Professional & Technical Employees, Local 17 records, 1927-2000  PDF

Overview of the Collection

Creator
Professional & Technical Employees. Local 17
Title
Professional & Technical Employees, Local 17 records
Dates
1927-2000 (inclusive)
Quantity
8.1 cubic feet (14 boxes plus 1 oversize folder)
Collection Number
6049 (Accession No. 6049-001)
Summary
Records of an independent union representing public sector, professional and technical employees in Washington and Oregon.
Repository
University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections
Special Collections
University of Washington Libraries
Box 352900
Seattle, WA
98195-2900
Telephone: 206-543-1929
Fax: 206-543-1931
speccoll@uw.edu
Access Restrictions

No restrictions on access.

Languages
English


Historical NoteReturn to Top

The history of the International Federation of Professional and Technical Engineers or IFPTE, can be traced back to 1914, when technical employees had no significant union representation. The first organization of technical employees was the Society of Marine Draftsmen, established in 1913 and ran by the upper management of the shipbuilding companies. The Society held its first convention in 1914, approving some minor resolutions while refusing wage increases. The Society disbanded shortly after, but the employees at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Virginia seized the opportunity to form their own union, Draftsmen Union No, 15327, with a charter from the American Federation of Labor (AFL). These organized employees later became IFPTE, Local 1, becoming one of the first official federal unions. In less than four years, Draftsmen Union No, 15327, expanded to become the International Federation of Draftsmen's Unions founded on July 1, 1918 when the AFL granted another charter to start a new labor organization representing technical engineering employees. The International Federation of Draftsmen's Unions charters included Local 1, Portsmouth, Virginia; Local 2, New York, New York; Local 3, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Local 4, Portsmouth, New Hampshire; Local 5, Newport, Rhode Island; Local 6, Charleston, South Carolina; Local 7, Quincy, Massachusetts; Local 8, Vallejo, California; and Local 12, Bremerton, Washington.

The first order of business for this new union was to negotiate for higher wages to meet the WWI-inflated cost-of-living. President Woodrow Wilson almost doubled the pay rate for shipyard engineers and federal draftsmen, leading non-member draftsmen to join the union. In 1919, the Federation petitioned AFL to include other technical craftsmen and became the International Federation of Technical Engineers, Architects, and Draftsmen's Unions.

During the Federation’s early years, members would meet in Washington, D.C. during annual convention time, and lobby the Navy and Federal Wage Board for higher wages and improved benefits. By the late 1920s, several public and private sector locals were organized. Early bargaining successes included salary increases throughout the 1940s and 1950s, and passage of SB 262 in April 1951, improving the state employees’ retirement system. Until the mid-1960s, the Federation president was the sole executive officer and would often forego salary due to the union’s financial issues. Most Federation presidents were on leave from federal shipyards and eventually returned to the Navy after their two-year term.

There were no formal organizing services until the late 1950s, and in 1960 a full-time director of organization was created, adding several new organizers throughout the country. The early 1950s were a substantial growth period for the union, acquiring many members from the Portland area in 1950, engineering employees of the Bonneville Power Administration in 1951, and affiliation with the Columbia Power Annual Employees Council. In San Francisco during the ‘30s and ‘40s, chemists and other lab staff at Cutter Labs in Berkeley and at Shell Development, were associated with the Federation after organizing the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) Federation of Architects, Engineers, Chemists, and Technicians (FAECT). The San Francisco chapter, officially chartered Local 21 in April 1977, was formed when the Federation’s organizer was transferred from Seattle to San Francisco in the late 1960s. This led to an agreement for an increase in organizing assistance based on a new member quota for a one-year period and attempts to obtain certification for several bargaining units. The San Francisco chapter’s membership was about 350 employees at the time and increased to over 1,200 members during that period. By the 50th anniversary in 1968, the Federation’s membership was only about 13,000 and in 1973, IFPTE represented 17,700 members within seventy-nine local unions. During the 1970s, there were a series of municipal strikes throughout San Francisco. Along with new collective bargaining legislation, these strikes spurred the addition of non-member chemists, accountants, auditors, municipal planners, data processors, and a variety of professional, administrative, technical, and mid-management groups. Local 21 now represents the South Bay, Oakland, East Bay, Alameda County, Contra Costa County, the Golden Gate Bridge, and the City of San Francisco, including the San Francisco Department of Public Works and Hunters Point Shipyard. During this time, the Federation also assisted IFPTE, Local 8, in obtaining exclusive representation of all employees in technical and scientific fields at Mare Island Naval Shipyard in Vallejo, CA. The union began to grow at a much faster rate after that period due to organizing outside of the union’s formal jurisdiction, reaching 23, 483 members by 1986.

The Federation’s broad scope of membership now includes Boeing, the City of San Francisco, Coulee Dam engineers, Pacific Coast Shipbuilders, Public Utilities, log scalers, architects, Seattle Metal Trades Council, Bechtel, economists, surveyors, attorneys, accountants, and many more throughout Canada and the United States.

On October 24, 1927, the Seattle Association of Technical Engineers and Architects, Local 17, joined the Federation. In the early 1940s, Local 17 gained jurisdiction over the entire state of Washington in order to more effectively represent the needs of professional engineers in the region. At this time, the Local’s official name was changed to the Technical Engineers and Architects Association. From 1955 to 1973, the Federation went by the American Federation of Technical Engineers (AFTE), and Local 17’s name changed again to the Professional and Technical Engineers Association.

Since the 1970s, Local 17 has expanded its representation to include a wider range of job classifications – from nurses, social workers, and health specialists, to real estate appraisers, transportation planners, environmental specialists to engineers. By 1980, there were 3400 members. The Local 17 governing body voted in 2010 to separate from the Federation, whose membership costs had become increasingly unsustainable, and whose leadership was unresponsive to the priorities of Local 17 and its members. At this time, the name was changed to Professional and Technical Employees, instead of Engineers, to more accurately reflect the professional diversity of the membership. Since that time, the organization has expanded its reach into Oregon and continues to grow. Today, PTE Local 17 represents nearly 9,000 public employees across Washington and Oregon.

In 1964, the Canadian General Electric groups of Local 164 went on strike for a month. This strike involved approximately 40% of Local 164 and was their first major strike since affiliating with AFTE. The Canadian chapters, Local 164 and 166, were unhappy with the support received during this strike and efforts were made to withdraw from AFTE. Union leaders from both sides visited Toronto and explained the financial and organizational hazards of withdrawal. They decided that success as a union would require cooperation and contribution to the development of AFTE to make it a worthwhile international organization. In January 1972, President David Dodd of the Draftsmen’s Association of Ontario, Local 164, suggested that AFTE change its’ name to the International Federation of Professional and Technical Engineers (IFPTE) to give it a more inclusive feel. The name change took effect in May of 1973. In 1979, IFPTE’s business manager Mike Waske, along with the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, filed suit on behalf of 22 unions representing Seattle employees to preserve collective bargaining procedures. Waske contended that the enactment of a personnel ordinance, part of a city charter amendment passed by voters in 1977, violated state law. Washington’s Public Employees’ Collective Bargaining Act required municipalities to bargain collectively with employees over wages, hours, working conditions, and terms of employment. The union maintained that the new personnel system conflicted with collective bargaining because it called for uniform personnel procedures and conflicted with their ability to hire and promote employees based on merit rather than seniority. King County Superior Court accommodated the merit system and collective bargaining by ruling that the City of Seattle must bargain with employees under state law, while maintaining the personnel ordinance and declaring it consistent with the law. IFPTE, Local 17 v. City of Seattle is an important milestone in public employee rights.

During the 1980s, IFPTE experienced a labor crisis due to forced strikes and “union busters” preventing employees from organizing.

In February of 1992, members of the City of Tacoma’s Technical and Supervisor bargaining units ratified a three-year agreement modifying the City’s health care coverage and introducing a new substance abuse policy. These additional benefits included public transportation reimbursement. In May of 1992, IFPTE’s Tacoma members ratified a collective bargaining agreement with the City of Tacoma which was effective through December 1994. The agreement provided wage adjustments with a minimum increase of 3% to a maximum of 6% each year, covering approximately 180 employees in the Tacoma area.

During this time, union representatives also began negotiating collective bargaining agreements with Washington State Patrol and the Seattle Police Department, presenting proposals for the Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Officers (CVEO) contract, with upgrades in classification, pay rates, and a vote to make membership dues part of their conditions of employment. The union negotiators were CVEO president Ernie Brown, vice president Tom Woods, and IFPTE staff negotiator Karen Place. By 1993, over one hundred of the IFPTE members at the Seattle Police Department were upgraded to new classification titles and higher salary ranges.

In the summer of 1992, twenty Boeing machinists, also affiliated with the International Association of Machinists (IAM) District Lodge 751, joined IFPTE and selected the union as their bargaining representative. IFPTE and IAM District 751 coordinated an agreement outlining and protecting working conditions, benefits, and salaries of IAM District 751’s employees, which included 36,000 Boeing employees.

Another group associated with Boeing employees, was the Society of Professional Engineering Employees in Aerospace (SPEEA). On October 13, 1999 SPEEA members voted to become Local 2001 of IFPTE to officially become a union. They now represent Boeing, Spirit Aerosystems, and Triumph Composite Systems, with members throughout Washington, Kansas, Oregon, Utah, Florida, and California.

The union’s financial issues were a recurring problem and would not be alleviated until the mid-’90s. Failure to win convention votes to increase union dues resulted in a deficit of about $12,000 for 1992 and the inability to replace equipment. Even with the monthly assistance from the International Union Executive Council that they had been awarded. IFPTE needed a full membership vote to increase its dues. The dues had been the same since the ‘80s and the union could not keep up with rising costs without raising its dues. In November of 1992, IFPTE dues were .85% of gross monthly wages, while other unions were up to 1.3%. IFPTE was finally able to set aside funds from December 1994 through 1996. This meant new telephone systems, computer hardware, and other equipment for the union offices that hadn’t been upgraded since the ‘80s.

IFPTE was involved in every aspect of workers’ rights for the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT), including wage increases, construction zone safety, and freedom of speech. For many years, IFPTE’s Department of Transportation members were afflicted with a persistent pay lag. In July of 1991, the Washington State Legislature approved a 10% pay increase and restored the State employee health and welfare package. Any cuts that the union had suffered were restored and even more money was added to fund benefits. In January of 1995, the DOT and IFPTE worked together for reclassification and salary increases anywhere from 5-10% for DOT appraisers.

In Edwards v. Department of Transportation , engineer Roger Edwards had written a letter critical of his employer to the City of Tacoma. As a result, his salary was reduced for a five month period without due process prior to disciplinary action. The DOT claimed that his letter was an embarrassment to the department and potentially damaging to its relationship with the City. Edwards appealed to Thurston County Superior Court where it was initially determined that his due process rights were violated, but his freedom of speech was not. IFPTE and Edwards’ appealed again where it was found that his speech was protected and that it should not have resulted in any disciplinary action. Edwards was rewarded for damages, the missing pay, and attorney’s fees.

Construction zone safety for WSDOT employees was another large issue for the union. In 1994, IFPTE testified on safety standards and led the fight to lobby the lawmakers to stiffen penalties against motorists who endanger the lives of WSDOT employees in work zones. Increasing monetary penalties for speeding and the suspension of drivers’ licenses for 60 days. Later that year, Ed Fabeck, a transportation planning technician for WSDOT was killed by a vehicle while setting traffic counters on I-90, just outside of Spokane, WA. IFPTE created a fund to assist his family and remains dedicated to safety measures for workers.

IFPTE won many reclassification disputes for union employees. On November 17, 1992, Environmental Health employees at Yakima County Health District accepted a new labor agreement providing a 4% wage increase with the help of the union’s lead negotiator Laurie Brown. Just a couple months later, IFPTE helped Pierce County employees reach agreements with the County on enhancements for medical, dental, child care, life insurance, and wellness programs. In December of 1994, Julie Klontz of Personnel Tech, had been working at the level of a Tech III for Pierce County, but the County refused to reclassify her for unclear reasons. IFPTE representative Sarah Luthens argued the matter in arbitration, winning Klontz’ reclassification and over a year in differential back pay and benefits by February of 1995.

Meanwhile, IFPTE members voted to ratify the City of Seattle’s offer on health benefits and cost of living adjustment (COLA). These contract changes included a wage increase of 3.5%, improved retiree medical plans, and premium-free dental services from 1995 to 1997. Another pay increase for 1995, granted court reporters a fifty cent per page rate increase for indigent criminal appellate transcripts by the Supreme Court. This 18% raise was the first since 1988 when IFPTE previously petitioned the court for an increase. This was a surprising achievement at the time since the state legislature had severely cut the budget for indigent criminal work.

IFPTE participated in negotiations for new uniforms for multiple organizations, some with poor reception and some positive. From October 27, 1992 to December 31, 1994 Water Department meter readers were given the option to select uniform items from an approved clothing specification list, subject to approval of the City Council’s annual budget. IFPTE and the City of Seattle collaborated on this project due to the nature of some of the Water Department's duties. Meter readers had to be easily identified on private property, sometimes entering meter chambers below ground, and were exposed to harsh conditions. IFPTE believed that this program would address these concerns and provide workers with adequate uniforms. Concurrently, two members of IFPTE’s negotiation team, Ernie Brown and Tom Woods, joined the union’s business representative Karen Place for the signing of the Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Officer (CVEO) contract. Washington State Patrol management had suggested during negotiations that the State Patrol accreditation with the Commission on Accreditation of Law Enforcement Agencies (CALEA) might be hindered if CVEO’s remained in Class A uniforms—the same uniform as State Troopers. After the signing ceremony, a letter to IFPTE from CALEA stated that there would have been no such demand and that the renewal for accreditation would have been granted regardless of the uniform change. CVEO members and the IFPTE bargaining team were angered by this unnecessary alteration.

From February to June 1995, IFPTE with the help of the Conflict Management Institute, put together a special Shop Steward Training Program with follow-up and advanced training events. The sessions focused on representational and problem-solving skills, and bargaining unit training so that stewards and member leaders could learn in the context of their own contracts. In conjunction with training, IFPTE developed a guide for stewards as a reference on laws and grievance procedures. About 300 members participated in the training sessions, from the Washington State Patrol, Carpenter’s Union, Seattle City Light, Parks Department, Seattle's Department of Design, Construction and Land Use (DCLU), as well as the health districts of Benton-Franklin, Bremerton-Kitsap, King, Skagit, and Whatcom Counties.

IFPTE sponsored memberships to other labor organizations, such as the local chapter of The Asian Pacific Labor Alliance (APALA), an AFL-CIO organization formed to promote the interests of the Asian and Pacific Islander communities in the labor movement. IFPTE’s secretary-treasurer at the time, Allan Yamaguchi, was also the vice president of the Seattle chapter of APALA. The end of 1995 projected a busy bargaining year for 1996. Many agreements were expiring and IFPTE was preparing for negotiations by conducting contract proposal surveys, membership proposal meetings, and opening sessions with various employers. Negotiations for new agreements were set up for the Snohomish Health District, Spokane County, Seattle-King County, King County Superior Court reporters, DOT Engineering Services and Engineering Technicians, and others. IFPTE was one of the unions to lobby for the federal Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) in 1995, providing employees with more rights to stay home from work to recover from illness or care for loved ones. They also supported multiple unions and other labor organizations in their rallies and strike efforts. This included pledging economic assistance to preserve health care benefits for the International Aerospace and Machinists (IAM). For additional information on the International Federation of Professional and Technical Engineers and Professional and Technical Employees, Local 17, see IFPTE’s Outlook Magazine and PTE, Local 17’s Insight Magazine.

Other Descriptive InformationReturn to Top

Forms a part of the Labor Archives of Washington

Content DescriptionReturn to Top

These records are arranged into eleven series: compensation and class specifications, meeting notes, financial records, Puget Sound Power and Light Company, letters, agreements, organizing services, San Francisco chapter, union-related publications, 2000 convention, and union paraphernalia. Compensation and class specifications provide insight into the duties, titles, salary, and benefits of technical workers from 1928 to 1964. Financial records were arranged by year. Puget Sound Power and Light Company includes organization charts, National Labor Relations Board petition and briefs, and information on strike issues. Letters were arranged by topic and date. Agreements include multiple contracts concerning trade workers: Coulee Dam engineers, Pacific Coast Shipbuilders, public utilities workers, log scalers, technical engineers, architects, and the Seattle Metal Trades Council. Organizing services is divided between Boeing-related literature and general organizing letters and reports. Union-related publications include membership materials, copies of biographical drafts, and IFPTE’s West Coast Engineer Newsletters arranged by date, from 1981-1996. Union paraphernalia contains a labor songbook and photo negatives on wooden printing blocks.

Other Descriptive InformationReturn to Top

Forms a part of the Labor Archives of Washington

Use of the CollectionReturn to Top

Restrictions on Use

Creator's copyrights transferred to the University of Washington Libraries Special Collections.

Administrative InformationReturn to Top


Detailed Description of the CollectionReturn to Top

 

SERIES I:  COMPENSATION AND CLASS SPECIFICATIONSReturn to Top

Container(s): Box-folder 1/1-1/13

Container(s) Description Dates
Box/Folder
1/1
Wages of King County Engineers
June 17, 1939-January 22, 1940
1/2
Local 17 Salary Schedule
May 1928
1/3
Wage Proposals to Seattle City Council: 1955-1966
August 1954-1966
1/4
Recommended Class Specifications: City of Seattle (1 of 3)
1964
1/5
Recommended Class Specifications: City of Seattle (2 of 3)
1964
1/6
Recommended Class Specifications: City of Seattle (3 of 3)
1964
1/7
Job Class Specifications of Seattle 1938 (1 of 3)
May 7, 1938
1/8
Job Class Specifications of Seattle 1938 (2 of 3)
May 7, 1938
1/9
Job Class Specifications of Seattle 1938 (3 of 3)
May 7, 1938
1/10
Job Class Specifications of Seattle, binder ( 1 of 2)
July 27, 1960-October 24, 1968
1/11
Job Class Specifications of Seattle, binder (2 of 2)
July 27, 1960-October 24, 1968
1/12
Local 17 Salary and Benefits
December 1942-January 31, 1962
1/13
Architects Classification and Salary
February 17, 1937

SERIES II:  MEETING NOTESReturn to Top

Container(s): Box-folder 1/14-2/2

Container(s) Description Dates
Box/Folder
1/14
Local 17 Meeting Notes (1 of 2)
August 30, 1927-December 14, 1933
1/15
Local 17 Meeting Notes (2 of 2)
December 13, 1934-December 30, 1936
1/16
Committee Meeting Binder 1944-1956 (1 of 3)
January 10, 1944-December 13, 1956
1/17
Committee Meeting Binder 1944-1956 (2 of 3)
January 10, 1944-December 13, 1956
1/18
Committee Meeting Binder 1944-1956 (3 of 3)
January 10, 1944-December 13, 1956
1/19
Local 17 Meeting Minutes 1957-1966 (1 of 2)
January 10, 1957-January 10, 1966
1/20
Local 17 Meeting Minutes 1957-1966 (2 of 2)
January 10, 1957-January 10, 1966
2/1
Miscellaneous Meeting Notes and Documents (1 of 2)
October 26, 1939-December 22, 1943
2/2
Miscellaneous Meeting Notes and Documents (2 of 2)
October 26, 1939-December 22, 1943

SERIES III:  FINANCIAL RECORDSReturn to Top

Container(s): Box-folder 2/3-7/5

Container(s) Description Dates
Box/Folder
2/3-6/1
Subseries A: Accounting Binders
Box/Folder
2/3
Accounting Binders, 1943-1956 (1 of 4)
January 1943-January 1956
2/4
Accounting Binders, 1943-1956 (2 of 4)
January 1943-January 1956
2/5
Accounting Binders, 1943-1956 (3 of 4)
January 1943-January 1956
2/6
Accounting Binders, 1943-1956 (4 of 4)
January 1943-January 1956
3/1
Accounting Binders, 1943-1954 (1 of 4)
January 5, 1943-December 31, 1954
3/2
Accounting Binders,1943-1954 (2 of 4)
January 5, 1943-December 31, 1954
3/3
Accounting Binders,1943-1954 (3 of 4)
January 5, 1943-December 31, 1954
3/4
Accounting Binders,1943-1954 (4 of 4)
January 5, 1943-December 31, 1954
3/5
Accounting Binders, 1955-1957
January 1955-December 1957
3/6
Accounting Binders, 1957-1965 (1 of 2)
1957-1965
3/7
Accounting Binders, 1957-1965 (2 of 2)
1957-1965
3/8
Accounting Binders, 1962-1972 (1 of 3)
January 1962-March 1972
4/1
Accounting Binders, 1962-1972 (2 of 3)
January 1962-March 1972
4/2
Accounting Binders, 1962-1972 (3 of 3)
January 1962-March 1972
4/3
Accounting Binder, 1971
1971
4/4
Accounting Binders, 1974-1980 (1 of 4)
January 1974-December 1980
4/5
Accounting Binders, 1974-1980 (2 of 4)
January 1974-December 1980
4/6
Accounting Binders, 1974-1980 (3 of 4)
January 1974-December 1980
4/7
Accounting Binders, 1974-1980 (4 of 4)
January 1974-December 1980
5/1
Accounting Binders, 1975-1989 (1 of 2)
January 1975-June 1989
5/2
Accounting Binders, 1975-1989 (2 of 2)
January 1975-June 1989
5/3
Accounting Binders, 1978-1987 (1 of 2)
January 1978-July 1987
5/4
Accounting Binders, 1978-1987 (2 of 2)
January 1978-July 1987
5/5
Accounting Binders, 1980-1988 (1 of 2)
December 31, 1980-September 30, 1988
5/6
Accounting Binders, 1980-1988 (2 of 2)
December 31, 1980-September 30, 1988
5/7
Accounting Binders, 1981-1983
January 1981-December 1983
6/1
Accounting Binders, 1981-1985
1981-1985
6/2-7/5
Subseries B: Other Financial Documents
Box/Folder
6/2
Financial Notes and Cash Books (1 of 3)
1931-1940
6/3
Financial Notes and Cash Books (2 of 3)
1940-1944
6/4
Financial Notes and Cash Books (3 of 3)
1968-1987
6/5
Lists of Members and Payroll
July 17 1936-November 8, 1940
6/6
Miscellaneous Receipts
October 8, 1937-August 23, 1938
6/7
Professional and Technical Employees Accounting: Per Capita Payments 1975-1981
January 10, 1975-December 7, 1981
7/1
Inventory-Accounting/Administrative Files
January 31, 1983-February 29, 1984
7/2
Cash and Public Disclosure Commission Binder (1 of 2)
February 4, 1984-January 4, 1988
7/3
Cash and Public Disclosure Commission Binder (2 of 2)
February 4, 1984-January 4, 1988
7/4
Professional and Technical Employees Accounting: Financial Reports 1985-1988
September 1985-December 1988
7/5
The City Record: Budget for 1937
July 7, 1937

SERIES IV:  PUGET SOUND POWER AND LIGHT COMPANYReturn to Top

Container(s): Box-folder 8/1-Oversize

Container(s) Description Dates
Box/Folder
8/1
Collective Bargaining (1 of 2)
January 12, 1970-March 31, 1972
8/2
Collective Bargaining ( 2 of 2)
January 12, 1970-March 31, 1972
8/3
Benefits
February 1970-December 10, 1971
8/4
Job Descriptions
December 23, 1969-January 7, 1971
8/5
National Labor Relations Board Petition
January 5, 1970-March 21, 1972
8/6
Miscellaneous
August 5, 1970-March 25, 1971
8/7
Strike
January 27, 1971-February 22, 1971
8/8
National Labor Relations Board Briefs (1 of 2)
December 19, 1969-March 25, 1970
8/9
National Labor Relations Board Briefs (2 of 2)
December 19, 1969-March 25, 1970
Oversize
Organization Chart
C. 1970s
Oversize
Organization Chart
C. 1970s

SERIES V:  LETTERSReturn to Top

Container(s): Box-folder 9/1-9/8

Container(s) Description Dates
Box/Folder
9/1
On Workers' Rights (1 of 2)
January 3, 1927-February 6, 1958
9/2
On Workers' Rights (2 of 2)
September 1936-August 1938
9/3
1936 Letters Sent & Received
February 20, 1936-December 31, 1936
9/4
1937 Letters Received (1 of 2)
January 4, 1937-August 11, 1937
9/5
1937 Letters Received (2 of 2)
July 7, 1937-November 11, 1937
9/6
1937 Letters Sent
January 4, 1937-August 12, 1937
9/7
University of Washington Board of Regents
December 1931-October 13, 1937
9/8
Received from C.L. Rosemund
March 5, 1936-June 5, 1937

SERIES VI:  AGREEMENTSReturn to Top

Container(s): Box-folder 10/1-10/13

Container(s) Description Dates
Box/Folder
10/1
Jurisdiction and Trade
January 13, 1938-August 18, 1938
10/2
1977 Charter Amendments-Municipal Elections
October 13, 1977-November 17, 1977
10/3
Coulee Dam Engineers
July 30, 1937
10/4
Pacific Coast Shipbuilders
1941-1961
10/5
Public Utilities
March 28, 1949-May 31, 1962
10/6
Log Scalers' Working Agreement
September 20, 1950-November 24, 1953
10/7
Technical Engineers' Agreements
November 1, 1945-December 31, 1958
10/8
Architects' Agreements
March 1, 1946-November 2, 1948
10/9
Spokane
September 1968
10/10
Skagit County
October 23, 1968-January 17, 1971
10/11
Thurston-Mason County Health District (1 of 2)
November 26, 1968-August 19, 1971
10/12
Thurston-Mason County Health District (2 of 2)
November 26, 1968-August 19, 1971
10/13
Seattle Metal Trades Council Master Contract
1941-1944

SERIES VII:  ORGANIZING SERVICESReturn to Top

Container(s): Box-folder 11/1-11/9

Container(s) Description Dates
Box/Folder
11/1-11/6
Subseries A: General
Box/Folder
11/1
General Letters and Reports
July 6, 1966-February 26, 1975
11/2
Mare Island
August 13, 1970-December 21, 1970
11/3
Great Northern Railway
March 4, 1968-April 29, 1971
11/4
Norfolk Naval Shipyard
July 22, 1970-August 12, 1970
11/5
San Francisco Area
November 20, 1965-January 27, 1972
11/6
Canada
June 24, 1968-February 1972
11/7-11/9
Subseries B: Boeing-Related
Box/Folder
11/7
Mailing Lists
C. 1971
11/8
Campaign Literature
September 1, 1971-May 8, 1972
11/9
Research
December 1970-December 14, 1971

SERIES VIII:  SAN FRANCISCO CHAPTERReturn to Top

Container(s) Description Dates
Box/Folder
12/1
Correspondance (1 of 2)
October 10, 1969-June 25, 1971
12/2
Correspondance (2 of 2)
October 10, 1969-June 25, 1971
12/3
Wage Standardization
1968-August 1970
12/4
California State Senate Bill No. 1228
1968
12/5
Redevelopment Agency: Petition and Certification
October 23, 1970-December 23, 1970
12/6
Agreements
June 16, 1969-August 12, 1971

SERIES IX:  UNION-RELATED PUBLICATIONSReturn to Top

Container(s): Box-folder 12/7-14/12

Container(s) Description Dates
Box/Folder
12/7-12/10
Subseries A: Membership
Box/Folder
12/7
Application for Membership
June 29, 1936-August 1937
12/8
Applications for Charter Memberships
June 25, 1937-August 24, 1938
12/9
A Brief Guide to Local 17
July 16, 1986-August 12, 1986
12/10
Local 17 Legislative Handbooks
1995-1999
13/1-13/2
Subseries B: Seattle Personnel Ordinance
Box/Folder
13/1
Letters and Reports
October 20, 1977-February 10, 1981
13/2
Citizens' Committee binder
December 15, 1977-May 8, 1978
13/3-13/5
Subseries C: Histories of Local 17
13/3
Typed Drafts
December 1942-1960
13/4
Handwritten Copies
December 1942-December 1958
13/5
Historical Outline of IFPTE's Organizing & Servicing of Locals Binder
1987
13/6-14/12
Subseries D: West Coast Engineer Newsletters
Box/Folder
13/6
1981
October 1981
13/7
1991
January 1991-November 1991
14/1
1992
January 1992-December 1992
14/2
1993
January 1993-December 1993
14/3
1994
January 1994-December 1994
14/4
1995 (1 of 3)
January 1995-April 1995
14/5
1995 (2 of 3)
May 1995-September 1995
14/6
1995 (3 of 3)
September 1995-December 1995
14/7
1996 (1 of 3)
January 1996-April 1996
14/8
1996 (2 of 3)
May 1996-October 1996
14/9
1996 (3 of 3)
September 1996-December 1996
14/10
Union-related Articles and Newsletter Resources (1 of 3)
June 1990-January 1996
14/11
Union-related Articles and Newsletter Resources (2 of 3)
June 1990-January 1996
14/12
Union-related Articles and Newsletter Resources (3 of 3)
June 1990-January 1996

SERIES X:  2000 CONVENTIONReturn to Top

Container(s): Box-folder 14/13-14/16

Container(s) Description Dates
Box/Folder
14/13
Convention Binder (1 of 2)
July 24, 2000-July 2000
14/14
Convention Binder (2 of 2)
July 24, 2000-July 2000
14/15
Officers' Report and Directory
July 24, 2000-July 2000
14/16
Convention Hand Fan
July 24, 2000-July 2000

SERIES XI:  UNION PARAPHERNALIAReturn to Top

Container(s): Box-folder 14/17-14/19

Container(s) Description Dates
Box/Folder
14/17
Negatives on Wooden Printing Blocks
undated
14/18
Kipper York Essay and Floppy Disk
circa 1990s
14/19
Songs for Labor Songbook
December 1983

Names and SubjectsReturn to Top

  • Subject Terms :
  • Contracts for work and labor--Oregon
  • Contracts for work and labor--Washington (State)
  • Labor movement--Oregon
  • Labor movement--Washington (State)
  • Labor union members--Oregon
  • Labor union members--Washington (State)
  • Labor union members--Washington (State)--Congresses
  • Labor unions--Oregon
  • Labor unions--Oregon--Congresses
  • Labor unions--Washington (State)
  • Labor--Oregon
  • Labor--Washington (State)
  • Corporate Names :
  • Professional & Technical Employees. Local 17--Archives
  • Form or Genre Terms :
  • Ephemera
  • Minutes (Records)
  • Records (Documents)
  • Other Creators :
    • Corporate Names :
    • Labor Archives of Washington (University of Washington),   host institution (creator)