted by: Illiterati.
February 18, 1943
A3.20
“Portrait of Johnny Johnson”
First Line: Johnny has found his rock.
November 21, 1943
A3.21
“CO’s Work on Mt. Road”
First Line: Like bay trees on the edge of La Cumbre Peak.
Accepted by: Illiterati.
December 23, 1942
A3.22
“Medals Are Pieces of Silver”
First Line: Medals are fastened with ribbon.
Accepted by: The Compass.
December 4, 1943
A3.23
“Artist”
First Line: Men store their carefulness in things.
April 5, 1942
A3.24
“Walking at Night”
First Line: Now I am alone, following the downwar slur.
March 13, 1943
A3.25
“Our Men”
First Line: Our men walk lightly and scatter over the mountains.
Accepted by: Illiterati.
September 15, 1943
A3.26
“Snow”
First Line: Silently down from Big Pine Mountains, white.
November 5, 1942
A3.27
“Baby at Our House”
First Line: Snowflake in the life of the world.
Accepted by: Gospel Messenger.
May 31, 1943
A3.28
“Country Company”
First Line: Song, where shall I hold your width.
September 6, 1943
A3.29
“Artistes”
First Line: Their gains are small in the campaign.
January 23, 1943
A3.30
“untitled”
First Line: Their voices were stilled across the land.
May 1, 1942
A3.31
“Stranger”
First Line: There is a person who listens*.
September 18, 1943
A3.32
“Apology”
First Line: There was a flowering bush one time by where I ....
May 13, 1943
A3.33
“Men in Chapel”
First Line: These valiant, these sailers without qualm.
Accepted by: CPS Magazine.
April 9, 1942
A3.34
“Explorers”
First Line: They said it was the Great Divide.
November 9, 1943
A3.35
“untitled”
First Line: They say sound is the ear and sight the eye.
February 11, 1943
A3.36
“untitled”
First Line: Just at sundown, this is the heart.
September 1, 1943
A3.37
“Discovery”
First Line: This land, the coast I found, the low dark line.
August 1, 1942
A3.38
“Communication [to the Alienated]*”
First Line: This turn of the hand is for them.
April 6, 1942
A3.39
“Communique”
First Line: This whimpering child is an army.
August 11, 1943
A3.40
“Possession”
First Line: We have a Sabbath; it’s from long ago.
March 9, 1943
A3.41
“Inspirational Talk”
First Line: We must dedicate our lives!” The speaker views.
March 4, 1942
A3.42
“White Pigeons”
First Line: What’s that --.
April 1, 1937
A3.43
“Rebels”
First Line: When we look up from sorrow toward the dark.
October 17, 1942
A3.44
“untitled”
First Line: While we sat on the lawn in the shade.
July 5, 1943
A3.45
“untitled”
First Line: Why should I fray grass with the feet*.
April 3, 1942
A3.46
“Escape”
First Line: With runaway wild smoke across the brain.
April 1, 1942

A4: Typed Copies of Poems in an unpublished put-together titled Survivors - Poems of 1944., 1944Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 2/Folder A4

47 items

Compiled at Gansner Bar, California on January 8, 1945.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 2/Folder A4
A4.1 and A4.2
4 page index
A4.3
“Then" [1944]
First Line: I will call you by your softest name.
Accepted by: Ladies Home Journal.
January 22, 1944
A4.4
“A Posy" [Hi, Neighbor!]
First Line: Some people keep a large and savage messiah.
Accepted by: Poetry.
September 20, 1944
A4.4
“In Our Time”
First Line: The wrath of God is offered at a fire sale.
Accepted by: Fellowship.
September 20, 1944
A4.4
“Pin Boys”
First Line: We are pinboys at their bowling alley.
Accepted by: Fellowship.
September 20, 1944
A4.5
“To a Gold Star Mother”
First Line: Which are the men who killed your son?.
Accepted by: Fellowship.
March 23, 1944
A4.6
“For Poems - ‘42 & ‘43”
First Line: I carry pieces of my world before the crowd.
May 5, 1944
A4.7
“At a Little Church”
First Line: Following the velvet trail, I found their shrine.
Accepted by: Gospel Messenger.
March 25, 1944
A4.8
“The Way Rain Falls”
First Line: Father’s house stood.
October 26, 1943
A4.9
“Carnadine”
First Line: A red army is advancing.
May 6, 1944
A4.10
“untitled”
First Line: Death was there one morning.
November 1, 1944
A4.11
“untitled”
First Line: A man with grey long coat, with half-soled shoes.
June 14, 1944
A4.12
untitled
First Line: Go home, little world.
Accepted by: Saturday Review of Literature.
July 1, 1944
A4.13
“Nocturne" [At Night]
First Line: Gone, gone. So silent..
October 22, 1943
A4.14
“Red”
First Line: He was like everyone else,.
May 31, 1944
A4.15
untitled
First Line: I do not love the truth.
September 21, 1944
A4.16
“Counsel”
First Line: If any ask, say yes.
May 24, 1944
A4.17
untitled
First Line: In front of theaters I see the tall and bold.
May 21, 1944
A4.18
untitled
First Line: It’s an old story.
May 29, 1944
A4.19
“These Mornings”
First Line: Watch our smoke curdle up out of the chimney.
Accepted by: Fellowship.
January 20, 1944
A4.20 and A4. 21
“Speech from the Big Play" [height over the cabin]
First Line: Not many of you in the world remember.
November 1, 1944
A4.22
“Trapped”
First Line: Now, gardens bound our world.
March 13, 1944
A4.23
“Fire in Lava Country”
First Line: Part of the earth not made to walk on.
May 28, 1944
A4.24
untitled
First Line: Shall we have that singing in the evening?.
Accepted by: Fellowship.
January 19, 1944
A4.25
“[November Incident]”
First Line: Silent the big dark ranger came down.
May 27, 1944
A4.26
“Laguna Beach”
First Line: The beach professionals.
April 20, 1944
A4.27
“untitled”
First Line: The one who said “No violence”.
May 21, 1944
A4.28
“Happy Journey!”
First Line: The person with our treasure swings.
Accepted by: Common Sense, Saturday Review of Literature.
May 31, 1944
A4.29
“War Guilt”
First Line: The pupil of the son.
Accepted by: Fellowship.
March 9, 1944
A4.30
“Speech from a Play”
First Line: The reason you cannot say anything is....
January 21, 1944
A4.31
untitled
First Line: There are no mountains here, no sea, no name.
May 24, 1944
A4.32
untitled
First Line: There was a roar in battle, Jericho to come,.
Accepted by: Fellowship; Saturday Review of Literature; and Atlantic.
December 2, 1943
A4.33
untitled
First Line: There was a time when valor wore old shoes.
Accepted by: Pacifist Verse?.
November 6, 1943
A4.34
untitled
First Line: They handle the ripe smooth fruit.
Accepted by: Poetry.
October 14, 1944
A4.35
untitled
First Line: They taught me to be hurt.
September 18, 1944
A4.36
“Listening" [Something about Music]
First Line: Our wilderness, the world.
October 1, 1944
A4.37
untitled
First Line: They flawed when struck.
September 21, 1944
A4.38
“One Friend”
First Line: To drink the dark we close the eyes.
Accepted by: Tiger’s Eye.
November 4, 1944
A4.39
untitled
First Line: Turn off the lamp, wait,.
October 23, 1943
A4.40
“[Little Stranger]?”
First Line: Walking away, bending his knees.
August 16, 1944
A4.41
untitled
First Line: We hear, whispering in our veins.
July 1, 1944
A4.42
“Christmas Comes But Once a Year”
First Line: What they told us on Christmas was all right.
Accepted by: Fellowship.
February 13, 1944
A4.43
“We Kindred”
First Line: Whoever stands uncertain in the night.
Accepted by: Saturday Review of Literature.
June 7, 1944
A4.44
“Words One Summer”
First Line: Words were our summer.
August 1, 1944
A4.45
“Reproof”
First Line: You driving 35.
April 20, 1944
A4.46
untitled
First Line: You might as well put.
March 31, 1944
A4.47
untitled
First Line: Your tragedy before the ship goes down.
Accepted by: Fellowship.
December 21, 1943

A4.1: Typed Copies of Poems in an unpublished put-together titled Some of the Words We Said., ???Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 2/Folder A4.1

?? items

Compiled at ???? on January 8, 1945.

A5: Typed Copies of Poems from 1945, 1945Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 2/Folder A5

33 items

Mostly unpublished poems.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 2/Folder A5
A5.1
“Before the Big Storm”
First Line: You are famous in my mind.
January 3, 1945
A5.2
“Victory”
First Line: All violent like the knife that drove.
August 16, 1945
A5.3
“Alone They Set the Only God”
First Line: Alone they set the only God.
August 14, 1945
A5.4
“On a Militaristic Church Service”
First Line: And there I sat on my swami.
September 8, 1945
A5.5
“Note On Solemn War””
First Line: A note on solemn war.
August 17, 1945
A5.6
“From Battle”
First Line: Catch the pattering soul, God, with.
January 10, 1945
A5.7
“For Bessie, who always …”
First Line: For Bessie, who always knew pain.
January 10, 1945
A5.8
“He whetted his wit…”
First Line: He whetted his wit on words.
April 14, 1945
A5.9
“I came out of blindness-”
First Line: I came out of blindness-.
January 1, 1945
A5.10
“I come from afar””
First Line: I come from afar.
September 22, 1945
A5.11
“I had forgotten the clown…”
First Line: I had forgotten the clown in me.
March 15, 1945
A5.12
“Flickerings”
First Line: I’m glad the heart sleeps.
Accepted by: Southwest Review.
March 15, 1945
A5.13
“One Place I Saw”
First Line: In that bright place the earth is always dry.
January 1, 1945
A5.14
“Softly”
First Line: I want an old sunset.
August 18, 1945
A5.15
“Farewell Note”
First Line: Like a big black dog we followed their question home.
March 11, 1945
A5.16
“Listener Farewell Note” [Short Story]
First Line: Like a big black dog I followed your question home.
March 11, 1945
A5.17
“Sound: Summer 1945”
First Line: Not a loud sound, the buzz of the rattlesnake.
August 1, 1945
A5.18
“Sound: Summer 1945”
First Line: Not a loud sound, the buzz of the rattlesnake.
August 8, 1945
A5.19
“So mildly there…”
First Line: So mildly there from far away.
April 13, 1945
A5.20
“Square on a German wagon”
First Line: Square on a German wagon.
August 10, 1945
A5.21
“That land spoke””
First Line: That land spoke.
March 9, 1945
A5.22
“Occupied City”
First Line: The biggen weight was iron.
November 27, 1945
A5.23
“first thing that grows..”
First Line: The first thing that grows in the spring.
July 28, 1945
A5.24
“Translation from the Yaqui”
First Line: The hairy faced who walk like aged bears.
May 1, 1945
A5.25
untitled
First Line: The little days have known, with their big eyes.
April 28, 1945
A5.26
“Mr. Conscience”
First Line: The meditative crane.
Accepted by: Grundtvig Review.
June 6, 1945
A5.27
“midgets of war…”
First Line: The midgets of war have loud hollow guns.
May 24, 1945
A5.28
“sky is hunting some one”
First Line: The sky is hunting some one-.
March 1, 1945
A5.29
“Ladies and Gentlemen”
First Line: Their tranquil lives like moss on ponds.
December 2, 1945
A5.30
“Unto a great deaf mountain”
First Line: Unto a great deaf mountain.
January 5, 1945
A5.31
“Nine-Years Old (II)”
First Line: Violence lowered its lids of silence.
September 24, 1945
A5.32
“CO Week End”
First Line: When we went into town.
October 31, 1945
A5.33
“Nine-Years Dream”
First Line: You have made tracks in our snow!.
Accepted by: Poetry.
June 21, 1945

A6: Typed Documentary Copies of Published Poems, 1946Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 3/Folder A6

27 items
Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 3/Folder A6
A6.1
“Romantic”
First Line: I go down into truth the hard way.
April 16, 1946
A6.2
“untitled”
First Line: All around the biggest bay the curious hive.
June 2, 1946
A6.3
“Members of the Kingdom”
First Line: All over the world meeting briefly.
December 6, 1946
A6.4
“Arrow Maker”
First Line: heard the chipping.
Accepted in: Accent.
November 3, 1946
A6.5
“Trotline Treasure”
First Line: Held that gold over it.
June 17, 1946
A6.6
“Grad”
First Line: Here where the pen secretes wisdom.
April 6, 1946
A6.7
“Campanile”
First Line: How many young have gone by here slow.
April 9, 1946
A6.8
“Two Bits Worth”
First Line: I heard some oath in boots mug the red beer.
Accepted by: Fellowship.
April 11, 1946
A6.9
“untitled”
First Line: I heard the shadowed quip.
March 10, 1946
A6.10
“untitled”
First Line: I thought they shouldn’t turn the light so low.
January 12, 1946
A6.11
“untitled”
First Line: Oh, ingots in gingham.
April 5, 1946
A6.12
“Persons in Mountains”
First Line: Slope raised green and on up aiming true.
January 17, 1946
A6.13
“Foundations”
First Line: Some invisible tower.
Accepted by: Fellowship.
August 16, 1946
A6.14
“Out the Dark Window”
First Line: Something from somewhere bows the trees.
November 30, 1946
A6.15
“Stray No One”
First Line: That stray no one.
October 21, 1946
A6.16
“Home Town from the Flyer”
First Line: The leaves, the stir of it.
August 28, 1946
A6.17
“Humanity in the Service”
First Line: The place by the ear.
October 14, 1946
A6.18
“Gust”
First Line: The wind that knows long walls is like my mind.
November 24, 1946
A6.19
“untitled”
First Line: They listened to him say his creed.
January 27, 1946
A6.20
“untitled”
First Line: When I walked along the earth.
May 4, 1946
A6.21
“Love Was a Pup”
First Line: When I was a kid, then love was a pup.
April 18, 1946
A6.22
“To Those Among Us…”
First Line: When we saw all of our friends, the helpers together.
March 7, 1946
A6.23
“Human Song”
First Line: Whenever we loved, our hearts were rolled.
May 16, 1946
A6.24
“untitled”
First Line: While one bird bears the noon.
September 3, 1946
A6.25
“untitled”
First Line: You dropped into my morning a sound.
March 30, 1946
A6.26
“Katherine”
First Line: Your small face in the bird well.
June 3, 1946
A6.27
“Katherine”
First Line: Your small face in the bird well.
June 3, 1946

A7: Typed Documentary Copies of Poems, 1947Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 3/Folder A7

29 items
Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 3/Folder A7
A7.1
“Walking Papers”
First Line: Foreman’s house in the shade of a tree.
Accepted by: Ladies Home Journal.
December 6, 1947
A7.2
“Walking Papers”
First Line: Born in a town by a water tank.
Accepted by: Ladies Home Journal.
December 6, 1947
A7.3
“Faith”
First Line: If I could be all alone.
Accepted by: Fellowship.
October 10, 1947
A7.4
“Heroes Around Here”
First Line: The one that wasn’t scared.
November 10, 1947
A7.5
“It Was This Way”
First Line: Again today I have not saved the world.
Accepted by: Fellowship.
November 30, 1947
A7.6
“Leader I Met”
First Line: A leader I met.
June 28, 1947
A7.7
“untitled”
First Line: A million explosions went out.
December 28, 1947
A7.8
“Northern Coast”
First Line: Down here off the leaned back land.
August 3, 1947
A7.9
“untitled”
First Line: Down wall, cat, and the twenty claws.
December 28, 1947
A7.10
“Knives Broadways”
First Line: How many have really lived that hill?.
September 24, 1947
A7.11
“Promoters”
First Line: If the world hasn’t reminded me,.
September 21, 1947
A7.12
“Veteran”
First Line: I have jerked out of a fall.
March 11, 1947
A7.13
“To a Pessimist”
First Line: In all the world you saw.
August 27, 1947
A7.14
“Prescription for Some”
First Line: Learn somehow to achieve grey.
September 7, 1947
A7.15
“Down Town”
First Line: How one knew how to mean slow.
February 11, 1947
A7.16
“Now”
First Line: Our weight swings on a sagging hinge.
December 18, 1947
A7.17
“Now Zone”
First Line: Over the world.
November 15, 1947
A7.18
“Graduate Work”
First Line: Perched there, footed on stone, up high.
September 5, 1947
A7.19
“Every Breakfast”
First Line: Reading the morning news.
August 2, 1947
A7.20
“Withheld”
First Line: The fields may be green, or some other color.
September 15, 1947
A7.21
“Big Book”
First Line: The gray nets of the fisher boat.
February 15, 1947
A7.22
“Mute”
First Line: The kind of gashed healed with iodine.
July 1, 1947
A7.23
“Incident: 1950”
First Line: The ticket men wait by the ramp.
July 1, 1947
A7.24
“untitled”
First Line: There in the deep room.
March 20, 1947
A7.25
“untitled”
First Line: The way home.
October 7, 1947
A7.26
“At 4:30”
First Line: This life cloth in daylight, pulled and shrunk.
July 1, 1947
A7.27
“Little Song of Heredity”
First Line: The wheat’ll vittle you all.
August 1, 1947
A7.28
“Rebel Telling You”
First Line: We must cannot tell.
December 17, 1947
A7.29
“untitled”
First Line: Your tears fell on my eyes.
May 20, 1947

A8: Typed Documentary Copies of Poems, 1948Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 3/Folder A8

16 items
Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 3/Folder A8
A8.1
untitled
First Line: Nothing, nothing, somewhere I’ll achieve to nothing.
January 10, 1949
A8.2
“Reverie”
First Line: Thought out over the desert.
January 4, 1949
A8.3
untitled
First Line: I have a horse.
September 11, 1948
A8.4
“Tolstoy’s “Hadji Murad”
First Line: Broken but not harvested.
August 9, 1948
A8.5
“Passport”
First Line: Down the long grade into Denver.
January 1, 1948
A8.6
“What Kind of Shoes”
First Line: I have wondered with what kind of shoes.
April 5, 1948
A8.7
“What Kind of Shoes (contd)”
First Line: As it was, we all shuddered through.
April 1, 1948
A8.8
“Someone”
First Line: Listen, captain, tighten your puttees;.
Accepted by: Fellowship.
August 10, 1948
A8.9
“Lame Dog”
First Line: Old dog was here for someone.
July 17, 1948
A8.10
“Aim”
First Line: Short boys who do tall things.
February 15, 1948
A8.11
“Landslide”
First Line: That ragged path, now studied with bloom.
March 17, 1948
A8.12
“Sand Blaster”
First Line: The sand blaster come polishing along.
June 21, 1948
A8.13
“Constant Storm”
First Line: The wind like tearing silk all night.
January 24, 1948
A8.14
untitled
First Line: When the tiger doesn’t move.
June 24, 1948
A8.15
“Brim Wide”
First Line: When tides of green lay deep.
April 11, 1948
A8.16
untitled
First Line: Who grab cold and spite.
January 9, 1948

A9: Typed Documentary Copies of Poems, 1949Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 3/Folder A9

1 item
Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 3/Folder A9
A9.1
"Looking West"
First Line: When I burned the papers a wind from the dark.
Accepted by: New Yorker.
December 27, 1949

A10: Typed Documentary Copies of Poems, 1950Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 3/Folder A10

5 items
Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 3/Folder A10
A10.1
"In the Hard Light"
First Line: On the beach at Nescowin we heard the sand.
Accepted by: Western Review.
November 13, 1950
A10.2
"In the White World"
First Line: In the white morning before day.
Accepted by: Ladies Home Journal.
September 28, 1950
A10.3
"On Guard"
First Line: I know how timid the August river pauses.
Accepted by: Experiment.
August 31, 1950
A10.4
"It’s All Right"
First Line: It cannot make any difference to you.
Accepted by: Ladies Home Journal.
March 20, 1950
A10.5
"To Be Continued"
First Line: In this the year of the bomb.
Accepted by: Fellowship.
January 30, 1950

A11: Typed Documentary Copies of Poems, 1940-1945Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 3/Folder A11

28 items
Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 3/Folder A11
A11.1
“Prisoner”
First Line: Touched the walls on every side again -.
May 8, 1942
A11.2
“Prison Camp”
First Line: I heard the homeless laugh.
June 1, 1943
A11.3
“Stranger 2" [in Town]
First Line: I looked for the town.
June 8, 1942
A11.4
“Home Town”
First Line: Peace on my little town, a speck in the safe....
Accepted by: Feoh, University of Kansas.
October 3, 1941
A11.5
“Vine”
First Line: Slash thought and a thunder of miles distant.
Accepted by: Feoh, University of Kansas.
May 10, 1942
A11.6
untitled
First Line: A man should always have a friend, a wall.
May 5, 1942
A11.7
“Event”
First Line: At evening on Feb. 26, the long flat sunlight.
Accepted by: Feoh, University of Kansas.
March 3, 1942
A11.8
“Observation”
First Line: Bending over, watching them quietly.
Accepted by: New Mexico Quarterly Review; New Signatures.
December 1, 1941
A11.9
“Experiment - Friend Sky”
First Line: Blue, blue forever ever and ever falling.
April 1, 1942
A11.10
“Refugee”
First Line: Crept through a forest and stopped where a limb.
August 1, 1940
A11.11
“Breath”
First Line: Far up the canyon where the salmon leap.
November 1, 1942
A11.12
“Tall Animals”
First Line: For pigs the click of the pail is enough.
Accepted by: New Orleans Poetry Journal.
January 28, 1945
A11.13
“Flickerings”
First Line: I’m glad the heart sleeps..
Accepted by: Soutwest Review.
March 15, 1945
A11.14
“At Roll Call”
First Line: One day I stood, small shoes upon the sand.
Accepted by: Compass.
March 1, 1942
A11.15
untitled
First Line: Only the children play in the snow.
October 7, 1941
A11.16
“Home" [Possession]
First Line: Our father owned a star.
Accepted by: Fellowship.
June 21, 1944
A11.17
“Night on a Hill”
First Line: Rain censors distant things; haze dims far hills.
June 9, 1942
A11.18
“To the Busy Editor”
First Line: Some lines go trotting far across the page....
October 9, 1941
A11.19
“Pin Boy”
First Line: I am pinboy at their bowling alley.
undated
A11.19
“Posy" [Hi, Neighbor!]
First Line: Some people keep a large and savage messiah.
Accepted by: Poetry.
September 20, 1944
A11.19
“In Our Time" / "We Give Their Lives”
First Line: The wrath of God is offered at a fire sale.
Accepted by: Fellowship.
September 20, 1944
A11.20
“Baby at Our House”
First Line: Snowflake in the life of the world.
Accepted by: Gospel Messenger.
May 31, 1943
A11.21
“[Landscape for Postcards]”
First Line: Stern duty is a bitter thought.
December 15, 1944
A11.22
“War Season”
First Line: The birds that winter blew past our yard.
Accepted by: Oregonian.
April 18, 1945
A11.23
“Exile (2)”
First Line: The burning city of my sorrow hurts.
May 4, 1942
A11.24
“Mr. Conscience”
First Line: The meditative crane.
Accepted by: Grundtvig Review and Poetry.
June 6, 1945
A11.25
“Discovery”
First Line: This land, the coast I found, the low dark line.
August 17, 1942
A11.26
“Buzzards Over Arkansas”
First Line: Three somber wheeling buzzards tatalize a vortex.
Accepted by: New Mexico Quarterly Review.
March 1, 1942
A11.27
untitled
First Line: Twelve slow wild geese beat by.
October 11, 1941
A11.28
“We Call It the Chaparral”
First Line: We called it the chaparral.
March 14, 1943

dc1: Typed Documentary Copies of Poems and Put-together for West of Your City, 1950-1959Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 4/Folder dc1

52 items

Assembled in 1960.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 4/Folder dc1
dc1.1
untitled
table of contents.
March 28, 1959
dc1.2
“Midwest”
first section contents.
March 1, 1959
dc1.3
“West of Your City”
First Line: West of your city into the fern.
Accepted by: Hudson Review .
June 1, 1956
dc1.4
“One Home”
First Line: Mine was a Midwest home - you can keep your world.
Accepted by: Hudson Review .
October 1, 1953
dc1.5
“Ceremony”
First Line: On the third finger of my left hand.
Accepted by: Talisman.
June 1, 1956
dc1.6
“In the Deep Channel”
First Line: Setting a trotline after sundown.
Accepted by: Hudson Review .
August 1, 1953
dc1.7
“At the Salt Marsh”
First Line: Those teal with traveling wings.
Accepted by: Colorado Quarterly .
January 8, 1947
dc1.8
“Hail Mary”
First Line: Cedars darkened their slow way.
Accepted by: Hudson Review .
December 1, 1954
dc1.9
“Listening”
First Line: My father could hear a little animal step.
Accepted by: Talisman .
September 1, 1952
dc1.10
“Circle of Breath”
First Line: The night my father died the moon shone on the snow.
Accepted by: Atlantic .
December 1, 1953
dc1.11
“Visit Home”
First Line: In my sixties I will buy a hat.
Accepted by: New Republic .
October 1, 1955
dc1.12
“Farm on the Great Plains”
First Line: A telephone line goes cold.
Accepted by: Poetry.
April 1, 1956
dc1.13
“Far West”
second section contents
March 1, 1959
dc1.14
“Walking West”
First Line: Anyone with quiet pace who.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
August 1, 1953
dc1.15
“Our People”
First Line: Under the killdeer cry.
Accepted by: Western Review.
January 1, 1953
dc1.16
“Survey”
First Line: Down in the Frantic Mountains.
Accepted by: Poetry.
July 10, 1951
dc1.17
“In the Oregon Country”
First Line: From Old Fort Walla Walla and the Klickitats.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
January 1, 1951
dc1.18
“Gun of Billy the Kid”
First Line: When they factoried Billy the Kid’s Gun.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
September 1, 1953
dc1.19
“Willa Cather”
First Line: Far as the night goes, brittle as the stars.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
July 1, 1953
dc1.20
“By the Snake River”
First Line: Something sent me out in these desert places.
Accepted by: Talisman.
May 1, 1956
dc1.21
“Small Item”
First Line: A tumbleweed that was trying.
Accepted by: Colorado Quarterly.
December 6, 1948
dc1.22
“At the Bomb Testing Site”
First Line: At noon in the desert a panting lizard.
Accepted by: Talisman.
December 1, 1953
dc1.23
“Lore”
First Line: Dogs that eat fish edging tidewater die.
Accepted by: Saturday Review.
December 1, 1954
dc1.24
“Weather Report”
First Line: Light wind at Grand Prairie, drifting snow.
Accepted by: Poetry.
January 1, 1954
dc1.25
“Vacation”
First Line: One scene as I bow to pour her coffee.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
January 31, 1950
dc1.26
“Fish Counter at Bonneville”
First Line: Downstream they have killed the river and built a dam.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
September 7, 1951
dc1.27
“Sauvies Island”
First Line: Some years ago I first hunted on Sauvies Island.
Accepted by: Saturday Review.
February 1, 1956
dc1.28
“Watching the Jet Planes Dive”
First Line: We must go back and find a trail on the ground.
Accepted by: Poetry.
November 1, 1953
dc1.29
“Summons in Indiana: Move to CA 1”
First Line: In the crept hours on our street.
Accepted by: Poetry.
February 1, 1956
dc1.30
“Lost Chance (first version of Move to CA 1)”
First Line: In the crept hours on our street.
Accepted by: Poetry.
February 1, 1956
dc1.31
“Glimpsed on the Way: Move to CA 2”
First Line: Think of the miles we left.
Accepted by: Poetry.
August 1, 1956
dc1.32
“Summit: Move to CA 3”
First Line: Past the middle of the continent.
Accepted by: Poetry.
August 8, 1952
dc1.33
“Springs Near Hagerman: Move to CA 4”
First Line: Water leaps from lava near Hagerman.
Accepted by: Poetry.
January 1, 1951
dc1.34
“Highway 40: Move to CA 5”
First Line: Those who wear green glasses through Nevada.
Accepted by: Poetry.
August 1, 1956
dc1.35
“Written on the Stub of the First Paycheck: Move to CA 6”
First Line: Gasoline makes game scarce.
Accepted by: Poetry.
August 1, 1956
dc1.36
“Outside”
third section contents.
March 1, 1959
dc1.37
“Bi-Focal”
First Line: Sometimes up out of this land.
Accepted by: Nation.
January 2, 1950
dc1.38
“Outside”
First Line: The least little sound sets the coyotes walking.
Accepted by: Western Review.
February 1, 1953
dc1.39
“Boom Town”
First Line: Into any sound important.
Accepted by: Poetry.
July 3, 1951
dc1.40
“Level Light”
First Line: Sometimes the light when evening fails.
Accepted by: Colorado Quarterly.
March 20, 1955
dc1.41
“Two Evenings”
First Line: Back of the stride of the power line.
Accepted by: Poetry.
June 1, 1953
dc1.42
“Ice-Fishing”
First Line: Not thinking other than how the hand works.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
October 1, 1955
dc1.43
“Well Rising”
First Line: The well rising without sound.
Accepted by: Western Review.
April 1, 1953
dc1.44
“Ritual to Read to Each Other”
First Line: If you don’t know the kind of person I am.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
July 1, 1953
dc1.45
“Connections”
First Line: Ours is a low, curst, under-swamp land.
Accepted by: Talisman.
September 23, 1953
dc1.46
“Acquaintance”
First Line: Because our world hardened.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
October 5, 1952
dc1.47
“On the Glass Ice”
First Line: It was time. Arriving at Long Lake the storm.
Accepted by: Talisman.
January 1, 1956
dc1.48
“Sayings from the Northern Ice”
First Line: It is people at the edge who say.
Accepted by: Poetry.
October 1, 1955
dc1.49
“It Is the Time You Think”
First Line: Deaf to process, alive only to ends.
Accepted by: Colorado Quarterly.
October 1, 1955
dc1.50
“Sunset: Southwest”
First Line: In front of the courthouse holding the adaptable flag.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
December 1, 1954
dc1.51
“Following”
First Line: There dwelt in a cave, and winding I thought lower.
Accepted by: Poetry.
March 1, 1953
dc1.52
“Postscript”
First Line: You reading this page, this trial.
Accepted by: Colorado Quarterly.
February 21, 1951

dc2: Typed Documentary Copies of Poems and Put-together for Traveling through the Dark, 1950-1962Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 4/Folder dc2

118 items

Assembled in 1962.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 4/Folder dc2
dc2.1
untitled
contents page 1.
February 1, 1962
dc2.2
untitled
contents page 2.
February 1, 1962
dc2.3
“In Medias Res”
subtitle, pt.1.
1962
dc2.4
“Traveling through the Dark”
First Line: Traveling through the dark I found a deer.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
June 1, 1956
dc2.5
“In Medias Res”
First Line: On Main one night when they sounded the chimes.
Accepted by: Poetry.
December 1, 1959
dc2.6
“Elegy”
First Line: The responsible sound of the lawnmower.
Accepted by: Western Review.
June 3, 1952
dc2.7
“Stared Story”
First Line: Over the hill came horsemen, horsemen.
Accepted by: Poetry Northwest.
November 17, 1953
dc2.8
“Thinking for Berky”
First Line: In the late night listening fom bed.
Accepted by: New Orleans Poetry Journal.
January 1, 1955
dc2.9
“With My Crowbar Key”
First Line: I do tricks in order to know.
Accepted by: Botteghe Oscure.
April 1, 1956
dc2.10
“Thought Machine”
First Line: Its little eye stares “On” in its forehead.
Accepted by: Poetry.
March 1, 1960
dc2.11
“Mouse Night: One of Our Games”
First Line: We heard thunder. Nothing great - on high.
Accepted by: Poetry Northwest.
August 1, 1957
dc2.12
“Parentage”
First Line: My father didn’t really belong in history.
Accepted by: New Orleans Poetry Journal.
March 1, 1955
dc2.13
“Research Team in the Mountains”
First Line: Answers are just echoes, they say. But.
Accepted by: Talisman.
October 1, 1957
dc2.14
“Holding the Sky”
First Line: We saw a town by the track in Colorado.
Accepted by: Schooner.
January 1, 1951
dc2.15
“Job”
First Line: It starts before light.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
September 1, 1959
dc2.16
“Prairie Town”
First Line: There was a river under First and Main.
Accepted by: Fiddlehead.
March 1, 1956
dc2.17
“Tornado”
First Line: First the soul of our house left, up the chimney.
Accepted by: Poetry Book Society Supplement.
June 1, 1960
dc2.18
“Conservative”
First Line: Indiana felt the ice.
Accepted by: Approach.
May 1, 1957
dc2.19
“Woman at Banff”
First Line: While she was talking a bear happened along, violating.
Accepted by: Saturday Review.
July 1, 1960
dc2.20
“Tillamook Burn”
First Line: These mountains have heard God.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
January 1, 1955
dc2.21
“Old Hamer Place”
First Line: The wind came every night like an animal.
Accepted by: Contact.
December 1, 1959
dc2.22
“On Quitting a Little College”
First Line: By footworn boards, by steps.
Accepted by: Approach.
March 1, 1956
dc2.23
“Reporting Back”
First Line: By the secret that holds the forest up.
Accepted by: Colorado Quarterly.
February 1, 1958
dc2.24
“Poets’ Annual Indigence Report”
First Line: Tonight beyond the determined moon.
Accepted by: Poetry Northwest.
March 1, 1958
dc2.25
“In Response to a Question”
First Line: The earth says have a place; be what that place requires.
Accepted by: Poetry.
July 1, 1960
dc2.26
“With One Launched Look”
First Line: The cheetah levels at one far deer.
Accepted by: Nation.
June 1, 1956
dc2.27
“B.C.”
First Line: The seed that met water spoke a little name.
Accepted by: New Orleans Poetry Journal.
June 1, 1955
dc2.28
“Captive”
First Line: Calmly through the bars observe.
Accepted by: December.
November 1, 1958
dc2.29
“View from Here”
First Line: In Antarctica drooping their little shoulders.
Accepted by: New Orleans Poetry Journal.
December 13, 1955
dc2.30
“Lit Instructor”
First Line: Day after day up here beating my wings.
Accepted by: Western Review.
November 15, 1952
dc2.31
“Star in the Hills”
First Line: A star hit in the hills behind our house.
Accepted by: Harper’s.
October 1, 1956
dc2.32
“I Was in the City All Day”
First Line: Into the desert, trading people for horses.
Accepted by: Colorado Quarterly.
October 1, 1958
dc2.33
“Poet to a Novelist”
First Line: When we write, fighting feedback, eedback, dback.
Accepted by: Listen.
March 1, 1957
dc2.34
“Universe Is One Place”
First Line: Crisis they call it? - when.
Accepted by: Colorado Quarterly.
March 1, 1959
dc2.35
“In the Night Desert”
First Line: The Apache word for love twists.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
January 1, 1961
dc2.36
“Before the Big Storm”
subtitle, pt.2.
1962
dc2.37
“Before the Big Storm”
First Line: You are famous in my mind.
Accepted by: New Mexico Quarterly.
January 3, 1945
dc2.38
“Things We Did That Meant Something”
First Line: This as memory to a bloodhound’s nose.
Accepted by: Poetry.
February 1, 1957
dc2.39
“At Liberty School”
First Line: Girl in the front row who had no mother.
Accepted by: Schooner.
September 9, 1953
dc2.40
“Lake Chelan”
First Line: They call it regional, this relevence.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
August 1, 1960
dc2.41
“Museum at Tillamook”
First Line: Stll faces on the wall: that look.
Accepted by: Poetry.
April 1, 1960
dc2.42
“Late at Night”
First Line: Falling separate into the dark.
Accepted by: Southwest Review.
October 14, 1950
dc2.43
“Summer Will Rise”
First Line: Summer Will Rise till the houses fear.
Accepted by: New Mexico Quarterly.
February 1, 1956
dc2.44
“Fall Journey”
First Line: Evening came, a paw, to the gray hut by the river.
Accepted by: Schooner.
August 1, 1954
dc2.45
“Dedication”
First Line: We stood by the library. It was an August night.
Accepted by: New Mexico Quarterly.
December 1, 1953
dc2.46
“Chickens the Weasel Killed”
First Line: A passerby being fair about sacrifice.
Accepted by: Poetry.
August 1, 1957
dc2.47
“Requiem”
First Line: Mother is gone. Bird songs wouldn’t let her breathe.
Accepted by: Paris Review.
June 1, 1954
dc2.48
“Last Friend ”
First Line: In every life poor body earns its own evil.
Accepted by: Listen (Marvell Press, Yorkshire).
February 13, 1951
dc2.49
“Lyf So Short”
First Line: We have lived in that room larger than the world.
Accepted by: New Republic.
January 1, 1954
dc2.50
“Only Card I Got on my Birthday Was from an Insurance Man”
First Line: On upland farms into abandoned wells.
Accepted by: Saturday Review.
January 1, 1961
dc2.51
“At the Old Place”
First Line: The beak of dawn’s rooster pecked.
Accepted by: Poetry.
December 1, 1956
dc2.52
“Love the Butcher Bird Lurks Everywhere”
First Line: A gather of apricots fruit pickers left.
Accepted by: Paris Review.
August 1, 1957
dc2.53
“Learning”
First Line: A needle knows everything lengthwise.
Accepted by: University of Portland Review.
October 16, 1950
dc2.54
“Adults Only”
First Line: Animals own a fur world.
Accepted by: Kenyon Review.
September 1, 1959
dc2.55
“Wisteria Jones”
First Line: She used to write, ribboning our talk away.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
April 1, 1960
dc2.56
“In the Museum”
First Line: Like that, I put the next thing in your hand.
Accepted by: Colorado Quarterly.
October 1, 1954
dc2.57
“Time’s Exile”
First Line: From all encounters vintages ensue.
Accepted by: Inland.
December 1, 1955
dc2.58
“Birthday”
First Line: We have a dog named “Here”.
Accepted by: Southwest Review.
November 1, 1959
dc2.59
“Glances”
First Line: Two people meet. The sky turns winter.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
January 1, 1953
dc2.60
“Fall Wind”
First Line: Pods of summer crowd around the door.
Accepted by: Poetry Northwest.
May 1, 1956
dc2.61
“As Pippa Lilted”
First Line: Good things will happen.
Accepted by: Poetry.
March 1, 1957
dc2.62
“Trip”
First Line: Our car was fierce enough.
Accepted by: Pioneer Log.
November 1, 1959
dc2.63
“Representing Far Places”
subtitle, pt.3.
1962
dc2.64
“Representing Far Places”
First Line: In the canoe wilderness branches wait for winter.
Accepted by: Nation.
June 1, 1956
dc2.65
“From the Gradual Grass”
First Line: Imagine a voice calling.
Accepted by: Nation.
June 1, 1958
dc2.66
“Long Distance”
First Line: Sometimes you watch the fire.
Accepted by: Beloit Poetry Journal.
dc2.67
“Peters Family”
First Line: At the end of their ragged field.
Accepted by: Colorado Quarterly.
July 1, 1959
dc2.68
“In Fear and Valor”
First Line: My mother was afraid.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
December 1, 1958
dc2.69
“Title Comes Later”
First Line: In my sleep a little man cries, “Faker! Faker!”.
Accepted by: Poetry Northwest.
September 1, 1959
dc2.70
“At Cove on the Crooked River”
First Line: At Cove at our camp on the Crooked River.
Accepted by: Saturday Review.
August 1, 1959
dc2.71
“Last Vacation”
First Line: Mountains crowded around on the north.
Accepted by: New Orleans Poetry Journal.
August 31, 1951
dc2.72
“Looking for Someone”
First Line: Many a time driving over the Coast Range.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
June 1, 1958
dc2.73
“What God Used for Eyes Before We Came”
First Line: At night sometimes the big fog roams in tall.
Accepted by: Paris Review.
February 1, 1958
dc2.74
“Returned to Say”
First Line: When I face north a lost Cree.
Accepted by: .
June 1, 1956
dc2.75
“Found in a Storm”
First Line: A storm that needed a mountain.
Accepted by: Poetry.
August 1, 1960
dc2.76
“Late Thinker”
First Line: Remembering mountain farms.
Accepted by: Colorado Quarterly.
June 1, 1954
dc2.77
“Look Returned”
First Line: At the border of October.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
August 1, 1958
dc2.78
“Interlude”
First Line: Think of a river beyond your thought.
Accepted by: Yale Rreview.
July 1, 1960
dc2.79
“In Dear Detail, By Ideal Light”
First Line: Night huddled our towm.
Accepted by: Poetry.
August 1, 1958
dc2.80
“Wanderer Awaiting Preferment”
First Line: In a world where no one knows for sure.
Accepted by: Paris Review.
February 1, 1959
dc2.81
“Vocation”
First Line: This dream the world is having about itself.
Accepted by: Poetry.
April 1, 1961
dc2.82
Traveling through the Dark publication materials, 1
Approved nov 17.
1960
dc2.83
Traveling through the Dark publication materials, 2
A collection of poems - to Eliz. Lawrence.
December 27, 1960
dc2.84
How to Cross This Valley: Traveling through the Dark publication materials, 3
earlier subtitle, pt.3.
April 12, 1959
dc2.85
Representing Far Places: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 4
A collection (2 pp.) sent to David Wagoner.
October 25, 1960
dc2.86
Traveling through the Dark publication materials 5
extra poems offered....
February 22, 1962
dc2.87
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 6
Approach.
1960-1962
dc2.88
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 7
Beloit Poetry Journal.
1960-1962
dc2.89
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 8
Botteghe Oscure.
1960-1962
dc2.90
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 9
Colorado Quarterly.
1960-1962
dc2.91
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 10
Contact.
1960-1962
dc2.92
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 11
Commonweal and Compass.
1960-1962
dc2.93
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 12
December.
1960-1962
dc2.94
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 13
Fiddlehead.
1960-1962
dc2.95
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 14
Harpers.
1960-1962
dc2.96
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 15
Hudson Review.
1960-1962
dc2.97
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 16
Inland.
1960-1962
dc2.98
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 17
Kenyon Review.
1960-1962
dc2.99
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 18
Listen.
1960-1962
dc2.100
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 19
The Nation.
1960-1962
dc2.101
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 20
New Mexico Quarterly.
1960-1962
dc2.102
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 21
New Orleans Poetry Journal.
1960-1962
dc2.103
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 22
New Republic.
1960-1962
dc2.104
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 23
New Yorker.
1960-1962
dc2.105
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 24
Northwest Review.
1960-1962
dc2.106
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 25
State of Oregon.
1960-1962
dc2.107
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 26
Paris Review.
1960-1962
dc2.108
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 27
Pioneer Log.
1960-1962
dc2.109
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 28
Poetry.
1960-1962
dc2.110
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 29
Poetry Book Society.
1960-1962
dc2.111
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 30
Poetry Northwest.
1960-1962
dc2.112
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 31
Prairie Schooner.
1960-1962
dc2.113
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 32
Saturday Review.
1960-1962
dc2.114
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 33
Sounthwest Review.
1960-1962
dc2.115
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 34
Talisman.
1960-1962
dc2.116
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 35
University of Portland Review.
1960-1962
dc2.117
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 36
Western Review.
1960-1962
dc2.118
copyright list: Traveling through the Dark publication materials 37
Yale Review.
1960-1962

dc3: Typed Documentary Copies of Poems and Put-together for The Rescued Year, 1949-1965Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 4/Folder dc3

69 items

Assembled in 1966.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 4/Folder dc3
dc3.1
copyright notes: Rescued Year 1
Poetry....
undated
dc3.2
copyright page
Poems scheduled for The Rescued Year.
undated
dc3.3
copyright page draft
Poems scheduled for use in Rescued Year....
undated
dc3.4
“Part 1 (Domestic and Nostalgic)”
section contents.
June 28, 1965
dc3.5
“Tulip Tree”
First Line: Many a winter night.
Accepted by: New York Times.
August 1, 1961
dc3.6
“Some Shadows”
First Line: Neither do I love a gloomy virtue.
Accepted by: Compass.
May 28, 1951
dc3.7
“Across Kansas”
First Line: My family slept those level miles.
Accepted by: Poetry.
February 1, 1961
dc3.8
“My Father: October 1942”
First Line: He picks up what he thinks is.
Accepted by: Focus Midwest.
January 1, 1963
dc3.9
“Back Home”
First Line: The girl who used to sing in the choir.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
July 1, 1957
dc3.10
“Family Turn”
First Line: All her kamikaze friends admired my aunt.
Accepted by: Poetry.
January 1, 1964
dc3.11
“Fifteen”
First Line: South of the bridge on Seventeenth.
Accepted by: Atlantic.
July 1, 1963
dc3.12
“Rescued Year”
First Line: Take a model of the world so big.
Accepted by: Poetry.
November 1, 1961
dc3.13
“Homecoming”
First Line: Under my hat I custom you intricate, Ella.
Accepted by: Poetry Northwest.
November 12, 1950
dc3.14
“Judgments”
First Line: I accuse.
Accepted by: Harper’s.
March 1, 1963
dc3.15
“Uncle George”
First Line: Some catastrophes are better than others.
Accepted by: Saturday Review.
April 1, 1964
dc3.16
“Aunt Mabel”
First Line: This town is haunted by some good deed.
Accepted by: Granta.
November 1, 1962
dc3.17
“One Home”
First Line: Mine was a Midwest home - you can keep your world.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
undated
dc3.18
“Strokes”
First Line: The left side of her world is gone.
Accepted by: Saturday Review.
September 1, 1955
dc3.19
“Our City Is Guarded by Automatic Rockets”
First Line: Breaking every law except the one.
Accepted by: Poetry.
April 12, 1957
dc3.20
“Believer”
First Line: A horse could gallop over our bridge that minnows.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
August 1, 1963
dc3.21
“Letter from Oregon”
First Line: Mother, here there are shadowy salmon.
Accepted by: Western Humanities Review.
September 3, 1949
dc3.22
“Vacation”
First Line: One scene as I bow to pour here coffee.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
undated
dc3.23
“Farewell in Tumbleweed Time”
First Line: One after another, fish fast over the fence.
Accepted by: Southern Review.
January 1, 1963
dc3.24
“Farm on the Great Plains”
First Line: A telephone line goes cold.
Accepted by: Poetry.
undated
dc3.25
“Listening”
First Line: My father could hear a little animal step.
Accepted by: Talisman.
undated
dc3.26
“Part 2 (Landscape and Americana)”
section contents.
undated
dc3.27
“Well Rising”
First Line: The well rising without sound.
Accepted by: Western Review.
undated
dc3.28
“At the Bomb Testing Site”
First Line: At noon in the desert a panting lizard.
Accepted by: Talisman.
undated
dc3.29
“At the Chairman’s Housewarming”
First Line: Talk like a jellyfish can ruin a party.
Accepted by: Western Review.
undated
dc3.30
“When I Was Young”
First Line: That good river that flowed backward.
Accepted by: Saturday Review.
July 1, 1963
dc3.31
“Doubt on the Great Divide”
First Line: One of the lies the world is compelled to tell.
Accepted by: Colorado Quarterly.
March 29, 1954
dc3.32
“Winterward”
First Line: Early in March we pitched our scar.
Accepted by: Nimrod.
July 1, 1953
dc3.33
“Epitaph Ending in And”
First Line: In the last storm, when hawks.
Accepted by: goodly co..
October 1, 1964
dc3.34
“Keepsakes”
First Line: Star Guides.
Accepted by: Harper’s.
September 1, 1960
dc3.35
“Documentary from America”
First Line: When the Presidential candidate came to our town.
Accepted by: Critical Quarterly.
July 1, 1960
dc3.36
“Out West”
First Line: This air the mountains watch, in Oregon, holds.
Accepted by: Saturday Review.
December 1, 1962
dc3.37
“At This Point on the Page”
First Line: Frightened at the slant of the writing, I looked up.
Accepted by: Frontier.
December 1, 1958
dc3.38
“In the Deep Channel”
First Line: Setting a trotline after sundown.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
undated
dc3.39
“Connections”
First Line: Ours is a low, curst, under-swamp land.
Accepted by: Talisman.
undated
dc3.40
“At the Fair”
First Line: Even the flaws were good.
Accepted by: Poetry Northwest.
August 31, 1950
dc3.41
“Passing Remark”
First Line: In scenery I like flat country.
Accepted by: Mt Shasta.
November 12, 1951
dc3.42
“Fish Counter at Bonneville”
First Line: Downstream they have killed the river and built a dam.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
undated
dc3.43
“Walking West”
First Line: Anyone with quiet pace who.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
undated
dc3.44
“At the Klamath Berry Festival”
First Line: The war chief danced the old way.
Accepted by: Mt Shasta.
March 1, 1957
dc3.45
“Near Edinburgh Castle”
First Line: Wind riffles a telephone book.
Accepted by: Critical Quarterly.
August 31, 1962
dc3.46
“Our People”
First Line: Under the killdeer cry.
Accepted by: Western Review.
undated
dc3.47
“Part 3 (Following the Markings of Dag Hammarskjold)”
section contents.
undated
dc3.48
“Prologue (Dag Hammarskjold 1)”
First Line: You have to take the road seriously.
Accepted by: Poetry.
January 1, 1965
dc3.49
“Song Demonstrators in Mexico Sing in Troubled Parts of a City (Dag Hammarskjold 2)”
First Line: Dear ones, watching us on any street.
Accepted by: Poetry.
July 20, 1964
dc3.50
“Thanksgiving for My Father (Dag Hammarskjold 3) - 2 versions”
First Line: The freezing convict wanted.
Accepted by: Poetry.
November 26, 1964
dc3.51
“Jack London (Dag Hammarskjold 4)”
First Line: Teeth meet on a jugular, pause, and bite.
Accepted by: Poetry.
September 1, 1964
dc3.52
“Concealment: Ishi the Last Wild Indian (Dag Hammarskjold 5)”
First Line: A rock, a leaf, mud, even the grass.
Accepted by: Poetry.
January 1, 1964
dc3.53
“Glimpses in the Woods (Dag Hammarskjold 6)”
First Line: That yew tree in the woods, that hermit.
Accepted by: Poetry.
November 1, 1964
dc3.54
“Walking the Wilderness (Dag Hammarskjold 7)”
First Line: God is never sure He has found.
Accepted by: Poetry.
December 1, 1964
dc3.55
“Part 4 (Inward and Fantastic Poems)”
section contents.
undated
dc3.56
“Right Now”
First Line: Tonight in our secret town.
Accepted by: Focus/Midwest.
February 1, 1962
dc3.57
“From Eastern Oregon”
First Line: Your day self shimmers at the mouth of a desert cave.
Accepted by: Virginia Quarterly Review.
July 1, 1963
dc3.58
“Once Men Were Created”
First Line: A whistle had already loomed, outside.
Accepted by: Carleton Miscellany.
March 1, 1963
dc3.59
“Ice-Fishing”
First Line: Not thinking other than how the hand works.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
undated
dc3.60
“Human Condition”
First Line: If there is a forest anywhere.
Accepted by: Poetry.
July 1, 1961
dc3.61
“Across the Lake’s Eye”
First Line: Walking ice across the lake’s eye.
Accepted by: Poetry Northwest.
January 1, 1960
dc3.62
“For the Grave of Daniel Boone”
First Line: The farther he went the farther home grew.
Accepted by: Botteghe Oscure.
June 24, 1955
dc3.63
“Hunting ”
First Line: What the keen hound followed.
Accepted by: New York Times.
April 1, 1962
dc3.64
“Move to CA (6 poems, 2 sheets)”
First Line: In the crept hours on our street.
Accepted by: Poetry.
undated
dc3.65
“Sophocles Says”
First Line: History is a story God is Telling.
Accepted by: Pioneer Log.
October 1, 1958
dc3.66
“Near”
First Line: Walking along in this not quite prose way.
Accepted by: Poetry.
January 24, 1952
dc3.67
“Animal That Drank Up Sound”
First Line: One day across the lake where echoes come now.
Accepted by: Atlantic.
August 1, 1963
dc3.68
“Recoil”
First Line: The bow bent remembers home long.
Accepted by: Paris Review.
August 1, 1953
dc3.69
“Read to the Last Line”
First Line: Suppose a heroic deed.
Accepted by: Poetry Northwest.
June 24, 1959

A13: PhD Submission, Winterward, 1950-1954Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 5/Folder A13

39 items

Assembled in 1954.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 5/Folder A13
A13.1
Acknowledgments page.
February 1, 1954
A13.2
Contents page (1).
undated
A13.3
Contents page (2).
undated
A13.4
Contents page (3).
undated
A13.5
“Boom Town”
First Line: Into any sound important.
undated
A13.6
“Homecoming”
First Line: Under my hat I custom you intricate, Goldy.
undated
A13.7
“Vine Maple”
First Line: There was a tree surprised by light.
undated
A13.8
“In the Mirror”
First Line: Alone here with a stranger.
undated
A13.9
“Listening”
First Line: My father could hear a little animal step.
undated
A13.10
“Near”
First Line: Walking along in this not quite prose way.
undated
A13.11
“Old Dance”
First Line: Anybody here know the old dance.
undated
A13.12
“Recall”
First Line: Image of me, I follow, eyes closed.
undated
A13.13
“Relation”
First Line: Because our church cut the wind.
undated
A13.14
“Translated from Grandmother’s Lesebuch”
First Line: On every merry-go-round there was one hideous rider.
undated
A13.15
“Elegy" (3 pages)
First Line: The responsible sound of the lawnmower.
undated
A13.16
“Acquaintance”
First Line: Because our world hardened.
undated
A13.17
“Lake Looks”
First Line: The eerie eyes of normal people.
undated
A13.18
“On the Moon”
First Line: It is so quiet on the moon.
December 31, 1950
A13.19
“Night Words”
First Line: My hand invented sorrow.
undated
A13.20
“Farewell to a Certain Student”
First Line: Kathleen, you may bear burghers. Goodbye.
July 31, 1950
A13.21
“Devotion”
First Line: Along my river frogs like thought.
undated
A13.22
“Reproof”
First Line: If this is a cave - the solid world.
undated
A13.23
“Sunday Afternoon”
First Line: In relief, the way time touches a carving.
undated
A13.24
“Civics”
First Line: At every level, down to duck feet on the pavement.
undated
A13.25
“Askance”
First Line: Rats at the pilings, holding them firm.
undated
A13.26
“Raveled Man”
First Line: A man of no great mark, a snarl of string.
undated
A13.27
“Speech”
First Line: This apple compliment - let it roll a moment.
undated
A13.28
“Bulletin”
First Line: At five o’clock one morning according to the chart.
July 31, 1950
A13.29
“On the Track”
First Line: Later the moth can follow the string.
undated
A13.30
“At the Grosses’ Housewarming”
First Line: Talk like a jellyfish can ruin a party.
undated
A13.31
“That Art Broker”
First Line: Icing the four rivers around the world.
undated
A13.32
“Fieldpath”
First Line: I helped make this groove.
undated
A13.33
“Survey”
First Line: Down in the Frantic Mountains.
undated
A13.34
“In the Oregon Country”
First Line: From old Fort Walla Walla and the Klickitats.
undated
A13.35
“Direction”
First Line: At night creating mushrooms, bending fern.
undated
A13.36
“Letter from Oregon”
First Line: Mother, here there are shadowy salmon.
undated
A13.37
“Inland Murmur”
First Line: In the Cimarron Hills.
undated
A13.38
“Fish-Counter at Bonneville”
First Line: Downstream they have killed the river - built a dam.
undated
A13.39
“Bi-Focal”
First Line: Sometimes up out of this land.
undated

A14: Unpublished put-together, Wind World, ??????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 5/Folder A14

15 items

Assembled in 1971.

A15: Unpublished put-together, It Was Like This, ??????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 5/Folder A15

30 items

Cascade Head Project. Assembled in 1975.

dc5: Unpublished put-together, Roundup, 1992Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 5/Folder dc5

43 items

Originally assembled in 1981. The 1981 put-together is housed in Box 17, Folder C7.

dc8: Poems for special Stafford issue of Small Farm, 1978-1979Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 5/Folder dc8

7 items

Assembled in 1979.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 5/Folder dc8
dc8.1
Submissions list
Poems to Jeff Daniel Marion.
May 16, 1978
dc8.2
Submissions list, page 1
Photographs to Jeff Daniel Marion.
May 16, 1978
dc8.3
Submissions list, page 2
Phographs to Jeff Daniel Marion p.2.
May 16, 1978
dc8.4
Small Farm
Cover page to submissions lists.
May 16, 1978
dc8.5
“Day at a Time" (original and copy)”
First Line: Something comes through the brush on its hands and knees.
December 1, 1978
dc8.6
“Around Some Corner" (orignal and copy)
First Line: Of a sudden outside the window the leaves.
September 1, 1978
dc8.7
“Faith in the Morning" (original and copy)
First Line: Rainwater gray, a window the morning makes.
February 22, 1979

dc4: Put-together for Allegiances, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 6/Folder dc4

87 items

Assembled in 1970.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 6/Folder dc4
dc4.1
Allegiances
Cover note.
April 1, 1969
dc4.2
Allegiances
title page
undated
dc4.3
Allegiances
back jacket copy
undated
dc4.4
“This Book”
First Line: Late, at the beginning of cold.
Accepted by: Critical Quarterly.
August 1, 1965
dc4.5
part 1
contents page.
undated
dc4.6
part 1
subtitle
undated
dc4.7
“With Kit, Age 7, at the Beach”
First Line: We were going to the highes dune.
Accepted by: Sponsa Regis.
undated
dc4.8
“With My Little Girl [Kit, 7,] at the Beach (earlier version)”
First Line: We were going to the highest dune.
Accepted by: Sponsa Regis.
June 1, 1959
dc4.9
“Bess”
First Line: Ours are the streets where Bess first met her.
Accepted by: Carleton Miscellany.
August 1, 1965
dc4.10
“Monuments for a Friendly Girl at a Tenth Grade Party”
First Line: The only relics left are those long.
Accepted by: Poetry.
February 1, 1966
dc4.11
“Holcomb, Kansas [In Cold Blood]”
First Line: The city man got dust on his shoes and carried.
Accepted by: New Amerian Review.
January 1, 1968
dc4.12
“Gesture toward an Unfound Renaissance”
First Line: There was the slow girl in art class.
Accepted by: Poetry Australia.
February 1, 1966
dc4.13
“Remembering Althea”
First Line: When you came out of your house.
Accepted by: New Yorker.
August 1, 1964
dc4.14
“Reaching to Turn On a Light”
First Line: Every lamp that approves its foot.
Accepted by: Poetry.
April 1, 1967
dc4.15
“Last Day”
First Line: To Geronimo rocks were the truth.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
May 1, 1966
dc4.16
“At the Grave of My Brother”
First Line: The mirror cared less and less at the last, but.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
May 1, 1965
dc4.17
“Father’s Voice”
First Line: No need to get home early.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
June 1, 1966
dc4.18
“Observation Car and Cigar”
First Line: Tranquility as his breath, his eye a camera.
Accepted by: Kenyon Review.
July 1, 1964
dc4.19
“In Sublette’s Barn, p.1”
First Line: Sublette moved up the Cimarron alert.
Accepted by: Poetry.
December 1, 1962
dc4.20
“In Sublette’s barn, p.2”
First Line: That was his land, but no one there to know. By.
Accepted by: Poetry.
December 1, 1962
dc4.21
“Carols Back Then”
First Line: Clouds on the hills. I hear a throat voice.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
April 1, 1954
dc4.22
“Some Autumn Characters”
First Line: Rain finds lost beach toys, on.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
July 1, 1964
dc4.23
“Girl Engaged to the Boy Who Died”
First Line: A part of the wind goes around her face.
Accepted by: Poetry.
April 1, 1967
dc4.24
“Strangers”
First Line: Brown in the snow, a car with a heater.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
January 1, 1965
dc4.25
“Preacher at the Corner”
First Line: He talked like an old gun killing buffalo.
Accepted by: Critical Quarterly.
January 23, 1960
dc4.26
“Gift (2 versions)”
First Line: The writer’s home he salvages from little pieces.
Accepted by: Writer’s Digest.
January 1, 1958
dc4.27
part 2
subtitle.
undated
dc4.28
part 2
contents page.
undated
dc4.29
“Return to Single-Shot”
First Line: People who come back refuse to touch.
Accepted by: Poetry.
August 1, 1960
dc4.30
“Remember”
First Line: The little towns day found.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
September 1, 1956
dc4.31
“Behind the Falls”
First Line: First the falls, then the cave.
Accepted by: Little Review.
September 1, 1961
dc4.32
“Behind the Falls (earlier version)”
First Line: In the cave behind the falls.
Accepted by: Little Review.
September 1, 1961
dc4.33
“Montana Eclogue”
First Line: After the fall drive, the last.
Accepted by: New Yorker.
September 1, 1965
dc4.34
“Story”
First Line: After they passed I climbed.
Accepted by: Atlantic.
October 1, 1965
dc4.35
“Memorial Day”
First Line: Said a blind fish loved that lake.
Accepted by: Poetry Bag.
June 1, 1966
dc4.36
“Quiet Town”
First Line: Here in our cloud we talk.
Accepted by: Poetry Northwest.
January 1, 1965
dc4.37
“Letter”
First Line: Dear Governor.
Accepted by: World Order.
August 1, 1966
dc4.38
“Flowers at an Airport”
First Line: Part of the time sun, part of.
Accepted by: Harper’s.
May 1, 1968
dc4.39
“Texas”
First Line: Wide, no limit, the whole.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
June 1, 1966
dc4.40
“Sound from the Earth”
First Line: Somewhere, I think in Dakota.
Accepted by: Nation.
April 1, 1967
dc4.41
“Garden City”
First Line: That town, those days, composed grand.
Accepted by: North American Review.
February 1, 1966
dc4.42
“Pioneer Cemetery [Memorials of a Tour Around Mt Hood 1]”
First Line: Both sides fought stillness.
Accepted by: OR Centennial.
April 4, 1959
dc4.43
“Cage at the Filling Station [Memorials of a Tour Around Mt Hood 2]”
First Line: In the turn of neck a wolverine offered.
Accepted by: OR Centennial.
March 1, 1959
dc4.44
“Camping at Lost Lake [Memorialsd of a Tour Around Mt Hood 3]”
First Line: Earth at large in constellations.
Accepted by: OR Centennial.
January 1, 1955
dc4.45
“And That Picnic at Zigzag [Memorials of a Tour Around Mt Hood 4]”
First Line: Tea at a campfire.
Accepted by: OR Centennial.
January 1, 1959
dc4.46
“Stories from Kansas”
First Line: Little bunches of.
Accepted by: Cloud Marauder.
April 1, 1968
dc4.47
part 3
subtitle.
undated
dc4.48
part 3
contents page.
undated
dc4.49
“Things That Happen”
First Line: Sometimes before great events a person will try.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
August 1, 1966
dc4.50
“What I Heard Whispered at the Edge of Liberal, Kansas”
First Line: Air waits for us.
Accepted by: Poetry.
October 1, 1966
dc4.51
“On Don Quixote’s Horse”
First Line: Loose reins, the pony finds.
Accepted by: Critical Quarterly.
March 1, 1964
dc4.52
“Christianite”
First Line: This new kind of metal will not suffer.
Accepted by: Dist. Voice.
June 1, 1964
dc4.53
“Vacation Trip”
First Line: The loudest sound in our car.
Accepted by: New Yorker.
December 1, 1965
dc4.54
“Like a Little Stone”
First Line: Like a little stone, feel the shadow of the great earth.
Accepted by: Talisman.
November 1, 1953
dc4.55
“Note”
First Line: Straw, feathers, dust.
Accepted by: Aperture.
August 16, 1949
dc4.56
“Space Country”
First Line: As usual the highest birds first.
Accepted by: Colorado State Review.
October 1, 1966
dc4.57
“Climb”
First Line: One campfire higher every year.
Accepted by: Little Review.
January 1, 1959
dc4.58
“Climb (earlier version)”
First Line: One campfire higher every year.
Accepted by: Little Review.
January 1, 1959
dc4.59
“Epiphany”
First Line: You thinkers, prisoners of what will work.
Accepted by: Little Review.
August 1, 1961
dc4.60
“Brevities”
First Line: Epitaph.
Accepted by: Carleton Miscellany.
August 1, 1963
dc4.61
“Humanities Lecture”
First Line: Aristotle was a little man with.
Accepted by: Critical Quarterly.
March 1, 1964
dc4.62
“In Fur”
First Line: They hurt no one. They rove the North.
Accepted by: Poetry.
November 1, 1965
dc4.63
“Evening News”
First Line: That one great window puts forth.
Accepted by: Saturday Review.
May 1, 1966
dc4.64
“Religion Back Home”
First Line: When God’s parachute failed.
Accepted by: Book Week.
September 1, 1966
dc4.65
“How I Escaped”
First Line: A sign said “How to be Wild.
Accepted by: Poetry.
December 1, 1963
dc4.66
part 4
subtitle.
undated
dc4.67
part 4
contents page
undated
dc4.68
“Mornings, p. 1”
First Line: Quiet.
Accepted by: Dist. Voice.
April 1, 1964
dc4.69
“Mornings, p. 2”
First Line: Light.
Accepted by: Dist. Voice.
April 1, 1964
dc4.70
“Spectator”
First Line: Treat the world as if it really existed.
Accepted by: Colorado Quarterly.
September 4, 1953
dc4.71
“Any Time”
First Line: Vacation? Our children took our love apart.
Accepted by: Virginia Quarterly Review.
August 1, 1965
dc4.72
“Folk Song”
First Line: First no sound, then you hear it.
Accepted by: Poetry Bag.
August 1, 1966
dc4.73
“Believing What I Know”
First Line: A lake on the map of Canada.
Accepted by: Saturday Review.
May 1, 1958
dc4.74
“Where We Are”
First Line: Much travel moves mountains large.
Accepted by: Harper’s.
September 1, 1964
dc4.75
“In the Old Days”
First Line: The wide field that was the rest of the world.
Accepted by: Colorado Quarterly.
June 1, 1965
dc4.76
“Tragic Song”
First Line: All still when summer is over.
Accepted by: Denver Quarterly.
January 1, 1965
dc4.77
“At Our House”
First Line: Home late, one lamp turned low.
Accepted by: Virginia Quarterly Review.
April 1, 1965
dc4.78
“Deerslayer’s Campfire Talk”
First Line: At thousands of places on any.
Accepted by: Poetry Northwest.
April 1, 1966
dc4.79
“In Fog”
First Line: In fog a tree steps back.
Accepted by: Poetry.
February 1, 1966
dc4.80
“Time”
First Line: The years to come (empty boxcars.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
August 1, 1963
dc4.81
“Allegiances”
First Line: It is time for all the heroes to go home.
Accepted by: Southern Review.
January 1, 1966
dc4.82
“These Days”
First Line: Hurt people crawl as if they.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
March 1, 1966
dc4.83
“Earth Dweller”
First Line: It was all the clods at once become.
Accepted by: Saturday Review.
May 1, 1967
dc4.84
“Walk in the Country”
First Line: To walk anywhere in the world, to live.
Accepted by: Chicago Tribune.
February 1, 1968
dc4.85
“To Walk Anywhere in the World (earlier version of Walk in the Country)”
First Line: To walk anywhere in the world.
Accepted by: Chicago Tribune.
February 1, 1968
dc4.86
“To Walk Anywhere in the World (earlier version of Walk in the Country)”
First Line: To walk anywhere in the world.
Accepted by: Chicago Tribune.
February 1, 1968
dc4.87
“So Long”
First Line: At least at night, a streetlight.
Accepted by: New Yorker.
October 1, 1966

dc6: Put-together for Someday, Maybe, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 6/Folder dc6

84 items

Assembled in 1973.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 6/Folder dc6
dc6.1
Acknowledgment & Index page 1
undated
dc6.2
Acknowledgment & Index page 2
undated
dc6.3
Acknowledgment & Index page 3
undated
dc6.4
Title page, etc.
May 30, 1972
dc6.5
“Motorcycle, Count My Sins”
subtitle, part 1.
undated
dc6.6
“Introduction to Some Poems”
First Line: Look: no one ever promised for sure.
Accepted by: Poetry.
February 1, 1967
dc6.7
“Thirteenth and Pennsylvania”
First Line: Motorcycle, count my sins.
October 1, 1970
dc6.8
“Glimpse Between Buildings”
First Line: Now that the moon is out of a job.
Accepted by: Field.
September 1, 1970
dc6.9
“For a Child Gone to Live in a Commune”
First Line: Outside our ways you found.
Accepted by: American Scholar.
November 1, 1971
dc6.10
“Old Dog”
First Line: Toward the last in the morning she could not.
Accepted by: Dogs.
January 1, 1970
dc6.11
“New Letters from Thomas Jefferson (3 pages)”
First Line: Dear Sir.
Accepted by: Esquire.
September 1, 1970
dc6.12
“Hero”
First Line: What if he came back, astounded.
Accepted by: Chicago Tribune.
January 1, 1971
dc6.13
“Lecture on the Elegy”
First Line: An elegy is really about the wilting of a flower.
Accepted by: Southern Review.
November 1, 1971
dc6.14
“That Time of Year”
First Line: Remember T.J.?.
Accepted by: Ohio Review.
September 24, 1969
dc6.15
“Girl Daddy Used to Know”
First Line: Winter adopted her.
Accepted by: Tar River Poets.
September 1, 1969
dc6.16
“World Staccato”
First Line: Things that say clear, linger.
Accepted by: Chicago Tribune.
July 1, 1968
dc6.17
“Living”
First Line: Even pain you can take, in waves.
Accepted by: American Scholar.
January 1, 1972
dc6.18
“Trying to Remember a Town”
First Line: After our trip one town was lost.
Accepted by: New Yorker.
August 1, 1969
dc6.19
“Waking at 3 a.m.”
First Line: Even in the cave of the night when you.
Accepted by: Slow Loris.
December 1, 1969
dc6.20
“Love in the Country”
First Line: We live like this: no one but.
Accepted by: Blackbird Circle.
February 1, 1970
dc6.21
“Escape”
First Line: Now as we cross this white page together.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
July 1, 1971
dc6.22
“Some Days of Its Gift”
First Line: It is a little day: no flags.
Accepted by: Harper’s.
February 1, 1971
dc6.23
“Losing a Friend”
First Line: Open the rain and go in.
Accepted by: Chelsea.
June 1, 1971
dc6.24
“In the Desert”
First Line: What is that stiff figure.
Accepted by: Southern Review.
July 1, 1971
dc6.25
“Dreams to Have”
First Line: They film a woman falling from a bridge.
Accepted by: Iowa Review.
April 1, 1972
dc6.26
“Little Gift”
First Line: Fur came near, night inside it.
Accepted by: Activist.
April 1, 1968
dc6.27
“Three Looks Out of a Window”
First Line: Someone went by in the alley.
Accepted by: Lillabulero.
April 1, 1971
dc6.28
“Hide and Go Seek at the Cemetery”
First Line: Where snow can’t find them.
Accepted by: Harper’s.
March 1, 1971
dc6.29
“In aTime of Need”
First Line: We put our hands on the window - cold.
Accepted by: Poetry.
January 1, 1971
dc6.30
“Sleeping on the Sisters Land”
First Line: Rain touches your face just a daylight.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
October 1, 1971
dc6.31
“In the White Sky”
First Line: Many things in the world have.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
October 1, 1971
dc6.32
“Weeds”
First Line: What’s down in the earth.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
September 1, 1971
dc6.33
“Room 000”
First Line: After the last class in the empty room.
Accepted by: New Republic.
December 1, 1971
dc6.34
“In a Museum in the Capital”
First Line: Think of the shark’s tiny brain.
Accepted by: Reporter for Conscience’ Sake.
September 1, 1969
dc6.35
“Speaking Frankly”
First Line: It isn’t your claim, or mine, or.
Accepted by: Iowa Review.
October 1, 1970
dc6.36
“Existences”
First Line: Half-wild, I hear a wolf.
Accepted by: Southern Review.
November 1, 1971
dc6.37
“Friend”
First Line: For anyone, for anyone.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
October 1, 1971
dc6.38
“Father and Son”
First Line: No sound - a spell - on, on out.
Accepted by: Atlantic.
December 1, 1970
dc6.39
Wind World
subtitle, part 2.
undated
dc6.40
“Origins”
First Line: So long ago that we weren’t people then.
Accepted by: Salmagundi.
January 1, 1972
dc6.41
“Indian Caves in the Dry Country”
First Line: These are some canyons.
Accepted by: University of Portland Review.
July 1, 1966
dc6.42
“People of the South Wind”
First Line: One day sun found a new canyon.
Accepted by: Poetry Northwest.
June 1, 1970
dc6.43
“Touches [in a Cave]”
First Line: Late, you can hear the stars. And beyond them.
Accepted by: Arlington Quarterly.
March 1, 1971
dc6.44
“Bring the North”
First Line: Mushroom, Soft Ear, Old Memory.
Accepted by: Field.
February 1, 1969
dc6.45
“Airport at Anchorage”
First Line: One plane dragging its.
Accepted by: Alaska Review.
March 1, 1969
dc6.46
“Watching”
First Line: The best way is, watch the moon after you.
Accepted by: Chicago Tribune.
October 1, 1970
dc6.47
“Sioux Haiku”
First Line: On a relief map.
January 1, 1966
dc6.48
“Report to Crazy Horse”
First Line: All the Sioux were defeated. A few.
Accepted by: Antaeus and Critical Quarterly.
December 1, 1969
dc6.49
“People with Whetstones”
First Line: Hardworking hunters beyond the taiga.
Accepted by: Granta.
June 1, 1963
dc6.50
“Stories to Live in the World With”
First Line: A long rope of gray smoke was.
Accepted by: Poetry.
March 1, 1971
dc6.51
“Wind World”
First Line: One time Wind World.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
August 1, 1969
dc6.52
“Deer Stolen”
First Line: Deer have stood around our house.
Accepted by: Beloit Poetry Journal.
September 1, 1955
dc6.53
“Earth”
First Line: When the earth doesn’t shake, when the sky.
Accepted by: Crazy Horse.
July 1, 1970
dc6.54
“Scene in the Country by a Telegraph Line”
First Line: The father staggers to act it all out.
Accepted by: Tennessee Poetry Journal.
November 1, 1967
dc6.55
“Lost Meteorite in the Coast Range”
First Line: No foot comes here, where.
Accepted by: Sumac.
September 1, 1970
dc6.56
“Widow Who Taught at an Army School”
First Line: She planted bullets in a windowbox.
Accepted by: Crazy Horse.
May 1, 1970
dc6.57
“Little Ways That Encourage Good Fortune”
First Line: Wisdom is having things right in your life.
Accepted by: World Order.
October 1, 1956
dc6.58
“Owl”
First Line: An owl - the cold with eyes.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
October 1, 1958
dc6.59
“Crossing the Desert”
First Line: Little animals call.
Accepted by: Mill Mountain Review.
May 1, 1970
dc6.60
“After That Sound, After That Sight”
First Line: After that sound we weren’t people .
Accepted by: Amanuensis.
May 1, 1970
dc6.61
“Journey”
First Line: You ramble over the wilderness, a bear or.
Accepted by: Arlington Quarterly.
February 1, 1971
dc6.62
“Whole Story (later version)”
First Line: Touched by the blast, I.
Accepted by: Iowa Review.
December 1, 1970
dc6.63
“Whole Story (earlier version)”
First Line: I was a victim touched by.
Accepted by: Iowa Review.
December 1, 1970
dc6.64
“Report from a Far Place”
First Line: subtitle, part 3.
Accepted by: Garret.
undated
dc6.65
“Moment”
First Line: It happens lonely - no one.
Accepted by: Dragonfly.
August 1, 1969
dc6.66
“Report from a Far Place”
First Line: Making these word things.
Accepted by: Garret.
July 1, 1968
dc6.67
“Swerve”
First Line: Halfway across a bridge one night.
Accepted by: New Republic.
January 1, 1970
dc6.68
“Freedom”
First Line: Freedom is not following a river.
Accepted by: New American Review.
May 1, 1967
dc6.69
“Little Lost Orphans”
First Line: Leaves took them in, lost.
Accepted by: Critical Quarterly.
May 1, 1970
dc6.70
“Eskimo National Anthem”
First Line: Wherever I work, some vibrations.
Accepted by: Tennessee Poetry Journal.
September 1, 1968
dc6.71
“People Who Went By in Winter”
First Line: The morning man came in to report.
Accepted by: Field.
December 1, 1968
dc6.72
“Witness”
First Line: This is the hand I dipped in the Missouri.
Accepted by: Tennessee Poetry Journal.
April 1, 1967
dc6.73
“Now”
First Line: Where we live, the teakettle whistles out.
Accepted by: Phoenix.
January 1, 1968
dc6.74
“Blackberries Are Back”
First Line: Blackberries are back. They cling near.
Accepted by: Redstart.
January 1, 1969
dc6.75
“Composed, Composed”
First Line: The flat people in magazines hear.
Accepted by: Other Side.
April 1, 1968
dc6.76
“Have You Heard This One?”
First Line: A woman forged her face.
Accepted by: Concerning Poetry.
June 1, 1967
dc6.77
“Song in the Manner of Flannery O’Connor”
First Line: Snow on the mountain - water in.
Accepted by: Tennessee Poetry Journal.
July 1, 1968
dc6.78
“Ozymandias’s Brother”
First Line: Without the style of Ozymandias, therefore.
Accepted by: Carleton Miscellany and Granta.
January 1, 1963
dc6.79
“Juncos”
First Line: They operate from elsewhere.
Accepted by: Pebble.
December 1, 1966
dc6.80
“Dear Mother”
First Line: Inside this camera I am tied to the film.
Accepted by: Microcoos.
February 1, 1968
dc6.81
“Our Time’s Name”
First Line: Uncle Relevant has.
Accepted by: Phoenix.
December 1, 1968
dc6.82
“Stick in the Forest”
First Line: The stick in the forest that pointed.
Accepted by: Dragonfly.
July 1, 1968
dc6.83
“For the Governor”
First Line: Sometimes I think how heartbeat by heartbeat.
Accepted by: Tennessee Poetry Journal.
September 1, 1969
dc6.84
“Vespers”
First Line: As the living pass, they bow.
May 1, 1972

dc7: Put-together for Stories That Could Be True, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 6/Folder dc7

51 items

Assembled in 1977.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 6/Folder dc7
dc7.1
half-title
dc7.2
Acknowledgment page 1
dc7.3
Acknowledgment page 2
dc7.4
“For My Party the Rain" (MS copy)
First Line: epigraph: You again, raindrop.
Accepted by: Oregon Rainbow.
dc7.5
“Roll Call" (documentary copy)
First Line: epigraph: You again, raindrop.
Accepted by: Oregon Rainbow.
October 1, 1973
dc7.6
“Believing”
subtitle, part 1.
dc7.7
“Our Story”
First Line: Remind me again - together we.
Accepted by: Nation.
January 1, 1976
dc7.8
“Always”
First Line: Inside the trees, where tomorrow.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
May 1, 1973
dc7.9
“Story That Could Be True”
First Line: If you were exchanged in the cradle and.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
November 1, 1973
dc7.10
“Burning House”
First Line: What does the floor hear - that cousin to earth?.
Accepted by: North American Review.
September 1, 1964
dc7.11
“Wovoka’s Witness”
First Line: The people around me.
Accepted by: Virginia Quarterly.
October 1, 1973
dc7.12
“Things in the Wild Need Salt”
First Line: Of the many histories, Earth tells only one.
Accepted by: Modern Poetry Studies.
September 1, 1974
dc7.13
“Blackbirds”
First Line: One day we sang.
Accepted by: Mikrokosm.
October 1, 1968
dc7.14
“Some Evening”
First Line: In the form of mist, from under a stone.
Accepted by: New Review.
July 1, 1975
dc7.15
“Heard Under a Tin Sign at the Beach”
First Line: I am the wind. Long ago.
Accepted by: Modern Poetry Studies.
June 1, 1974
dc7.16
“Accountability”
First Line: Cold nights outside the taverns in Wyoming.
Accepted by: Atlantic.
February 1, 1975
dc7.17
“Message from the Wanderer(4th version)”
First Line: Today outside your prison I stand.
Accepted by: Critical Quarterly.
January 1, 1967
dc7.18
“Message from the Wanderer (3 earlier versions)”
First Line: Today outside your prison I stand .
Accepted by: Critical Quarterly.
January 1, 1967
dc7.19
“Being Good”
subtitle, part 2.
dc7.20
“Look”
First Line: From my head this bubble labeled “Love”.
Accepted by: New Letters.
April 23, 1975
dc7.21
“Song Now”
First Line: Guitar string is.
April 1, 1970
dc7.22
“At the Playground”
First Line: Away down deep and away up high.
Accepted by: Audience.
July 1, 1971
dc7.23
“Artist, Come Home”
First Line: Remember how bright it is.
April 13, 1975
dc7.24
“Wild Horse Lore”
First Line: Downhill, any gait will serve.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
October 21, 1975
dc7.25
“Fictions”
First Line: They make a song for their dogs, up north.
Accepted by: North American Review.
May 1, 1966
dc7.26
“My Party the Rain”
First Line: Loves upturned faces, laves everybody.
Accepted by: Atlantic.
December 1, 1965
dc7.27
“On a Church Lawn”
First Line: Dandelion cavalry, light little saviors.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
September 1, 1967
dc7.28
“Ducks Down in the Meadow”
First Line: Ducks begin to wake - they’ll never.
Accepted by: Nation.
May 1, 1975
dc7.29
“Another Old Guitar”
First Line: For years I was tuned a few notes too high.
Accepted by: Alaska Review.
April 1, 1968
dc7.30
“Learning to Live in the World”
subtitle, part 3.
dc7.31
“Slave on the Headland”
First Line: When they brought me here from the north island.
Accepted by: New Yorker.
January 1, 1976
dc7.32
“One Life”
First Line: Pascal glanced at infinity.
Accepted by: Poetry Bag.
December 1, 1965
dc7.33
“Little Girl by the Fence at School”
First Line: Grass that was moving found all shades of brown.
Accepted by: Audience.
December 1, 1970
dc7.34
“Growing Up”
First Line: One of my wings beat faster.
Accepted by: Nation.
January 1, 1973
dc7.35
“At the Un-National Monument Along the Canadian Border”
First Line: This is the field where the battle did not happen.
Accepted by: American Literary Accents.
March 1, 1962
dc7.36
“Surviving a Poetry Circuit”
First Line: My name is Old Mortality - mine is the hand.
Accepted by: New Letters.
February 1, 1975
dc7.37
“One of Your Lives”
First Line: One of your lives, hurt by the mere sight of.
Accepted by: South Carolina Review.
March 16, 1975
dc7.38
“Ask Me”
First Line: Some time when the river is ice, ask me.
Accepted by: New Yorker.
December 1, 1974
dc7.39
“Bird Inside a Box”
First Line: A bird inside a box, the box will.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
April 1, 1975
dc7.40
“Whispered into the Ground”
subtitle, part 4.
dc7.41
“Moment”
First Line: In breath, where little kingdoms hide.
December 1, 1969
dc7.42
“Apologia Pro Vita Sua”
First Line: As I traveled the earth I heard.
Accepted by: PTA Magazine.
March 1, 1972
dc7.43
“Broken Home”
First Line: Here is a cup left empty in their.
Accepted by: American Poetry Review.
March 1, 1973
dc7.44
“Islands”
First Line: There could be an island.
Accepted by: Poetry Now.
September 1, 1974
dc7.45
“Sitting Up Late”
First Line: Beyond silence, on the other side merging.
Accepted by: Rapport.
July 1, 1975
dc7.46
“One of the Years”
First Line: Hat pulled low at work.
Accepted by: Nation.
May 1, 1975
dc7.47
“Whenever It Is”
First Line: You stand in the magnet’s embrace.
Accepted by: Ironwood.
March 1, 1974
dc7.48
“Bridge Begins in the Trees”
First Line: In an owl cry, night became real night.
May 1, 1957
dc7.49
“Peace Walk”
First Line: We wondered what our walk should mean.
Accepted by: Focus/Midwest.
November 1, 1961
dc7.50
“This Town: Winter Morning (2 versions)”
First Line: This town has a spire.
Accepted by: Poetry.
July 1, 1973
dc7.51
“Whispered into the Ground”
First Line: Where the wind ended and we came down.
Accepted by: Atlantic.
April 1, 1973

dc9: Put-together for Wyoming Circuit, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 7/Folder dc9

7 items

Assembled in 1980.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 7/Folder dc9
dc9.1
“Welcome Hunters” (Wyoming Circuit 1)
First Line: You dream in The Sunset. Blood flows from the pickup.
November 1, 1978
dc9.2
“Out the South Road" (Wyoming Circuit 2)
First Line: The sheep don’t know if it’s cold. They stand.
November 1, 1978
dc9.3
“Staring at Souvenirs of the West" (Wyoming Circuit, 3)
First Line: What if a buffalo eye, big.
November 1, 1978
dc9.4
“By Cheryl’s Old Place" (Wyoming Circuit, 4)
First Line: Fleet as a bronco the road goes.
November 1, 1978
dc9.5
“Against the Morning Light" (Wyoming Circuit, 5)
First Line: A north wind caught young cottonwoods.
November 1, 1978
dc9.6
“Address to the Senior Class”
First Line: Coming down the hill into this town.
November 1, 1978
dc9.7
“Seeing a Red Rock”
First Line: Over near Tensleep the highway comes down.
November 1, 1978

dc10: Put-together for Things That Happen Where There Aren't Any People, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 7/Folder dc10

35 items

Assembled in 1980.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 7/Folder dc10
dc10.1
Cover page
undated
dc10.2
Poem list
undated
dc10.3
Index
undated
dc10.4
“For Someone Else”
Dedication.
undated
dc10.5
“For the Readers”
Second dedication.
undated
dc10.6
“Lines to Introduce Fragments from a Journal”
First Line: Go, little book I never thought.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
July 1, 1973
dc10.7
“Notice What This Poem Is Not Doing”
First Line: The light along the hills in the morning.
Accepted by: Field.
March 1, 1975
dc10.8
“Nobody”
First Line: Quiet when I come home, you.
Accepted by: Ontario Review.
November 2, 1976
dc10.9
“Places That Will Be Saved”
First Line: Sacred for what’s not yet done.
June 1, 1976
dc10.10
“Hinge in the Wind" (two versions)
First Line: When they come by, I sing them away.
Accepted by: Missouri Review.
May 1, 1976
dc10.11
“Answerers”
First Line: There are songs too wide for sound.
Accepted by: Contemporary American Poetry.
October 1, 1976
dc10.12
“Early Ones”
First Line: They kept it all level. And low. Even.
Accepted by: Seattle Review.
May 1, 1976
dc10.13
“End of the Man Experiment”
First Line: In The North a great wind lived.
Accepted by: Crazy Horse.
August 1, 1971
dc10.14
“Pretty Stone”
First Line: Some other year, if the sun.
March 1, 1976
dc10.15
“Explanation”
First Line: They tell about a train.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
March 1, 1962
dc10.16
“Learning Your Place [Learned While Eating Popcorn at the Zoo]”
First Line: They have other studies in their eyes.
Accepted by: Red Cedar Review.
April 1, 1976
dc10.17
“By the Old Deer Trail”
First Line: Into the forest under the bough.
Accepted by: Colorado Quarterly.
November 1, 1958
dc10.18
“Buffalo Skull" (with earlier version, On the Plains)
First Line: All day devoted to earth.
Accepted by: Dacotah Territory.
January 1, 1969
dc10.19
“Treatise: Influence of Howls on the Frontier”
First Line: Wolf howls alone devastated the West.
Accepted by: West Coast Review.
April 1, 1965
dc10.20
“Hand in Water" [pub. as “Poem Written for the Sewanee Review but Published Elsewhere”]
First Line: Dolphins live like heroes without hands.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
October 1, 1967
dc10.21
“Through the Junipers”
First Line: In the afternoon I wander away through.
Accepted by: Western Humanities Review.
September 1, 1976
dc10.22
“Wherever You Go on the Island”
First Line: Built slowly from fog, led.
Accepted by: Paumanok Rising.
November 1, 1975
dc10.23
“Things That Happen Where There Aren’t Any People”
First Line: It’s cold on Lakeside Road.
Accepted by: Western Humanities Review.
July 1, 1976
dc10.24
“Remote But There”
First Line: Mornings a shaft of light pauses to read.
Accepted by: Inquiry.
August 1, 1976
dc10.25
“History of Tomorrow”
First Line: It is the stones, they say, that began.
Accepted by: Seattle Review.
November 1, 1975
dc10.26
“Crossing the Desert”
First Line: Little animals call.
Accepted by: Mill Mountain Review.
May 1, 1970
dc10.27
“What It Is”
First Line: By luck, it finds where to flow.
Accepted by: .
March 1, 1976
dc10.28
“Dawn on the Warm Springs Reservation”
First Line: Into its frost-white branches.
Accepted by: Quarterly West.
February 18, 1977
dc10.29
“Dialectic of the Mountains"
First Line: Descending at 60 the slow dream of the freeway.
Accepted by: Carlelton Miscellany.
April 1, 1960
dc10.30
“St Augustine’s Prayer”
First Line: In the world of Augustine a part of God.
Accepted by: Genesis.
January 1, 1959
dc10.31
“Place in the Woods”
First Line: An early place - come near and look.
Accepted by: Ellipsis.
July 1, 1976
dc10.32
“Address to the Vacationers at Cape Lookout”
First Line: The whole weight of the ocean smashes on rocks.
Accepted by: New Yorker.
January 1, 1963
dc10.33
“Any Old Time”
First Line: Deep in the morning.
Accepted by: Seattle Review.
May 1, 1976
dc10.34
“Being Still”
First Line: Try it, being stil in the mountains.
Accepted by: Quarterly West.
June 1, 1978
dc10.35
“Offering”
First Line: Had you noticed - a shadow.
Accepted by: Seattle Review.
April 1, 1977

dc11: Put-together for A Glass Face in the Rain, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 7/Folder dc11

104 items

Assembled in 1982.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 7/Folder dc11
dc11.1
handmade cover
undated
dc11.2
Title page
May 1, 1981
dc11.3
Contents page
undated
dc11.4
“Smoke Signals - a Dedication”
First Line: There are people on a parallel way. We do not.
Accepted by: Christian Science Monitor.
June 1, 1979
dc11.5
“How It Began”
First Line: They struggled their legs and blindly loved, those puppies.
Accepted by: Hampden-Sydney Poetry Review.
April 1, 1978
dc11.6
“Tuned In Late One Night”
First Line: Listen - this is a faint station.
Accepted by: Milkweed Chronicle.
May 1, 1978
dc11.7
“Friends”
First Line: How far friends are! They forget you.
Accepted by: Conjnctions.
October 1, 1980
dc11.8
“Rover”
First Line: She came out of the field - low.
Accepted by: Christian Science Monitor.
December 31, 1978
dc11.9
“Knowing”
First Line: To know the other world you turn.
Accepted by: Harvard Magazine.
January 1, 1978
dc11.10
“They Say”
First Line: Now and again in some sound you discover.
Accepted by: Sceptre.
April 1, 1978
dc11.11
“Touch on Your Sleeve”
First Line: Consider the slow descent.
Accepted by: Blair & Ketchum’s Country Journal.
September 1, 1977
dc11.12
“Glimpses”
First Line: One time when the wind blows it is years.
Accepted by: American Poetry Review.
February 1, 1979
dc11.13
“Looking Across the River”
First Line: We were driving the river road.
Accepted by: Poetry.
December 1, 1978
dc11.14
“Our Cave”
First Line: Because it was good, we were afraid.
Accepted by: Chicago Review.
January 1, 1978
dc11.15
“Not Very Loud”
First Line: Now is the time of the moths that come.
Accepted by: Nation.
September 1, 1978
dc11.16
“Why We Need Fantasy”
First Line: It’s a sensational story.
Accepted by: Abraxas.
March 1, 1979
dc11.17
“Passing a Pile of Stones”
First Line: A shadow hides in every stone.
Accepted by: Cimarron Review.
December 1, 1978
dc11.18
“Event at Big Eddy”
First Line: The whole weight of the river.
Accepted by: New Yorker.
February 1, 1970
dc11.19
“How to Get Back”
First Line: By believing, you can get there - that edge.
Accepted by: Sceptre.
February 1, 1978
dc11.20
“Some Night Again”
First Line: When the world vanishes, I will come back.
Accepted by: Tinderbox.
September 1, 1979
dc11.21
Part 2: Things That Come
undated
dc11.22
“Things That Come”
First Line: After it came down from the mountains.
Accepted by: Two Pears.
September 20, 1979
dc11.23
“There Is Blindness”
First Line: There is blindness; there is.
Accepted by: Three Rivers Poetry Journal.
December 22, 1976
dc11.24
“Old Pickerel in Walden Pond”
First Line: One winter - open, I remember it was.
Accepted by: Chicago Review.
January 1, 1978
dc11.25
“Finding Out”
First Line: No, not dark. Even at night a glow from a shaft.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
February 1, 1977
dc11.26
“Acoma Mesa”
First Line: Surrounded by air, we live where.
Accepted by: Nation.
April 1, 1977
dc11.27
“Dark Wind”
First Line: Jean, who no longer is, was.
Accepted by: Practices.
October 1, 1980
dc11.28
“Glimpse in the Crowd”
First Line: A Parachute catches and suddenly you know.
Accepted by: National Forum.
July 1, 1978
dc11.29
“Friends: A Recognition”
First Line: It came silent in my thought.
Accepted by: Helix.
December 1, 1978
dc11.30
“Class Reunion”
First Line: Where others ran I run my hand.
Accepted by: Critic.
April 1, 1977
dc11.31
“Sabbath”
First Line: A light - it’s only the sun - has broken.
Accepted by: Harvard Magazine.
May 1, 1977
dc11.32
“Child’s Face in a Small Town”
First Line: Sometimes it happens a storm.
Accepted by: Blue Beech.
March 1, 1978
dc11.33
“Watching a Candle”
First Line: A candle went down its long stair.
Accepted by: Nation.
May 1, 1977
dc11.34
“Child in the Evening”
First Line: Why does this house have no windows, Mother?.
Accepted by: Black Warrior Review.
September 1, 1973
dc11.35
“Murder Bridge”
First Line: You look over the edge, down, down.
Accepted by: Field.
May 1, 1978
dc11.36
“Seeing and Perceiving”
First Line: You learn to like the scene that everything.
Accepted by: South and West.
December 1, 1978
dc11.37
“Maybe”
First Line: Maybe (it’s a fear), maybe.
Accepted by: Field.
September 19, 1980
dc11.38
“How It Is”
First Line: It is war. They put us on a train and.
Accepted by: Columbia.
March 1, 1980
dc11.39
“Late Guest”
First Line: I guess I thought it was music - that sound.
Accepted by: Morse book.
June 10, 1980
dc11.40
“Later”
First Line: Sometimes, loping along, I almost find.
Accepted by: Yankee.
July 1, 1978
dc11.41
“In a Corner”
First Line: Walls hold each other up when they meet.
Accepted by: Michigan Quarterly Review.
October 1, 1979
dc11.42
“Why I Say Adios”
First Line: From their wide, still country words.
Accepted by: Practices of the Wind.
May 1, 1980
dc11.43
“Remembering”
First Line: When there was air, when you could.
Accepted by: Michigan Quarterly Review.
October 1, 1979
dc11.44
Part 3: Revelations
Contents page.
undated
dc11.45
“Sending These Messages”
First Line: Over these writings I bent my head.
Accepted by: Poetry.
December 1, 1978
dc11.46
“Glass Face in the Rain”
First Line: Sometime tou’ll walk all night. You’ll.
Accepted by: River Styx.
April 1, 1977
dc11.47
“Yellow Cars”
First Line: Some of the cars are yellow, that go.
Accepted by: Field.
April 1, 1980
dc11.48
“Torque”
First Line: One day all the people c ome out on to the street.
Accepted by: Slow Loris.
February 1, 1979
dc11.49
“My Life”
First Line: In my cradle and then driving.
Accepted by: Paintbrush.
May 1, 1979
dc11.50
“Message from Space”
First Line: Everything that happens is the message.
Accepted by: Pequod.
July 1, 1979
dc11.51
“Revelation”
First Line: When I came back to earth, it was my bike.
Accepted by: Field.
January 1, 1981
dc11.52
“On the Road Last Night”
First Line: On the road last night I heard the tires.
Accepted by: San Jose Studies.
December 22, 1976
dc11.53
“After Arguing Against the Contention That Art Must Come from Discontent”
First Line: Whispering to each handhold, “I’ll be back”.
Accepted by: Tendril.
July 15, 1978
dc11.54
“Course in Creative Writing”
First Line: They want a wilderness with a map.
Accepted by: Ellipsis.
undated
dc11.55
“Things I Learned Last Week”
First Line: Ants, when they meet each other.
Accepted by: American Scholar.
March 1, 1980
dc11.56
“Incident”
First Line: They had this cloud they kept like a zeppelin.
Accepted by: Slow Loris.
May 1, 1979
dc11.57
“Fiction”
First Line: We would get a map of our farm as big.
Accepted by: Kansas Quarterly.
April 1, 1980
dc11.58
“Our Kind”
First Line: Our mother knew our worth.
Accepted by: Hampden-Sydney Poetry Review.
June 1, 1978
dc11.59
“Hanging Tough”
First Line: All right, I’ll ask about home: - How is the grass.
Accepted by: Quest.
October 1, 1977
dc11.60
“Learning to Like the New School”
First Line: They brought me where it was bright and said.
Accepted by: Canto.
December 21, 1978
dc11.61
“Catechism”
First Line: Who challenged my soldier mother?.
Accepted by: Plainsong.
July 1, 1978
dc11.62
“School Days”
First Line: After the test they sent an expert .
Accepted by: Field.
October 1, 1977
dc11.63
“We Interrupt to Bring You”
First Line: It will be coming toward Earth, and.
Accepted by: Quest.
November 1, 1976
dc11.64
“My Mother Was a Soldier”
First Line: If no one moved on order, she would kill.
Accepted by: Chariton Review.
April 1, 1978
dc11.65
“Anticipating”
First Line: Keeping your word is like putting a bell into.
Accepted by: Three Sisters .
October 1, 1980
dc11.66
“When You Go Anywhere" [Verses for the Wall By Your Bed, 1]
First Line: This passport your face (not you.
Accepted by: .
undated
dc11.67
Part 4: Troubleshooting
Contents page.
undated
dc11.68
“Now wait -”
First Line: If you close this book, one page.
Accepted by: Asphodel.
December 1, 1977
dc11.69
“Once in the 40’s”
First Line: We were alone one night on a long.
Accepted by: Chariton Review.
July 1, 1978
dc11.70
“Around You, Your House”
First Line: I give you the rain, its long hollow.
Accepted by: Plainsong.
September 1, 1978
dc11.71
“Cameo of Your Mother”
First Line: What the blind have for their light.
Accepted by: Harvard Magazine.
October 1, 1977
dc11.72
“Ruby Was Her Name”
First Line: My mother, who opened my eyes, who.
Accepted by: Paris Review.
June 1, 1978
dc11.73
“At the Falls: A Birthday Picture”
First Line: A few leaves flutter still, even on the maple.
Accepted by: Nimrod.
February 1, 1977
dc11.74
“Letting You Go”
First Line: Day brings what is going to be. Trees.
Accepted by: Carolina Quarterly.
September 1, 1974
dc11.75
“Troubleshooting”
First Line: On still days when country telephone.
Accepted by: Black Warrior Review.
October 22, 1977
dc11.76
“Letter Not to Deliver”
First Line: Why should it be anguish (but anguish.
Accepted by: Plainsong.
October 1, 1978
dc11.77
“Having the Right Name”
First Line: It is like a color inside your head that.
Accepted by: Beyond Baroque.
August 1, 1978
dc11.78
“Day to Remember”
First Line: I.m standing at Lakeside Drive with my bike.
Accepted by: Inquiry.
September 1, 1977
dc11.79
“Remembering Brother Bob”
First Line: Tell me, you years I had for my life.
Accepted by: Iowa Review.
July 1, 1980
dc11.80
“Places with Meaning”
First Line: Say it’s a picnic on the Fourth of July.
Accepted by: Blue Beech.
July 1, 1978
dc11.81
“Confessor" (two versions)
First Line: The girl hiding in the hall on the ferry.
Accepted by: Plainsong.
February 1, 1978
dc11.82
“Scene”
First Line: Grandpa gives me a candy watch.
Accepted by: Chariton Review.
March 1, 1976
dc11.83
“With Neighbors One Afternoon”
First Line: Someone said, stirring their tea, “I would.
Accepted by: Poetry.
December 1, 1978
dc11.84
“Absences”
First Line: Once when the waves were talking one said.
Accepted by: Field.
September 1, 1978
dc11.85
Part 5: The Color That
Contents page.
undated
dc11.86
“Tentative Welcome to Readers”
First Line: It is my hope that those who blame.
Accepted by: Poetry.
November 1, 1978
dc11.87
“Color That Really Is”
First Line: The color that really is comes over a desert.
Accepted by: Crazy Horse.
July 24, 1978
dc11.87
“Journey”
First Line: Through many doors it’s been - through.
Accepted by: Chowder Review.
March 1, 1979
dc11.88
“Friends, Farewell”
First Line: After the chores are done I tune.
Accepted by: Plainsong.
August 1, 1978
dc11.89
“If I Could Be Like Wallace Stevens”
First Line: The octopus would be my model.
Accepted by: Wallace Stevens Journal.
May 1, 1979
dc11.90
“Yellow Flowers”
First Line: While I was dying I saw a flower.
Accepted by: Poetry Miscellany.
October 1, 1979
dc11.91
“Salvaged Parts”
First Line: Fire took the house. Black bricks.
Accepted by: Three Rivers Poetry Journal.
August 1, 1976
dc11.92
“Survivor”
First Line: Remember that party we had, the one.
Accepted by: Ark.
October 1, 1978
dc11.93
“One Time”
First Line: When evening had flowed between houses.
Accepted by: Christian Science Monitor.
March 1, 1979
dc11.94
“Little Night Stories”
First Line: There was a certain flake. For miles it.
Accepted by: Nation.
January 1, 1977
dc11.95
“Receiver”
First Line: Listening late at parties, hearing.
Accepted by: Quest.
January 1, 1976
dc11.96
“From Hallmark or Somewhere”
First Line: Think now of a mountain - say, that one.
Accepted by: Cornfield Review.
January 1, 1978
dc11.97
“Much Have I Traveled”
First Line: When we heard it like an ocean.
Accepted by: San Jose.
April 1, 1977
dc11.98
“Once in a Dream”
First Line: Once after we hid from each other you passed.
Accepted by: Spectrum.
November 1, 1977
dc11.99
“Late Flight”
First Line: Home from far, moon on the wing.
Accepted by: Harpoon.
February 1, 1979
dc11.100
“Whatever Happened to the Beats?”
First Line: On that street in San Francisco.
Accepted by: Modern Poetry Studies.
December 1, 1976
dc11.101
“What I’ll See That Afternoon”
First Line: The young man who has to look.
Accepted by: San Jose Studies.
August 1, 1976
dc11.102
“Pegleg Lookout”
First Line: Those days, having the morning clouds, and with no one.
Accepted by: Virginia Quarterly Review.
May 24, 1977
dc11.103
“Yucca Flowers”
First Line: In the hills today if you bow.
Accepted by: New Yorker.
July 1, 1970
dc11.104
“From Our Balloon Over the Provinces”
First Line: From our balloon floating early.
Accepted by: Practices of the Wind.
February 1, 1980

dc12a: Put-together for Eleven Untitled Poems, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 8/Folder dc12a

8 items

Assembled in 1968.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 8/Folder dc12a
dc12a.1
Eleven Untitled Poems
typescripts for 3 of 11 poems, notes for 4 others. "An attempt Oct 79 to gather...."
October 1, 1979
dc12a.2
“Tragic Song”
First Line: All still - when summer is over.
undated
dc12a.3
“These Days”
First Line: Hurt people crawl....
undated
dc12a.4
“In Fog”
First Line: In fog a tree steps back....
undated
dc12a.5
“In Fur”
First Line: They hurt no one....
undated
dc12a.6
“Proclamation”
First Line: Today will be listen day.
Accepted by: Aperture.
February 1, 1962
dc12a.7
“At the Cabin”
First Line: Across the snowed-in roof.
Accepted by: Etchngs.
December 1, 1957
dc12a.8
“No One Who Trusts Words”
First Line: No one who trusts words can learn.
Accepted by: Aperture.
March 1, 1956

dc12b: Put-together for Weather, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 8/Folder dc12b

13 items

Assembled in 1969.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 8/Folder dc12b
dc12b.1
“Butterflies in the Radiator Grill”
First Line: Arrayed like Solomon.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
January 1, 1968
dc12b.2
“In Our Country”
First Line: Yellow light.
Accepted by: Cafe Solo.
May 1, 1968
dc12b.3
“Boone Children”
First Line: You can hear the calendar munching leaves in autumn.
Accepted by: Tennessee Poetry Journal.
January 1, 1968
dc12b.4
“Nature Walk”
First Line: In the shaggy field.
Accepted by: Field.
September 1, 1968
dc12b.5
“Twelve Years Old”
First Line: Tired that day we were: we found.
Accepted by: Ladies' Home Journal.
May 15, 1945
dc12b.6
“When We Got to Chitina”
First Line: No one was going to come.
Accepted by: Alaska Review.
July 1, 1968
dc12b.7
“Just to Let You Know”
First Line: The road from Bend, looking for a way.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
August 1, 1967
dc12b.8
“In the Cold”
First Line: When I got out of the rocket.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
June 1, 1965
dc12b.9
“After Spring and Summer”
First Line: Sometimes a wind mentions your (cloud) face.
Accepted by: Ohio Review.
April 1, 1968
dc12b.10
“On Her Slate at School”
First Line: On her slate at school my mother wrote 'Winter'.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
October 20, 1964
dc12b.11
“Brother”
First Line: It’s cold where Bob is.
Accepted by: Poetry.
February 1, 1966
dc12b.12
“Farewell Picture”
First Line: My eyes look their twinned corridor far.
Accepted by: Nation.
February 1, 1965
dc12b.13
“That Weather”
First Line: Our boy was a child when the good.
Accepted by: Poetry.
February 1, 1966

dc12c: Put-together for Temporary Facts, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 8/Folder dc12c

16 items

Assembled in 1970.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 8/Folder dc12c
dc12c.1
“Temporary Facts”
Cover.
April 7, 1969
dc12c.2
“Farm World”
First Line: Richening, ripening sinks the sun.
Accepted by: Hawk & Whippoorwill.
January 1, 1953
dc12c.3
“Inland Murmur”
First Line: In the Cimarron hills.
Accepted by: New Mexico Quarterly.
March 29, 1950
dc12c.4
“That Autumn Instant”
First Line: You stand on a hill in July.
July 1, 1968
dc12c.5
“Walk with My Father When I Was Eight”
First Line: Here is a space for the way the day started.
Accepted by: Colorado Quarterly.
September 1, 1960
dc12c.6
“North of Liberal”
First Line: You open your mouth to say “Wait!”.
December 1, 1968
dc12c.7
“Day at a Time”
First Line: One summer at dusk.
February 1, 1967
dc12c.8
“Toad”
First Line: Hop, hope. Hop again.
Accepted by: Compass.
February 1, 1957
dc12c.9
“When I Worked as a Lawn-Man”
First Line: You passed in a convertible.
Accepted by: Medford Tribune.
June 1, 1956
dc12c.10
“Temporary Facts”
First Line: That look you had, Agnes, was a temporary fact.
Accepted by: New Orleans Poetry Journal.
September 1, 1954
dc12c.11
“Nine P.M.”
First Line: Moths go by.
Accepted by: Compass.
February 3, 1949
dc12c.12
“Discovery”
First Line: Plowing the nest of the lark.
Accepted by: Northwest Challenge.
March 1, 1953
dc12c.13
“Robin at a Time”
First Line: A robin at a time.
Accepted by: Compass.
January 1, 1956
dc12c.14
“Demolition Project”
First Line: Turn off the rocker where Momma sewed.
Accepted by: Tiger’s Eye.
July 21, 1946
dc12c.15
“Not Policy, But Love”
First Line: Regarding river lights.
Accepted by: Poetry Northwest.
February 1, 1956
dc12c.16
Correspondence with Duane Schneider
10 pages

dc12d: Put-together for That Other Alone, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 8/Folder dc12d

15 items

Assembled in 1973.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 8/Folder dc12d
dc12d.1
Cover for "That Other Alone”
September 1, 1973
dc12d.2
“Tonight”
First Line: Tonight and another night linger.
Accepted by: American Poetry Review.
August 15, 1972
dc12d.3
“Any Journey”
First Line: When God watches you walk, you are.
May 1, 1972
dc12d.4
“At the Edge of Town”
First Line: Sometimes when clouds float.
Accepted by: American Poetry Review.
February 1, 1972
dc12d.5
“Witnessing for Our Youth”
First Line: Remember us to the deep caves.
January 1, 1972
dc12d.6
“These [Those] Leaves”
First Line: Somewhere a forest, every.
Accepted by: American Poetry Review.
August 1, 1970
dc12d.7
“Church Keeps On”
First Line: No house can last, no house.
April 1, 1972
dc12d.8
“Rebuttal”
First Line: Some of you words that follow me.
May 1, 1972
dc12d.9
“Going Away”
First Line: On the way to join carbon again.
February 1, 1972
dc12d.10
“Way It Will Be”
First Line: Awake when the world turns over.
April 1, 1972
dc12d.11
“Where We Live”
First Line: Inside a house I live, inside.
February 1, 1972
dc12d.12
“Meditation”
First Line: Animals full of light.
October 1, 1972
dc12d.13
“Conditions”
First Line: Torn when winter came.
May 1, 1972
dc12d.14
“In Space”
First Line: All the islands in the ocean.
May 1, 1971
dc12d.15
“Beginning the Day”
First Line: It is still. No breeze, no one.
September 1, 1972

dc12e: Put-together for Going Places, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 8/Folder dc12e

31 items

Assembled in 1974.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 8/Folder dc12e
dc12e.1
Title page
December 1, 1973
dc12e.2
“Part One: Before Anyone Died”
Contents page.
undated
dc12e.3
“Solstice”
First Line: On a certain day the sun.
Accepted by: Window Pains.
September 1, 1970
dc12e.4
“Before Anyone Died”
First Line: West of home where we lay talking quietly.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
February 1, 1960
dc12e.5
“Summer Game”
First Line: All over the mountains we looked for.
Accepted by: Raven.
September 1, 1969
dc12e.6
“Time Capsule”
First Line: That year the news.
Accepted by: Denver Quarterly.
March 1, 1965
dc12e.7
“Rambling On”
First Line: Ending a visit.
Accepted by: Lotus.
January 1, 1971
dc12e.8
“Even Now”
First Line: Wherever I go such winter shakes our town.
Accepted by: Poetry.
August 1, 1961
dc12e.9
“Mr. Fear”
First Line: At the last he knew everyone.
Accepted by: Hart.
July 2, 1970
dc12e.10
Part Two: A Lawn Like Texas
Contents page.
undated
dc12e.11
“Last Time”
First Line: They headed toward the Platte, a lawn like Texas.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
June 9, 1956
dc12e.12
“Fort Rock”
First Line: Dead grass makes an arc on the sand.
Accepted by: Eastern Oregon Literary Supplement.
April 1, 1965
dc12e.13
“At Missoula”
First Line: We hunted bitterroot over the patient mountain.
Accepted by: Tri-Quarterly.
July 1, 1965
dc12e.14
“Indian Cave Jerry Ramsey Found”
First Line: Brown, brittle, wait-a-bit weeds.
Accepted by: Abraxas.
September 1, 1968
dc12e.15
“Old Scout”
First Line: Holding heretical ideas about non-controversial subjects.
Accepted by: Colorado Quarterly.
October 1, 1954
dc12e.16
“Knife Dialogue”
First Line: Little Knife said to Big Knife.
Accepted by: Tar River Poets.
December 1, 1969
dc12e.17
Part Three: Local Witness
Contents page.
undated
dc12e.18
“Visions”
First Line: Once in Mexico an old man was.
Accepted by: Poetry Northwest.
September 1, 1970
dc12e.19
“With the Gift of a Flower, for the First Birthday of the Computer for Humble Oil on the North Slope of Alaska”
First Line: Every tree in The North now has a number.
Accepted by: Poetry Northwest.
February 1, 1970
dc12e.20
“It’s Like Wyoming”
First Line: At sunset you have piled the empties and.
Accepted by: Cutbank.
July 9, 1972
dc12e.21
“Reno”
First Line: Mouth, hands, and cascade hair.
Accepted by: Dragonfly.
September 1, 1969
dc12e.22
“At a Writers’ Conference in Texas”
First Line: An insect in the mesquite calls it name.
Accepted by: Welsh mag.
July 1, 1971
dc12e.23
“Tourist Country”
First Line: Shadows, like Navahoes, wear velvet.
Accepted by: North American Review.
May 1, 1963
dc12e.24
“Over Utah: The Angel Moroni”
First Line: Smoke or cloud cities, windy.
Accepted by: Carolina Quarterly.
June 1, 1973
dc12e.25
“Bill Watson’s Report from Canada”
First Line: Safe in their giant glass house.
Accepted by: Nation.
October 1, 1965
dc12e.26
“Sitka”
First Line: It began to come true, that long cold.
Accepted by: Hawaii Literary Review.
March 1, 1972
dc12e.27
Part Four: Bringing It Together
Contents page.
undated
dc12e.28
“Terms of Surrender”
First Line: We hide in the dead grass.
Accepted by: Chicago Tribune.
September 1, 1971
dc12e.29
“Remnants of a Poem, Obscure Parts Burned Away, in a Freak Accident at the Office of the Westigan Review" [The Tree House]
First Line: Noon in the elms, wide noon.
Accepted by: Westigan Review.
September 1, 1970
dc12e.30
“Locust Trees”
First Line: One kind of touch is a religious greeting.
Accepted by: Colorado Quarterly.
August 1, 1960
dc12e.31
“At the Breaks Near the River”
First Line: Autumn some year will discover again.
Accepted by: Kansas Quarterly.
May 1, 1967

dc12f: Put-together for Braided Apart, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 8/Folder dc12f

24 items

Assembled in 1976.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 8/Folder dc12f
dc12f.1
Cover and contents
undated
dc12f.2
“Attenuate”
First Line: Some time, following out a sound.
Accepted by: Aperture.
March 4, 1952
dc12f.3
“Shells”
First Line: When they turn the dial to “know”.
Accepted by: Bridge.
August 10, 1948
dc12f.4
“Aquarium at Seaside”
First Line: Groping stars culled up from a field.
Accepted by: Edge.
March 1, 1970
dc12f.5
“Saint of Thought" [with four previous versions]
First Line: One moment each noon, faced.
Accepted by: Crazy Horse.
July 5, 1970
dc12f.6
“Rich Man”
First Line: I drink it for luck.
Accepted by: Seneca Review.
February 1, 1970
dc12f.7
“For a Marker”
First Line: Where I lay first the grass.
Accepted by: Slackwater Review.
August 1, 1975
dc12f.8
“Happy in Sunlight”
First Line: Maybe it’s out by Glass Butte some.
Accepted by: Iowa Review.
September 1, 1975
dc12f.9
“Gutters of Jackson: Cache Street North
Documentary copy not present in this file. It is located at dc12h.10.
August 1, 1975
dc12f.10
“PMLA Biblio. Is Limited to Certain Printed Works”
First Line: There are others, and mss.
Accepted by: Satire Newsletter.
December 1, 1963
dc12f.11
“Sayings”
First Line: You wonder, sometimes.
July 1, 1970
dc12f.12
“At Archbishop Lamy’s Church in Santa Fe”
First Line: A few leaves cling and skitter.
Accepted by: American Poetry Review.
February 1, 1972
dc12f.13
“Pullman Trip" [Night Journey]
First Line: The hidden streams of Oregon.
Accepted by: Oregonian.
December 6, 1952
dc12f.14
“At the Metolius River”
First Line: Water in that river.
Accepted by: Northwest Magazine.
September 1, 1954
dc12f.15
“Peace Walk”
Documentary copy missing.
Accepted by: Focus/Midwest.
undated
dc12f.16
“One Day in August”
First Line: There in the suddenly.
Accepted by: Poetry.
October 1, 1960
dc12f.17
“Remembering a First-Grade Music Teacher”
First Line: Her non-representational near face.
Accepted by: Bullfrog.
April 1, 1968
dc12f.18
“Good Horse”
First Line: They thought the balancing horse.
Accepted by: Saturday Review.
January 1, 1966
dc12f.19
“Prayers to Paste on Your Tires”
First Line: No nails, no glass, no rocks.
Accepted by: Souther Voices.
January 1, 1973
dc12f.20
“Saturday Nights”
First Line: My hands reason with steel.
Accepted by: West Coast Poetry Review.
January 1, 1971
dc12f.21
“Talk from the Mountains”
First Line: Someone, or maybe only two branches.
Accepted by: Slackwater Review.
July 1, 1975
dc12f.22
“Proportioning”
First Line: At any proud hour the flame.
Accepted by: Approach.
February 1, 1959
dc12f.23
“At the Coast”
First Line: When you fall you can lay your head.
Accepted by: Michigan Quarterly Review.
July 1, 1970
dc12f.24
“At the Art Institute”
First Line: Heroes who thought they won.
Accepted by: Arena.
November 1, 1964

dc12g: Put-together for The Design on the Oriole, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 9/Folder dc12g

10 items

Assembled in 1977.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 9/Folder dc12g
dc12g.1
cover
January 1, 1977
dc12g.2
“It Rode with Us”
First Line: All things had their place. Even the wind.
Accepted by: Colorado Quarterly.
March 1, 1963
dc12g.3
“Gift for Kit”
First Line: Fence wire sang - spring wind -.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
May 1, 1973
dc12g.4
“Design on the Oriole”
First Line: Dragon blood, they say - little emblems.
December 1, 1959
dc12g.5
“Coyote in the Zoo”
First Line: A yellow eye meets mine.
April 1, 1968
dc12g.6
“Across Nebraska”
First Line: Popcorn spoke. A cathedral praised.
Accepted by: Green River Review.
August 1, 1975
dc12g.7
“Canadian”
First Line: Hear the wild geese; know how their.
Accepted by: Audience.
April 1, 1972
dc12g.8
“Frog Songs”
First Line: Edge of the meadow.
Accepted by: New Letters.
March 1, 1971
dc12g.9
“At the Apostle Islands”
First Line: We had a sled with a sail.
Accepted by: Runes.
March 1, 1970
dc12g.10
“By the Deschutes Shore”
First Line: Millions of miles away at evening the sun.
Accepted by: Places.
June 1, 1974

dc12h: Put-together for All About Light, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 9/Folder dc12h

13 items

Assembled in 1978.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 9/Folder dc12h
dc12h.1
Permissions list
undated
dc12h.2
Contents page
December 7, 1977
dc12h.3
“Light, and My Sudden Face”
First Line: I am the man whose heart.
Accepted by: Poetry Northwest.
February 1, 1964
dc12h.4
“Another Twilight”
First Line: Sometime you will be in a shop.
Accepted by: Iowa Review.
October 1, 1975
dc12h.5
“Some Lights”
First Line: You turn on a light in a room, and.
August 1, 1971
dc12h.6
“Things About the Sun”
First Line: Any time the sun.
Accepted by: Poetry Now.
August 1, 1973
dc12h.7
“Rx Creative Writing: Identity”
First Line: You take this pill, a new world.
Accepted by: Writer's Digest.
February 17, 1961
dc12h.8
“Many Things Are Hidden by the Light”
First Line: Now I remember, letting the dark.
Accepted by: Georgia Review.
December 1, 1973
dc12h.9
“Cave Painting”
First Line: It was like the moon, the open before us.
Accepted by: Iowa Review.
December 1, 1973
dc12h.10
“Gutters of Jackson: Cache Street North”
First Line: Gum wrapper with nothing, Coors can.
Accepted by: Slackwater Review.
August 1, 1975
dc12h.11
“Charged by Moonlight”
First Line: Whatever this dance we’re in, the moon.
Accepted by: Yankee.
November 1, 1975
dc12h.12
“Home”
First Line: Our father owned a star.
Accepted by: Fellowship.
June 21, 1944
dc12h.13
Correspondence with Duane Schneider & permissions letters
20 items

dc12i: Put-together for Smoke's Way, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 9/Folder dc12i

11 items

Assembled in 1978.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 9/Folder dc12i
dc12i.1
“Looking for You”
First Line: Looking for you through the gray rain.
Accepted by: Field.
June 1, 1976
dc12i.2
“Glass Face in the Rain”
First Line: Sometime you’ll walk all night. You’ll.
Accepted by: River Styx.
undated
dc12i.3
“Smoke" (two copies)
First Line: Smoke’s way’s a good way - find.
Accepted by: Three Rivers Poetry.
January 1, 1977
dc12i.4
“Glimpse by the Path”
First Line: Mitten, follow that hand.” All.
Accepted by: PTA Magazine.
March 1, 1972
dc12i.5
“Watching a Candle”
First Line: A candle went down its long stair.
Accepted by: Nation.
May 1, 1977
dc12i.6
“Much Have I Traveled”
First Line: When we heard it like the ocean.
Accepted by: Helios.
undated
dc12i.7
“At an Interval in Talk”
First Line: An owl call - round, globed as the moon.
Accepted by: Dalmo’ma.
undated
dc12i.8
“Finding Out”
First Line: No, not dark. Even at night a glow from a shaft.
Accepted by: Pacific Northwest Review of Books.
undated
dc12i.9
“In Our State No One Ever”
First Line: No one ever cared.
Accepted by: Rogue River Gorge.
July 1, 1968
dc12i.10
“Assurance" (two versions)
First Line: You will never be alone, you hear so deep.
Accepted by: Hand Book.
November 1, 1975
dc12i.11
Correspondence with Scott Walker
Four sheets
undated

dc12j: Put-together for Tuft By Puff, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 9/Folder dc12j

16 items

Assembled in 1978.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 9/Folder dc12j
dc12j.1
cover
May 19, 1977
dc12j.2
contents page
January 1, 1978
dc12j.3
“Survival”
First Line: Evenings, we call quail.
Accepted by: The Journal.
August 1, 1965
dc12j.4
“Talk Before Work”
First Line: Where you going, needle?.
Accepted by: Florida Review.
July 1, 1971
dc12j.5
“Casual Round-Up Sonnet”
First Line: Late, in the east-west canyons.
March 1, 1966
dc12j.6
“It’s Time”
First Line: A woodpecker drilled back to.
Accepted by: Fiction International.
March 1, 1972
dc12j.7
“Stories”
First Line: Up in our tree house.
Accepted by: New Letters.
January 1, 1973
dc12j.8
“Tennis with the Net Down”
First Line: The big taboo truck moved.
Accepted by: Tar River Poetry.
May 1, 1970
dc12j.9
“Uplifting Thoughts”
First Line: Jet engines, the Wright brothers.
Accepted by: Ohio Review.
November 1, 1974
dc12j.10
“Those Few”
First Line: They’ve gone.
Accepted by: Oregonian.
February 8, 1947
dc12j.11
“Walking the Headland”
First Line: Stones at the coast may be the last.
Accepted by: Back Door.
May 1, 1968
dc12j.12
“Beaver Talk”
First Line: Not all the lakes have names.
Accepted by: Dryad.
January 1, 1967
dc12j.13
“From the Bengali”
First Line: True, there are tigers, and they.
Accepted by: Phoenix.
March 1, 1970
dc12j.14
“You from There, Me from Here”
First Line: Tingaling, this is your telephone.
October 1, 1973
dc12j.15
“At the Coast”
First Line: Every wave has.
May 1, 1970
dc12j.16
Letter to Walter Hamady
February 7, 1978

dc12k: Put-together for The Quiet of the Land, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 9/Folder dc12k

8 items

Assembled in 1979.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 9/Folder dc12k
dc12k.1
cover
undated
dc12k.2
“Early Morning" (two copies)
First Line: Inside this dream to come awake.
Accepted by: Anagnorisis.
July 1, 1971
dc12k.3
“One Leaf Comes Down”
First Line: One leaf comes down. The crew.
Accepted by: Blue Unicorn.
undated
dc12k.4
“Way I Do It" (two copies)
First Line: The best things we say, I.
Accepted by: Sam Houston Literary Review.
March 1, 1976
dc12k.5
“After All These Years”
First Line: Each faint star out in the night.
Accepted by: Critical Quarterly.
undated
dc12k.6
“Fanatic”
First Line: He molded clay while he talked.
Accepted by: Bachy.
undated
dc12k.7
“Girl Who Died, Who Lived" (two copies)
First Line: Last night an old sound came by chance.
Accepted by: Poetry Northwest.
February 1, 1961
dc12k.8
“Correspondence with Nadja Press" (thirteen items)
undated

dc12l: Put-together for Sometimes Like a Legend, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 9/Folder dc12l

51 items

Assembled in 1981.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 9/Folder dc12l
dc12l.1
cover
July 1, 1980
dc12l.2
Contents page
July 19, 1980
dc12l.3
“Part 1: It Has a Certain Flavor”
Section title.
dc12l.4
“Sub-urban”
First Line: In any town I must live near the rind.
Accepted by: Ladies Home Journal.
September 7, 1947
dc12l.5
“Vine Maple”
First Line: There was a tree surprised by light.
Accepted by: Oregonian.
August 9, 1948
dc12l.6
“Assay”
First Line: They found the big mine of honesty.
Accepted by: Pacific and Fellowship.
December 4, 1945
dc12l.7
“Old Friends”
First Line: I knew that summer well.
Accepted by: Compass.
April 12, 1947
dc12l.8
“Days for the World”
First Line: That the world have days.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
October 20, 1969
dc12l.9
“Alive in the Mountains”
First Line: Alone, and then alone again, the summits.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
December 1, 1967
dc12l.10
“Storm at the Coast”
First Line: What moves on, moves far.
Accepted by: Concerning Poetry.
March 1, 1967
dc12l.11
“Part 2: You Get Glimpses”
Section title.
dc12l.12
“Little Room”
First Line: When I woke up at the beach.
Accepted by: New York Quarterly.
October 1, 1969
dc12l.13
“British Columbia”
First Line: After the border, it was trees all the way to.
Accepted by: American Scholar.
February 1, 1971
dc12l.14
“Jefferson County”
First Line: A formal county like that.
Accepted by: Jeopardy.
June 1, 1967
dc12l.15
“Meeting Roethke”
First Line: I’d see him dance into the room.
Accepted by: Chrysalis.
March 1, 1962
dc12l.16
“Viewing the Coast”
First Line: A tracker from Neptune.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
July 1, 1967
dc12l.17
“Stadium High, Tacoma”
First Line: This building in front is Greek, copper.
Accepted by: Crazy Horse.
March 1, 1973
dc12l.18
“At Port Townsend”
First Line: All night I sat up watching.
Accepted by: Unmuzzled Ox.
July 1, 1976
dc12l.19
“Part 3: It’s a Quaint Place”
Section title.
dc12l.20
“Heron in Residence”
First Line: Our high-shouldered patient.
Accepted by: Yankee.
August 1, 1976
dc12l.21
“Places and Punctuation: The Coast”
First Line: Seaside-Rockaway, Tillamook-Astoria.
Accepted by: Oregon People Magazine.
December 1, 1974
dc12l.22
“Camping with Jack”
First Line: So clear we slept outside the tent.
Accepted by: Jason.
October 1, 1960
dc12l.23
“Mountain That Got Little”
First Line: Hidden far somewhere trembling with.
Accepted by: New Letters.
July 1, 1973
dc12l.24
“Limber Gulls Owning the Wind”
First Line: In my sleep they take place, each with.
Accepted by: Mill Mountain Review.
July 1, 1970
dc12l.25
“Day I Got the Good Idea”
First Line: Had the right amount of rain, wind pushing it.
Accepted by: Poetry.
January 1, 1962
dc12l.26
“Beaver People”
First Line: Beaver people are trying to figure out the good water.
Accepted by: Virginia Quarterly.
August 1, 1960
dc12l.27
“Part Four: And Sometimes Like a Legend”
Section title.
dc12l.28
“Outreach”
First Line: In the barefoot dark without a cry.
Accepted by: New Orleans Poetry Journal.
October 1, 1954
dc12l.29
“On the Coast”
First Line: Rain drives flat at our shack on the coast.
Accepted by: Oregon Journal.
September 29, 1953
dc12l.30
“Winter Orchard”
First Line: In the bereaved orchard.
Accepted by: Prism.
October 1, 1955
dc12l.31
“Stillness Is the Right Wave”
First Line: At the shore we always choose.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
April 5, 1975
dc12l.32
“Kinship”
First Line: In a wilderness at the end of a vine.
Accepted by: Special Libraries.
January 1, 1970
dc12l.33
“At an Interval in [the] Talk”
First Line: An owl call - round, globed as the moon.
Accepted by: Dalmo’ma.
June 1, 1974
dc12l.34
“Slants of Rain”
First Line: Some of the rain past the searchlight.
Accepted by: Christian Science Monitor.
September 1, 1973
dc12l.35
“Part Five: Even Dark and Strange”
Section title.
dc12l.36
“Storm Warning”
First Line: Something not the wind shakes along far.
Accepted by: Rough Weather.
August 22, 1947
dc12l.37
“In a Northwest Museum”
First Line: This man - Tlingit? - filed his teeth to tear.
Accepted by: Poetry Northwest.
August 1, 1957
dc12l.38
“Letter Not Even to Deliver”
First Line: The world often has a quiet look.
Accepted by: Hawk & Whippoorwill.
January 1, 1960
dc12l.39
“So Clear, So Cold”
First Line: At Cold Lake, wagon.
Accepted by: Ohio Review.
October 1, 1971
dc12l.40
“From Behind These Vines”
First Line: We thought if we swept those vines.
Accepted by: Tennessee Poetry Journal.
September 1, 1967
dc12l.41
“Ferns”
First Line: After the firestorms that end history.
Accepted by: Critical Quarterly.
May 1, 1970
dc12l.42
“Waiting at the Beach”
First Line: The sun tugs over the sky.
Accepted by: River Styx.
dc12l.43
“Part 6: You Get a Taste for It”
Section title.
dc12l.44
“Quiet Day at the Beach”
First Line: Gulls hit the silence and come through.
July 1, 1970
dc12l.45
“Slow Land”
First Line: The sun gradually pulls a whole.
Accepted by: Southern Poetry Review.
October 1, 1973
dc12l.46
“Snapshot”
First Line: A hand reaches over the edge of rock.
Accepted by: Colorado State Review.
February 1, 1967
dc12l.47
“Little Sermon" (2 copies)
First Line: The butterfly, the bee, the hummingbird.
Accepted by: Bridge.
August 16, 1944
dc12l.48
“Looking Out and Staying True”
First Line: The main thing meant this morning is.
Accepted by: Choice: A Magazine of Poetry and Photography.
January 6, 1964
dc12l.49
“Outside of Town”
First Line: Loud sparrows hidden.
Accepted by: Human Voice.
July 1, 1968
dc12l.50
“West of Here”
First Line: The road goes down. It stops at the sea.
Accepted by: Kansas City Star.
March 1, 1973
dc12l.51
Correspondence with Sam Hamill
12 pages

dc13: Put-together for Segues, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 10/Folder dc13

22 items

Assembled in 1981.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 10/Folder dc13
dc13.1
“Hunger for Stories”
First Line: By now it’s not Japan or a bell.
Accepted by: Poetry Miscellany.
June 1, 1979
dc13.2
“Things Not in the Story”
First Line: Most things are impossible, but I think.
Accepted by: Pequod.
July 1, 1979
dc13.3
“Hunting What Is”
First Line: There are days when everything waits - you run.
Accepted by: Field.
undated
dc13.4
“Telling You Carefully”
First Line: Part of the time I want to tell you.
Accepted by: Field.
August 19, 1979
dc13.5
“Serving with Gideon”
First Line: Now I remember: in our town the druggist.
Accepted by: Field.
September 1, 1979
dc13.6
“Losers”
First Line: You learn from losers. You yield back tough talk.
Accepted by: Field.
October 4, 1979
dc13.7
“Meeting Big People”
First Line: We would sit down, after a visitor had.
Accepted by: Field.
November 1, 1979
dc13.8
“Permission of the Snow”
First Line: The perfect snow that told your face which way.
Accepted by: Field.
November 24, 1979
dc13.9
“Learning, Any TIme”
First Line: We were singing one day about justice.
Accepted by: Field.
January 28, 1980
dc13.10
“Testing, Testing, Not Being Lost”
First Line: Wherever you are you hear it, a hum.
Accepted by: Poetry Miscellany.
February 1, 1980
dc13.11
“Dear Marvin”
First Line: Dear Marvin.
Accepted by: Hawaii Review.
May 1, 1980
dc13.12
“Accepting What Comes”
First Line: In a mirror so deep it’s forever I see.
Accepted by: American Poetry Review.
June 4, 1980
dc13.13
“Living Far Enough Away”
First Line: At the shop in my brain where everything happens - at the grunsel.
Accepted by: Hawaii Review.
July 3, 1980
dc13.14
“More Than Words Can Tell”
First Line: Don’t ask, “Are you afraid?”.
Accepted by: American Poetry Review.
August 15, 1980
dc13.15
“Reading at American University”
First Line: Start with a doorbuster, how to get in from.
Accepted by: American Poetry Review.
September 1, 1980
dc13.16
“What to Say”
First Line: Sometimes you hear it from strangers, talkers.
Accepted by: American Poetry Review.
November 12, 1980
dc13.17
“Before It Burned Over - a Sioux Grass Chant”
First Line: World carpet, robe, every leaf.
Accepted by: Poetry Miscellany.
November 20, 1980
dc13.18
“Just Some Names”
First Line: If it’s just “the weather” or “the season,” they.
Accepted by: Poetry Miscellany.
December 9, 1980
dc13.19
“Nothing Special”
First Line: Someone was by the glass in the door. It was.
Accepted by: American Poetry Review.
December 31, 1980
dc13.20
“It Still Happens Now”
First Line: You make me walk my town, its terrible.
Accepted by: American Poetry Review.
June 2, 1981
dc13.21
“Key of C - an Interlude for Marvin”
First Line: Sometime nothing has happened. We are home.
Accepted by: American Poetry Review.
June 9, 1981
dc13.22
“For an OK Writer”
First Line: You make it happen - the world out there.
Accepted by: Hawaii Review.
June 30, 1981

dc14: Put-together for Listening Deep, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 10/Folder dc14

24 items

Assembled in 1984.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 10/Folder dc14
dc14.1
Title page
June 22, 1982
dc14.2
“Prophets”
First Line: Some prophets decide not to tell. They go around.
Accepted by: Poetry Miscellany.
January 6, 1981
dc14.3
“Textures”
First Line: The dwell of a sound for miles.
Accepted by: American Poetry Review.
July 1, 1981
dc14.4
“Today, Tonight”
First Line: Today when silence came we heard.
Accepted by: Blue Unicorn.
June 1, 1975
dc14.5
“Farther Than Stout Cortez”
First Line: Even far out in the air beyond the trees.
Accepted by: Hapa.
May 1, 1978
dc14.6
“Renegade”
First Line: My brother came home in darkness.
Accepted by: Concerning Poetry.
October 1, 1979
dc14.7
“Objector”
First Line: In line at lunch I cross my fork and spoon.
Accepted by: Aloe.
July 1, 1981
dc14.8
“Heroes”
First Line: Here is the rabbit that ran through a field on fire.
Accepted by: MSS.
January 13, 1981
dc14.9
“How to Regain Your Soul”
First Line: Come down Canyon Creek trail on a summer afternoon.
Accepted by: Poetry.
September 7, 1981
dc14.10
“One Leaf Comes Down”
First Line: One leaf comes down. The crew.
Accepted by: Blue Unicorn.
June 1, 1976
dc14.11
“On an Un-Named Mountain”
First Line: You try to be sure while you stand.
Accepted by: Nation.
June 1, 1977
dc14.12
“Into Summer Again”
First Line: One of the pieces of light.
Accepted by: Pacific Search.
April 1, 1977
dc14.13
“While We Are Waiting”
First Line: Under a bush in your yard, if I found it.
Accepted by: Berkeley Poetry Review.
October 1, 1977
dc14.14
“Passing an Old Farm”
First Line: They forget to improve old gardens, and.
Accepted by: Pacific Search.
May 1, 1977
dc14.15
“Out in Pawnee Country" (three versions)
First Line: A patient wind has finally uncovered.
Accepted by: Late Harvest.
August 1, 1974
dc14.16
“On the Boat Coming In”
First Line: No wave but thuds this question: “When?”.
Accepted by: Dalmo’ma.
May 1, 1974
dc14.17
“Things the Wind Says”
First Line: Everything still ought to move.
Accepted by: South Dakota Review.
April 1, 1980
dc14.18
“Bells”
First Line: According to law, a bell had to sound.
Accepted by: Mid-South Writer.
October 1, 1980
dc14.19
“Optimism”
First Line: What you can make with a knife.
Accepted by: Cincinnati Poetry Review.
February 1, 1980
dc14.20
“August”
First Line: It comes up out of the ocean.
Accepted by: American Poetry Review.
August 17, 1981
dc14.21
“1080”
First Line: Ten-Eighty,” they say it, when they call.
Accepted by: Clearwater.
July 1, 1981
dc14.22
“Big School”
First Line: Will you be afraid when miles of sagebrush.
Accepted by: Clearwater.
January 28, 1980
dc14.23
“Listening Deep”
First Line: It came to me that a river is flowing.
Accepted by: Cumberland Poetry Review.
May 22, 1980
dc14.24
correspondence with Penmaen Press and galley proofs
6 items

dc15: Put-together for Stories and Storms and Strangers, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 10/Folder dc15

19 items

Assembled in 1984.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 10/Folder dc15
dc15.1
cover
March 1, 1984
dc15.2
“Stereopticon”
First Line: This can happen. They can bring the leaves back.
Accepted by: American Poets in 1976.
May 30, 1974
dc15.3
“Stopping by Frost”
First Line: Whose lines these were I thought I knew.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
December 1, 1973
dc15.4
“Stories You Tell”
First Line: A clock falls on its face.
Accepted by: Tar River Poetry.
September 1, 1970
dc15.5
“Storm" [Haiku]
First Line: On the old highway.
Accepted by: Portland Review.
September 1, 1974
dc15.6
“Storm in the Mountains”
First Line: Even God can’t take the lightning back.
Accepted by: Crazy Horse.
September 1, 1971
dc15.7
“Story for a Winter Night”
First Line: Late one winter night in the North.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
January 14, 1971
dc15.8
“Story of a Piebald Horse”
First Line: It put out its feet, trotted through.
Accepted by: Stone Drum.
May 1, 1971
dc15.9
“Story That Hasn’t Happened”
First Line: Where the river spins, rock talks.
Accepted by: L’Espirit.
August 1, 1971
dc15.10
“Story This Land Is Telling”
First Line: A chapter about volcanoes, and then .
Accepted by: Poetry Now.
January 1, 1975
dc15.11
“Strange Face on the Sand”
First Line: Once upon a time our town owned a story.
Accepted by: Chicago Tribune.
June 1, 1972
dc15.12
“Stranger”
First Line: The place he wanted to tell about.
Accepted by: Stand.
November 1, 1967
dc15.13
“That Day Again”
First Line: Some nights you hear wires taunting the wind.
Accepted by: Audience.
August 1, 1971
dc15.14
“Today”
First Line: Beside my ear the bowstring says.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
March 1, 1973
dc15.15
“Today Again”
First Line: The ordinary miracles begin. Somewhere.
Accepted by: Poets On.
June 1, 1976
dc15.16
“Together Again”
First Line: When I drive, every bridge is.
Accepted by: Field.
October 1, 1970
dc15.17
“.38”
First Line: This metal has come to look at.
Accepted by: Ohio Review.
December 1, 1971
dc15.18
“They Carved an Animal”
First Line: In a cave somewhere they carved an animal.
Accepted by: American Scholar.
November 1, 1976
dc15.19
“That Year”
First Line: The last year I was your friend, they fell.
Accepted by: Southern Poetry Review.
May 1, 1970

dc17: Put-together for Brother Wind, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 10/Folder dc17

24 items

Assembled in 1986.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 10/Folder dc17
dc17.1
“Memo" (used as special holograph poem in Brother Wind book)
First Line: To each plant in our yard.
Accepted by: Sandlapper.
May 1, 1976
dc17.2
“Preface: Sniffing the Region”
First Line: Being tagged a regional artist....
Accepted by: Concerning Poetry.
April 1, 1980
dc17.3
“Brother Wind”
First Line: Air this morning embraces you.
Accepted by: Western Humanities Review.
September 1, 1977
dc17.4
“Priorities at Friday Ranch”
First Line: All that juniper west of.
Accepted by: American Poetry Review.
April 14, 1976
dc17.5
“Cheat Grass”
First Line: If you are reading this, please.
Accepted by: High Country News.
June 1, 1977
dc17.6
“Out by Keith and Shirley’s”
First Line: Backdoor people, ones who borrow a wrench.
Accepted by: Chariton Review.
April 1, 1978
dc17.7
“Standing and Knowing”
First Line: Wherever the mountains put their white gloves on.
Accepted by: Inquiry.
September 1, 1977
dc17.8
“Remembering Mountain Men”
First Line: I put my foot in cold water.
Accepted by: Concerning Poetry.
December 1, 1978
dc17.9
“About These Poems”
First Line: Of brass, though broken. See? - almost.
Accepted by: Field.
August 1, 1978
dc17.10
“Good Citizens”
First Line: Rocks are usually in trouble, but.
Accepted by: Amicus.
October 1, 1979
dc17.11
“For Later”
First Line: When I put my foot on this cold road.
Accepted by: American Poetry Review.
September 1, 1978
dc17.12
“Graydigger’s Home”
First Line: Paw marks near one burrow show Graydigger.
Accepted by: Poetry Review.
August 1, 1977
dc17.13
“Big Wilderness”
First Line: Not seeing mountains makes them wilder.
Accepted by: Tower.
September 1, 1978
dc17.14
“Everything Twice”
First Line: One time a green forest one time.
Accepted by: Atlanta.
September 1, 1979
dc17.15
“It Takes a Long Time”
First Line: Wherever a bulldozer gouges into the earth.
Accepted by: Perception.
June 1, 1977
dc17.16
“Face”
First Line: It’s just by chance, who.
Accepted by: Partisan Review.
July 22, 1977
dc17.17
“Out in the Garden”
First Line: Details, details, the mole says.
Accepted by: Sandlapper.
September 1, 1969
dc17.18
“One of the Many Dreams of Childhood”
First Line: Floorboards of an old car. Shaking.
Accepted by: Blue Buildings.
June 1, 1978
dc17.19
“August Back Then”
First Line: A day was trees. One touched the other.
Accepted by: Perceptions.
June 1, 1977
dc17.20
“Walk in September”
First Line: Early snow falls through.
Accepted by: Wang Hui Ming.
May 1, 1967
dc17.21
“Hills (two copies)”
First Line: Half of each hill is underground. Moles.
Accepted by: Percpetions.
December 1, 1976
dc17.22
“Crossing the Campus with a New Generation”
First Line: Practicing how to lose I have perfected.
Accepted by: Tar River Poetry.
June 26, 1977
dc17.23
Computer copies of nine poems involved in...
dc17.24
correspondence with publisher, Donnell Hunter
5 pages

dc18: Put-together for An Oregon Message, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 10/Folder dc18

129 items

Assembled in 1987.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 10/Folder dc18
dc18.1
“Falling into the Sky”
First Line: Day again - sunlight has found.
Accepted by: Forum.
May 1, 1981
dc18.2
“Saying Goodby to What Happened”
First Line: I am saying that the years were just being themselves.
Accepted by: Christian Science Monitor.
July 1, 1981
dc18.4
“September, 1982”
First Line: Something from out there came for Princess Grace.
Accepted by: The Oregonian.
September 1, 1982
dc18.5
“Wearing Ear Protectors”
First Line: It’s all different now. After the loud world.
Accepted by: Georgia Review.
May 16, 1984
dc18.6
cover
undated
dc18.7
“Big Picture”
2 lists of poems, one folded page .
dc18.8
“Part 1: The Book About You”
section title.
dc18.9
“Keeping a Journal”
First Line: At night it was easy for me with my little candle.
Accepted by: America.
March 9, 1985
dc18.10
“First Grade”
First Line: In the play Amy didn’t want to be.
Accepted by: Ontario Review.
December 1, 1982
dc18.11
“Life, a Ritual”
First Line: My mother had a child, one dark.
Accepted by: Southern Review.
April 10, 1983
dc18.12
“Surrounded by Mountains”
First Line: Digging potatoes east of Sapporo.
Accepted by: Field.
September 16, 1984
dc18.13
“Little Rooms”
First Line: I rock high in the oak - secure, big branches.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
April 1, 1980
dc18.14
“Big House”
First Line: She was a modern, you know.
Accepted by: Spectrum.
January 1, 1984
dc18.15
“Voice from the Past”
First Line: I never intended this face, believe me.
Accepted by: Ontario Review.
December 21, 1982
dc18.16
“Confessions of an Individual”
First Line: I let history happen - sorry. When Muslims.
Accepted by: Poetry Now.
October 1, 1979
dc18.17
“To Recite Every Day”
First Line: This bread is rye. Many places.
Accepted by: Plainsong.
August 1, 1980
dc18.18
“Sleeping Toward Heaven”
First Line: I wish that I had been one of the Seven Sleepers of Ephesus.
Accepted by: Brockport Writers' Forum.
September 9, 1981
dc18.19
“For People with Problems about How to Believe”
First Line: Say it’s early morning, coming awake.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
June 1, 1981
dc18.20
“Next Time”
First Line: Next time what I’d do is look at.
Accepted by: New England Review.
August 1, 1982
dc18.21
“Burning a Book”
First Line: Protecting each other, right in the center.
Accepted by: Field.
March 21, 1984
dc18.22
“Salt Creek”
First Line: It’s a place to go, far from the country.
Accepted by: Oregon East.
June 3, 1981
dc18.23
“Book About You”
First Line: The book that tells about you slumps in the library.
Accepted by: Black Warrior Review.
September 1, 1977
dc18.24
“Thinking about Being Called Simple by a Critic”
First Line: I wanted the plums, but I waited.
Accepted by: Chicago Review.
January 1, 1978
dc18.25
“Learning How to Lose" [Lipstick on a Coffee Cup]
First Line: All your years learning how to live to win.
Accepted by: MSS.
dc18.26
“Querencia”
First Line: Years and years go by in a high country.
Accepted by: American Scholar.
March 1, 1983
dc18.27
“Part 2: Serving with Gideon”
Section title.
dc18.28
“Serving with Gideon”
First Line: Now I remember: in our town the druggist.
Accepted by: American Poetry Review.
September 1, 1979
dc18.29
“Ground Zero”
First Line: A bomb photographed me on the stone.
Accepted by: Ontario Review.
December 1, 1982
dc18.30
“Looking for Gold”
First Line: A flavor like wild honey begins.
Accepted by: Yankee.
January 1, 1984
dc18.31
“Stillborn”
First Line: Where a river touches an island.
Accepted by: New Letters.
May 6, 1982
dc18.32
“Chicory”
First Line: Till the great darkness gathers them in .
Accepted by: Southwest Review.
October 1, 1984
dc18.33
“Say You Are Lonely”
First Line: More still than a star, one thought shines.
Accepted by: Sunstone.
March 27, 1982
dc18.34
“Scars”
First Line: They tell how it was, and how time.
Accepted by: New Letters.
March 27, 1982
dc18.35
“Honeysuckle”
First Line: Not yet old enough, still only a kid.
Accepted by: Indiana Review.
December 19, 1979
dc18.36
“School Play”
First Line: You were a princess, lost; I.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
September 1, 1980
dc18.37
“Ceremony: Doing the Needful”
First Line: Carrying you, a little model carefully dressed.
Accepted by: Field.
September 1, 1981
dc18.38
“Graffiti”
First Line: What’s on the wall will influence your life.
Accepted by: Sunstone.
March 1, 1981
dc18.39
“For the Unknown Enemy”
First Line: This monument is for the unknown.
Accepted by: Christian Science Monitor.
January 1, 1984
dc18.40
“Being an American”
First Line: Some network has bought history, all the rights.
Accepted by: Poetry Now.
December 1, 1979
dc18.41
“What You See”
First Line: You see the Great at the Kennedy Center.
Accepted by: Iowa Review.
December 1, 1979
dc18.42
“Our Time”
First Line: It came.
Accepted by: Wooster Review.
September 1, 1983
dc18.43
“Over the North Jetty”
First Line: Geese and brant, their wingbeats.
Accepted by: New York Quarterly.
May 2, 1984
dc18.44
“On Earth”
First Line: Any sun that comes, even.
Accepted by: Literature and Belief.
April 21, 1983
dc18.45
“Walking with Your Eyes Shut”
First Line: Your ears receive a pletter of sound.
Accepted by: Plainsong.
April 1, 1981
dc18.46
“Dream of Descartes”
First Line: When dawn comes along any morning it carries.
Accepted by: Poetry Miscellany.
October 1, 1980
dc18.47
“When You Hear This”
First Line: When you hear this I am twenty.
Accepted by: Quest.
May 1, 1975
dc18.48
“Waiting in Line”
First Line: You the very old, I have come.
Accepted by: Barnwood.
June 1, 1980
dc18.49
“Not Having Wings”
First Line: If I had a wing it might hurt.
Accepted by: Light Year.
December 1, 1975
dc18.50
“Afterward”
First Line: In the day I sheltered on the sunny side.
Accepted by: Cottonwood.
March 1, 1984
dc18.51
“Four Oak Leaves”
First Line: When I was green, everyone loved me. Bees.
Accepted by: Hampden-Sydney Poetry Review.
December 1, 1982
dc18.52
“Oregon Message”
First Line: When we first moved here, pulled.
Accepted by: New Yorker.
August 13, 1967
dc18.53
“Why I Am Happy”
First Line: Now has come, an easy time. I let it.
Accepted by: Plainsong.
July 1, 1980
dc18.54
Part 3: A Writer’s Fountain Pen Talking
Section title.
dc18.55
“Bird Count”
First Line: Choose a day: whatever birds come.
Accepted by: Field.
November 3, 1981
dc18.56
“Day at Home”
First Line: On the near pine rain hangs.
Accepted by: Miami Magazine.
March 21, 1975
dc18.57
“Dean at Faculty Retreat”
First Line: They go by dragging their chains. I hook.
Accepted by: Western Humanities Review.
September 1, 1976
dc18.58
“Final Exam: American Renaissance”
First Line: Fill in blanks: Your name is.
Accepted by: Critical Quarterly.
May 1, 1962
dc18.59
“Rodeo at Sisters, Oregon”
First Line: When the speaker stops we can hear.
Accepted by: New Republic.
July 1, 1973
dc18.60
“Simple Talk”
First Line: Spilling themselves in the sun bluebirds.
Accepted by: Cornell Review.
August 1, 1976
dc18.61
“Purifying the Language of the Tribe”
First Line: Walking away means.
Accepted by: Charles Seluzicki.
June 1, 1984
dc18.62
“Starting with Little Things”
First Line: Love the earth like a mole.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
September 1, 1973
dc18.63
“Today”
First Line: Somebody today called me “old”.
Accepted by: Field.
March 1, 1973
dc18.64
“Ultimate Problem"s [Is There a Niebuhr in the House?]
First Line: In the Aztec design God crowds.
Accepted by: Poetry Northwest.
November 1, 1959
dc18.65
“Uncle Bill Visits”
First Line: Remember me, kids? Here:.
Accepted by: Poetry.
January 1, 1967
dc18.66
“Visiting”
First Line: The weather visits us. It has another.
Accepted by: Hampden-Sydney Poetry Review.
December 1, 1974
dc18.67
“Volkswagen”
First Line: I heard that un-engine in front.
Accepted by: Concerning Poetry.
September 1, 1963
dc18.68
“When I Met My Muse”
First Line: I glanced at her and took my glasses.
Accepted by: Christian Science Monitor.
August 1, 1976
dc18.69
“Where the Saw Is”
First Line: It waits in its little room. You turn.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
June 1, 1973
dc18.70
“Ghalib Decides to Be Reticent”
First Line: There is a question I would like to ask.
Accepted by: Light Year.
May 1, 1978
dc18.71
“Writer’s Fountain Pen Talking”
First Line: I gave out one day and left a woman.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
April 27, 1981
dc18.72
“Stone, Paper, Scissors”
First Line: Stone.
Accepted by: Poetry.
September 17, 1981
dc18.73
“Sparkle Depends on Flaws in the Diamond”
First Line: Wood that can learn is no good for a bow.
Accepted by: Ontario Review.
October 22, 1981
dc18.74
“Day Last Summer" [Morning in June]
First Line: Cowbird,” someone said. I was.
Accepted by: Negative Capacity.
July 1, 1980
dc18.75
“Mr. or Mrs. Nobody”
First Line: Some days when you look out, the land.
Accepted by: Negative Capacity.
December 1, 1982
dc18.76
“Ode to Garlic" (two drafts)
First Line: Sudden, it comes for you.
Accepted by: Garlic Festival.
January 11, 1982
dc18.77
“Part 4: Saint Matthew and All”
Section title.
dc18.78
“Scripture”
First Line: In the dark book where words crowded together.
Accepted by: Michigan Quarterly Review.
September 1, 1982
dc18.79
“Forget”
First Line: Forget the rain, being inside.
Accepted by: Ontario Review.
December 1, 1982
dc18.80
“Turn Over Your Hand”
First Line: Those lines on your palm, they can be read.
Accepted by: Milkweed Chronicle.
February 1, 1985
dc18.81
“Pilgrims”
First Line: They come to the door, usually carrying or leading.
Accepted by: Plainsong.
June 9, 1983
dc18.82
“1932”
First Line: Nobody could come because ours was the house.
Accepted by: Mid-American Review.
February 1, 1981
dc18.83
“1940”
First Line: It is August. Your father is walking you.
Accepted by: Southern Humanities Review.
July 1, 1983
dc18.84
“Game and a Brother”
First Line: Afraid, but not really afraid, we heard.
Accepted by: Michigan Quarterly Review.
May 1, 1976
dc18.85
“Brother”
First Line: Somebody came to the door that night.
Accepted by: Western Humanities Review.
February 1, 1982
dc18.86
“Madge”
First Line: Or you could do it, the speech I mean.
Accepted by: Western Humanities Review.
January 28, 1982
dc18.87
“Waiting Sometimes”
First Line: Inside your hands when you clasp them while waiting.
Accepted by: International Poetry Review.
October 1, 1981
dc18.88
“Hearing the Song”
First Line: My father said, “Listen,” and that subtle song.
Accepted by: Coyote’s Journal.
July 1, 1980
dc18.89
“108 East Nineteenth”
First Line: Mother, the sweet peas have gushed out of.
Accepted by: Atlantic.
April 13, 1981
dc18.90
“Mother’s Day”
First Line: Peg said “This one,” and we bought it.
Accepted by: Practices of the Wind.
July 1, 1980
dc18.91
“Getting Scared”
First Line: Tending our fire in the oil drum, we felt.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
March 1, 1981
dc18.92
“Memorial for My Mother" (2 drafts)
First Line: For long my life left hers. It went.
Accepted by: Little Balkans Review.
May 28, 1979
dc18.93
“Land Between the Rivers”
First Line: It happened to be Thursday. No one was going.
Accepted by: Plainsong.
April 1, 1981
dc18.94
“Our Neighborhood”
First Line: Sam’s Mother.
Accepted by: Paintbrush.
September 1, 1979
dc18.95
“How It Is with Family”
First Line: Let’s assume you have neglected to write.
Accepted by: Black Warrior Review.
August 1, 1977
dc18.96
“When You Go Anywhere" [Verses for the Wall by Your Bed/Identification] (two drafts)”
First Line: This passport your face (not you.
Accepted by: Rolling Stone anthology Wonders.
January 1, 1978
dc18.97
“By Tens”
First Line: In my twenties the days came with a war wind.
Accepted by: New York Quarterly.
January 1, 1984
dc18.98
“Afraid of the Dust”
First Line: Afraid of the dust, closely peering.
Accepted by: Ironwood.
August 1, 1976
dc18.99
“Good Room”
First Line: In this best room, only a kitchen.
Accepted by: Kansas Quarterly.
April 1, 1967
dc18.100
“My Mother Said”
First Line: All day, deep in the mine.
Accepted by: Christian Science Monitor.
August 1, 1976
dc18.101
“To the Children at the Family Album" (two drafts)
First Line: Across Grandmother Ingersoll’s face.
Accepted by: Chicago Tribune.
January 1, 1967
dc18.102
“What If We Were Alone?”
First Line: What if there weren’t any stars?.
Accepted by: Yankee.
July 1, 1974
dc18.103
“Saint Matthew and All”
First Line: Lorene - we thought she’d come home. But.
Accepted by: Carolina Quarterly.
October 1, 1983
dc18.104
“Part 5: The Big Picture”
Section title.
dc18.105
“Run Before Dawn”
First Line: Most mornings I get away, slip out.
Accepted by: Ontario Review.
January 1, 1983
dc18.106
“Owls at the Shakespeare Festival”
First Line: How do owls find each other.
Accepted by: Mss.
June 1, 1976
dc18.107
“Loyalty”
First Line: Some people, they tire of their dog, they.
Accepted by: New York Quarterly.
December 4, 1981
dc18.108
“Figuring Out How It Is”
First Line: How it tilts while you are thinking.
Accepted by: Christian Science Monitor.
September 1, 1982
dc18.109
“Looking Up at Night”
First Line: It’s awful stillness the moon feels, how the earth.
Accepted by: Writers' Forum.
August 1, 1983
dc18.110
“Dear Sky”
First Line: This note is to explain....
Accepted by: Brockport Review.
September 8, 1981
dc18.111
“Barnum and Bailey”
First Line: And also besides, listen, in addition, there was.
Accepted by: New Letters.
January 27, 1982
dc18.112
“Lie Detector”
First Line: You said it beats like a fist, proclaiming.
Accepted by: Scape.
August 29, 1980
dc18.113
“Deciding”
First Line: One mine the Indians worked had.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
May 6, 1981
dc18.114
“Help from History”
First Line: Please help me know it happened.
Accepted by: American Scholar.
January 1, 1980
dc18.115
“Austere Hope, Daily Faith”
First Line: Even a villain sleeps - atrocities.
Accepted by: Alembic Press, Roseliep Retrospective.
April 1, 1977
dc18.116
“By a River in Osage Country”
First Line: They called it “Neosho,” meaning.
Accepted by: Crazy Horse.
April 1, 1980
dc18.117
“Wovoka in Nevada”
First Line: Holding his dream (buffalo all over.
Accepted by: Gramercy Review.
August 1, 1979
dc18.118
“Arrival”
First Line: While the years were mine I walked the high country.
Accepted by: Palaemon Press.
September 1, 1982
dc18.119
“Something I Was Thinking About”
First Line: If anything ever happens to time again.
Accepted by: Tendril.
March 27, 1982
dc18.120
“Publius Vergilius Maro (two drafts)”
First Line: Toward the last, paled by the page he wrote.
Accepted by: Nation.
November 1, 1965
dc18.121
“Report from an Unappointed Committee”
First Line: The uncounted are counting.
Accepted by: Illiterati.
February 10, 1948
dc18.122
“Santa’s Workshop”
First Line: The doll bodies glide past on little.
Accepted by: New Letters.
October 1, 1974
dc18.123
“Seasons in the Country”
First Line: When we unfasten the cabin door in.
Accepted by: Human Voice.
December 1, 1968
dc18.124
“My Hands”
First Line: It is time for applause. My hands rest.
Accepted by: Long Pond Review.
December 1, 1979
dc18.125
“Our Journey, a Story from the Dust”
First Line: Every town came true. Every person.
Accepted by: Cornfield Review.
June 1, 1979
dc18.126
“Bush from Mongolia”
First Line: This bush with light green leaves.
Accepted by: Amicus Journal.
September 1, 1984
dc18.127
“Fame”
First Line: My book fell in a river and rolled.
Accepted by: New York Quarterly.
September 6, 1983
dc18.128
“Practice”
First Line: When you stop off at rehearsal you can stumble.
Accepted by: Oregon Arts Commission.
November 26, 1984
dc18.129
“Maybe Alone on My Bike”
First Line: I listen, and the mountain lakes.
Accepted by: New Yorker.
December 1, 1963

dc22: Put-together for Fin, Feather, Fur, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 10/Folder dc22

23 items

Assembled in 1989.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 10/Folder dc22
dc22.1
“Roll Call”
First Line: Red Wolf came, and Passenger Pigeon.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
February 1, 1988
dc22.2
“Our City”
First Line: Not just people.
Accepted by: Christian Science Monitor.
March 1, 1986
dc22.3
“Some of the Ways”
First Line: Title for two-poem sequence broken up in FFF.
Accepted by: Virginia Quarterly.
May 1, 1980
dc22.4
“Scenes of Rain in the Mountains”
First Line: First, they show a lake, from right down.
Accepted by: Virginia Quarterly.
May 1, 1980
dc22.5
“Last Things”
First Line: It is cold and the horses breathe white.
Accepted by: Virginia Quarterly.
March 1, 1980
dc22.6
“Glance Down”
First Line: Where are the ants taking this field?.
Accepted by: Nation.
July 1, 1977
dc22.7
“Abandoned Farm in the Count[r]y”
First Line: None of them ever came back.
Accepted by: Hardscrabble.
July 1, 1981
dc22.8
“Accounting”
First Line: Little gray animals, and the birds.
Accepted by: Wittenberg Review.
September 1, 1977
dc22.9
“For a City Child”
First Line: Out in the country some of the things that happen.
Accepted by: Stanzapress.
May 14, 1983
dc22.10
“Bedtime Story”
First Line: When we animals lived in caves, our mothers.
Accepted by: Alaska Field and Game.
June 4, 1985
dc22.11
“Tidepool”
First Line: It is the ocean at home.
Accepted by: Oregonian.
May 1, 1985
dc22.12
“Moose Jaw”
First Line: Not knowing why a numb fish.
Accepted by: Practices of the Wind.
December 1, 1979
dc22.13
“Another Time”
First Line: Water one day sang in the ditch that came by.
Accepted by: Prism.
June 10, 1982
dc22.14
“Experiments”
First Line: Part of the cost, we knew, was the pain.
Accepted by: Literary Olympians II.
January 1, 1987
dc22.15
“Lesson in Biology”
First Line: Moses my name, a box my home.
Accepted by: Morehead State Student paper, The Trail Blazer.
October 1, 1988
dc22.16
“Inheriting the Earth: Quail”
First Line: You are supposed to stay still. It won’t.
Accepted by: Quarterly Qest.
January 1, 1981
dc22.17
“In the World”
First Line: Wild things and the unborn.
Accepted by: High Rock Review.
July 10, 1982
dc22.18
“Redbird”
First Line: In the tress between them and the lake.
Accepted by: Tusitala.
May 1, 1978
dc22.19
“Losers”
First Line: Along the coast and all along those interior rivers.
Accepted by: Cottonwood.
January 4, 1983
dc22.20
“Vocatus atque Non Vocatus”
First Line: Before our life, was there a world?.
Accepted by: Field.
December 9, 1980
dc22.21
“At Lascaux [Leceaux]”
First Line: It came into my mind that no one had painted.
Accepted by: Poetry Miscellany.
March 1, 1978
dc22.22
“Waiting by the Sea”
First Line: This tidepool day you inhabit contains more than.
Accepted by: Albatross.
January 1, 1986
dc22.23
correspondence with Donnell Hunter
22 pages including first submission (12 poems)

dc16: Put-together for Wyoming, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 11/Folder dc16

12 items

Assembled in 1985.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 11/Folder dc16
dc16.1
cover letter to Robert McRoberts
February 5, 1985
dc16.2
Title page
undated
dc16.3
“Accountability”
First Line: Cold nights outside the taverns in Wyoming.
undated
dc16.4
“Welcome, Hunters”
First Line: You dream in The Sunset. Blood flows from the pickup.
undated
dc16.5
“Out the South Road”
First Line: The sheep don’t know if it’s cold.
undated
dc16.6
“Staring at Souvenirs of the West”
First Line: What if a buffalo eye, big.
undated
dc16.7
“By Cheryl’s Old Place”
First Line: Fleet as a bronco the road goes.
undated
dc16.8
“Against the Morning Light”
First Line: A north wind caught young cottonwoods.
undated
dc16.9
“Address to the Senior Class”
First Line: Coming down the hill into this town.
undated
dc16.10
“Seeing a Red Rock”
First Line: Over near Tensleep the highway comes down.
undated
dc16.11
“Gutters of Jackson: Cache Street North”
First Line: Gum wrappers with nothing, Coors can.
undated
dc16.12
“Daily Shoot-Out for Tourists on the Square in Jackson, Wyoming”
First Line: It is more serious now, the encounter.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
undated

dc19: Put-together for You and Some Other Characters, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 11/Folder dc19

32 items

Assembled in 1987.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 11/Folder dc19
dc19.1
“Sayings for a Dedication Page”
First Line: T.S. Eliot would sell no poem before its time.
Accepted by: Scarab.
April 1, 1982
dc19.2
“Identity" (two versions)
First Line: You are the slow arrival, the coming-to.
Accepted by: Jeopardy.
October 1, 1954
dc19.3
“Country Epitaph”
First Line: I am the man who plunged.
Accepted by: Southern Review.
October 1, 1965
dc19.4
“Widow”
First Line: On the first day when light came through the curtain.
Accepted by: Crab Creek Review.
July 1, 1985
dc19.5
“Character”
First Line: Mobs yell, “Death!” Death separates into.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
December 1, 1967
dc19.6
“Who Is Sylvia?" (2 versions)
First Line: One day in the kitchen she grabbed.
Accepted by: South Carolina Review.
April 1, 1974
dc19.7
“Someone, Somewhere”
First Line: Not you, standing with your host by a window talking .
Accepted by: Chariton Review.
December 11, 1981
dc19.8
“Walking at the Zoo”
First Line: You move till a step seems.
Accepted by: Christian Science Monitor.
February 1, 1976
dc19.9
“Coyote”
First Line: My left hind-.
June 1, 1978
dc19.10
“Some Words for Hamlet”
First Line: You filed your mother tongue, those quiddities.
Accepted by: Lemming.
February 1, 1972
dc19.11
“Emily”
First Line: Monuments last too long” - her voice.
Accepted by: Quarterly West.
November 11, 1981
dc19.12
“Someone Sleeping”
First Line: You rumple your pillow, an ear.
Accepted by: Christian Science Monitor.
October 1, 1976
dc19.13
“At the Thirtieth Reunion”
First Line: That afternoon when it rained.
Accepted by: Pacific Review.
June 1, 1984
dc19.14
“On the Poly Sci Bulletin Board”
First Line: Wanted: for our study of truth.
Accepted by: New Republic.
September 1, 1970
dc19.15
“On a Picture of Ava Gardner at Davidson University”
First Line: What stings the wrong sense charges.
Accepted by: Sumac.
December 1, 1970
dc19.16
“Old Man by the Road”
First Line: You young around me.
Accepted by: New Letters.
July 1, 1973
dc19.17
“Meeting at Berkeley in the 40s”
First Line: Bourgeois” ricocheted often. I seem to remember.
Accepted by: Field.
March 17, 1975
dc19.18
“Kenny’s Office”
First Line: At noon under the eighteenth century.
Accepted by: Lewis and Clark Home Companion and Literary Review.
November 1, 1973
dc19.19
“Part of What the War Was About”
First Line: Porcelain flowers and leaves wrapped.
Accepted by: Oregon East.
July 1, 1980
dc19.20
“Librarian at Fort Yukon”
First Line: When parents made moosehide moccasins.
Accepted by: Christian Science Monitor.
October 6, 1984
dc19.21
“Book Review: Keats’s Poems”
First Line: It is not casual and meaningless, the way.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
January 1, 1974
dc19.22
“Incident on a Road Near Sisters, Oregon”
First Line: If you had been there, when the snake.
Accepted by: Ironwood.
October 1, 1976
dc19.23
“For a Young Man at an Airport”
First Line: It was a still day. Even the engines.
Accepted by: Preview.
February 1, 1967
dc19.24
“For a Star in Silent Pictures”
First Line: Shadows under trestles and the webs.
Accepted by: Chrysalis.
September 18, 1963
dc19.25
“Ours”
First Line: We needed our man there - theirs.
Accepted by: Tri-Quarterly.
July 1, 1965
dc19.26
“Remembering”
First Line: Long afterwards we swang.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
March 1, 1973
dc19.27
“One Man”
First Line: Dull Knife,” that sound, his name, surrounded.
Accepted by: Western Humanites Review.
July 27, 1972
dc19.28
“Why I Am a Poet”
First Line: My father’s gravestone said, “I knew it was time.”.
Accepted by: Field.
September 1, 1973
dc19.29
“Fanatic”
First Line: He molded clay while he talked.
Accepted by: Bachy.
July 1, 1970
dc19.30
“Poet in a Strange Land" (epigraph)
First Line: To be present, seeing.
January 1, 1987
dc19.31
correspondence with Donnell Hunter, incl. copy of MS
37 pages
dc19.32
Copies of Barbara Stafford-Wilson’s ink drawings
3 pages

dc20: Put-together for Writing the World, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 11/Folder dc20

41 items

Assembled in 1988.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 11/Folder dc20
dc20.1
“Looking at a Pen”
First Line: By ponds in the country around home, before.
Accepted by: Ontario Review.
June 1, 1975
dc20.2
“Father, His Friend, and Another”
First Line: Father’s friend Ray at the planing mill.
Accepted by: Kenyon Review.
March 1, 1964
dc20.3
“Ardmore”
First Line: By eight it was dark, with a breeze. A dog.
Accepted by: Missouri Review.
October 1, 1980
dc20.4
“First Clarinet”
First Line: Later, too late to prevent what happened - after.
Accepted by: Poetry Miscellany.
November 28, 1983
dc20.5
“Thought Makes All Things Happen”
First Line: Thought has a sun inside it, its cause.
Accepted by: Phoebe.
July 1, 1980
dc20.6
“Last Love Song”
First Line: Some of us were laughing.
Accepted by: John Berryman Studies.
November 1, 1974
dc20.7
“Map of Your Hand”
First Line: You look at the map of your hand, a province.
Accepted by: Ironwood.
September 1, 1976
dc20.8
“At the Desk in the Morning”
First Line: Voices, while the hand writes, follow it.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
August 1, 1967
dc20.9
“Some Things in My Fantasy Life”
First Line: There is the broken phone.
Accepted by: Raccoon.
March 1, 1978
dc20.10
“Words, Books, Stories”
First Line: Hagar” was one. The world.
Accepted by: Pax.
August 7, 1982
dc20.11
“Writing the World”
First Line: In the stillness around me that no one can cross.
Accepted by: New Republic.
July 1, 1975
dc20.12
“Minimum Carol”
First Line: When Earth was a lonely place.
Accepted by: Three Sisters.
August 1, 1971
dc20.13
“For My Young Friends Who Are Afraid”
First Line: There is a country to cross you will.
Accepted by: Rapport.
July 1, 1975
dc20.14
“Here Is...”
First Line: Dawning toward each other, two.
Accepted by: World Order.
July 1, 1973
dc20.15
Letter to Robert Bradley
June 17, 1988
dc20.16
Title page and contents page
2 items
June 17, 1988
dc20.17
“At the Desk in the Morning”
First Line: Voices, while the hand writesm follow it.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
undated
dc20.18
“Song of Widows and Orphans”
First Line: Lincoln said, “Open hand”.
Accepted by: New Letters.
undated
dc20.19
“Action”
First Line: The bolo’s a knife you grab at the awkward end.
Accepted by: New Mexico Quarterly.
undated
dc20.20
“World When My Father Was Young”
First Line: In his separate hat moving through.
Accepted by: Midwest Quarterly.
undated
dc20.21
“Map of Your Hand”
First Line: You look at the map of your hand, a province.
Accepted by: Ironwood.
undated
dc20.22
“By the Rules”
First Line: The still game, after the breathing.
Accepted by: Barataria.
undated
dc20.23
“Yeah, they hurt”
First Line: Sometimes the ends of my fingers.
Accepted by: Aim.
undated
dc20.24
“Looking at a Pen”
First Line: By ponds in the country round home, before.
Accepted by: Ontario Review.
undated
dc20.25
“Last Love Song”
First Line: Some of us were laughing.
Accepted by: John Berryman Studies.
undated
dc20.26
“Hostler’s Son at School”
First Line: There was a candle that made the cave.
Accepted by: Andover Review.
undated
dc20.27
“Here Is...”
First Line: Dawning toward each other, two.
Accepted by: World Order.
undated
dc20.28
“Writing the World”
First Line: In the stillness around me that no one can cross.
Accepted by: New Review.
undated
dc20.29
“Minimum Carol”
First Line: When Earth was a lonly place.
Accepted by: Three Sisters.
undated
dc20.30
letter from Robert Bradley
June 28, 1988
dc20.31
letter from Robert Bradley
July 25, 1988
dc20.32
Letter to Robert Bradley
August 2, 1988
dc20.33
“Words, Books, Stories”
First Line: Hagar” was one. The world.
Accepted by: Pax.
undated
dc20.34
“Listening Around”
First Line: Any breeze to Willow.
Accepted by: .
January 1, 1981
dc20.35
“First Clarinet”
First Line: Later, too late to prevent what happened - after.
Accepted by: Poetry Miscellany.
undated
dc20.36
“Thought Makes All Things Happen”
First Line: Thought has a sun inside it, its cause.
Accepted by: Phoebe.
undated
dc20.37
“Ardmore”
First Line: By eight it was dark, with a breeze. A dog.
Accepted by: Missouri Review.
undated
dc20.38
“Some Things in My Fantasy Life”
First Line: Here is the broken phone.
Accepted by: Raccoon.
undated
dc20.39
“Last Service”
First Line: Good morning, Mr.Custer. May I.
Accepted by: Michigan Quarterly Review.
undated
dc20.40
letter from Robert Bradley
August 13, 1988
dc20.41
Letter to Robert Bradley
September 3, 1988

dc21: Put-together for Annie-Over, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 11/Folder dc21

8 items

Assembled in 1988.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 11/Folder dc21
dc21.1
“At This Place”
First Line: It happens that night falls. It happens.
July 12, 1984
dc21.2
“At Fort Worden: Calling Names" (9 drafts)
First Line: Lingering through Hood Canal these tranquil.
July 14, 1984
dc21.3
“At Fort Worden: Calling Names”
First Line: This gun emplacement where we live aims.
July 14, 1984
dc21.4
“Station on the Way”
First Line: Scribbled in dust, faInt under grass.
July 16, 1984
dc21.5
“How They Hold Their Heads”
First Line: Bob was the best, I remember. Somehow.
July 18, 1984
dc21.6
“In the Cemetery beyond Eisenhower Avenue”
First Line: For some it is different, their tears and anger.
July 20, 1984
dc21.7
correspondence with Marvin Bell and Donnell Hunter
incl. drafts of poems, 37 pages
dc21.8
“Afterword”
First Line: Drifting Decisively.
January 12, 1986

dc33: Put-together for unpublished book, Sometimes I Breathe, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 11/Folder dc33

63 items

Assembled in 1992. Many of the poems were published posthumously in The Way It Is.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 11/Folder dc33
dc33.1
cover
dc33.2
cover sheet
July 1, 1992
dc33.3
“Part 1: Straight Talk”
Section title.
dc33.4
“Sky”
First Line: I like it with nothing. Is it.
Accepted by: Virginia Quarterly Review.
March 1, 1991
dc33.5
“One Night”
First Line: A voice within my shadow wakened me.
Accepted by: Canto.
February 1, 1979
dc33.6
“Specimen”
First Line: It is 4 a.m. - perfectly quiet. Then the radio.
Accepted by: Independent.
dc33.7
“Ceremony at the Coast”
First Line: Looking at a beach town in the late sun, I.
Accepted by: Westigan Review.
September 1, 1979
dc33.8
“Third Street”
First Line: They are watching me die. Six years old.
Accepted by: Poetry.
dc33.9
“Selina”
First Line: In a tiny pearl resting on velvet.
Accepted by: Oregonian.
December 4, 1990
dc33.10
“What They Taught Me in Soledad”
First Line: You have to take what the court says.
Accepted by: Nation.
April 24, 1990
dc33.11
“Gaea" (2 versions)
First Line: Often, while the barn braces itself.
Accepted by: Christian Science Monitor.
March 1, 1991
dc33.12
“Waiting for It”
First Line: The way sunset leaned through town.
Accepted by: Goshen College.
May 29, 1989
dc33.13
“On Standby”
First Line: I caught my step this year, opened.
Accepted by: Light.
dc33.14
“Something That Happens Right Now”
First Line: I haven’t told this before....
Accepted by: Left Bank.
May 1, 1992
dc33.15
“Clash”
First Line: The butcher knife was there.
Accepted by: Fair.
June 1, 1956
dc33.16
“How It Goes”
First Line: It happens behind my eyes, this kingdom.
Accepted by: Chariton Review.
dc33.17
“Not in the Headlines”
First Line: It’s not the kind of thing that ought to happen; so.
Accepted by: New Myths.
June 1, 1989
dc33.18
“Part 2: It’s a Cold World, But...”
Section title.
dc33.19
“Tragedy”
First Line: It happens. You knew it could.
Accepted by: American Scholar.
June 5, 1990
dc33.20
“Meeting an Old Friend in the Supermarket”
First Line: When you’re old you dance different; and after.
Accepted by: Virginia Quarterly Review.
January 16, 1991
dc33.21
“It Gets Deep”
First Line: A big ship goes down. There on the bottom.
Accepted by: Southern California Anthology.
dc33.22
“Why We Willows Bend”
First Line: Pretty soon, after the moon, a million frogs.
Accepted by: Windfall.
October 17, 1989
dc33.23
“Right to Die”
First Line: God takes care of it for.
Accepted by: Michigan Quarterly Review.
July 15, 1990
dc33.24
“When We Looked Back”
First Line: The most present of all the watchers where we camped.
Accepted by: New Yorker.
dc33.25
“Toward the End”
First Line: They will give you a paperweight.
Accepted by: Nimrod.
July 16, 1990
dc33.26
“Whispered in Winter”
First Line: Snow falls. The fields begin again.
Accepted by: New Myths.
June 1, 1990
dc33.27
“At the Edge”
First Line: A thought so fine may be.
Accepted by: Painted Hills Review.
June 1, 1986
dc33.28
“Family Album”
First Line: Mostly it worked, the forsaking farm.
Accepted by: Practices of the Wind.
September 1, 1987
dc33.29
“Consolation”
First Line: In this dream it isn’t going to get.
Accepted by: American Literary Review.
November 18, 1991
dc33.30
“In Any Country”
First Line: Someone swims near in this restless water.
Accepted by: Tar River Poetry.
May 1, 1987
dc33.31
“Oldtimers”
First Line: Sometimes, in form of a dog, you see.
Accepted by: Light.
February 1, 1992
dc33.32
“Slide Show”
First Line: Choose a day. Bring it up in the big lens.
Accepted by: Chariton Review.
February 8, 1990
dc33.33
“Walking in the Morning”
First Line: We walk on the secret earth. Our look.
Accepted by: Cream City Review.
February 1, 1986
dc33.34
“RSVP”
First Line: Ice melts in your glass; then.
Accepted by: Onthebus.
November 1, 1991
dc33.35
“Old Glory”
First Line: No flag touched ours this year.
Accepted by: Windfall and After the Storm.
August 5, 1991
dc33.36
“Part 3: Quirks”
section title.
dc33.37
“Explaining the Big One”
First Line: Remember that leader with the funny mustache?.
Accepted by: Chadakoin Review.
November 1, 1989
dc33.38
“Way I Do It”
First Line: To think, I hold my head and roll it.
Accepted by: Light.
March 3, 1992
dc33.39
“Annals of tai chi: Push Hands”
First Line: In this long routine “Push Hands”.
Accepted by: Poetry.
August 23, 1991
dc33.40
“Sure You Do”
First Line: Remember the person you thought you were? That summer.
Accepted by: Motes.
July 18, 1991
dc33.41
“Sympathy”
First Line: Nobody could sing like Robin.
Accepted by: Light.
dc33.42
“Magic Mountain”
First Line: A book opens. People come out, bend.
Accepted by: Poetry.
December 20, 1991
dc33.43
“Getting Going”
First Line: My hand slides hangers around looking for.
Accepted by: Light.
March 1, 1992
dc33.44
“Living Statues”
First Line: By the rules you stop in that pose.
Accepted by: Virginia Quarterly Review.
August 31, 1991
dc33.45
“Worldly Considerations”
First Line: One worm said to another worm, “What kind.
Accepted by: Light.
January 22, 1992
dc33.46
“What You Need”
First Line: You need some sky, some trees, a.
Accepted by: Light.
July 1, 1980
dc33.47
“Real Myths”
First Line: Bears walk a myth, like us. Bears.
Accepted by: Licking River Review.
dc33.48
“Collage”
First Line: Big purple sky, tree cut out.
Accepted by: Hunkering (Walter Hamady).
November 15, 1990
dc33.49
“Put These in Your Pipe”
First Line: In a crash my head hit the pavement.
Accepted by: Light.
March 18, 1992
dc33.50
“From Tombstones Back Home”
First Line: God said come in. I came.
Accepted by: Light.
March 1, 1992
dc33.51
“On the Bookrack at Corner Drugs”
First Line: Second Chance at Love leans toward.
Accepted by: Field.
June 1, 1989
dc33.52
“Excursion”
First Line: Plunging over Niagara you hold.
Accepted by: Artful Dodge.
September 4, 1989
dc33.53
“Part 4: Left for the Back Pages”
section title.
dc33.54
“Left for the Back Pages”
First Line: Here in the back pages hide the little.
Accepted by: Field.
April 1, 1992
dc33.55
“Reminders”
First Line: Before dawn, across thew whole road.
Accepted by: Christian Science Monitor.
August 29, 1990
dc33.56
“Choosing a Dog”
First Line: It’s love,” they say. You touch.
Accepted by: Tar River Poetry.
June 12, 1990
dc33.57
“Owning a Pearl" (2 versions)
First Line: You lift it between thumb and finger and roll.
Accepted by: Paintbrush.
November 27, 1988
dc33.58
“On the Quiet”
First Line: The way mushrooms arrive, it is dark.
Accepted by: Field.
February 1, 1988
dc33.59
“Checking Out”
First Line: You can walk up the drive and .
Accepted by: Onthebus.
March 2, 1984
dc33.60
“Authority of the Text”
First Line: Sometimes after it’s over.
Accepted by: Rhetoric Review.
August 5, 1990
dc33.61
“Identities”
First Line: If a life could own another life.
Accepted by: Sequoia.
August 8, 1989
dc33.62
“Assuming Control”
First Line: Sometimes I breathe and.
Accepted by: Orbis.
July 1, 1991
dc33.63
“Where Did These Poems Come From?”
First Line: Many writers, I think, try to write.
February 20, 1992

dc23: Put-together for A Scripture of Leaves, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 12/Folder dc23

65 items

Assembled in 1989.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 12/Folder dc23
dc23.1
“Part1: Listening" [Beginning]
Section title.
April 1, 1989
dc23.2
“A Ritual to Read to Each Other”
locating note for poem.
September 21, 1987
dc23.2
“To You Around Me”
First Line: The ways I follow go down by the river.
Accepted by: Nightsun.
July 1, 1982
dc23.3
“Offering”
First Line: Had you noticed - a shadow.
dc23.4
“Hearing the Tide”
First Line: Many tomorrows ago, when the world.
Accepted by: Oregonian.
May 1, 1985
dc23.5
“I Have a Witness”
First Line: Among the stars one light shone below.
Accepted by: Calapooya Collage.
November 1, 1986
dc23.6
“Invocation”
First Line: Where the birds are singing, for an hour.
Accepted by: Calapooya Collage.
March 1, 1986
dc23.7
“Preservation”
First Line: In that new country mountains won’t have a name.
Accepted by: Three Rivers.
November 1, 1986
dc23.8
“Assay”
First Line: They found the big mine of honesty.
dc23.9
“Bowing”
First Line: Before our time, before years that said no.
Accepted by: Caliban.
May 1, 1986
dc23.10
“Time Let Me Learn”
First Line: On Sunday no storms came. Bees.
Accepted by: Balcones.
December 1, 1986
dc23.11
“Part 2: [Back Then]”
Section title.
dc23.12
“Six Years Old”
First Line: One time I am making shadows.
Accepted by: Tower.
August 1, 1978
dc23.13
“Out Camping”
First Line: Today comes walking over the water.
Accepted by: Rainbow.
January 1, 1978
dc23.14
“Lessons in the World”
First Line: At the school where spiders learn.
Accepted by: Rolling Stone.
May 1, 1978
dc23.15
“Lessons at Grandpa’s Knee”
First Line: Children, around us the Twentieth Century is happening.
Accepted by: Five AM.
December 1, 1986
dc23.16
“Incident”
First Line: One summer evening in the world, the air.
Accepted by: Christian Science Monitor.
February 1, 1982
dc23.17
“For Someone Who Said Boo to Me”
First Line: Now the good times come:if you can get scared enough.
Accepted by: Chariton Review.
October 29, 1981
dc23.18
“Coming Back”
First Line: Near your face a breath, your dog: “It’s day.”.
Accepted by: Poetry.
August 23, 1986
dc23.19
“Being Sorry”
First Line: When I was a kid I wanted to drop.
Accepted by: Greenfield Review.
July 1, 1977
dc23.20
“Today”
First Line: The ordinary miracles begin. Somewhere.
dc23.21
“Distant Friend”
First Line: We never visit now, or call or write. Neither.
Accepted by: Kentucky Poetry Review.
January 19, 1982
dc23.22
“Weekly Schedule”
First Line: Monday - Liberties Day.
Accepted by: Oregon English.
December 1, 1978
dc23.23
“Part 3: [Family]”
Section title.
dc23.24
“Listening”
note on poem.
dc23.25
“In the Old House”
First Line: Inside our Victrola a tin voice, faint.
Accepted by: Cottonwood.
August 1, 1980
dc23.26
“Gleam”
First Line: At work in the garden my mother and I.
Accepted by: Panoply.
March 10, 1988
dc23.27
“Birthright" (3 drafts)
First Line: No other heart has found the beat of mine.
Accepted by: Plainsong.
September 1, 1975
dc23.28
“Aunt Mabel”
note on poem.
dc23.29
“Way It Was Then”
First Line: Aunt Mabel used to say.
Accepted by: Late Harvest.
August 9, 1956
dc23.30
“At Summer Camp”
First Line: Someone is leaving - tears.
Accepted by: Quartz Mountain.
June 1, 1978
dc23.31
“Certain Bend”
First Line: A certain bend in the road, swayed willows.
Accepted by: Missouri Review.
July 25, 1977
dc23.32
“Part 4: [Church-Going]”
Section title.
dc23.33
“Conviction”
First Line: It is not by light, the way we find.
Accepted by: Religion & Intellectual Life.
June 25, 1987
dc23.34
“Saying a Big Word”
First Line: If I said “religion” or “music” you might believe.
Accepted by: Jeopardy.
November 1, 1977
dc23.35
“Sometimes”
First Line: It could be you move through a crowd and your arm.
Accepted by: Memphis State Review.
December 1, 1985
dc23.36
“Why It Is Dark in Church”
First Line: Every spring a call from the woods.
Accepted by: Christian Science Monitor.
January 1, 1982
dc23.37
“Long Way Short of Damascus”
First Line: Along Main Street, avoiding what trouble.
Accepted by: Other Side.
April 21, 1986
dc23.38
“Living in the Spirit”
First Line: Some of each life is lived in italics: it is.
Accepted by: Plainsong.
January 1, 1983
dc23.39
“Lighting a Candle”
First Line: A soul, my mother said, will drink.
Accepted by: Coe Review.
June 1, 1979
dc23.40
“Childish Things”
First Line: When they light the candles a little propellor.
Accepted by: World Order.
December 1, 1982
dc23.41
“Center”
First Line: Whenever you breathe God comes in.
Accepted by: Cottonwood.
October 1, 1982
dc23.42
“Waiting for Vesuvius”
First Line: Cold people, proud people.
Accepted by: Other Side.
June 1, 1987
dc23.43
“Part 5: [Social Action]”
section title.
dc23.44
“Noticing”
First Line: Often a crumb on my plate at the last.
Accepted by: Poetry.
February 20, 1985
dc23.45
“Wrong Number”
First Line: The call is for you. Someone at the end of a country.
Accepted by: Negative Capcity.
March 9, 1985
dc23.46
“On a Statue Not in the Park Blocks”
First Line: Just because it isn’t here, people.
Accepted by: Wilmington Review.
March 1, 1986
dc23.47
“Being Tough”
First Line: Just because my hand struck hard.
Accepted by: Poetry Review.
April 1, 1977
dc23.48
“Small Claims”
First Line: All over town the court of the people.
Accepted by: Allied Arts.
December 1, 1980
dc23.49
“Listening at Little Lake Elkhart”
First Line: What signal brought us, leaving our work, our homes.
Accepted by: Crab Creek Review.
June 1, 1988
dc23.50
“Living Here”
First Line: In Babylon, where I live now, revenge.
Accepted by: Field.
December 1, 1986
dc23.51
“Preserving the Present”
First Line: Carefully left as it is, our town demonstrates.
Accepted by: Cream City Review.
July 1, 1981
dc23.52
“Globescope" [For a Meeting of Concerned Citizens] (2 drafts)
First Line: Grass is our flag. It whispers “Asia.
dc23.53
“Part 6: [Ending]”
section title.
dc23.54
“Jordan Valley”
First Line: On the farm a long slow wind begins to wander.
Accepted by: Tailwind.
December 1, 1984
dc23.55
“Where Is Tomorrow?”
First Line: There is an island that no one.
Accepted by: Chaminade Literary Review.
May 19, 1988
dc23.56
“At a Small College”
First Line: Words jut forward out of the stone.
Accepted by: Laurel Review.
October 13, 1986
dc23.57
“You Can Do It”
First Line: Pick up the phone any day.
Accepted by: Cow Creek Review.
February 1, 1986
dc23.58
“West of Here”
note on poem.
dc23.59
“No One Knows What They Mean”
First Line: Every evening, dim as a low gray mist.
December 30, 1984
dc23.60
“Looking at You”
First Line: Over your shoulder I see it there.
Accepted by: Coe Review.
September 1, 1979
dc23.61
“Late, Late”
First Line: That touch when rain.
Accepted by: Crosscurrents.
January 8, 1987
dc23.62
“Centering”
First Line: There have been times hungry for the sky.
Accepted by: Agenda.
April 1, 1973
dc23.63
“Contributor’s Note”
First Line: My tribe, for better or worse, is America.
Accepted by: Quarterly West.
June 1, 1978
dc23.64
“Reading the Big Weather”
First Line: Mornings we see our breath. Weeds.
Accepted by: Washington State University magazine.
September 15, 1982
dc23.65
“Scripture of Leaves”
First Line: Correspondence with Brethren Press, including submitted texts.

dc24: Put-together for How To Hold Your Arms When It Rains, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 12/Folder dc24

23 items

Assembled in 1990.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 12/Folder dc24
dc24.1
Original title page: A Dawn That’s Forever
dc24.2
“Gift”
First Line: Time wants to show you a different country. It’s the one.
Accepted by: Ohio Review.
July 13, 1987
dc24.3
“Awareness”
First Line: Of a summer day, of what moves.
Accepted by: Ohio Review.
August 1, 1987
dc24.4
“In the Backyard”
First Line: Something beyond us bends over town.
Accepted by: Ohio Review.
July 1, 1987
dc24.5
“Forestry”
First Line: Old cedars, when the storms come.
Accepted by: Amicus.
April 1, 1986
dc24.6
“Snow on the Ground" (2 drafts)
First Line: Whispering our years for the glacier.
March 9, 1985
dc24.7
“Twelfth Birthday”
First Line: They never found what slowly descended, silently.
Accepted by: Three Rivers.
November 1, 1986
dc24.8
“One Summer”
First Line: Back then in the old days I was.
Accepted by: Plainsong.
June 1, 1986
dc24.9
“Tracks in the Sand" [Read My Lips, Forget My Name]
First Line: For anyone, I am a substitute.
Accepted by: Georgia Review.
September 22, 1985
dc24.10
“Atwater Kent”
First Line: Late nights the world flooded our dark house.
May 30, 1987
dc24.11
“Dropout”
First Line: Grundy and Hoagland and all the rest who ganged.
Accepted by: Negative Capacity.
July 1, 1981
dc24.12
“Some Remarks When Richard Hugo Came”
First Line: Some war, I bomb their towns from five.
Accepted by: Chicago Tribune.
July 18, 1972
dc24.13
“Reading the Fine Print”
First Line: Paths you follow disappear.
Accepted by: Memphis State Review.
January 1, 1986
dc24.14
“Wind from a Wing”
First Line: Something outside my window in the dark.
Accepted by: New York Quarterly.
July 1, 1986
dc24.15
“Tremolo”
First Line: The figure with your name is led nodding.
Accepted by: Ohio Review.
January 1, 1987
dc24.16
“In Hurricane Canyon”
First Line: After we talked, after the moon.
Accepted by: New Yorker.
May 1, 1968
dc24.17
“Ways to Say Wind”
First Line: Moves in the woods without.
Accepted by: American Scholar.
October 24, 1975
dc24.18
“Turning Points”
First Line: Leafing through calendar pages you read.
Accepted by: Ohio Review.
November 1, 1986
dc24.19
“Pacemaker”
First Line: Our slow breath goes out and returns.
Accepted by: .
June 1, 1987
dc24.20
“History of Our Land” [Hokkaido]
First Line: In the old times here the hills moved.
Accepted by: Alaska Fish and Game.
September 1, 1984
dc24.21
“Last Day”
First Line: Finally rain gives the blessing. It anoints.
July 1, 1987
dc24.22
“Being Sure”
First Line: On a still day the sun is mellowing westward.
Accepted by: Plainsong.
January 1, 1986
dc24.23
“You, Reader”
First Line: Any night you can lie awake and line up with the north star.
Accepted by: Yankee.
July 1, 1986

dc25: Put-together for The Long Sigh the Wind Makes, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 12/Folder dc25

40 items

Assembled in 1991.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 12/Folder dc25
dc25.1
Original title: Home State
dc25.2
Part 1: The Long Sigh the Wind Makes [So Big a Cave]”
Section title.
dc25.3
“Want List”
First Line: Bring me the Cascades. Bring that bend.
Accepted by: Calapooya Collage.
September 4, 1989
dc25.4
“Night in Oregon”
First Line: Pines embraced by scarves of snow.
Accepted by: Calapooya Collage.
January 1, 1986
dc25.5
“Old Growth”
First Line: They never found the grove. But.
Accepted by: Calapooya Collage.
August 1, 1989
dc25.6
“Everyone Out Here Knows”
First Line: Flowers jump from the tracks of Big Foot.
Accepted by: Poetry Now.
October 1, 1977
dc25.7
“Not Marble Nor the Gilded Monuments" (2 versions)
First Line: Every wave proclaims, “I’m permanent.
Accepted by: Weber Studies.
July 17, 1989
dc25.8
“Celebrating Portland”
First Line: Some evenings from clouds west of town.
Accepted by: Downtowner.
January 20, 1978
dc25.9
“Why the Sun Comes Up”
First Line: To be ready again if they find an owl.
Accepted by: Oregonian.
August 15, 1990
dc25.10
“Over the Mountains”
First Line: Maybe someone stumbles across that child.
Accepted by: Calapooya Collage.
December 1, 1989
dc25.11
“How It Was, and Is”
First Line: At Cape Disappointment the trees lean inland.
Accepted by: Folio.
March 8, 1989
dc25.12
“You Night Men”
First Line: You night men, striking your fires in the bush.
Accepted by: Fiddlehead.
October 7, 1950
dc25.13
“Places in Oregon”
First Line: Once near Clarno when winter closed in, an owl.
Accepted by: Calapooya Collage.
January 1, 1983
dc25.14
“Visit to Antelope”
First Line: Smoke is ascending straight and swirling.
Accepted by: Calapooya Collage.
December 1, 1982
dc25.15
“What Happens When You Get Lost”
First Line: Out in the mountains nobody gives you anything.
Accepted by: Calapooya Collage.
May 1, 1986
dc25.16
“Among the Junipers”
First Line: Without regard for the rest of the country, this area.
Accepted by: Calapooya Collage.
January 1, 1986
dc25.17
“Inscription in the Cave at Fort Rock”
First Line: Not because of storms, nor in any.
Accepted by: Calapooya Collage.
November 17, 1986
dc25.18
Part 2: An Inner Wilderness
Section title.
dc25.19
“Seeing an Old Snapshot”
First Line: We will be different people when.
Accepted by: Yankee.
December 1, 1981
dc25.20
“I Have a Witness”
note on poem.
March 10, 1991
dc25.21
“Considering My Face in an Alley”
First Line: Their eyes are not the same, one.
Accepted by: Calapooya Collage.
November 14, 1981
dc25.22
“That Day”
First Line: That day we decided what word to say.
Accepted by: Calapooya Collage.
June 4, 1985
dc25.23
“Centering”
First Line: This is only today. We can.
dc25.24
“Shape of an Oak”
First Line: In the open an oak makes no mistakes.
Accepted by: Calapooya Collage.
December 1, 1986
dc25.25
“Waiting at the Beach”
First Line: The sun tugs over the sky.
Accepted by: River Styx.
August 1, 1976
dc25.26
“Darker, Brighter, Farther”
First Line: When the tree grows, and the limbs.
Accepted by: Small Farm.
December 1, 1978
dc25.27
“Getting Here”
First Line: Briars caught in my coat.
Accepted by: Calapooya Collage.
December 30, 1984
dc25.28
“Near Dawn Some Time”
First Line: After I’m gone.
Accepted by: Greenfield Review.
February 9, 1978
dc25.29
“Appearances”
First Line: Never ambitious enough, we climbed only.
Accepted by: Pacific Review.
January 1, 1984
dc25.30
“This Is for Everyone”
note on poem.
dc25.30
“Secret”
First Line: Where the tongue lives, it almost.
Accepted by: Oregonian.
December 3, 1990
dc25.31
“Invocation”
note on poem.
dc25.32
“Clowns at the Fair”
First Line: They wind one up. It dances, bows.
Accepted by: Blue Buildings.
February 5, 1978
dc25.33
“Air Will Forget You”
First Line: When you come along no one is around. It is dawn.
Accepted by: Three Rivers.
October 1, 1975
dc25.34
“Surviving”
First Line: A swimmer avoids a wave.
Accepted by: Small Farm.
December 1, 1978
dc25.35
“Every Morning All Over Again”
First Line: Only the world guides me.
Accepted by: Spectrum.
January 1, 1984
dc25.36
“Whatever Comes”
First Line: In the fall, rain of the happy tears returns.
Accepted by: High Country News.
October 1, 1979
dc25.37
“Romance”
note on poem.
Accepted by: Calapooya Collage.
dc25.38
“Monument for a Wrinkle in the Pavement Near Strong Hall”
First Line: The years 1914-1986 - in case these numbers.
Accepted by: Calapooya Collage.
October 15, 1986
dc25.39
“Faux Pas”
note on poem.
Accepted by: Calapooya Collage.
dc25.40
“Questioning the Residents Who Foiled an Attempted Robbery”
First Line: Gun had no comment to make.
Accepted by: Calapooya Collage.
July 1, 1983

dc26: Put-together for Passwords, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 12/Folder dc26

81 items

Assembled in 1991.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 12/Folder dc26
dc26.1
cover
February 1, 1990
dc26.2
contents page
undated
dc26.3
“Dedications, Pledges, Commitments”
First Line: For the past.
undated
dc26.4
“Passwords: A Program of Poems" (3 drafts)
First Line: Might people stumble and wander.
Accepted by: Sea Pen Press.
October 1, 1958
dc26.5
“Part 1: Mileposts”
Section title.
undated
dc26.6
“Story Time”
First Line: Tell that one about Catherine.
Accepted by: Field.
March 8, 1989
dc26.7
“Way I Write”
First Line: In the mornings I lie partly propped up.
Accepted by: Virginia Quarterly Review.
August 1, 1989
dc26.8
“Reading with Little Sister: a Recollection”
First Line: The stars have died overhead in their great cold.
Accepted by: Mss..
January 1, 1987
dc26.9
“Birthdays”
First Line: A birthday is when you might not have been born.
Accepted by: Crosscurrents.
December 1, 1986
dc26.10
“Day Millicent Found the World”
First Line: Every morning Millicent ventured farther.
Accepted by: Poetry.
September 1, 1986
dc26.11
“Some Things the World Gave”
First Line: Times in the morning early.
Accepted by: Iowa Review.
October 4, 1985
dc26.12
“Local Events”
First Line: A mouth said a bad word. A foot.
Accepted by: Caliban.
May 27, 1985
dc26.13
“News Every Day”
First Line: Birds don’t say it just once. If they like it.
Accepted by: Andover Review.
July 1, 1986
dc26.14
“Faux Pas”
First Line: Waiting seems to be best. Your remark might.
Accepted by: Calapooya Collage.
July 1, 1984
dc26.15
“Afternoon in the Stacks”
First Line: Closing the book, I find I have left my head.
Accepted by: Fort Valley Journal.
May 1, 1987
dc26.16
“Origin of Country”
First Line: A child came out on to the porch. It was.
Accepted by: Wooster Review.
January 1, 1987
dc26.17
“Paso por Aqui”
First Line: Comanches tell how the buffalo.
Accepted by: Sidewinder.
July 1, 1986
dc26.18
“Old Blue”
First Line: Some day I’ll crank up that Corvette, let it.
Accepted by: Spectrum.
June 1, 1984
dc26.19
“Overheard Through an Airduct in the Reference Library”
First Line: These cards I sort, I sort by color.
Accepted by: Innisfree.
June 1, 1979
dc26.20
“Archival Print”
First Line: God snaps your picture - don’t look away.
Accepted by: Field.
May 4, 1988
dc26.21
“Part 2: The Big Room Where the Plain World Lives”
section title.
undated
dc26.22
“At the Aesthetics Meeting”
First Line: We invented shape after shape.
Accepted by: Western Humanities Review.
January 21, 1962
dc26.23
“Trouble with Reading”
First Line: When a goat likes a book, the whole book is gone.
Accepted by: Field.
March 1, 1987
dc26.24
“Romance”
First Line: A woman down our street went away and became.
Accepted by: Calapooya Collage.
November 16, 1986
dc26.25
“Dream of Now”
First Line: When you wake to the dream of now.
Accepted by: Milkweed Chronicle.
October 1, 1977
dc26.26
“Atavism”
First Line: Sometimes in the open you look up.
Accepted by: Long Pond Review.
June 1, 1981
dc26.27
“Trying to Tell It”
First Line: The old have a secret.
Accepted by: Willamette Journal.
January 1, 1988
dc26.28
“Daydreams”
First Line: In my dream of the city, I stride with commuters. We carry.
Accepted by: Poetry Kanto.
June 1, 1979
dc26.29
“Daydreams" (1st version)
First Line: In my dream of the city, I stride with commuters. We carry.
Accepted by: Poetry Kanto.
June 1, 1979
dc26.30
“Summer We Didn’t Die”
First Line: That year, that summer, that vacation.
Accepted by: Negative Capacity.
July 1, 1985
dc26.31
“Remarks on My Character”
First Line: Waving a flag I retreat a long way beyond.
Accepted by: Georgia Review.
September 27, 1988
dc26.32
“You Don’t Know the End”
First Line: Even as you are dying a part of the world.
Accepted by: Chariton Review.
December 9, 1981
dc26.33
“Different Things”
First Line: Steel hardly knows what a hint is, but for thistledown.
Accepted by: Clockwatch Review.
January 1, 1986
dc26.34
“My Name Is Tillie Olsen”
First Line: I live by the washing machine. My husband comes home.
Accepted by: Occident.
November 18, 1985
dc26.35
“Key to an Old Farmhouse”
First Line: One of the raindrops going by.
Accepted by: Small Farm.
January 1, 1978
dc26.36
“Waiting for God”
First Line: This morning I breathed in. It had rained.
Accepted by: Artful Dodge.
August 24, 1988
dc26.37
“Part 3: Compartments of Truth”
Section title.
undated
dc26.38
“Light by the Barn”
First Line: The light by the barn that shines all night.
Accepted by: Farmer’s Market.
May 1, 1985
dc26.39
“Five A.M.”
First Line: Still dark, the early morning breathes.
Accepted by: America.
December 30, 1984
dc26.40
“Cover Up”
First Line: One thing, don’t worry about the mountains.
Accepted by: Artful Dodge.
October 26, 1989
dc26.41
“Climbing Along the River" [cf. Walking the West]
First Line: Willows never forget how it feels.
Accepted by: Limberlost.
May 1, 1987
dc26.42
“Ground Zero”
First Line: While we slept.
Accepted by: Field.
June 1, 1982
dc26.43
“Gospel Is Whatever Happens”
First Line: When we say “Breath”.
Accepted by: Stony Lonesome.
August 27, 1972
dc26.44
“Eloquent Box”
First Line: Here is the compartment of truth.
Accepted by: Small Farm.
April 1, 1979
dc26.45
“Toward the Space Age”
First Line: We must begin to catch hold of everything.
Accepted by: Voyageur.
January 1, 1965
dc26.46
“Network”
First Line: It shakes whenever you try - the tree by the door.
Accepted by: Tendril.
May 19, 1982
dc26.47
“Neighbors”
First Line: These mountains do their own announcements.
Accepted by: Bristlecone.
July 24, 1987
dc26.48
“Late, Passing Prairie Farm”
First Line: All night like a star a single bulb.
Accepted by: Plainsong.
September 1, 1975
dc26.49
“Signs at Our Place”
First Line: One chair has this desk across the arm.
Accepted by: Yankee.
March 1, 1978
dc26.50
“Report from K9 Operator Rover on the Motel at Grand Island”
First Line: Four summers ago tar covered a road.
Accepted by: Green Mountains Review.
November 5, 1985
dc26.51
“Winnemucca, She”
First Line: Lived here when eagles owned Stony Mountain.
Accepted by: New Letters.
March 12, 1989
dc26.52
“Cocktail Party Talk”
First Line: Italic talk. Plain round hand talk.
Accepted by: Jeopardy.
November 1, 1977
dc26.53
“Poets to Consider for Next Season’s Series”
First Line: Creighton L. Herksheimer the Princeton .
Accepted by: Occident.
November 21, 1985
dc26.54
“Part 4: Elegies”
Section title.
undated
dc26.55
“If Only”
First Line: If only the wind moved outside, and all else waited.
Accepted by: New Letters.
March 8, 1989
dc26.56
“For a Lost Child”
First Line: What happens is, the kind of snow that sweeps.
Accepted by: Field.
April 4, 1989
dc26.57
“Going On”
First Line: On the hollow night a small hand.
Accepted by: Nation.
June 1, 1989
dc26.58
“Consolations”
First Line: The broken part mends even stronger than the rest.
Accepted by: Virginia Quarterly Review.
May 1, 1989
dc26.59
“What She Left”
First Line: The dress with flowers on it and.
Accepted by: Cornell Review.
September 1, 1976
dc26.60
“Four A.M.”
First Line: Night wears out. Stars that were high go down.
Accepted by: Agni.
April 21, 1986
dc26.61
“Security”
First Line: Tomorrow will have an island. Before night.
Accepted by: Hawaii Review.
March 1, 1988
dc26.62
“Rescue”
First Line: A fire was burning. In another room.
Accepted by: Small Farm.
October 18, 1977
dc26.63
“Long Distance”
First Line: We didn’t know at the time. It was.
Accepted by: Poetry Northwest.
March 1, 1982
dc26.64
“Disposal”
First Line: Paste her picture back of the mirror.
Accepted by: Literary Olympians II and Crosscurrents.
January 1, 1987
dc26.65
“Your Life”
First Line: You will walk toward the mirror.
Accepted by: Poetry.
November 7, 1986
dc26.66
“Yes”
First Line: It could happen any time, tornado.
Accepted by: Sequoia.
April 4, 1989
dc26.67
“Listening Around”
First Line: Any breeze to willow.
January 1, 1981
dc26.68
“Part 5: Vita”
section title.
undated
dc26.69
“What’s in My Journal”
First Line: Odd things, like a button drawer. Mean.
Accepted by: Field.
April 4, 1989
dc26.70
“Evolution”
First Line: The thing is, I’m still.
Accepted by: Field.
December 1, 1987
dc26.71
“Merci Beaucoup”
First Line: It would help if no one ever mentioned.
Accepted by: Williwaw.
May 1, 1987
dc26.72
“Young”
First Line: Before time had a name, when win.
Accepted by: Panoply.
April 27, 1988
dc26.73
“It’s All Right”
First Line: Someone you trusted has treated you bad.
Accepted by: Cutbank.
September 26, 1988
dc26.74
“Life Work”
First Line: Even now in my hands the feel of the shovel comes back.
Accepted by: Wooster Review.
February 1, 1986
dc26.75
“In Camp”
First Line: That winter of the war, every day.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
January 1, 1973
dc26.76
“How These Words Happened”
First Line: In winter, in the dark hours, when others.
Accepted by: 5:00 AM.
January 1, 1987
dc26.77
“Some Words in Place of a Wailing Wall”
First Line: Saplings by the river here to grow.
Accepted by: The And Review.
October 22, 1987
dc26.78
“Something to Declare”
First Line: They have never had a war big enough.
Accepted by: Antaeus.
March 1, 1988
dc26.79
“Size of a Fist”
First Line: This engine started years ago - many .
Accepted by: New Letters.
March 8, 1989
dc26.80
“Bonuses”
First Line: Any island, or a break in the weather.
Accepted by: Cimarron Review.
March 28, 1988
dc26.81
“Vita”
First Line: God guided my hand.
Accepted by: Agni Review.
July 1, 1989

dc27: Put-together for History Is Loose Again, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 12/Folder dc27

49 items

Assembled in 1991.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 12/Folder dc27
dc27.1
cover
March 11, 1991
dc27.2
“Part 1: Learning About the Ground”
Section title.
undated
dc27.3
“How You Know”
First Line: Everyone first hears the news as a child.
Accepted by: Alembic.
November 14, 1989
dc27.4
“Listening to the Tide”
First Line: Tomorrows ago the world spun.
Accepted by: Oregonian.
February 1, 1985
dc27.5
“Good Thought”
First Line: Bent over a ship in a bottle, on an island.
Accepted by: New Letters.
February 23, 1982
dc27.6
“In the Library”
First Line: You are reading a book, and think you know.
Accepted by: Oregon English.
October 1, 1984
dc27.7
“Note Slid Under the Door”
First Line: Some people don’t know this:.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
October 27, 1983
dc27.8
“La Boheme”
First Line: The music said sorrow. It said Mimi was dead.
Accepted by: Brown.
February 2, 1984
dc27.9
“Even in the Desert”
First Line: You know how willow is. Well, there was.
Accepted by: Western Humanities Review.
December 15, 1981
dc27.10
“Bent-Over Ones”
First Line: Some trees look down when.
Accepted by: Spectrum.
July 1, 1984
dc27.11
“Bristlecone”
First Line: A sky so blue it hurts frames.
Accepted by: Calliopea.
October 1, 1982
dc27.12
“Way Trees Began”
First Line: Before the tress came, when only grass.
Accepted by: Southern Review.
March 1, 1984
dc27.13
“Watching Sandhill Cranes”
First Line: Spirits among us have departed - friends.
Accepted by: Petroglyph.
June 1, 1987
dc27.14
“Weeds in a Vacant Lot”
First Line: We know that it’s our fault, these effluent suburbs.
Accepted by: Tampa Bay Review.
April 21, 1988
dc27.15
“By the Chapel”
First Line: We stood around for awhile and John said.
Accepted by: Painted Bride.
March 8, 1989
dc27.16
“Presence”
First Line: A dawns inside my shadow.
Accepted by: Poetry Kanto.
September 1, 1982
dc27.17
“January’s Child”
First Line: My life arrived in winter, wrapped.
Accepted by: Kentucky Poetry Review.
July 18, 1983
dc27.18
“Freedom of Expression”
First Line: My feet wait there listening, and when.
Accepted by: Southern Florida Poetry Review.
August 1, 1989
dc27.19
“Coming to Know”
First Line: A balloon ascends on that path it finds in the air.
Accepted by: New York Quarterly.
March 1, 1984
dc27.20
“Someone You Don’t Know”
First Line: Walking into a hall, not pressing, never.
Accepted by: Clockwatch Review.
December 1, 1981
dc27.21
“Getting Acquainted with Someone You Don’t Know (prose commentary)”
First Line: This poem is one of the....
undated
dc27.22
“It Returns at Times”
First Line: Where is that grief I had, the one.
Accepted by: Willamette Journal.
July 1, 1988
dc27.23
“Twelve”
First Line: Early leaves are tender. They shiver.
June 4, 1985
dc27.24
“Cottonwood”
First Line: By June or July the river flows lazily.
Accepted by: New Letters.
March 8, 1989
dc27.25
“Looking Out in the Morning: Carson City”
First Line: In Nevada we ordinary people carry our money.
Accepted by: Ellipsis.
July 28, 1989
dc27.26
“Time Goes By”
First Line: On a corner you meet a face. It follows you.
Accepted by: Writer's Forum.
September 18, 1983
dc27.27
“How It Can Be”
First Line: People can drift farther apart. They can.
Accepted by: Quarterly West.
October 1, 1984
dc27.28
“Bad Dreams”
First Line: You are wounded, but at first you think.
Accepted by: Hampden-Sydney Poetry Review.
March 1, 1978
dc27.29
“Influential Writers”
First Line: Some of them write too loud.
Accepted by: Willow Springs.
June 28, 1990
dc27.30
“For the Chair of Any Committee I’m On”
First Line: If you value my opinion, please be.
Accepted by: Western Humanities Review.
October 8, 1981
dc27.31
“Child of Luck”
First Line: Once I feel bad, it takes chocolate.
Accepted by: Formalist.
November 1, 1990
dc27.32
“Browser”
First Line: Is there another book that was.
Accepted by: Southwest Review.
October 1, 1984
dc27.33
Left out of History is Loose Again - leftover from MNWT
Cover page.
March 11, 1991
dc27.34
“My Name Is William Tell - Poems from the Tradition of Experiment”
First Line: My name is William Tell.
Accepted by: Ontario Review.
September 1, 1982
dc27.35
“Later”
First Line: It will get cold.
Accepted by: Alembic.
January 8, 1987
dc27.36
“For Miss Frazier in Ninth Grade Art”
First Line: Look - between flurries of rain, mountains.
Accepted by: Prairie Wind.
April 1, 1987
dc27.37
“Living in the West”
First Line: At Biggs Junction in Jack’s Fine Foods.
Accepted by: Fine Madness.
July 1, 1989
dc27.38
“In Memoriam”
First Line: That shriek when a train passes.
Accepted by: Soundings.
April 5, 1990
dc27.39
“Four A.M. on Crusader”
First Line: It’s that first long swell of the tide rocks.
Accepted by: Agni Review.
June 1, 1989
dc27.40
“Growing Up in Kansas”
First Line: It was the smell stopped me.
Accepted by: Review La Booche.
October 13, 1989
dc27.41
“Libretto”
First Line: Now comes the bad part, where she hears.
Accepted by: Oxford Magazine.
May 16, 1984
dc27.42
“Poet in a Strange Land”
First Line: To be present, seeing.
Accepted by: Scarab.
July 8, 1982
dc27.43
“Saying It”
First Line: You don’t have to try, for the truth.
Accepted by: Carolina Quarterly.
June 10, 1982
dc27.44
“Deserters”
First Line: At first the old people hesitate - time.
Accepted by: Negative Capacity.
April 23, 1984
dc27.45
“Looking Back on the Weaving Room”
First Line: It will be the days and the sound of the sewing.
Accepted by: New Letters.
August 1, 1982
dc27.46
“Late Call”
First Line: When Jeanie called me, my life was easy.
Accepted by: Pteranodon.
January 1, 1983
dc27.47
“Sentences”
First Line: Whatever is closing toward us begins to spell.
Accepted by: Bluefish.
March 6, 1983
dc27.48
“Panel at AWP”
First Line: Someone named Canal talked about a bear.
Accepted by: Plainsong.
February 1, 1983
dc27.49
“This Is for Everyone”
First Line: Avalanche.
July 1, 1988

dc28: Put-together for Holding Onto the Grass, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 13/Folder dc28

29 items

Assembled in 1992.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 13/Folder dc28
dc28.1
“When It Comes”
First Line: Any time. Now. The next minute.
Accepted by: Southern California Anthology.
July 1, 1991
dc28.2
Title page
undated
dc28.3
“Some Questions to Ask During [an Interview] Your Reading”
Dedication.
undated
dc28.4
“Part 1: Grace Abounding”
Section title.
undated
dc28.5
“That Day”
First Line: Have the phone ready.
Accepted by: Licking River Review.
December 1, 1989
dc28.6
“Report to Someone”
First Line: We think we’re all there is, then the big light.
Accepted by: Willamette Journal.
July 16, 1989
dc28.7
“Leaving Home”
First Line: What you leave is the front porch in the evening.
Accepted by: Left Bank.
March 2, 1992
dc28.8
“For Robert I. Stafford”
First Line: Caterpillars measure you, our mother.
Accepted by: Chicago Review.
December 1, 1974
dc28.9
“One of the Stories”
First Line: A square of color on Rayl’s Hill.
Accepted by: .
October 1, 1973
dc28.10
“Grace Abounding”
First Line: Air crowds into my cell so considerately.
Accepted by: Chariton Review.
August 6, 1991
dc28.11
“Part 2: Pretend You Live In a Room”
Section title.
undated
dc28.12
“After a Sleazy Show”
First Line: No warning was posted there in the theater.
Accepted by: Pointed Circle.
July 12, 1987
dc28.13
“My NEA Poem”
First Line: A blank place on the page.
Accepted by: Red Dirt.
July 28, 1990
dc28.14
“You Forget”
First Line: Often in high school some quick sun-arrow.
Accepted by: University of Tampa.
April 8, 1989
dc28.15
“Learning to Adjust”
First Line: At the store they gave me the wrong.
Accepted by: Nimrod.
August 12, 1990
dc28.16
“Men”
First Line: After a war come the memorials.
Accepted by: Chariton Review.
April 9, 1990
dc28.17
“Distractions" (two drafts)
First Line: Think about Gypsies.
Accepted by: Practices of the Wind.
October 1, 1980
dc28.18
“Pretend You Live in a Room”
First Line: Play like you had a war. Hardly anyone.
Accepted by: Inroads.
April 30, 1991
dc28.19
“Part 3: From the Ink on This Page”
Section title.
undated
dc28.20
“From the Ink on This Page”
First Line: An old barn could hold out its dreams. Day.
Accepted by: Oregonian.
December 22, 1990
dc28.21
“Getting Here”
First Line: Utah restores your soul,” Window.
Accepted by: Calapooya Collage.
October 21, 1989
dc28.22
“Up a Side Canyon”
First Line: They have trained the water to talk, and it prattles.
Accepted by: Nighthawk.
August 1, 1991
dc28.23
“East of Broken Top”
First Line: Sunset reaches out, earth rolls free.
Accepted by: Northwoods.
July 1, 1988
dc28.24
“In the All-Verbs Navaho World”
First Line: Left-alone grow things wait, rustle-grass, click-.
Accepted by: Rhetoric Review.
February 26, 1990
dc28.25
“Malheur Before Dawn”
First Line: An owl sound wandered along the road with me.
Accepted by: Calapooya Collage.
March 1, 1992
dc28.26
“For Our Party Last Night”
First Line: It was necessary at the time that the sun.
Accepted by: Nimrod.
July 30, 1990
dc28.27
“Sound by the River”
First Line: A bird with a little brown vest.
Accepted by: Fireweed.
August 20, 1990
dc28.28
“Some Names”
First Line: Some only whispers, they have faded.
Accepted by: Plum Review.
April 1, 1992
dc28.29
“Survival Course”
First Line: This is the grip, like this.
Accepted by: Sow’s Ear.
August 1, 1990

dc29: Put-together for Seeking the Way, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 13/Folder dc29

10 items

Assembled in 1992.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 13/Folder dc29
dc29.1
“Why I Keep a Journal" (two drafts)
First Line: While I follow the wind.
Accepted by: American Scholar and Inroads.
July 1, 1974
dc29.2
“Maybe There Is”
First Line: Could there be a star so pure you would die.
Accepted by: Rook Press.
November 1, 1975
dc29.3
“One of the Exiles”
First Line: They give me their vast neglect.
Accepted by: Mikrokosmos and Inroads.
July 1, 1968
dc29.4
“Coming Home”
First Line: The engine at fifty, driving.
Accepted by: Portland Review.
October 1, 1975
dc29.5
“On a Walk One Rainy Morning”
First Line: Mushrooms announce their small religions.
Accepted by: University of Portland Review.
October 8, 1963
dc29.6
“After All These Years”
First Line: Each faint star out in the night.
Accepted by: Critical Quarterly.
April 16, 1970
dc29.7
“Any Day”
First Line: The world is on fire, slow flame.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
June 1, 1973
dc29.8
“Always With Us”
First Line: Always with us, quiet, attentive.
Accepted by: Literary Half-Yearly.
July 1, 1971
dc29.9
“On the Moon”
First Line: It is so quiet on the moon.
Accepted by: Western Humanities Review.
December 31, 1950
dc29.10
“Speaking Trance" (2 versions)
First Line: When Saint Sebastian came down this street.
Accepted by: Tennessee Poetry Journal.
May 16, 1967

dc30: Put-together for unpublished book Torque Tongue , ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 13/Folder dc30

10 items

Assembled in 1992. Includes drawings by Barbara Stafford-Wilson.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 13/Folder dc30
dc30.1
“What We Did”
First Line: We clamped the camera to a fencepost, old.
Accepted by: Tuatara.
April 1, 1968
dc30.2
“Becoming Sure”
First Line: In the cave I forgot the word: stalagmite.
Accepted by: Small Farm.
January 1, 1978
dc30.3
“Cabbage”
First Line: Green brain, great lettuce, fumbling.
Accepted by: Small Farm.
February 1, 1979
dc30.4
“What a Generator Tells a Wire”
First Line: To know life lengthwise you must accept.
Accepted by: Thistle.
February 1, 1976
dc30.5
“Butcher’s Dog" (2 versions)
First Line: Something to bark about, a tail.
Accepted by: Bestiary.
February 1, 1971
dc30.6
“In My Copy of Wordsworth”
First Line: Far on the Khyber Road beyond Peshawar.
Accepted by: Rapport.
September 1, 1972
dc30.7
“Speed-Reading the World”
First Line: Anything we forget goes over.
Accepted by: Indiana Writes.
July 1, 1974
dc30.8
“Even Then It Was Late”
First Line: In a drawer - your fingers know the place.
Accepted by: Plainsong.
October 1, 1980
dc30.9
“Learning”
First Line: A piccolo played, then a drum.
Accepted by: Berkeley Magazine.
November 1, 1977
dc30.10
“Yesterday in the East Pasture”
First Line: I lay among rocks to try being dead.
Accepted by: Small Farm.
April 1, 1977

dc30.1: Put-together for unpublished book with Gibbs Smith Publishing, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 13/Folder dc30.1

?? items

Assembled in 1992.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 13/Folder dc30.1
dc30.1.1
Publisher query
9/14/92
dc30.1.2
Stafford reply to query
9/22/92
dc30.1.3
“Stafford Handwritten note”
Gibbs Smith Project.
5/11/93
dc30.1.4
“Confronting These Pages" (1)
First Line: Sight isn't enough—don't just look.
9/22/92
dc30.1.5
“Confronting These Pages" (2)
First Line: by. It's a smart system. . ..
9/22/92
dc30.1.6
“Confronting . . .”
First Line: Wait. You've picked this up . . ..
undated
dc30.1.7
“Is This Feeling About the West Real?”
First Line: All their lives out here people know.
Published in: Even In Quiet Places and Methow River Poems.
undated
dc30.1.8
“Some Places Are Quiet" (Texts for Pictures)
First Line: You can think of how still it will be.
undated
dc30.1.9
“A Mystery" (Texts for Pictures)
First Line: What does it mean when so many trees are just.
undated
dc30.1.9
“What Gets Away”
First Line: Little things hide. Sometimes they.
Published in: Even In Quiet Places and Methow River Poems.
undated
dc30.1.10
“Junipers" (Texts for Pictures)
First Line: When we're together, when the sun's hand.
undated
dc30.1.11
“Looking at a Rock" (1)
First Line: Some people say the best rock in the world.
9/29/92
dc30.1.12
“Looking at a Rock" (2)
First Line: the terrible choking boulder that grows in.
9/29/92
dc30.1.13
“Texts for Pictures”
First Line: Some of us have chosen to live among rocks.
Published in: Even In Quiet Places and Methow River Poems.
undated
dc30.1.14
“Texts for Pictures" (rocks, continued)
First Line: Now and then one stirs when nobody.
Published in: Even In Quiet Places and Methow River Poems.
undated
dc30.1.15
“A Digression" (Texts for Pictures)
First Line: Under the earth a great river has found.
Published in: Even In Quiet Places and Methow River Poems.
undated
dc30.1.16
“The Whole Thing" (Texts for Pictures)
First Line: Does it make any difference what you see.
undated
dc30.1.17
“Wistful Places”
First Line: Certain real places want to feel loved. They.
undated
dc30.1.18
“The Whole Thing”
First Line: Does it make any difference what you see.
Published in: Even In Quiet Places and Methow River Poems.
undated
dc30.1.19
“Treasure”
First Line: Trees allow you a wilderness. Go find .
verso: poem notes
undated
dc30.1.20
“Like a Peanut”
First Line: All you can see of a rock is the outside, but.
undated
dc30.1.21
“What Gets Away”
First Line: Little things hide. Sometimes they.
Published in: Even In Quiet Places and Methow River Poems.
verso: Photo 5
undated
dc30.1.22
“A Mystery”
First Line: What does it mean when so many trees are just.
verso: Photo 4
undated
dc30.1.23
“Junipers”
First Line: When we're together, when the sun's hand.
verso: Photo 6
undated
dc30.1.24
“Looking at a Rock" (1)
First Line: Some people say the best rock in the world.
9/19/92
dc30.1.25
“Looking at a Rock" (2)
First Line: The strange thing is, it worked; and that person.
undated
dc30.1.26
“Looking at a Rock" (1)
First Line: Some people say the best rock in the world.
undated
dc30.1.27
“Looking at a Rock" (2)
First Line: The strange thing is, it worked; and that person.
verso: Photo 8
undated
dc30.1.28
“A Digression”
First Line: Under the earth a great river has found.
Published in: Even In Quiet Places and Methow River Poems.
verso: Photo 11
undated
dc30.1.29
“More About Rocks" (1)
First Line: Some of us have chosen to live among rocks.
Published in: Even In Quiet Places and Methow River Poems.
undated
dc30.1.30
“More About Rocks" (2)
First Line: Now and then one stirs when nobody.
Published in: Even In Quiet Places and Methow River Poems.
undated
dc30.1.31
“Treasure”
First Line: Trees allow you a wilderness. Go find .
verso: Photo 13
undated
dc30.1.32
“Junipers (Texts for Pictures)”
First Line: When we're together, whenwe all comb the wind.
undated
dc30.1.33
“Texts for Pictures”
First Line: Some places are quiet.
undated
dc30.1.34
“Texts for Pictures”
First Line: What does it mean when so many trees are just.
undated
dc30.1.34
“[What Gets Away]”
First Line: Little things hide. Sometimes they.
Published in: Even In Quiet Places and Methow River Poems.
undated
dc30.1.35
“Is This Feeling About the West Real?”
First Line: All their lives out here people know.
Published in: Even In Quiet Places and Methow River Poems.
verso: Photo 2
undated
dc30.1.36
“Some Places Are Quiet”
First Line: You can think of how still it will be.
verso: Photo 3
undated
dc30.1.37
“Confronting These Pages”
First Line: Wait. You've picked this up . . ..
undated
dc30.1.38
“Some Places Are Quiet”
First Line: You can think of how still it will be.
undated

dc31: Put-together for Who Are You Really, Wanderer?, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 13/Folder dc31

32 items

Assembled in 1993.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 13/Folder dc31
dc31.1
Cover page
January 1, 1993
dc31.2
title page
undated
dc31.3
contents page
undated
dc31.4
“For You”
First Line: It is a secret still, but already your tree.
Accepted by: Southern Florida Poetry Review.
January 1, 1986
dc31.5
“Another Language”
First Line: Recently another language....
Accepted by: Caliban.
March 26, 1982
dc31.6
“Deep Light”
First Line: From far a light, maybe a hill ranch.
Accepted by: Cimarron Review.
October 20, 1987
dc31.7
“Stray Moments”
First Line: We used to ask - remember? We said.
Accepted by: Alembic.
October 13, 1989
dc31.8
“History Display”
First Line: Think of those generals at the wax museum.
Accepted by: Panoply.
July 1, 1986
dc31.9
“Spirit of Place: Great Blue Heron”
First Line: Out of their loneliness for each other.
Accepted by: Audience.
April 1, 1987
dc31.10
“All the Time”
First Line: Evenings, after others go inside.
Accepted by: Crab Creek Review.
October 31, 1986
dc31.11
“Being Young: Eleven”
First Line: I dreamed I was dead.
Accepted by: Inroads.
June 1, 1981
dc31.12
“Back Home on Class Day”
First Line: A tornado interrupted the speech about.
Accepted by: Cow Creek Review.
August 1, 1986
dc31.13
“Facts”
First Line: Zurich is in the Alps,” I learned.
Accepted by: Southern Florida Poetry Review.
August 1, 1978
dc31.14
“Being Saved”
First Line: We have all we need, some kind of sky and maybe.
Accepted by: Kansas Quarterly.
dc31.15
“Playing the Game”
First Line: Every rock says, “Your move,” then waits.
Accepted by: Red Dirt.
April 25, 1990
dc31.16
“In a Country Churchyard”
First Line: You little diggers and birds, things.
Accepted by: Plainsong.
August 20, 1980
dc31.17
“Big World, Little Man”
First Line: Some things it is wrong to think of,”.
Accepted by: Kansas Quarterly.
February 21, 1992
dc31.18
“Something You Should KNow”
First Line: They bring racing pigeons from everywhere.
Accepted by: Christian Science Monitor.
August 8, 1992
dc31.19
“Over in Montana”
First Line: Winter stops by for a visit each year.
Accepted by: Nation.
August 17, 1992
dc31.20
“Story I Have to Tell You”
First Line: They made a wolf out of sheet iron.
Accepted by: Nation.
March 16, 1992
dc31.21
“Farrier Talk”
First Line: They said a mule with the right mother.
Accepted by: Nation.
March 27, 1992
dc31.22
“Farewell, Age Ten”
First Line: While its owner looks away I touch the rabbit.
Accepted by: Kansas Quarterly.
March 2, 1992
dc31.23
“Sometimes”
First Line: While they criticize you how do you .
Accepted by: Fine Madness.
October 1, 1988
dc31.24
“Glimpse: Age Five”
First Line: Our mother was pretty sure. She held her.
Accepted by: Sycamore Review.
July 31, 1990
dc31.25
“Old Prof”
First Line: He wants to go north. His life has become.
Accepted by: Fine Madness.
April 21, 1986
dc31.26
“Poetry [Facing Outward](2 drafts)”
First Line: Its door opens near. It’s a shrine.
Accepted by: Orbis.
February 6, 1992
dc31.27
“In the Book”
First Line: A hand appears.
Accepted by: Cafe Solo.
July 5, 1991
dc31.28
“Junkyard Thoughts”
First Line: Around each thing on earth put.
Accepted by: Christian Science Monitor.
June 13, 1992
dc31.29
“Impasse”
First Line: Something shines among the mountains. I follow it.
Accepted by: Field.
March 1, 1982
dc31.30
“One Good Thing”
First Line: One good thing, you can’t get.
Accepted by: Tar River Poetry.
April 22, 1991
dc31.31
“Commitment”
First Line: When you go away and the sun crosses.
Accepted by: Quarterly West.
July 1, 1986
dc31.32
“Snow”
First Line: Without a word I arrive quietly.
Accepted by: Beloit Poetry Journal.
January 1, 1988

dc32: Put-together for Methow River Poems, ????Return to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 13/Folder dc32

31 items

Assembled in 1995.

Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 13/Folder dc32
dc32.1
Cover sheet
July 1, 1993
dc32.2
“Where We Are" [This Morning] (2 versions)
First Line: Fog in the morning here.
April 22, 1993
dc32.3
“Valley Like This”
First Line: Sometimes you look at an empty valley like this.
June 10, 1993
dc32.4
“From the Wild People”
First Line: Time used to live here.
October 24, 1992
dc32.5
“Nobody Cares [Silver Star]”
First Line: Nobody cares if you stop here. You can.
June 3, 1993
dc32.6
“Being a Person" [Invoking the Owls]
First Line: Be a person here. Stand by the river, invoke.
February 19, 1993
dc32.7
“Is This Feeling about the West Real?”
First Line: All their lives out here some people know.
undated
dc32.8
“You Reading This: Stop" (2 versions)
First Line: Don’t just stay tangled up in your life.
July 1, 1993
dc32.9
“Silver Star" [Being a Mountain / What It Takes]
First Line: To be a mountain you have to climb alone.
February 14, 1993
dc32.10
“Time for Serenity, Anyone?”
First Line: I like to live in the sound of water.
May 16, 1993
dc32.11
“Climbing Along the River”
note on poem.
undated
dc32.12
“Ask Me”
First Line: note on poem.
undated
dc32.13
“You Can’t See It, But”
First Line: Under the earth a great river has found.
October 24, 1992
dc32.14
“Emily, This Place, and You”
First Line: She got out of the car here one day.
May 17, 1993
dc32.15
“From This Lookout Point”
First Line: The cast here, in order of disappearance, were.
undated
dc32.16
“I’m Any Old Tree" [Angel Oak]
First Line: Look at me. My family are gone. I am old and alone.
March 19, 1993
dc32.17
“Real People" [Tree People]
First Line: Trees are afraid of storms. Even big ones.
undated
dc32.18
“Pretty Good Day”
First Line: Before day around here.
undated
dc32.19
“It’s Like This”
First Line: It’s like this - time opens.
undated
dc32.20
“Stop, Look, Listen”
First Line: This is the poem speaking. The wood that holds me.
May 15, 1993
dc32.21
“Mountain-Size Blunders: What Poor Planning Can Do”
First Line: You wouldn’t happen to need any rocks, would you?.
May 16, 1993
dc32.22
“Whole Thing”
First Line: Does it make any difference what you see.
undated
dc32.23
“In the Deep Forest" [Cedars]
First Line: Every night the trees are listening. They hear.
January 8, 1993
dc32.24
“What Gets Away”
First Line: Little things hide. Sometimes they.
undated
dc32.25
“You Know Who Did All This?”
First Line: Time did all this, built it rock.
July 12, 1993
dc32.26
“What’s the hurry? Stop here awhile”
First Line: Our ancestors used to stop here. (This was before.
undated
dc32.27
“Viewpoint" (draft of You Reading This: Stop)
First Line: You reading this: Stop. It just gets tangled up.
undated
dc32.28
“You Standing There”
First Line: At the next place where you stop.
undated
dc32.29
“It Will Be Hard to Get Past Here”
First Line: And anyway you should stop for a little while.
undated
dc32.30
“First Ones Here”
First Line: Her name was Wanda Sue. Or maybe it was Olisawa.
June 3, 1993
dc32.31
“Methow Trail”
First Line: There’s a strange kind of rock around here somewhere.
June 3, 1993

B1: Typescripts for Uncollected Poems Published in Serials, Titles A-E, 1960s-1970sReturn to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 14/Folder B1

101 items
Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 14/Folder B1
B1.1
“Mirror”
First Line: I bring you your life back, lefthanded.
Accepted by: Willamette Week.
May 1, 1974
B1.2
“Lost One”
First Line: Faint heart hints.
Accepted by: Tennessee Poetry Journal.
October 1, 1961
B1.3
“Lost Colony”
First Line: Waiting for help they held on at Roanoke.
Accepted by: Elizabeth Press.
January 1, 1956
B1.4
“Little Fictions, Little Truths”
First Line: The world is upside down in the eye.
Accepted by: American Scholar.
October 5, 1975
B1.5
“Last Song at the Bottom of Lake Chinook”
First Line: Their songs have lifted them far away.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
January 1, 1973
B1.6
“Lake Look”
First Line: The eerie eyes of proud people.
Accepted by: Amanuensis.
October 14, 1952
B1.7
“Glimpsed in Grass”
First Line: A snake finds life and lives.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
March 1, 1973
B1.8
“A Dream”
First Line: I scramble far to a niche.
Accepted by: The Phoenix.
February 9, 1969
B1.9
list of poems
B1.10
“Paragraphs to Tack on the Wall" [A Prospectus for a Class Called “Notes on the Refrigerator Door”]
First Line: There are messages to leave, as if.
Accepted by: Bellevue Press.
August 1, 1974
B1.11
“War-Monument Speech for July 4”
First Line: We knock an oak and for each rememberer.
Accepted by: Midwest Quarterly.
June 1, 1972
B1.12
“Hearing the Sad Coyotes”
First Line: They know.
September 1, 1975
B1.13
“Austere Hope, Daily Faith”
First Line: Even a villain sleeps - atrocities.
Accepted by: Alembic.
undated
B1.14
“About Yesterday (two versions)”
First Line: Wind past a hollow tree, that mouth.
Accepted by: Poetry Now.
October 1, 1977
B1.15
MS contents list
B1.16
MS contents list
B1.17
Ms list
maybe for Alberta Turner & David Young book.
June 1, 1978
B1.18
“Accepting Surprise”
First Line: The right mistakes - that rich moment.
Accepted by: Hampden - Sydney Poetry Review.
July 1, 1975
B1.19
“Accepting the Sky”
First Line: Big animals alive in the cage of the forest.
Accepted by: Counter Measures.
September 1, 1971
B1.20
“Accepting the Watch”
First Line: Upon your wrist where time taps.
Accepted by: Beloit Poetry Journal.
March 1, 1975
B1.21
“Across the Mountains”
First Line: That country discovered by dawn beyond.
Accepted by: Oregon Times.
June 1, 1975
B1.22
“Action”
First Line: A bolo’s a knife you grab at the awkward end.
Accepted by: New Mexico Quarterly.
May 1, 1955
B1.23
“Aeneas”
First Line: Clear place in the tide.
Accepted by: Aperture.
June 1, 1958
B1.24
“After Agra”
First Line: The court that lets me live - how far.
Accepted by: Thought.
September 1, 1972
B1.25
“After the Osprey Dream”
First Line: Fish leap out of the lake; their.
July 1, 1965
B1.26
“Afterthoughts on How Difficult People Say It Is to Tell What the Future Will Bring”
First Line: We saw ahead all right.
Accepted by: But Is It Poetry?.
December 1, 1961
B1.27
“Almost”
First Line: The grass prepares for a footprint.
Accepted by: Georgia Review.
March 1, 1974
B1.28
“American Studies”
First Line: In our country there is a long strange.
Accepted by: Vanderbilt Poetry Review.
March 1, 1971
B1.29
“Another Incarnation”
First Line: Some name woven among the stars.
Accepted by: Tennessee Poetry Journal.
December 1, 1967
B1.30
“Anyone’s Shoes”
First Line: We walk anywhere, wear anyone’s.
Accepted by: Portland Scribe.
May 1, 1974
B1.31
“Asking You to Turn These Pages”
First Line: Those earlier pages were only important - great.
Accepted by: Northwest Review of Books.
January 1, 1977
B1.32
“At a College Arts Festival [at La Grande]”
First Line: The college on its hill, with horn-rimmed.
Accepted by: Virginia Quarterly.
April 18, 1963
B1.33
“At a Honeymoon Hotel”
First Line: A pulse of air steadies a flag.
Accepted by: Gryphon.
May 1, 1968
B1.34
“At a School for the Deaf”
First Line: They talk their hands. They.
Accepted by: Literary Half-Yearly, Mysore.
March 1, 1975
B1.35
“At a Small, Church-Related College”
First Line: Books around the office make a shelter.
Accepted by: Portland.
May 1, 1962
B1.36
“At Dawn”
First Line: Light hunts the meadow.
Accepted by: Stone Drum.
October 1, 1971
B1.37
“At Earle Birney’s School (UBC)”
First Line: Where the slopes turn cliff.
Accepted by: Poetry.
September 2, 1958
B1.38
“At Ghost Ranch”
First Line: This is the place where tumbleweeds meet.
Accepted by: Doones.
September 1, 1969
B1.39
“At Sky Ranch (two versions)”
First Line: When quick-swirled green wind hits the poplar.
Accepted by: Phoenix.
July 1, 1967
B1.40
“At the Old Farm”
First Line: The thorns are left, wounding each other.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
December 1, 1967
B1.41
“Readers" [Author, Author] (2 versions)
First Line: A figure somewhere moves. They all stand.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
January 1, 1967
B1.42
“Autumn Ode on Everything Except a Grecian Urn”
First Line: Real edges on leaves offer a better way.
Accepted by: Abraxas.
August 1, 1967
B1.43
“Bangladesh”
First Line: That day green earth began.
Accepted by: Critical Quarterly.
October 1, 1972
B1.44
“Because of the Rain”
First Line: Someone I touched because of.
Accepted by: Pembroke Magazine.
June 1, 1971
B1.45
“Berky”
First Line: I wasn’t at your house, regret.
Accepted by: Thistle.
October 1, 1976
B1.46
“Best Show in Vegas”
First Line: The best show in Las Vegas was.
Accepted by: This Issue.
May 1, 1970
B1.47
“Beyond Olallie”
First Line: Drowned in Oregon rain, in a cabin.
Accepted by: Christian Science Monitor.
January 1, 1976
B1.48
“Beyond Pawnee Rock”
First Line: From here on The West inherits its own.
Accepted by: Crucible.
May 1, 1970
B1.49
“Beyond What the Stock Market Says”
First Line: We move a compass and watch the needle.
Accepted by: Concerning Poetry.
October 1, 1976
B1.50
“Biology Notes”
First Line: Talk we had, and even speech.
Accepted by: Chowder Review.
October 1, 1973
B1.51
“Birches”
First Line: Seeing the leaves fall.
Accepted by: Pebble.
July 1, 1968
B1.51
“Birches in the North”
First Line: That forest fows black and white.
Accepted by: Chicago Tibune Magazine.
September 1, 1968
B1.52
“Both Ways”
First Line: Two things crossed Main Street [every day].
Accepted by: Three Rivers.
July 16, 1972
B1.53
“Brown Blanket”
First Line: At random, from somewhere forgotten.
Accepted by: Virginia Quarterly.
October 1, 1965
B1.54
“By a Window in Winter”
First Line: It is late. I am afrid. No one.
Accepted by: Goddard Journal.
January 1, 1975
B1.55
“By the Black Ships”
First Line: All afternoon the blue rested there.
Accepted by: Quarterly Review of Literature.
May 1, 1962
B1.56
“By the Rules”
First Line: The still game, after the breathing.
Accepted by: Barataria.
November 1, 1974
B1.57
“Candle”
First Line: Up in the mountains inside a.
Accepted by: Seneca Review.
December 1, 1970
B1.58
“Canon F 1 in France”
First Line: Spun from the light this picture.
Accepted by: Cincinnati Poetry Review.
February 1, 1975
B1.59
“Care for Others”
First Line: Where you live, lights love.
Accepted by: Lewis & Clark College Alumni Association.
December 1, 1971
B1.60
“Casualty”
First Line: Every turn of her head was alms.
Accepted by: New York Quarterly.
January 1, 1970
B1.61
“Certain Cities”
First Line: Today cities like turtles on their backs.
Accepted by: Tennessee Poetry Journal.
April 1, 1968
B1.62
“Character”
First Line: You preferred oak trees, walked.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
December 1, 1959
B1.63
“Character”
First Line: You preferred oak trees, walked.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
December 1, 1959
B1.64
“Charm”
First Line: For if the plane goes down.
Accepted by: Ontario Review.
June 1, 1975
B1.65
“Chicago" [version of Out West]
First Line: This air the buildings watch here holds.
January 1, 1963
B1.66
“Cinquain & 2 Haiku”
First Line: Baby.
Accepted by: Thoreau Journal Quarterly.
April 1, 1972
B1.67
“Coming Toward You”
First Line: In the sea my fingers begin to grow.
Accepted by: Mr. Cogito.
April 1, 1973
B1.68
“Compliments to a Visitor”
First Line: You raised your eyebrows at the right .
Accepted by: Mosaic.
April 1, 1971
B1.69
“Confession of a Reader" [two lines from The Lost Child, P27.81]
First Line: There are countries I locate by the taste of coffee.
Accepted by: Tennessee Poetry Journal.
January 1, 1967
B1.70
“Corner of the Yard”
First Line: When the rock garden listens to the rain.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
February 1, 1963
B1.71
“Crows”
First Line: You know a crow, you know a character.
Accepted by: Blackbird Circle.
May 1, 1970
B1.72
“Daily Shoot-Out for Tourists on the Square in Jackson, Wyoming”
First Line: It is more serious now, the encounter.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
August 1, 1975
B1.73
“Daisy’s Ghost”
First Line: Found by midnight rain.
Accepted by: Dragonfly.
March 1, 1969
B1.74
“Day When You Are Reading This”
First Line: The planet of nothing fills the sky, and.
Accepted by: Poetry.
September 1, 1973
B1.75
“Dear Jim Long" (three-page poem)
First Line: I have a wound called “thought”.
Accepted by: Hawaii Review.
May 1, 1975
B1.76
“Death of Three Astronauts”
First Line: At some dawn or night.
Accepted by: Three Sisters.
July 1, 1971
B1.77
“December Twenty-Five”
First Line: The date is ashamed. After all these years.
Accepted by: Hallmark Cards.
December 1, 1963
B1.78
“Defense of My Uncle”
First Line: His job is a small part of the budget.
Accepted by: Satire Newsletter.
June 1, 1963
B1.79
“Democracy" [cf. American Studies]
First Line: In our great country.
Accepted by: Steelhead.
September 1, 1970
B1.80
“Denying”
First Line: It happened that we met. So many birds.
Accepted by: Poetry Now.
January 1, 1975
B1.81
“Departure Time”
First Line: Announcements.
Accepted by: Anagnorisis.
May 1, 1972
B1.82
“Descent”
First Line: Combed past the wings, night recites to.
Accepted by: Jeopardy.
January 1, 1967
B1.83
“Design”
First Line: North of here in the tan autumn.
Accepted by: Sketchbook.
June 1, 1963
B1.84
“Eagle on the Corner”
First Line: An eagle on the corner selling flags.
Accepted by: Tar River Poets.
July 1, 1970
B1.85
“Electra”
First Line: It’s a long hard ride, face toward the window.
Accepted by: Grilled Flowers.
August 1, 1976
B1.86
“Dogwood Tree in Bloom”
First Line: This tree has not been getting the news.
Accepted by: Abraxas.
undated
B1.87
“Dorm in Autumn”
First Line: Fistfuls of winter flung at our window.
Accepted by: The Performing Voice in Literature.
December 1, 1955
B1.88
“Dream of My Life”
First Line: Days go by. Hearts hardly change.
Accepted by: New Review.
July 1, 1975
B1.89
“Drummer Boy”
First Line: An army in the dust.
Accepted by: New Letters.
August 1, 1974
B1.90
“Early Massacre”
First Line: Backward on the wagon.
Accepted by: Sumac.
December 1, 1969
B1.91
“Early Riser”
First Line: The sick alarm clock crows.
Accepted by: Jeopardy.
February 1, 1970
B1.92
“Ecology in Southern California”
First Line: A woman with a can came into the room.
Accepted by: Second Growth.
March 1, 1975
B1.93
“Elegy”
First Line: Time: Now.
Accepted by: Tenn Poetry Journal.
March 1, 1970
B1.94
“Encounters”
First Line: Meeting a silver destiny, our stream.
Accepted by: Presbyterian Life.
April 28, 1945
B1.95
“Entering New Country”
First Line: The cat from all the hills.
Accepted by: Steppenwolf.
August 1, 1962
B1.96
“Evening Walk”
First Line: All the animals are looking over.
Accepted by: New Yorker.
August 1, 1976
B1.97
“Even Today" [cf. That Day Again]
First Line: Over an empty bridge with hardly a sound.
August 1, 1971
B1.98
“Every Autumn”
First Line: No matter how fast we hurry, winter.
Accepted by: Lewis & Clark alumni brochure 1973.
July 1, 1968
B1.99
“Every Generous Day”
First Line: Remember days that fled over the hills.
Accepted by: Stand.
April 1, 1968
B1.100
“Explaining How It Is - for John Crowe Ransom”
First Line: This is the way it is: back then.
Accepted by: Sou’wester.
June 1, 1973
B1.101
“Exorcism”
First Line: Lest a dream I have made my life.
Accepted by: Tri Quarterly.
September 1, 1963

B2: Typescripts for Uncollected Poems Published in Serials, Titles F-M, 1960s-1970sReturn to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 14/Folder B2

148 items
Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 14/Folder B2
B2.1
“Farewell to [Death of] a Scholar”
First Line: The book fell from his hand. His life began.
Accepted by: Tar River Poets.
September 1, 1970
B2.2
“Farewell to Romantics Class”
First Line: In the world are there more answers than there are questions?.
Accepted by: Cimarron Review.
February 1, 1974
B2.3
“Farm on the Hill”
First Line: Drawn back, a danger to the window.
Accepted by: Today.
June 1, 1964
B2.4
“Fern”
First Line: A tough plant, fern.
Accepted by: Ohio University Review.
January 1, 1968
B2.5
“Fern in the Coal”
First Line: Wanting - I heard this one time - made hands.
Accepted by: Poetry Northwest.
March 1, 1960
B2.6
“Fieldpath”
First Line: I helped make this groove.
Accepted by: Colorado Quarterly.
March 1, 1952
B2.7
“Finding Out Something”
First Line: It takes a long time, how cats learn to walk.
Accepted by: Rapport.
July 1, 1975
B2.8
“Finding Sky Ranch”
First Line: There beyond Hay Creek turn.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
August 1, 1974
B2.9
“Finding the World”
First Line: Finally you feel the treasure: others.
Accepted by: Review La Booche.
May 1, 1976
B2.10
“First and Last Things”
First Line: Sometimes you glimpse far ditches - laced.
Accepted by: World Order.
August 1, 1973
B2.11
“First War”
First Line: Soldiers wore puttees, then. That was.
Accepted by: Saturday Review.
April 1, 1964
B2.12
“Fir Trees of the Valleys”
First Line: When they are clustered, their darkness.
Accepted by: Christian Science Monitor.
January 1, 1976
B2.13
“Focusing”
First Line: We go down near enough to care.
Accepted by: Critical Quarterly.
June 1, 1970
B2.14
“Footnote”
First Line: When they captured Ishi, the last wild Indian, near Oroville.
Accepted by: Poetry.
February 2, 1945
B2.15
“For a Distant Friend”
First Line: Where Western towns end nobody cares.
Accepted by: Road Apple Review.
January 1, 1970
B2.16
“For a Friend Who Neglects Current Events”
First Line: Granted, there is a hat for Texas.
Accepted by: Today.
July 1, 1964
B2.17
“For an Artist on the Art Commission”
First Line: What happens once.
Accepted by: Arts in Society.
April 1, 1967
B2.18
“For a Plaque on the Door of an Isolated House”
First Line: Someone Here, listen to your pulse and.
Accepted by: New Letters.
October 1, 1974
B2.19
“For a Stone at Balmer’s Ranch”
First Line: From the first even a coyote pup will begin to.
Accepted by: Southern Review.
September 1, 1966
B2.20
“For a While”
First Line: In the long cavern, after the candle.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
September 1, 1969
B2.21
“For Ben Hur Lampman”
First Line: In this lonely country after sundown.
Accepted by: Where Would You Go? Exploring the Seasons with Ben Hur Lampman.
August 31, 1975
B2.22
“Forceful Things”
First Line: In the opinion of butterflies.
Accepted by: Stand.
September 1, 1967
B2.23
“For Certain Dirty Holy Men”
First Line: Bells won’t rinse these ruins.
Accepted by: Westerly Review.
September 1, 1972
B2.24
“Forgetting Places”
First Line: This is the city puts a big hand, “Howdy”.
Accepted by: Open Places.
November 1, 1976
B2.25
“Forgetting the Girl in the Choir”
First Line: In the world or its opposite, where.
Accepted by: Hearsay Press.
September 1, 1974
B2.26
“For John and Jo Haines, Milepost 68, Fairbanks”
First Line: Like snow now we look out.
Accepted by: Alaska Review.
July 1, 1968
B2.27
“For Someone Gone”
First Line: Like that horse, its breath whistled.
Accepted by: Colorado State Review.
January 1, 1967
B2.28
“For the Party of the Third Part”
First Line: We knew your house before we ever.
Accepted by: Rogue River Gorge.
June 1, 1970
B2.29
“For the Record”
First Line: Always it puzzled me, why in my dreams.
Accepted by: In the Clock of Reason and Pebble.
January 1, 1964
B2.30
“For the Stick [Shtick] People”
First Line: At birth, launched into light.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
August 1, 1969
B2.31
“Found Wanting - Chitina, Alaska”
First Line: First light, that early gray urge.
Accepted by: Critical Quarterly.
July 1, 1968
B2.32
“Found Written on the Sand”
First Line: Maybe on some island when.
Accepted by: Dragonfly.
November 1, 1973
B2.33
“Four Mirrors”
First Line: Over four mirrors the s light gushed late.
Accepted by: World Order.
August 1, 1964
B2.34
“From a Historian”
First Line: Come near. Here is the picture.
Accepted by: Dragonfly.
February 1, 1966
B2.35
“From Exile: the Place He Chose”
First Line: Seared and brave, the dogs run lean.
Accepted by: Tennessee Poetry Journal.
June 1, 1971
B2.36
“From Hole-in-the-Ground”
First Line: This year began.
Accepted by: Tar River Poets.
May 1, 1970
B2.37
“From the Back Row”
First Line: Is the quiet note heard?.
Accepted by: Satire Newsletter.
December 26, 1947
B2.38
“From the Quet of the Land”
First Line: Wise men: some of your words.
Accepted by: Crazy Horse.
September 1, 1971
B2.39
“From the Trees in the Forest”
First Line: ‘69? Yes, we remember: year.
Accepted by: Hart.
November 1, 1959
B2.40
"From the Writing Workshop" [cf. Send-Off to Ralph Salisbury P27.113]
First Line: We all scattered like a dropped.
Accepted by: Freelance.
May 1, 1966
B2.41
“From Your Thorp Springs Correspondent”
First Line: If you take one of these days - this one, say.
Accepted by: Oregon People Magazine.
March 15, 1975
B2.42
“J”
First Line: One day i fell, straight as i should.
Accepted by: Genesis West.
May 1, 1963
B2.43
“Gestures Any Day" [For Every Day]
First Line: In an old bookshop the owner pushed.
Accepted by: Chicago Tribune.
July 7, 1972
B2.44
“Ghost That Does Not Believe in Men”
First Line: They seem to exist, but when I come steadily.
Accepted by: December and Pioneer Log.
January 1, 1965
B2.45
“Gifts from a Train”
First Line: Herded toward eternity.
Accepted by: Stone Drum.
July 1, 1968
B2.46
“Glimpsed on a Wall in a Hotel”
First Line: Afraid of you, the mirror turns.
Accepted by: Southern Poetry Review.
July 1, 1973
B2.47
“Going Out and Coming Back”
First Line: Many people have wandered away.
Accepted by: Chariton Review.
August 1, 1974
B2.48
“Graduate”
First Line: An old anguish, real as a nail.
Accepted by: Quixote.
April 1, 1967
B2.49
“Great American Poem”
First Line: Like speaking soft, it was.
Accepted by: Roy Harvey Pearce Christmas card.
April 1, 1971
B2.50
“Great Singing”
First Line: Something sang into the dust.
Accepted by: Etc..
August 13, 1958
B2.51
“Green Mansions”
First Line: Listening Leaves guard the continent.
Accepted by: New Orleans Poetry Journal.
June 8, 1955
B2.52
“Greetings from Oregon”
First Line: It’s neighborly to hear the rain.
Accepted by: The Record.
October 29, 1952
B2.53
“Gulls Near the Bay”
First Line: Flannel pieces of gull come toward the school.
Accepted by: Approach.
November 1, 1956
B2.53
“Haines Place: Mile 68, Fairbanks, Alaska”
First Line: It’s.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
January 1, 1976
B2.54
“Hatbrim Judgment”
First Line: Disguised as myself, I enter their city.
Accepted by: Virginia Quarterly Review.
February 1, 1970
B2.55
“Headlong Creek”
First Line: When they let me out of the snow.
Accepted by: L’Esprit and Hotzarouli.
July 1, 1971
B2.56
“Head of a Family”
First Line: I wake at four. I can breathe.
Accepted by: Uzzano.
August 1, 1974
B2.57
“Headwaters of the Metolius”
First Line: Open woods, and we came there.
Accepted by: Eastern Oregon Literary Supplement.
October 1, 1965
B2.58
“Hearing the Content”
First Line: Your voice, no matter how good, fades.
Accepted by: Christian Science Monitor.
May 1, 1976
B2.59
“Help from Anywhere”
First Line: Listen, ears: when the sun came up.
Accepted by: Christian Science Monitor.
June 1, 1976
B2.60
“Hippolytus”
First Line: You tangled your hands in the spray.
Accepted by: West Coast Review.
October 1, 1962
B2.61
“Historical Facts”
First Line: My father willed me some things.
Accepted by: Chowder Review.
October 1, 1973
B2.62
“Home Economics”
First Line: What came, our mother took.
Accepted by: South & West.
December 1, 1966
B2.63
“Home from Sabbatical”
First Line: In Washington they have hired.
Accepted by: The Wrighter.
August 1, 1964
B2.64
“Hostler’s Son at School”
First Line: There was a candle that made the cave.
Accepted by: Andover Review.
January 1, 1973
B2.65
“Identities”
First Line: In the land of lightning.
Accepted by: Stinktree.
April 1, 1967
B2.66
“Important Things”
First Line: Like Locate Knob out west.
Accepted by: Stoney Lonesome.
August 14, 1972
B2.67
“In a Country Cemetery”
First Line: Their last blanket, the wind, has.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
March 1, 1966
B2.68
“In a Country Churchyard”
First Line: Part of someone’s name carved on a stone.
Accepted by: Oregon Times.
January 1, 1976
B2.69
“In Alaska on a Summer Morning”
First Line: A map on the floor catches.
Accepted by: Runes.
July 1, 1968
B2.70
“In an Old Album”
First Line: This boy whose eyes can’t hide.
Accepted by: Runes.
September 1, 1969
B2.71
“Incident”
First Line: Our clock one day, that ticked off.
Accepted by: Chowder Review.
December 1, 1967
B2.72
“Incident in Fortran”
First Line: Too distant to feel, a ratio prowls.
Accepted by: Esquire.
April 1, 1972
B2.73
“Incident in Space”
First Line: Something the size of a speck of dust.
Accepted by: Second Growth.
October 1, 1973
B2.74
“Independence Day”
First Line: Sunk in the channel, half a rusty ship .
Accepted by: Poetry Now.
October 1, 1972
B2.75
“In Hawaii”
First Line: One long wave dreams the Pacific.
Accepted by: Poetry Australia.
December 1, 1967
B2.76
“Inscription to be Found on an Island”
First Line: When our hands were here they.
Accepted by: Marvin Seltzman prints.
January 1, 1972
B2.77
“In Skeleton Cave”
First Line: Hand open along the wall, we two.
Accepted by: World Order.
May 1, 1972
B2.78
“Interview in the Dean’s Office”
First Line: Was your mouth hard like that.
Accepted by: Western Humanities Review.
April 1, 1976
B2.79
“In the Airport at Denver”
First Line: To disappear, carry skis.
Accepted by: Harper’s.
July 1, 1966
B2.80
“In the Clock of Reason”
First Line: Outside the clock of reason, cry, cry.
Accepted by: In the Clock of Reason.
October 1, 1958
B2.81
“In the Funhouse at Seaside”
First Line: While the girl aimed the elegant.
Accepted by: University of Tampa Poetry Review.
February 1, 1964
B2.82
“In the Morning All Over”
First Line: High there in our grove the little birds.
Accepted by: New Letters.
January 1, 1974
B2.83
“In the Quiet”
First Line: Somewhere on Mars it is dawn.
Accepted by: Unmuzzled Ox.
August 1, 1976
B2.84
“In This One Life”
First Line: Beyond our door, beyond our wall.
Accepted by: Wang Hui-Ming.
July 1, 1971
B2.85
“Landscape of Eberhart Poems [In This Room]”
First Line: It’s as if no one has turned far enough.
Accepted by: Quartet.
June 2, 1973
B2.86
“In Touch’s Kingdom”
First Line: We use the stupid self.
Accepted by: Southwest Review.
May 1, 1970
B2.87
“Inventory”
First Line: Remember - we were warm.
Accepted by: NBW (Spring Rain).
February 1, 1972
B2.88
“Invitation”
First Line: What you think about.
Accepted by: Christian Science Monitor.
September 1, 1971
B2.89
“Invitation to Explore”
First Line: The next thing that is going to happen.
Accepted by: Chariton Review.
B2.90
“In Washington”
First Line: If you turn a scene on its side.
Accepted by: Tar River Poets.
September 1, 1970
B2.91
“It Is Given”
First Line: The look of winter comes through the woods.
Accepted by: Mill Mountain Review.
September 1, 1969
B2.92
“It Will Find You”
First Line: Not even a leaf, no one even.
Accepted by: Chelsea.
June 1, 1971
B2.93
“Jeffers”
First Line: He is little now, less than a gull.
Accepted by: Tennessee Poetry Journal.
June 1, 1965
B2.94
“Job Interview: Unsuccessful - Oberlin, Ohio”
First Line: We speak. Words walk down the hall.
Accepted by: New Student Review.
July 1, 1974
B2.95
“John of the Mountains”
First Line: You can climb a mountain. At the top.
Accepted by: Places.
March 1, 1974
B2.96
“Juniper Trees”
First Line: People of the dry wind.
Accepted by: Arlington Quarterly.
May 1, 1970
B2.97
“Kansan Thinks of Colorado”
First Line: We brought home the wind in the oval.
Accepted by: Southern Colorado Standard.
May 1, 1973
B2.98
“Keeping a Journal Even in Bad Times ”
First Line: Those rays of the sun that choose.
Accepted by: Critical Quarterly.
June 1, 1972
B2.99
“Lake Oswego”
First Line: Laurel craves this town.
Accepted by: Portland.
June 1, 1960
B2.100
“Lake Wendoka”
First Line: Under the sidewalk lay an Indian village.
Accepted by: Thistle.
February 1, 1976
B2.101
“1940’s”
First Line: In a mirror that saved those days.
Accepted by: Soft Press.
December 1, 1969
B2.102
“Landowners in the Indian Country”
First Line: In October these are the straight tongues.
Accepted by: Back Door.
December 1, 1968
B2.103
“Language of Things”
First Line: One man heard how deep we are.
Accepted by: Medford Tribune.
September 1, 1962
B2.104
“Late at Night”
First Line: Driving, I come for a while.
Accepted by: American Poetry Review.
August 1, 1969
B2.105
“Late August at the Game Refuge”
First Line: Out on the wide marsh at Malheur.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
August 1, 1974
B2.106
“Late Fall Meadow”
First Line: By day the sun starts home; it has.
Accepted by: South Carolina Review.
July 1, 1973
B2.107
“Later”
First Line: When the world comes back, when the chairs.
Accepted by: Pembroke Magazine.
May 1, 1971
B2.108
“Learning to live in the Gutter”
First Line: Broken pieces of glass on guard.
Accepted by: South & West.
July 1, 1977
B2.109
“Learning to Live in the World”
First Line: For us there are few passes over the.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
July 1, 1975
B2.110
“Leaves”
First Line: Where they fell the earth got stronger.
Accepted by: Tennessee Poetry Journal.
April 1, 1971
B2.111
“Leavetaking”
First Line: When we heard the fish swim again.
Accepted by: Chicago Tribune.
November 1, 1968
B2.112
“Leaving Bit Shah”
First Line: Under the willows a strange light comes.
Accepted by: Iowa Review.
September 1, 1972
B2.113
“Letters from Notables: #1”
First Line: Dear Sir.
Accepted by: Wang Hui-Ming.
October 1, 1970
B2.114
“Life I Live Is Fiction, the Story I Tell Is Truth (2 pp)”
First Line: A Japanese.
Accepted by: Field.
January 1, 1975
B2.115
“Limits”
First Line: The blind man hears the sun.
Accepted by: New Letters.
July 1, 1974
B2.116
“Lines for a Girl Named Rosy”
First Line: Clouds are gray. In the light.
Accepted by: Pomegranate Press.
June 1, 1972
B2.117
“Lines to Start [Stop] Talking By”
First Line: In your city today outside my room.
Accepted by: Chicago Tribune.
January 1, 1973
B2.118
“Lines with a Bouquet of Pearly Everlasting”
First Line: These days before the sun finds out.
Accepted by: Chi Trib 9/70.
August 1, 1968
B2.119
“Listening the Hours”
First Line: Listening the hours that filled with snow.
Accepted by: UCLAN Review.
December 20, 1955
B2.120
“Little Beginning”
First Line: Whatever is important, the first.
Accepted by: Southern California Review.
March 1, 1971
B2.121
“Little Sermon”
First Line: Those things you think to say, say them.
Accepted by: Literary Half-Yearly.
January 1, 1975
B2.122
“Living on the Plains”
First Line: That winter when this thought came - how the river.
Accepted by: Ark River Review.
February 1, 1976
B2.123
“Local Statement”
First Line: After their trance all night the trees.
Accepted by: Crazy Horse.
March 12, 1972
B2.124
“Lone Rider”
First Line: Leaving behind the slow wagons.
Accepted by: Inland.
March 18, 1951
B2.125
“Looking Out in the Morning”
First Line: There is a promise: you live in a certain.
Accepted by: World Order.
July 1, 1973
B2.126
“Lucy, Summer Nights”
First Line: From her fair turn through.
Accepted by: Critical Quarterly.
June 1, 1970
B2.127
“Magazine”
First Line: Someone dreamed a magazine, pages that moved.
Accepted by: Second Growth.
September 1, 1974
B2.128
“Magic Lantern”
First Line: Here is that far, deep country I’ve.
Accepted by: New Letters.
July 1, 1974
B2.129
“Man from the Alaska Highway”
First Line: Some rainy mornings before citizens get up.
Accepted by: Harper’s.
October 1, 1962
B2.130
“Matinee”
First Line: Dragged by the wild horse, everyone.
Accepted by: Idaho Heritage.
October 1, 1975
B2.131
“Meditation at Dawn”
First Line: Sudden as the sky, day comes.
Accepted by: Chariton Review.
July 1, 1975
B2.132
“Meeting My Class Called “Easy Writer””
First Line: Where the cages were the animals.
Accepted by: Field.
October 1, 1973
B2.133
“Memo from the Anthropology Department”
First Line: Around here professors wonder how.
Accepted by: Prism.
June 1, 1964
B2.134
“Message”
First Line: Snow, airmail, and sleet, special delivery.
Accepted by: Literary Review: Lewis and Clark College.
November 1, 1974
B2.135
“Message for [from] Upstairs”
First Line: Look - these words all pull; each one.
Accepted by: Field.
October 1, 1973
B2.136
“Message from Kathmandu for Kit’s Pet Rabbit Cadillac”
First Line: Out in the little washes and gullies.
Accepted by: PTA Magazine.
September 1, 1972
B2.137
“Miracles”
First Line: Remember waking up, the clouds of your feet.
Accepted by: Field.
June 1, 1976
B2.138
“Moose Call”
First Line: A dead man says this: “Broad leaf home” - the world.
Accepted by: Dalmo’ma.
April 11, 1975
B2.139
“A Morning”
First Line: From high tide in the night a dead.
Accepted by: Charles Street Journal.
August 1, 1970
B2.140
“Mother Talking in the Porch Swing”
First Line: Inside the river is there a river?.
Accepted by: Southern Poetry Review.
August 1, 1974
B2.141
“Mumbled Report on Our Trip”
First Line: Wherever I look now, it is.
Accepted by: University of Portland Review.
January 1, 1963
B2.142
“Museum Pieces" (2 sheets, 4 sides)”
First Line: A man at the museum....
Accepted by: Genesis West.
July 12, 1959
B2.143
“Muttered [Unpublished] Creed”
First Line: Never again for any glorious thing.
Accepted by: Fellowship.
December 3, 1946
B2.144
“My Job [Lost]”
First Line: Lost for many days, a gray ship.
Accepted by: Poem.
October 1, 1966
B2.145
“My Life”
First Line: This corridor through the air, shaped.
Accepted by: Literary Half-Yearly.
December 1, 1974
B2.146
“My Mother Looked Out in the Morning”
First Line: Announced by an ax, Daniel Boone.
Accepted by: American Poets in 1976.
June 1, 1974
B2.147
“My Name Will be Samoset”
First Line: Drive spikes into trees and climb.
Accepted by: Poetry Northwest.
June 28, 1957
B2.148
“Myth and Reason”
First Line: When Aristotle analyzed his dreams.
Accepted by: Antioch Review.
February 1, 1958

B3: Typescripts for Uncollected Poems Published in Serials, Titles N-S, 1960s-1970sReturn to Top

Container(s): Box-folder Box 14/Folder B3

167 items
Container(s)DescriptionDates
box-folder
Box 14/Folder B3
B3.1
“Near Flathead Lake”
First Line: This land gives you back to the Indians.
Accepted by: Decal Poetry Review.
July 1, 1965
B3.2
“Near the Ghost Town of Chitina”
First Line: The water that falls down this river will.
Accepted by: Back Door.
July 8, 1968
B3.3
“New Friends”
First Line: They approach, odd times, any.
Accepted by: Granite.
April 1, 1972
B3.4
“New Government Plant in Colorado”
First Line: Smooth earth, numbered clouds.
Accepted by: December.
September 1, 1961
B3.5
“Night Cries: A Legend”
First Line: After old rain babies crawled from the mud.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
September 1, 1972
B3.6
“1965 Blues”
First Line: Roots in the dirt, limbs in the weather.
Accepted by: Experiment.
May 1, 1962
B3.7
“Nobody”
First Line: Quiet when I come home, you.
Accepted by: Ontario Review.
November 1, 1976
B3.8
“No Matter How Far”
First Line: Fish plot an island, animals.
Accepted by: Vanderbilt Poetry Review.
September 1, 1971
B3.9
“No More School”
First Line: No more school: The landscape has turned.
Accepted by: Westigan Review.
September 1, 1969
B3.10
“North of Imperia”
First Line: Napoleon could not capture the olive trees.
Accepted by: World Order.
August 1, 1969
B3.11
“Not Being an Actor”
First Line: In the wild we find animals various as thought.
Accepted by: Talisman.
February 1, 1957
B3.12
“Nothing to Be Carved on Stone”
First Line: If lightning lasted, you might.
Accepted by: Southern California Review.
June 1, 1972
B3.13
“Now Listen Here”
First Line: I’ve said it often, a yellowhammer.
Accepted by: In the Clock of Reason.
December 1, 1971
B3.14
“Nuance, Oregon" [Two Towns in Oregon]
First Line: Nuance, a ghost town that is now.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
January 1, 1964
B3.15
“Oak”
First Line: When we heard the long wind coming home.
Accepted by: Poetry.
January 1, 1971
B3.16
“Oak Leaves”
First Line: Listen - from under this ice we speak.
Accepted by: Nation.
January 1, 1973
B3.17
“Old Barn”
First Line: Doors that the years have broken.
Accepted by: Stoney Lonesome.
September 1, 1971
B3.18
“Old Friend”
First Line: We leaned back in the swing.
Accepted by: Chicago Tribune Magazine.
December 1, 1968
B3.19
“Old Hero”
First Line: The left is my lonely shoulder. Outside.
Accepted by: Salmagundi.
January 1, 1972
B3.20
“Old Story”
First Line: I am that traveler they tell of.
Accepted by: Blue Moon.
November 1, 1976
B3.21
“Old Summer”
First Line: One summer I learned to aim my dream.
Accepted by: Spring Rain.
February 1, 1972
B3.22
“On a Bridge in Cairo”
First Line: A loafer puffs a cigarette.
Accepted by: Al-Ahram.
September 1, 1972
B3.23
“On a Kite Our Son Left in Alaska”
First Line: What we loosed pretended.
Accepted by: Kenyon Review.
October 1, 1968
B3.24
“On an Autumn Walk”
First Line: No matter how high the woodpile.
Accepted by: Ohio University Review.
September 1, 1967
B3.25
“On Duty Every Morning”
First Line: Outside in the cold with a little light.
Accepted by: Review La Booche.
September 1, 1975
B3.26
“One’s Place”
First Line: Intent at one place on the earth is.
Accepted by: Christian Science Monitor.
September 1, 1973
B3.27
“One Thing at a Time”
First Line: Ours is the faith that leaves mountains where they are.
Accepted by: Hudson Review.
June 1, 1973
B3.28
“One Who Brings This Report Has Alaska With Him”
First Line: The way the world comes across a window.
Accepted by: Baby John.
July 1, 1968
B3.29
“On Seeing “Massacre at Glencoe” - a Picture in Scotland”
First Line: No one was more cruel than these.
Accepted by: Quarterly Review of Literature.
August 1, 1962
B3.30
“On the Blind Bus”
First Line: Cool fog hands burst open.
Accepted by: Oregon College of Education.
December 1, 1968
B3.31
“On the River”
First Line: These were the hours: we floated on .
Accepted by: Sumac.
September 1, 1970
B3.32
“On the Trek”
First Line: Later the moth can follow the string.
Accepted by: Experiment and Poems from the Iowa Poetry Workshop 1951.
July 20, 1950
B3.33
“Oregon”
First Line: Rain says etcetera, its.
Accepted by: Northwest Review.
August 1, 1975
B3.34
“Oregon”
First Line: Trees having their picture taken.
Accepted by: Christian Science Monitor.
August 19, 1972
B3.35
“Oregon: A Report”
First Line: A state with see-through air.
Accepted by: Eastern Oregon Literary Supplement.
December 1, 1971
B3.36
“Osprey Dream”
First Line: When fish leaped out of the lake, their.
Accepted by: Southern Review.
July 1, 1965
B3.37
“Our Neighborhood”
First Line: Plat 40: A Avenue to F; eigth to Twelfth.
Accepted by: Poetry Northwest.
June 1, 1959
B3.38
“Our Story”
First Line: after the ink drink, off.
Accepted by: New Republic.
February 1, 1971
B3.39
“Our Study That Was Not Rewarded”
First Line: Some day when the tigers blur.
Accepted by: Compass Review.
August 29, 1947
B3.40
“Out in the Country”
First Line: You watch the grass. It crawls.
Accepted by: Counter Measures.
August 1, 1971
B3.41
“Over the Miles”
First Line: The sun sank low on the prairies.
Accepted by: Cold Mountain Press postcard.
September 1, 1970
B3.42
“Pace”
First Line: In space, on a sign they found floating by.
Accepted by: New Letters.
September 1, 1974
B3.43
“Parents”
First Line: I remember their shadow on the wall.
Accepted by: American Poetry Review.
July 1, 1970
B3.44
“Passage to Alaska”
First Line: Gray, gray, headland by headland north.
Accepted by: Three Sisters.
October 1, 1968
B3.45
“Passing a Place”
First Line: A gray fish came near our ship.
Accepted by: San Francisco Review.
November 1, 1958
B3.46
“Passports”