Seattle Model Cities Program Records, 1967-1975  PDF

Overview of the Collection

Creator
Seattle Model Cities Program
Title
Seattle Model Cities Program Records
Dates
1967-1975 (inclusive)
Quantity
104.2 cubic ft., (221 boxes and 6 volumes)
Collection Number
5400
Summary
Records of the Seattle Model Cities Program, 1967-1975. Included are administrative files, correspondence, reports, task force files, and program and project files.
Repository
Seattle Municipal Archives
Seattle Municipal Archives
Office of the City Clerk
City of Seattle
PO Box 94728
98124-4728
Seattle, WA
Telephone: 206-233-7807
Fax: 206-386-9025
archives@seattle.gov
Access Restrictions

Records are open to the public.

Languages
English
Sponsor
Funding for encoding this finding aid was provided through a grant awarded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.


Historical NoteReturn to Top

Model Cities Program

In response to urban problems of poverty and race in the United States, Congress passed legislation in November 1966 to initiate a demonstration effort known as the Model Cities Program. Called the Demonstration Cities and Metropolitan Act of 1966 PL 754, the primary goal of this legislation was to improve the quality of urban life. The Model Cities Program goals and objectives were to reduce social and economic disadvantages in designated neighborhoods, provide maximum training and employment opportunities, and establish health services for residents. Financial and technical assistance was made available to cities, through the Department of Housing and Urban Development, to ameliorate social, economic, and physical conditions in needed neighborhoods. City agencies were required to coordinate their efforts and the program emphasized the citizen participation. The goals of the program were to coordinate and concentrate federal, state and local resources, develop innovative programs, and to involve local residents in the planning and development process.

Eligible cities received one-year planning grants to prepare Comprehensive Plans. Implementation and on-going planning occurred over a five-year demonstration period. Seattle was the first city chosen to receive federal funds. The planning process involved creating a Comprehensive Plan in the first eight months, quantifying five-year objectives for the Model Neighborhood Area and developing first-year action plans and programs.

An extension of the Model Cities program was launched August 1, 1972 by the Nixon administration to provide for more review, involvement, and cooperation by various levels of local government and citizens, with less review at the federal level. Nixon approved $2.3 billion to fund model cities from 1969 to 1973. Model Cities funding was terminated June 20, 1975.

Seattle Model Cities Program

The Mayor and City Council supported an ad hoc committee, which first met in November 1966, to prepare a grant application. The committee defined the Model Neighborhood as the Central Area, Pioneer Square, and the International District. The population of this geographical area comprised about 10 percent of the city's population and about 61% of the city's non-white population. The initial application stated "Seattle is a city which is still short of the crisis situation of the older urban centers…The Model neighborhood is in the initial stages of decay, not the final stages….It is because we do still have time that we have developed the sense of urgency to attack our problems now."

The program was administered by the City's Executive Department. Walter Hundley, 38, was announced as the program director in December 1967. Hundley came to Seattle in 1954 to serve as a minister of a nondenominational church and later joined the State Department of Public Assistance. In 1967 he was Director of the Central Area Motivation Program, an anti-poverty project in Seattle. Hundley was chosen by a 10-member citizen's committee, headed by Charles Brink, Dean of the School of Social Work at the University of Washington.

The major components of the administrative structure for SMCP consisted of an Advisory Council, Steering Committee, staff, and task forces. The Advisory Council consisted of over 80 members representing organizations within the Model Neighborhood.

Task forces worked with staff on planning. Based on work done by the Task Forces, Hundley reorganized and rewrote the drafts and submitted to HUD. HUD announced in December 1968 that Seattle's First-Year Action Program was the first to be approved for funding. The First-Year Action Program proposed projects in nine areas which corresponded to the focus of each task force. The areas included: Arts and Culture, Education, Employment and Economic Development, Health, Housing, Law and Justice, Physical Planning and Environment, Welfare, and Youth. From 1968 to 1971, the SMCP was successful in planning, developing, and implementing a variety of effective programs. Programs were developed in collaboration with the model neighborhood, which included, community activists, and a variety of agencies at local, state, and federal levels.

In 1971, Seattle was one of 16 cities chosen to participate in the Planned Variation or city-wide expansion. The Seattle Model Cities Program received $5.2 million in federal funds and the program was expanded to include three additional neighborhoods: north Seattle, southeast Seattle, and southwest Seattle. Walter Hundley was appointed to a city-wide post by Mayor Wes Uhlman and Louis C. Warner was appointed manager of the east branch, the city's original program. Jim Hurd and then George Clark were managers of the Southwest Branch; John Ybarra, Jr. was manager of the Southeast Branch; the North Branch manger was John Mitsules.

Seattle's Model Cities funding ended in 1974 and the program was transferred that year to the Department of Human Resources for closeout. Following the loss of funding, many projects were continued under the auspices of community organizations, larger institutions, City agencies, and other governmental entities. Some received ongoing funding through the Community Development Block Grant program.

Content DescriptionReturn to Top

Records of the Model Cities Program are arranged in two sub-groups and date from 1967 to 1975. The Administrative records measure 57.2 cubic feet and are arranged in 19 series. The Program and Project files measure 44 cubic feet.

The Administrative Records provide details of SMCP from many different perspectives. The largest volume of records are those of Director Walter Hundley. His correspondence with HUD, City officials, state and local government officials, community leaders and SMCP employees offers a detailed view of the issues and complexities presented by SMCP. Records from each piece of the administrative structure: the Advisory Council, task forces, and Branch Offices complement Hundley's records to provide a very complete picture of the difficulties and successes of SMCP. Correspondence with officials in other Model Cities programs throughout the country provides a national perspective on the Model Cities Program.

The two largest subseries within Administrative Records are the Central Administrative Files (5400-03) and the Task Force Files (5402-04) and would be good beginning places for research on the Seattle Model Cities Program. The Central Administrative Files include correspondence and reports at all levels of the SMCP. The records provide a good overview of the main participants, projects, and working relationships in the SMCP, and other participants at the local level as well as the regional, state and national level.

The Task Force Files provide information on how the work within SMCP was accomplished, the projects undertaken as well as the difficulties and successes are discussed in Weekly Reports and Correspondence. The breadth and scope of projects is apparent in these records. The records can also be used to learn about the cooperative nature of SMCP projects, between citizens, community groups and government agencies.

Use of the CollectionReturn to Top

Preferred Citation

[Item and date], Seattle Model Cities Program Records, Record Series 5400-[xx]. Box [number], Folder [number]. Seattle Municipal Archives.

Administrative InformationReturn to Top


Detailed Description of the CollectionReturn to Top

The following section contains a detailed listing of the materials in the collection.

Administrative RecordsReturn to Top

57.4 cubic ft.
Container(s) Description Dates
5400-01: Director's Correspondence, 1968-1973
2.8 cubic ft.
Correspondence and memoranda of Walter Hundley, Director of the Seattle Model Cities Program. Dating from 1968 through 1973, it is arranged chronologically. The correspondence is largely of an administrative nature; personnel and financial issues are prominent. Programmatic issues can be followed to some degree through the director's correspondence. Organizations with whom Hundley corresponded frequently include those in the City of Seattle Parks and Recreation Department and Department of Human Resources, the Seattle Public Schools, community groups, including Central Seattle Community Council, Seattle Urban League, and Central Area Motivation Program (CAMP), and health organizations, including Children's Orthopedic Hospital.
Box/Folder
1/1
Correspondence: January
1968
1/2
Correspondence: February
1968
1/3
Correspondence: March
1968
1/4
Correspondence: April
1968
1/5
Correspondence: May
1968
1/6
Correspondence: June
1968
1/7
Correspondence: July
1968
1/8
Correspondence: August
1968
1/9
Correspondence: September-October
1968
1/10
Correspondence: November-December
1968
1/11
Correspondence: January-February
1969
1/12
Correspondence: March-April
1969
1/13
Correspondence: May-June
1969
1/14
Correspondence: July-August
1969
2/1
Correspondence: September-October
1969
2/2
Correspondence: November
1969
2/3
Correspondence: December
1969
2/4
Correspondence: Incoming
1969
2/5
Memorandum
1969
2/6
Correspondence: January-February
1970
2/7
Correspondence: March
1970
2/8
Correspondence: April
1970
2/9
Correspondence: May
1970
3/1-3
Correspondence: June-August
1970
3/4
Correspondence: September-October
1970
3/5-6
Correspondence: November-December
1970
3/7
Incoming Correspondence: January-June
1970
3/8
Incoming Correspondence: July-December
1970
4/1
Correspondence: January-February
1971
4/2
Correspondence: March
1971
4/3
Correspondence: April-May
1971
4/4
Correspondence: June
1971
4/5
Correspondence: July
1971
4/6
Correspondence: August-September
1971
4/7
October
1971
4/8
November-December
1971
5/1
Incoming Correspondence: January-April
1971
5/2
Incoming Correspondence: May-June
1971
5/3
Incoming Correspondence: July-December
1971
5/4
Memoranda: January - July
1971
5/5
Memoranda: August- December
1971
5/6
Memoranda: January - June
1972
5/7
Memoranda: July - December
1972
6/1
Correspondence: January
1972
6/2
Correspondence: February
1972
6/3
Correspondence: March
1972
6/4
Correspondence: April-May
1972
6/5
Correspondence: June
1972
6/6
Correspondence: July-August
1972
6/7
Correspondence: September-October
1972
6/8
Correspondence: November-December
1972
7/1
Incoming Correspondence
1972
7/2
Correspondence: January-February
1973
7/3
Correspondence: March-May
1973
7/4
Correspondence: June-August
1973
7/5
Correspondence: September-October
1973
7/6
Correspondence: November-December
1973
7/7
Incoming Correspondence
1973
7/8
Memoranda
1973
5400-02: US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Correspondence, 1967-1976
1.4 cubic ft.
Correspondence, directives, and memoranda between various HUD officials and SMCP participants regarding procedures, administration, and evaluation of SMCP funds and programs. There are three subseries: Correspondence, arranged by correspondent, Subject Files, arranged alphabetically, and National Model Cities. The correspondence and meeting minutes of the Model Cities Directors Association is included here, and provides a glimpse of the Model Cities Program at a national level. The HUD correspondence reflects the complexities of managing a national program of huge scope at the local, regional, and national levels.
Correspondence
Box/Folder
1/1
Walter Hundley
1968-1970
1/2
Walter Hundley
1971
1/3
Memoranda
1968
1/4
Memoranda
1969-1971
1/5
Robert H. Baida
1970
1/6
Andrew Bella, Assistant Regional Administrator
1967-1969
1/7
Andrew Bella, Assistant Regional Administrator
1970
1/8
Floyd Hyde, Assistant Secretary (includes Task Force)
1969
1/9
Floyd Hyde, Assistant Secretary
1969-1970
1/10
Floyd Hyde, Assistant Secretary
1971-1973
1/11
Martin Miller, Assistant Regional Administrator
1970
1/12
Martin Miller, Assistant Regional Administrator
1971-1972
1/13
Region X, Area Director
1970
1/14
Region X, Area Director
1971
1/15
Region X, Area Director
1972-1976
Subject Files
Box/Folder
1/16
Conferences and Seminars (includes Industry)
1968
1/17
Legislation
1968
1/18
Legislation: Demonstration Cities Act of 1966 and HUD Act of 1968
1968-1969
1/19
Better Communities Act
1973-1974
1/20
Program Information
1968-1969
1/21
Planner Variations Waivers
1971-1972
1/22
Consultants
1971-1972
1/23
General Neighborhood Renewal Program: South Central (includes maps)
1971-1972
1/24
One-Year and Five-Year Program Plans and Program Cuts
1968-1973
1/25
Residential Rehabilitation
1969
1/26
Social Services Bulletins
1968
1/27
Technical Assistance Memos
1970
2/1
Model Cities Service Center
1970-1972
National Model Cities
Box/Folder
2/2
Model Cities Directors Association
1968-1970
2/3
Model Cities Directors Association: Conference
1968-1970
2/4
Model Cities Directors Association
1971-1972
2/5
National Model Cities
1968
2/6
National Model Cities
1969
2/7
National Model Cities
1970
2/8
National Model Cities
1971-1972
5400-03: Seattle Model Cities Program Central Administration Files, 1967-1974
11.2 cubic ft.
Administrative records of the Seattle Model Cities Program include correspondence and reports within the program regarding planning and programmatic issues, correspondence with other levels of government, including city, state, and federal, and proposals. The records are arranged in seven subseries: Administrative, City, State, Federal, Organizations, Grants and Proposals, and Publicity. The Administrative subseries measures 4.75 cubic feet and includes information regarding the internal organization and challenges of the Model Cities Program in Seattle. Included are staff meeting minutes, financial reports, and work program planning. In addition to the Director Walter Hundley, primary correspondents include Dorothy Hollingsworth, Murray Meld, Albert Adams, Michael Conant, and Bernard Salazar. The records are arranged alphabetically within each year. The second subseries contains correspondence between the Seattle Model Cities Program and various City departments. These records measure 2.25 cubic feet. Correspondence of Rosemary Horwood in the Department of Community Development is included here and records of the Yesler Atlantic Neighborhood Improvement Project (YANIP) are part of this group. Correspondence with the Law Department, the Department of Parks and Recreation, and the Office of the Mayor are included as well. Correspondence between SMCP and State agencies measures 1.25 cubic feet and includes communications between SMCP staff and various task forces, committees, boards, and departments. The Department of Public Assistance and the City-State Task Force are the largest files. Correspondence between SMCP and individuals in Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW) makes up the bulk of records in the Federal subseries, which measures .75 cubic feet. The subseries Organizations reflects the relationship of SMCP with community organizations. The records measure 2.0 cubic feet. They include requests from organizations to work with SMCP as well as correspondence between SMCP staff and others on projects. Some of the organizations include Checkmate Enterprises, Central Area Civil Rights Committee and NAACP. There are also several folders of correspondence with Seattle Public Schools. Proposals and grant applications are arranged chronologically. Included are proposals and grant applications from a variety of community, educational, and health organizations for a broad spectrum of projects. Included are programs for the elderly, Native Americans, Samoans and gypsies, as well as residents of the Central Area. Projects include health clinics, alcohol recovery centers, job training, counseling, and transportation. Publicity includes a newsletter put out by Hundley "Director's Message" and newspaper clippings. Researchers should also see the scrapbooks for more newspaper clippings. The newsletter "Seattle Model City News Report" dates from 1970 to 1971.
Administrative
Box/Folder
1/1
Organization Charts
1968
1/2
City Demonstration Agency (CDA) Budget
1968
1/3
City Demonstration Agency Contract
1968
1/4
Community Renewal Program (HUD): Progress Reports and Correspondence
1968
1/5
Financial Statements
1968
1/6
Progress Reports
1968
1/7
Facilities Needs
1968
1/8
Research and Evaluation
1968
1/9
Work Program Planning
1968
1/10
Central Area Motivation Program (CAMP) Communications Coordinator
1968
1/11
Citizen Input
1968
1/12
Citizen Input: Advocate Planners
1968
1/13
Community Agency Coordination
1968
1/14
Planning: Proposal Coordination
1968
1/15
Planning
1968
1/16-17
Sociological/Household Survey
1968
1/18
Task Force Schedules
1968
1/19
Task Force Planning
1968-1969
1/20
Office Reports
1968
1/21
Staff Meeting Minutes
1968
1/22
Symbol/Logo
1968
1/23
Program Reports to HUD
1969
1/24
Community Renewal Program (HUD) Progress Reports
1969
1/25
Financial: City Demonstration Agency (CDA) Budget
1969
1/26
Financial: Correspondence
1969
1/27
Financial: Statements
1969
1/28
Financial: Base Calculation
1969
1/29
Financial: Weekly Reports to Director
1969
1/30
Facilities
1969
1/31
Program Proposals
1969
1/32
Planning (Deputy Director Dorothy Hollingsworth)
1969
1/33
Planning: Incoming Correspondence
1969
1/34
Planning: Second Year Action Plan
1969
1/35
Planning: Community Agency Coordination
1969
1/36
Public Information Office: Correspondence
1969
1/37
State of Washington Coordination Program
1969
1/38
Task Force Schedules
1969
2/1
Work Program
1969
2/2
Work Program Development
1969
2/3
Work Program Reports
1969
2/4
Staff Meeting Minutes
1969
2/5
Writing Coordinating
1969
2/6
Research and Evaluation: Correspondence
1969
2/7
Research and Evaluation: Memoranda
1969
2/8
Research and Evaluation: Citizen Participation
1969
2/9
Research and Evaluation: Federal Grants CDA #7
1969
2/10
Research and Evaluation: Information Management Systems
1969
2/11
Research and Evaluation: Battelle Institute
1969
2/12
Research and Evaluation: Reports and Studies (includes Marshall, Kaplan, Gans, and Kahn study)
1969
2/13
Monthly Program Progress Reports to HUD
1969-1970
2/14
Project Proposals
1969-1970
2/15
Work Program Status
1969-1970
12/1
Audit Strategy (Touche Ross)
1970
2/16
Budget
1970
2/17
Budget Revisions
1970-1971
2/18
Expansion: Planned Variations
1970
2/19
Financial: Community Renewal Program
1970-1971
2/20
Financial: Federal Funding
1970
2/21
Financial: Touche Ross Audits
1970
2/22
Healthy Economic Life for Puget Sound (HELPS) Task Force
1970
2/23
Legal Opinions
1970
2/24
Agency and Governmental Relations: Correspondence
1970
2/25
Planning Department: Correspondence (1)
1970
2/26
Planning Department: Correspondence (2)
1970
2/27
Planning: Second Year Action Plan
1970
2/28
Project Directors and Planning Staff Meetings
1970-1972
2/29
Program Management and Evaluation: Project Folders Review
1970
2/30
Project Monitoring and Evaluation
1970
2/31
Program Progress Reports
1970
3/1
Publications
1970
3/2
Progress Reports: Quarterly
1970-1972
3/3
Contract Reports
1970-1973
3/4
Research and Evaluation: In Kind Contributions
1970-1971
3/5
Research and Evaluation
1970
3/6
Research and Evaluation: Correspondence
1970
3/7
Research and Evaluation: Proposals and Correspondence
1970
3/8
Program Breakdown Structure
1971-1973
3/9
Third Year Action Plan
1971
3/10
Fourth Year Planning
1971-1972
3/11
Employee Status Reports
1971
3/12
Expansion: Planned Variations
1971-1973
3/13
Facilities: Astor Building
1971-1972
3/14
Financial: Touche Ross Audits
1971-1974
3/15
Intergovernmental Affairs: Correspondence
1971
3/16
Legal Correspondence
1971
3/17
Planning Department: Correspondence
1971
3/18
Program Control
1971-1972
3/19
Program Control: Information Unit
1971-1972
3/20
Program Management and Evaluation
1971
3/21
Program Management: Federal Grant Information
1971
3/22
Program Planning: Correspondence
1971
3/23
Public Affairs: Correspondence
1971-1972
3/24
Seattle Times: "Troubleshooter"
1971-1974
3/25
Task Force Monitors
1971
4/1
Boundary Maps
1972
12/2
Chief Executive Review and Comment - Grants Management Office
1971-1973
12/3
Chief Executive Review and Comment - Grants Management Office - Quarterly Grants Reports
1973
12/4
Chief Executive Review and Comment - Grants Management Office
1972-1973
4/2
Employee Status Reports
1972-1973
4/3
Expansion: Planned Variations
1972-1973
4/4
Fourth Year Planning
1972-1973
4/5
Financial: HUD Supplemental Funding
1972-1973
4/6
Financial: Revenue Summary
1972-1973
4/7
Policies
1972
4/8
Program Control: Correspondence
1972-1973
4/9
Program Planning: Correspondence
1972
4/10
Program Planning and Monitoring
1972
4/11
Public Affairs
1972
4/12
Public Affairs
1972-1973
4/13
Quarterly Reports
1972-1973
4/14
Financial: In Kind Contributions
1973
4/15
Financial: Internal Auditor
1972-1973
4/16
Financial: "New Federalism"
1973
4/17
Fifth Year Action Plan: East Branch
1973-1974
4/18
Program Control: Evaluation Unit
1973
4/19
Program Planning: Correspondence
1973
4/20
Project Evaluation Reports
1973
4/21
Project Evaluations: Final
1973
4/22
Phase Out
1973-1974
4/23
Program Planning
1974-1975
4/24
Systems Development/Technology
1974-1975
City
Box/Folder
4/25
City Council
1968
4/26
City Team
1968
4/27
Office of the Mayor
1967-1968
4/28
Capitol Improvement Project
1968-1969
4/29
Seattle Development Program Advisory Committee
1968
4/30
Yesler Atlantic Neighborhood Improvement Project (YANIP)
1968
5/1
Budget Office
1969
5/2
City Council
1969
5/3
Corporation Counsel
1969-1970
5/4
Department of Community Development
1969
5/5
Department of Engineering
1969
5/6
Department of Parks and Recreation
1969
5/7
Job Trainee Program
1969
5/8
Human Rights Commission
1969
5/9
Office of the Mayor
1969
5/10
Seattle Design Commission
1969
5/11
Transportation
1969
5/12
Yesler Atlantic Neighborhood Improvement Project (YANIP)
1969
5/13
Budget
1970
5/14
Budget Office
1970
5/15
City Council
1970
5/16
Civil Service
1970
5/17
Corporation Counsel
1970
5/18
Cooperative Area Manpower Planning Systems
1970
5/19
Department of Buildings
1970
5/20
Department of Community Development
1970
5/21
Department of Community Development/Rosemary Horwood
1970-1971
5/22
Department of Engineering
1970
5/23
Department of Parks and Recreation
1970
5/24
General Neighborhood Renewal Program: South Central Business
1970-1971
5/25
Seattle Design Commission
1970
5/26
General: Various Departments
1970
5/27
Human Rights Commission
1970
5/28
Mayor's Consortium on Youth
1970
5/29
Office of the Mayor
1970
5/30
Personnel Office
1970
5/31
Seattle Planning Commission
1970
5/32
Transportation
1970
5/33
Seattle/King County Department of Public Health
1970
5/34
Yesler Atlantic Urban Renewal Program (YANIP)
1970-1971
5/35
Board of Public Works
1971
5/36
Charter Change Proposals
1971
5/37
City Council
1971
5/38
Cooperative Area Manpower Planning System (CAMPS)
1971
5/39
Corporation Counsel
1971-1972
6/1
Department of Buildings
1971-1972
6/2
Department of Community Development
1971
6/3
Department of Community Development/Rosemary Horwood
1971-1972
6/4
Department of Engineering
1971
6/5
Department of Human Rights
1971
6/6
Department of Parks Recreation
1971-1972
6/7
Departments (Various)
1971-1972
6/8
Drug/Alcohol Program Coordinator
1971-1972
6/9
Job Trainee Program
1971
6/10
Office of Management and Budget
1971-1972
6/11
Office of the Mayor
1971-1972
6/12
Personnel Office
1971-1972
6/13
Public Employment Program
1971-1972
6/14
Seattle-King County Department of Public Health
1971-1972
6/15
Transportation
1971-1972
6/16
Washington Alaska Regional Medical Program
1971-1972
6/17
Affirmative Action Program
1972
6/18
City Council
1972
6/19
Department of Community Development 1972 (includes Lake Union Action Plan Phase II)
1972
6/20
Department of Engineering
1972
6/21
Board of Adjustment
1973
6/22
City Council
1973-1974
6/23
City Light
1973-1974
6/24
Civil Service
1973-1974
6/25
Community Renewal Program
1972-1973
6/26
Corporation Counsel
1973-1974
6/27
Department of Buildings
1973-1974
6/28
Department of Engineering
1973-1974
6/29
Department of Human Resources
1973-1974
6/30
Department of Parks and Recreation (Martha Washington School)
1973
6/31
Mayor's Bicentennial Task Force
1973
6/32
Office of the Mayor
1973
6/33
Office of Management and Budget
1973-1974
6/34
Office of Women's Rights
1973
State
Box/Folder
7/1
Advisory Task Force on Vocational Education
1972-1973
7/2
Board Against Discrimination
1965-1968
7/3
Board for Community College Education
1970-1972
7/4
Citizen's Committee on Crime
1968
7/5
City-State Task Force: Intergovernmental Policy Group
1972
7/6
City-State Task Force: Intergovernmental Policy Group
1972
7/7
City-State Task Force: Intergovernmental Policy Group
1972-1973
7/8
City-State Task Force: Intergovernmental Policy Group
1973-1974
7/9
Cooperative Area Manpower Planning System (CAMPS)
1968-1969
7/10
Cooperative Area Manpower Planning System (CAMPS)
1970-1972
7/11
Correspondence (various agencies)
1967-1968
7/12
Correspondence
1969-1970
7/13
Correspondence
1971-1972
7/14
Correspondence
1973-1974
7/15
Department of Education
1968-1972
7/16
Department of Institutions
1968, 1971
7/17
Department of Public Assistance
1969
7/18
Department of Public Assistance
1970
7/19
Department of Public Assistance
1971-1972
7/20
Employment Security Department
1970-1972
7/21
Governor's Advisory Committee on Community College
1969
7/22
Governor's Office
1969
7/23
Governor's Task Force on Housing
1969
7/24
Health Division: Department of Social and Health Services
1970-1972
7/25
Health Training Project
1969
7/26
Highway Commission
1968-1971
7/27
Interagency Team
1968-1969
7/28
Law and Justice
1973
7/29
Legislature
1970
7/30
Planning and Community Affairs Agency
1968-1970
7/31
Planning and Community Affairs Agency
1970-1972
7/32
SMCP In Service Training
1974
8/1
Senate: Durkan
1973
8/2
Social and Health Services
1973-1974
8/3
Seattle Central Community College
1971-1972
8/4
University of Washington
1970
8/5
University of Washington
1971-1972
8/6
Vocational Education
1970-1971
8/7
White House Conference on Children and Youth
1971
Federal
Box/Folder
8/8
Correspondence
1969
8/9
Correspondence
1970
8/10
Correspondence
1971-1972
8/11
701 Survey
1968
8/12
Federal Team Meeting
1968-1969
8/13
Health, Education and Welfare (HEW)
1968
8/14
Health, Education and Welfare (HEW)
1969
8/15
Health, Education and Welfare (HEW)
1969-1970
8/16
Health, Education and Welfare (HEW)
1970
8/17
Health, Education and Welfare (HEW)
1969-1971
8/18
Health, Education and Welfare (HEW)
1971-1972
8/19
Health, Education and Welfare (HEW): Pre-Application for Fiscal 1971 Project Grants
1970
8/20
Labor Department
1970-1973
8/21
Labor Department: Concentrated Employment Program
1968-1970
8/22
Federal Housing Administration
1968-1969
8/23
National Alliance of Businessmen
1971
8/24
Office of Economic Opportunity
1968-1969
8/25
Office of Economic Opportunity
1970
8/26
Office of Economic Development
1971-1973
8/27
Small Business Administration
1971-1972
8/28
Social Security Act Title IV-A
1971-1972
8/29
VISTA
1970
Organizations
Box/Folder
8/30
Puget Sound Governmental Conference
1968-1970
8/31
Puget Sound Governmental Conference
1972-1973
8/32
Puget Sound Comprehensive Health Planning Board
1969-1974
9/1
Seattle Public Schools
1968-1970
9/2
Seattle Public Schools
1970
9/3
Seattle Public Schools
1971
9/4
Seattle Public Schools
1971
9/5
Seattle Public Schools
1971
9/6
Seattle Public Schools
1972-1973
9/7
Seattle University
1972-1973
9/8
University of Washington
1968
9/9
University of Washington
1969
9/10
Seattle Times (Public Information Request)
1970-1971
9/11
Alcoholism Facility
1968-1972
9/12
American Arbitration Association
1969
9/13
American Bar Association / Bar Association of Washington State
1969-1971
9/14
American Indian Women's League, Inc.
1971-1972
9/15
American Friends Service Committee
1970
9/16
American Institute of Architects: Seattle Chapter
1969-1972
9/17
American Red Cross: Seattle King County Chapter
1969-1972
9/18
Association of Washington Cities
1969-1970
9/19
Boys' Clubs of Seattle and King County, Inc.
1969-1970
9/20
Central Area Civil Rights Committee
1967-1972
9/21
Central Area Committee for Peace and Improvement
1968-1971
9/22
Central Area Cooperative
1968
9/23
Central Area Federal Credit Union
1969-1971
9/24
Central Area Tenants Organization
1968-1971
9/25
Central Contractor Association, Inc.
1969-1973
9/26
Checkmate Enterprises, Inc.
1969
9/27
Checkmate Enterprises, Inc.
1969-1970
9/28
Checkmate Enterprises, Inc.
1970-1971
10/1
Columbia Club
1970
10/2
Concentrated Employment Program
1968-1970
10/3
Council of Planning Affiliates
1968-1973
10/4
Council on Aging
1968-1971
10/5
Economic Growth Organization, Inc.
1968
10/6
Equal Opportunity for Spanish-Speaking Americans
1970-1971
10/7
Family Counseling Service
1969-1971
10/8
Forward Thrust
1968
10/9
Municipal League
1968
10/10
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)
1969-1973
10/11
National Association of Social Workers
1969-1971
10/12
National Association of Minority Contractors
1970-1971
10/13
New Careers Project
1969-1971
10/14
Neighborhood House
1971-1972
10/15
Okoamoto-Kiskamu (contractor)
1968-1970
10/16
Rumor Control Center
1968-1970
10/17
Seattle Atlantic Street Center
1971-1972
10/18
Seattle Community Organization for Renewal Enterprises
1971
10/19
Seattle King County Opportunity Board
1968
10/20
Seattle Opportunities Industrialization Center
1967-1968
10/21
Seattle Treatment Center
1968
10/22
Sparkman and McLean Co.
1970
10/23
YMCA
1968
10/24
White House Conference on Children and Youth
1969-1971
Proposals and Grant Applications
Box/Folder
10/25
Proposals and Grant Applications
n.d.
10/26
Proposals and Grant Applications
1968
10/27-28
Proposals and Grant Applications
1969
10/29
Proposals and Grant Applications
1970
11/1-3
Proposals and Grant Applications
1971
11/4-6
Proposals and Grant Applications
1972
11/7
Proposals and Grant Applications
1973-1974
Publicity
Box/Folder
11/8
Executive Director's Message
1972
11/9-12
Newspaper Clippings
1968-1971
5400-04: Press Clippings, 1967-1974
3.8 cubic ft ( (6 vols., 2 boxes) )
Six scrapbooks of press clippings dating from 1967 to 1971. Topics covered include Seattle's Model Cities Program, race relations in Seattle, the Black Panthers, Seattle Police Department, the Seattle School Board, low-income housing, homelessness, parks, discrimination, and transportation, including the R. H. Thomson Expressway. The majority of articles are from the Seattle Times and the Seattle Post-Intelligencer.
Volume
1
Volume 1: December 1967 - December 1968
1967-1968
2
Volume 2: January 1969 - December 1969
1969
3
Volume 3: January 1970 - March 1971
1970-1971
4
Volume 4: April - November 1971
1971
5
Volume 5: January - August 1972
1972
6
Volume 6: August 1972
1972
Box
1
Press Clippings
1972
2
Press Clippings
1972-1974
5400-05: Press Releases, 1971-1973
News releases publicizing Model Cities programs, events, and meetings and announcing new appointees to positions, and advertising job openings in Model Cities programs. The news releases contain information on Mini-Tran, an NAACP membership drive, citizen advisory councils, youth programs, neighborhood branches, citizen participation, creation of new councils, committees, and task forces, social service and medical facilities, community centers, child care, housing, education, and recreation.Some supplementary materials, including newspaper and magazine articles and resumes for Model Cities officials such as John F. Mitsules and Jeffery K. Finn, are included with the news releases.
Box/Folder
1/1
Press Releases: November 1971
1971
1/2
Press Releases: December 1971
1971
1/3
Press Releases: January 1972
1972
1/4
Press Releases: February-March 1972
1972
1/5
Press Releases: April 1972
1972
1/6
Press Releases: May-June 1972
1972
1/7
Press Releases: July 1972
1972
1/8
Press Releases: August 1972
1972
1/9
Press Releases: September 1972
1972
1/10
Press Releases: October 1972
1972
1/11
Press Releases: November 1972
1972
1/12
Press Releases: December 1972
1972
1/13
Press Releases: January-February 1973
1973
1/14
Press Releases: March 1973
1973
1/15
Press Releases: April 1973
1973
5400-06: News Report, 1968-1971
.2 cubic foot
Newspaper format publication sent to residents of the Model Neighborhood to communicate Model Cities Program developments. Includes photographs, profiles of individuals, and reports on events. Varies from weekly to monthly publication.
Box/Folder
1/1
News Report
1968-1969
1/2
News Report
1969
1/3
News Report
1970
1/4
News Report
1971
5401-01 : Social Indicators Data, 1972
0.4 cubic ft.
Primarily demographic data compiled by the Model Cities Program Information Unit from the United States Census and its own research files. The data is arranged to correspond with the 14 project areas of the Seattle Model Cities Program.
5401-02 : Reports, Studies, and Evaluations, 1968-1975
11.6 cubic ft.
Studies, surveys, proposals, work programs, grant applications and awards, action plans, status reports, audits and evaluations, contracts, and financial reports relating to the Model Cities Program and its projects. Also included are reference manuals and handbooks concerning general accounting, reporting, and evaluation procedures. Several reports and studies deal with the program at the national level. The documents in this series have been cataloged and indexed and included in the Seattle Municipal Archives Local Government Documents Collection. The catalog search page is located at http://clerk.ci.seattle.wa.us/~public/docs1.htm.
5402-01: Citizen Participation Division Records, 1968-1973
3 cubic ft.
The Citizen Participation Division Records are arranged in six subseries: Associate Director Files, Advisory Council, Combined Citizens Advisory Council, task forces (arranged by Branch Office), Citizen Monitoring Reports, Weekly Reports (all task forces).George E. Clark was the associate director of the Citizen Participation Division for the SMCP. The records of the citizen Participation Division reflect his activities and the citizens and work occurring in the various branches. Clark's reports discuss activities related to citizen participation at the various branches, including personnel and work programs. His reports are based on reports to him from the branches, which are also included. Clark's incoming and outgoing correspondence includes both internal and external correspondents and covers programmatic and personnel issues.The Advisory Council was the policy-making body of the SMCP. Every known organization in the Model Neighborhood was invited to participate; representation included over 80 community groups. Issues such as task force planning and organization structure were addressed through the Council. Records of the Council include minutes, correspondence and bylaws. These records overlap with series 5402-02, Advisory Council Files.The Combined Citizens Advisory Council began meeting in 1972. Mandated at the federal level, it was composed of 40 members from the branch councils. Its role was to act as a citizen advisory body to the SMCP, which became more decentralized in 1972. The Citizens Advisory Council records are arranged by branch and consist of minutes and committee reports.There were four Branch Advisory Councils corresponding to each of the Model Neighborhood areas: East, Southeast, Southwest, and North. The Branch Advisory Councils reviewed proposals and recommendations by the task forces and coordinated planning for the branches. Branch records include bylaws and minutes. Each Branch had seven functional task forces corresponding with the seven city-wide task forces: Education, Elderly, Employment, Health, Housing and Physical Environment, Law and Justice, Recreation and Youth, Social Services and Welfare. The task forces were run by citizens, fostering citizen participation which was an important tenet of the Model Cities Program. Task force records consist of minutes and attendance sheets, arranged by branch and then by task force. Although the task force records in this subseries document the years 1972 to 1973 in more detail, they overlap to some degree with Task Force Minutes (5402-03) and Task Force Records (5402-04). Updates on specific proposals and projects are given in the minutes. The successes and the frustrations of citizen involvement are evident in the Task Force Records. The minutes discuss conflicting goals between the task forces, the City's Office of Program Planning (in one report referred to as 'the Mayor Boys') and the SMCP.The Citizen Participation staff were responsible for training the citizen monitors to observe specific SMCP projects at each of the branches. Citizens went out in teams to interview project participants and directors and observe the projects in action and offer their observations on successes and areas for improvement. Their monitoring forms provide a close-up look at specific projects in the Model Cities Program. Weekly Reports -- written mostly by branch managers for Director Walter Hundley and copied to Clark -- include information on branch activities and provide a glimpse of day-to-day activity and issues, such as communication with the main office and with City employees. The reports also provide updates on planning, budgets, citizen participation and task force activity as well as advisory council meetings for each branch. Interaction with city council members is reported on as well. Staff meeting minutes for the branches are often included in the reports. The reports are a good way to compare activities between the different branches.
Associate Director
Box/Folder
1/1
Weekly Reports
1972
1/2
Monthly and Quarterly Reports
1972-1973
1/3
Training Work Program
1972
1/4
Work Programs
1972
1/5
Correspondence: Outgoing
1972
1/6
Correspondence: Outgoing to Hundley
1973
1/7
Correspondence: Incoming
1971
1/8
Correspondence: Incoming
1972
1/9-10
Citizen Participation: Incoming Correspondence
1973
1/11
Citizen Participation Handbook: Revision
1972
1/12
Seattle 2000 Commission: Task Force on Government and Citizen Participation
1973
Advisory Council
Box/Folder
1/13
Bylaws
1968-1969
1/14
Correspondence
1970-1972
1/15
Minutes
1968-1969
1/16
Minutes
1969-1971
1/17
Minutes
1972-1973
1/18
Workshop and Reports
1970-1971
1/19
Program Committee
1970-1971
Combined Citizens Advisory Council
Box/Folder
1/20
Membership List
1973
1/21
By Laws Committee
1972-1973
1/22
Citizen Participation Committee
1970-1972
1/23
Finance Committee Minutes
1970-1971
1/24
City-Wide Task Forces
1973
1/25
Law and Justice Task Force: Attendance
1971
1/26
Nomination Committee
1972-1973
1/27
Program Management Committee
1972
1/28
North Branch
1972
1/29
North Branch: Bylaws
1971-1972
1/30
North Branch: Finance Committee
1972-1973
1/31
North Branch: Meeting Minutes
1971-1972
1/32
North Branch: Attendance
1971-1972
2/1
Southwest Branch
1971-1972
2/2
East Branch: Attendance and Meeting Minutes
1971-1973
2/3
East Branch: Finance Committee
1972-1973
2/4
Southeast Branch
1971-1972
Task Forces
Box/Folder
2/5
East Branch: Citizen Participation - Minutes
1971-1972
2/6
East Branch: Health Advisory Board - East Branch
1972
2/7
East Branch: Health - Minutes
1972
2/8
East Branch: Housing and Physical Environment
1972
2/9
East Branch: Law and Justice - Minutes and Attendance
1972
2/10
East Branch: Social Services and Welfare - Minutes and Attendance
1972
2/11
North Branch: Education, Arts and Culture, Recreation and Youth - Minutes and Attendance
1972
2/12
North Branch: Elderly - Minutes and Attendance
1971-1972
2/13
North Branch: Employment - Minutes and Attendance
1971-1972
2/14
North Branch: Health - Minutes and Attendance
1971-1972
2/15
North Branch: Housing and Physical Environment - Minutes and Attendance
1971-1973
2/16
North Branch: Law and Justice - Minutes and Attendance
1971-1972
2/17
North Branch: Social Services and Welfare - Minutes and Attendance
1971-1972
2/18
Southeast Branch: Correspondence
1971-1972
2/19
Southeast Branch: Education - Minutes and Attendance
1971-1972
2/20
Southeast Branch: Employment - Minutes and Attendance
1971-1972
2/21
Southeast Branch: Health - Minutes and Attendance
1971-1972
2/22
Southeast Branch: Housing - Minutes and Attendance
1971-1972
2/23
Southeast Branch: Law and Justice - Minutes and Attendance
1972
2/24
Southeast Branch: Manpower and Economic Development
1972
2/25
Southeast Branch: Welfare and Social Services - Minutes and Attendance
1972
2/26
Southwest Branch: Education - Minutes and Attendance
1971-1972
2/27
Southwest Branch: Employment - Minutes
1971-1972
2/28
Southwest Branch: Health - Minutes and Attendance
1971-1972
2/29
Southwest Branch: Housing - Minutes and Attendance
1971-1972
2/30
Southwest Branch: Law and Justice - Minutes and Attendance
1971-1972
2/31
Southwest Branch: Manpower and Economic Development - Attendance
1972
2/32
Southwest Branch: Social Services and Welfare
1971-1972
Citizen Monitoring Reports
Box/Folder
2/33
All-City Reports
1972
2/34
Branches
1972-1973
2/35
Health
1972-1973
2/36
Health: Southwest Branch
1972-1973
2/37
Housing and Physical Planning (includes playgrounds)
1971-1973
2/38
Law and Justice
1971-1973
2/39
Manpower / Job Development
1971-1973
3/1
Recreation / Culture / Youth / Art
1971-1973
3/2
Welfare / Social Services
1972-1973
Weekly Reports (All Task Forces)
Box/Folder
3/3
Spanish Speaking Community
1970
3/4
Southwest Branch: September-October
1972
3/5
Southwest Branch: November - December
1972
3/6
East Branch: May - July
1972
3/7
East Branch: August - December
1972
3/8
East Branch
1973
3/9
Southeast Branch: February-July
1972
3/10
Southeast Branch: August- December
1972
3/11
Southeast Branch: February-May
1973
3/12
Southwest Branch: March-June
1972
3/13
Southwest Branch: July-August
1972
3/14
North Branch: May - June
1972
3/15
North Branch: July-August
1972
3/16
North Branch: September - October
1972
3/17
North Branch: November - December
1972
3/18
Neighborhood Planners Weekly Reports
1973
3/19
Meeting Schedule Flyers
1971-1972
3/20
Meeting Schedule Flyers
1971-1972
5402-02: Seattle Model City Program Advisory Council, 1968-1974
.8 cubic ft.
The role of the SMCP Advisory Council was to oversee the planning process for the Program. The Council met once a month with oversight for the citizen task forces. The membership of the Council was made up of organizations and clubs within the SMCP boundaries. There is some overlap between these records and those in the Citizen Participation Division Files (5402-01). The records of the Advisory Council include minutes, correspondence, and attendance lists. A proposal to continue selected projects after SMCP monies ended is included.
Box/Folder
1/1
Bylaws and Membership
1968-1969
1/2
Minutes
1968
1/3
Minutes and Reports
1969
1/4
Minutes and Reports
1970-1972
1/5
Minutes and Agendas
1972-1974
1/6
Correspondence
1968
1/7
Correspondence
1969
1/8
Correspondence
1970-1971
1/9
Steering Committee Minutes
1968
1/10
Steering Committee
1969-1970
2/1
Grievance Committee
1970-1971
2/2
East Branch: Correspondence
1972-1973
2/3
East Branch: Minutes and Correspondence
1971-1974
2/4
Southwest Branch: Minutes and Correspondence
1973
2/5
Citywide Task Force Membership
1972-1973
2/6
Attendance
1971-1972
2/7
Membership Lists
1972-1973
2/8
Public Relations Recommendations: Jay Rockey Public Relations Inc.
1972
2/9
Proposal to Seattle City Council on Continuing Certain Model Neighborhood Projects
1973
5402-03: Task Force Minutes, 1968-1973
2.4 cubic ft.
The Task Force Minutes record the activities of the task forces before and after the Planned Variations plan. The records are arranged by task force from 1968 to 1971 and by Branch Office from 1971 to 1973. This record group overlaps with Citizen Participation Division Files (5402-01).
Program Task Force Minutes
Box/Folder
1/1
Arts and Culture
1968
1/2
Arts and Culture
1969-1970
1/3
Education
1968
1/4
Education
1969
1/5
Education, Arts/Culture Minutes
1970
1/6
Education, Arts/Culture, Youth and Recreation
1971-1972
1/7
Employment
1968
1/8
Employment and Economic Development
1969
1/9
Employment and Economic Development
1970
1/10
Employment and Economic Development
1971
1/11
Health
1968
1/12
Health
1969
2/1
Health
1970
2/2
Health
1971
2/3
Housing
1968
2/4
Housing and Physical Environment
1969
2/5
Housing and Physical Environment
1970
2/6
Housing and Physical Environment
1971-1972
2/7
Law and Justice
1968
2/8
Law and Justice
1969
2/9
Law and Justice
1970
2/10
Law and Justice
1971
3/1
Physical Planning
1968
3/2
Welfare
1968
3/3
Welfare
1969
3/4
Welfare
1970
3/5
Welfare
1971-1972
3/6
Youth
1968
3/7
Youth
1969
3/8
Citizen Participation
1968
3/9
Citizen Participation
1969
3/10
Citizen Participation
1970
3/11
Citizen Participation
1971
Branch Task Forces
Box/Folder
3/12
East Branch: Advisory Council
1971-1973
3/13
East Branch: Employment / Economic Development
1972-1973
4/1
East Branch: Health
1971-1973
4/2
East Branch: Housing / Physical Planning 1971-1973
4/3
East Branch: Law and Justice
1971-1973
4/4
East Branch: Welfare
1971-1971
4/5
East Branch: Youth, Education, Arts, Culture, and Recreation
1971-1973
4/6
North Branch: Advisory Council
1971-1973
4/7
North Branch: Employment / Economic Development
1971-1973
4/8
North Branch: Health
1971-1973
5/1
North Branch: Housing / Physical Planning
1971-1973
5/2
North Branch: Law and Justice
1971-1973
5/3
North Branch: Welfare
1971-1973
5/4
North Branch: Youth, Education, Arts, Culture, and Recreation
1971-1973
5/5
Southeast Branch: Advisory Council
1971-1973
5/6
Southeast Branch: Concerned Citizens of Holly Park
1973
5/7
Southeast Branch: Health
1971-1973
5/8
Southeast Branch: Housing / Physical Planning
1971-1973
6/1
Southeast Branch: Law and Justice
1971-1973
6/2
Southeast Branch: Manpower / Economic Development
1971-1973
6/3
Southeast Branch: Welfare
1971-1973
6/4
Southeast Branch: Youth, Education, Arts, Culture, and Recreation
1971-1973
6/5
Southwest Branch: Advisory Council
1971-1973
6/6
Southwest Branch: Youth, Education, Arts, Culture, and Recreation
1971-1973
6/7
Southwest Branch: Health
1971-1973
6/8
Southwest Branch: Housing / Physical Planning
1971-1973
6/9
Southwest Branch: Manpower / Economic Development
1971-1973
6/10
Southwest Branch: Law and Justice Task Force
1971-1973
6/11
Southwest Branch: Welfare
1971-1973
5402-04: Task Force Records, 1968-1974
12 cubic ft.
Included are records for the following task forces: Arts and Culture, Citizen Participation, Education, Employment, Health, Housing, Law and Justice, Physical Planning, Welfare and Youth. Task Force Records include weekly reports, attendance records, correspondence. Task Force Records include correspondence with Walter Hundley, task force members, and others at municipal, state, and federal levels. The records document the planning and varying degrees of success of projects for each task force. The records are also contain information regarding the involvement of other government and community agencies in Model Cities projects and some of the organizational issues faced by Model Cities workers. Other Task Force Records, such as Minutes (5204-03) should be consulted as well.The Arts and Culture Task Force records comprise the smallest portion of the Task Force Records (.25 cf) and date from 1968-1970. The records contain information on efforts to ensure cultural vitality in the Model Neighborhoods, including houses of art, theater and music groups incorporating culturally diverse programs.The Citizen Participation Task Force records (.75 cf) date from 1968-1973 and include records regarding the efforts to encourage citizen participation at all levels of Model Cities projects and the effort to make information regarding Model Cities projects available to all in the Model Neighborhoods.The Education Task Force records (1 cf) date from 1968-1974 are useful for studying the Model Cities Program's relationship with the Seattle Public Schools and the University of Washington, as many of the education programs were cooperative efforts with these institutions. The Education projects included art programs, programs focused on middle school students and teachers, early childhood education, and programs on occupational skills.The Employment Task Force records (1 cf) date from 1968-1972 and include records relating to construction training, affirmative action, trades, and including minorities in the work force in general, but especially on projects within the Model Neighborhoods.The Health and Housing Task Force records are both 2 cubic feet. The Health records date from 1968 to 1972 and include information on a variety of health programs, including dental programs, environmental health, family planning, mental retardation, and alcohol and drug treatment programs. The Housing Task Force records contain information about explorations into various solutions for adequate and affordable housing in the Model Neighborhood. Some of the projects were funded at a federal level, others explored possibilities using local resources. Projects included code enforcement, low income housing for elderly, townhouses, and assistance with home ownership. The Housing Demonstration Project includes information about CAT-12, a group of 12 graduating University of Washington students who planned to build 4-8 units of low-income housing for their final design project. There is some overlap between the Physical Planning and Housing task forces; researchers should look at records for both task forces. Task force members struggled with opposition from residents to projects in their neighborhoods, with using contractors and business owners from the Model Neighborhood, and with securing the quality of housing necessary. Correspondents include Walter Hundley, Lem Peterson, Elmira Hunter, Ruth Hughes, Seattle Housing Authority, and the University of Washington. The Law and Justice Task Force records (1.25 cf) date from 1968-1972 and include information on projects relating to crime, group homes, legal services, a public defender program, and landlord tenant issues. Correspondents include Ed Wood and Charles Ehlert.Physical Planning Task Force records (1.75) relate to land use, transportation including I-90 planning, and parks planning. They date from 1968-1972. Correspondents include Lem Peterson, planning coordinator, consultant firm Okamoto-Liskamm and various City employees in planning, transportation and the Mayor's office.The records of the Welfare Task Force (1.25) date from 1968 to 1973 include correspondence and reports about infant child care, services for the elderly, and Pioneer Square shelter/rehabilitation center and more. The Income Maintenance program was designed to provide an income subsidy to public assistance recipients to test the effect of a decent standard of living on motivation, self-worth, and the ability to lower welfare caseloads. Correspondence from state, county, and local agencies is included. Correspondents include Orene Scott, Mary Lou Williams, Sharon Fujii, Dorothy Hollingsworth, Roland Hairston.The Youth Task Force (.75) date from 1968-1972 and contain records regarding summer camps at the Red Barn Ranch, a program called Summer Emphasis on Education and Knowledge (SEEK), and other programs such as the Soul Academy.
Arts and Culture Task Force
Box/Folder
1/1
Arts and Culture: Plans and Proposals
1968
1/2
Arts and Culture: Plans and Proposals
1969
1/3
Arts and Culture: Weekly Reports
1968
1/4
Arts and Culture: Weekly Reports
1969
1/5
Arts and Culture: Attendance
1968
1/6
Arts and Culture: Correspondence
1969
1/7
Arts and Culture: Correspondence
1970
1/8
Arts and Culture: Minutes and Reports
1970
1/9
Arts and Culture: Bikur Cholim Synagogue Property
1968
1/10
Arts and Culture: Afro American Arts Program
1969
1/11
Arts and Culture: Boutique
1969
1/12
Arts and Culture: Yesler Neighborhood Center / Bikur Cholim Synagogue Property
1969
Citizen Participation Task Force
Box/Folder
1/13
Citizen Participation: Grant Application (HUD)
1969
1/14
Citizen Participation: Technical Assistance Program
1969
1/15
Citizen Participation: Proposals and Programs
1969
1/16
Citizen Participation: Feedback
1969
1/17
Citizen Participation: Correspondence
1968
1/18
Citizen Participation: Correspondence
1969
1/19
Citizen Participation: Correspondence
1970
1/20
Citizen Participation: Correspondence and Memoranda
1970-1971
1/21
Citizen Participation: Correspondence
1971
1/22
Citizen Participation: Memoranda
1971-1972
1/23
Citizen Participation: Minutes and Reports
1968
1/24
Citizen Participation: Minutes and Agendas
1971-1972
1/25
Citizen Participation: Weekly Reports
1969
1/26
Citizen Participation: Weekly Reports
1970
1/27
Citizen Participation: Weekly and Quarterly Reports
1971-1972
1/28
Citizen Participation: Attendance
1968-1969
1/29-31
Citizen Participation: Attendance
1971-1973
1/32
Citizen Participation: Policies and Guidelines
1968
1/33
Citizen Participation: Guidelines and Personnel
1969
1/34
Citizen Participation: Guidelines and Reports
1971
1/35
Citizen Participation: Intern Training Program
1969-1970
1/36
Citizen Participation: Notes
1969
1/37
Citizen Participation: Work Program
1969-1970
1/38
Citizen Participation: Scholarship Program
1971
1/39
Citizen Participation: Scholarship Program
1972
Education Task Force
Box/Folder
2/1
Education: Outreach and Organization
1968
2/2-6
Education: Correspondence
1968-1972
2/7
Education: Minutes and Reports
1968
2/8
Education: Minutes and Agendas
1971-1972
2/9
Education: Weekly Reports
1969
2/10
Education: Weekly and Quarterly Reports
1970
2/11-12
Education: Weekly Reports
1971-1972
2/13
Education: Subcommittees
1968
2/14
Education: Seattle Public Schools Board
1968
2/15
Education: Planning and Outreach
1969
2/16
Education: Central Area School Council
1969
2/17
Education: Curriculum Redevelopment
1969
2/18
Education: Demonstration School
1969
2/19
Education: Higher Education
1969
2/20
Education: Seattle Public Schools Dropout Prevention Program
1969
2/21
Education: Dropout Prevention Program Title 8
1968-1974
2/22
Education: Talent Search Proposal
1969, 1972
2/23
Education: Teacher Training Institute
1969
2/24
Education: Boutique Program
1970-1972
2/25
Education: Scholarship Program
1970
2/26
Education: Proposals
1970-1971
2/27
Education: Adult Basic Education
1971-1972
2/28
Education: Planning and Reports
1971-1972
2/29
Education: Community Learning Centers
1971
2/30
Education: Planning
1972
2/31-32
Education: Attendance
1969-1972
Employment Task Force
Box/Folder
3/1
Employment: Planning
1968
3/2
Employment: Planning and Proposals
1969
3/3
Employment: Proposals
1970
3/4
Employment: Planning
1971
3/5-7
Employment: Correspondence
1968-1970
3/8
Employment: Correspondence
1971-1972
3/9-12
Employment: Weekly Reports
1968-1972
3/13-15
Employment: Economic Development
1968-1970
3/16
Employment: Construction Training Program
1969-1970
3/17
Employment: Contract Compliance - Affirmative Action
1969
3/18
Employment: Contract Compliance - Building Trades
1970
3/19
Employment: Contract Compliance -Weekly Reports
1969
3/20
Employment: Labor Union Negotiations
1969
3/21
Employment: Top-It
1970
3/22
Employment: Resident Employment and Training / City Demonstration Agency (CDA) Letter #11
1971
3/23-25
Employment: Unicenter
1969-1970
4/1-2
Employment: United Inner City Development Foundation
1968-1969
4/3
Employment: United Inner City Development Foundation
1970-1971
4/4
Employment: Wick's Construction / Medgar Evers Pool
1969
4/5
Employment: Attendance
1969
Health Task Force
Box/Folder
4/6
Health: Memoranda
1968-1969
4/7-8
Health: Memoranda
1970-1971
4/9
Health: Correspondence and Planning
1968
4/10-11
Health: Correspondence
1969
4/12
Health: Correspondence
1970
4/13
Health: Correspondence
1971-1972
4/14-16
Health: Weekly Reports
1968-1972
4/17
Health: Planning Consultant
1970
5/1-3
Health: Advisory Board
1969-1972
5/4
Health: Corporate Health Board
1970
5/5
Health: Corporate/Community Health Board
1970-1971
5/6
Health: Comprehensive Health Care Program
1969
5/7
Health: Comprehensive Health Care Program-Grant
1970
5/8
Health: Facilities - Herzl Synagogue Building
1969
5/9
Health: Adult Services
1970
5/10
Health: Dental Proposals
1968-1969
5/11
Health: Environmental Health Project
1969-1970
5/12
Health: Family Planning
1969
5/13
Health: Mental Retardation Proposal
1969
5/14
Health: Mental Retardation and Head Start
1970
5/15
Health: Mental Retardation
1971
5/16
Health: Neighborhood Health Station Project
1969-1970
5/17-18
Health: Nutrition
1969-1970
5/19
Health: Prepaid Health Care
1970
5/20
Health: Regional Medical Program
1969-1970
5/21
Health: Seattle Treatment Center - Detoxification
1969
5/22-23
Health: Drugs / Alcohol Addition Program
1969-1970
5/24
Health: Alcohol Detoxification Program
1971
5/25-26
Health: Attendance
1969-1973
Housing Task Force
Box/Folder
6/1
Housing: Correspondence - W. Hundley
1968
6/2
Housing: Correspondence - W. Hundley
1969
6/3
Housing: Correspondence
1968
6/4
Housing: Correspondence
1969
6/5
Housing: Correspondence - January - June
1970
6/6
Housing: Correspondence - July - December
1970
6/7
Housing: Correspondence
1971
6/8
Housing: Correspondence - Edward Russell
1971
6/9
Housing: Correspondence
1971-1972
6/10
Housing: Memorandum
1968-1969
6/11
Housing: Memorandum January - June
1970
6/12
Housing: Memorandum July - December
1970
6/13
Housing: Memorandum
1971-1972
6/14
Housing: Reports - Weekly
1968
6/15
Housing: Reports - Weekly
1969
6/16
Housing: Reports - Weekly
1970
6/17
Housing: Reports - Weekly
1971-1972
6/18
Housing: Reports - Quarterly
1971
6/19
Housing: Survey - "Housing Market Study for a Community Action Program"
1967
Projects
Box/Folder
6/20
Projects: Active Mortgage and Escrow Company
1971-1972
6/21
Projects: Beacon Hill Project
1969
6/22
Projects: Federally Assisted Code Enforcement Project (FACE)
1968
6/23
Projects: Federally Assisted Code Enforcement Project (FACE) (includes grant proposal)
1971-1972
6/24
Projects: Federal Housing Administration (FHA)
1969-1971
7/1-3
Projects: Housing Demonstration Program
1969-1972
7/4-5
Projects: Housing Development League
1969-1970
7/6
Projects: Housing Information System
1971
7/7
Projects: Housing Relocation Assistance
1970-1971
7/8
Projects: International District Turnkey Project
1970
7/9-10
Projects: Leschi Neighborhood Development Project
1970-1971
7/11-13
Projects: Home Ownership Project - 1968 Housing Act Sec 235
1969-1972
7/14
Projects: Housing Proposal - Elderly
1969
7/15
Projects: Magnuson Housing Plan
1968-1969
7/16
Projects: Mt. Baker Housing Project (includes map)
1970
7/17
Projects: Operation Breakthrough
1970
7/18
Projects: Operation Rehabilitation
1970
7/19-20
Projects: Seattle Housing Authority
1970-1972
7/21
Projects: UW Housing Project
1970
7/22
Projects: Westinghouse Experimental Housing
1968
7/23
Attendance Sheets
1968-1972
Law and Justice Task Force
Box/Folder
8/1
Law and Justice: Correspondence
1968-1969
8/2
Law and Justice: Correspondence - Ed Wood
1968-1969
8/3
Law and Justice: Correspondence
1970
8/4-5
Law and Justice: Correspondence - Charles Ehlert
1971-1972
8/6
Law and Justice: Memorandum
1968-1970
8/7-8
Law and Justice: Memorandum - Charles Ehlert
1971-1972
8/9
Law and Justice: Reports - Weekly and Quarterly
1968-1972
8/10
Law and Justice: Legislative Committee of the Whole
1968-1969
Projects
Box/Folder
8/11
Projects: Draft First Year Programs
1968
8/12
Projects: Community Service Officer
1970-1971
8/13
Projects: Crime Control - Omnibus
1968-1970
8/14-15
Projects: Group Homes
1969-1970
8/16-17
Projects: Legal Economic Design
1969-1970
8/18
Projects: Legal Services
1968-1969
8/19-20
Projects: Public Defender Program
1969-1970
Proposals
Box/Folder
9/1
Proposals: Consumer Protection
1970
9/2
Proposals: Half Way House
1968-1970
9/3
Proposals: Landlord Tenant Law Reform
1969
9/4
Proposals: Parole Study
1969
9/5
Proposals: Tubman Center
1971
Box/Folder
9/6
Law and Justice: Attendance
1969-1972
Physical Planning Task Force
Box/Folder
9/7
Physical Planning: Correspondence
1968
9/8
Physical Planning: Subcommittees
1968
9/9-11
Physical Planning: Correspondence
1969-1971
9/12-14
Physical Planning: Memorandum
1968-1970
9/15-17
Physical Planning: Weekly Reports
1968-1970
9/18-20
Physical Planning: International District Improvement Association
1968-1970
9/21-24
Physical Planning: Land Use Planning
1968-1971
9/25
Physical Planning: Land Use Planning
1972-1973
9/26-27
Physical Planning: Land Use Review Board
1969-1970
9/28
Physical Planning: Leschi Improvement Council
1969
9/29
Physical Planning: Parks and Recreation
1969-1970
9/30
Physical Planning: Relocation
1968-1969
10/1
Physical Planning: Transportation (includes I 90)
1968
10/2
Physical Planning: Transportation (includes I 90 and R.H. Thomson)
1969
10/3
Physical Planning: Transportation (includes I 90 Design Advisory Committee)
1970-1972
10/4
Physical Planning: Transportation- I 90 Design Advisory Committee Recommendations
1971
10/5
Physical Planning: Transportation - I 90 Design Advisory Committee
1971
10/6
Physical Planning: Transportation - I 90 Design Advisory Committee
1971-1973
Projects
Box/Folder
10/7
Projects: Alley Lighting
1969
10/8
Projects: Garfield Running Track / Powell Barnett Parks
1969
10/9
Projects: Garfield / Medgar Evers Pool
1968-1971
10/10
Projects: Land Bank Program
1969
10/11
Projects: Land Bank Program
1970-1971
10/12
Projects: Neighborhood Development Plan
1968-1969
10/13
Projects: Neighborhood Facility Network
1969-1970
10/14
Projects: Parks and Block Development (including Hillside Park, Madrona Bathhouse, Rainier Ave S overpass)
1970-1971
10/15-16
Projects: Parks-in-Cities
1970-1971
10/17
Projects: Parks-Operation Triangle
1971-1973
10/18
Projects: Transportation Study
1969-1970
10/19
Projects: Pioneer Square Rehabilitation / Service Center
1970
10/20
Projects: Urban Observatories
1968-1969
10/21
Projects: Utility Undergrounding / Sewer Separation
1969-1970
Box/Folder
10/22
Physical Planning: Attendance
1968-1972
Welfare Task Force
Box/Folder
11/1-2
Welfare: Correspondence
1968-1969
11/3
Welfare: Correspondence
1970-1971
11/4
Welfare: Correspondence
1972-1973
11/5
Welfare: Memos
1968-1970
11/6
Welfare: Memos
1971
11/7
Welfare: Reports and Meeting Minutes
1968
11/8
Welfare: Weekly Reports
1968-1970
11/9
Welfare: Weekly Reports
1971-1972
Aging Project
Box/Folder
11/10-11
Aging Project: Correspondence
1969-1970
11/12
Aging Project: Memos
1969-1970
11/13
Aging Project: Reports
1969-1970
11/14
Aging Project: Grant
1969
Projects
Box/Folder
11/15
Projects: Syracuse University Workshop
1969-1970
11/16
Projects: U.S. Senate
1968
11/17-19
Projects: Day Care
1968-1970
11/20
Projects: Family Planning
1969
11/21
Projects: Foster Homes for Elderly
1969
11/22
Projects: Foster Family Homes for Adults
1969-1971
11/23
Projects: Income Maintenance
1969-1971
11/24
Projects: King County Community Coordinated Child Care
1970-1971
11/25
Projects: King County Community Coordinated Child Care
1972-1973
12/1-2
Projects: Pioneer Square Rehabilitation Service Center
1970
12/3
Projects: Pioneer Square Service Center Advisory Board
1970
12/4
Projects: Seattle Handicapped Center
1969
12/5
Projects: Unwed Mothers Project
1969
12/6
Projects: 1115 Program (includes overview of all programs)
1971
Projects:
Projects:
Projects:
Projects:
Box/Folder
12/7
Welfare: Attendance
1969
Youth Task Force
Box/Folder
12/7-9
Youth: Correspondence
1968-1970
12/10
Youth: Memos
1968-1969
12/11
Youth: Minutes and Weekly Reports
1968-1969
12/12
Youth: Planning
1968
12/13
Youth: Camp / Red Barn Ranch
1969-1970
12/14
Youth: Seattle Boys Club
1970
12/15-16
Youth: Summer Emphasis on Education and Knowledge (SEEK)
1969
12/17
Youth: Summer Emphasis on Education and Knowledge (SEEK)
1970
12/18
Youth: Program Evaluations
1970
12/19
Youth: Attendance
1970
12/20-21
Youth: Task Force Meeting Schedules
1968-1969
12/22
Youth: Task Force Meeting Schedules
1970-1972
12/23
Youth: Flyers
1968-1970
5403-01: East Model Neighborhood Office Files, 1971-1974
.75 cubic ft.
The task forces were reorganized by neighborhood offices in 1971 as part of the Model Cities Planned Variations. Louis Warner, formerly an engineer in the Seattle Engineering Department, became manager of the East Branch. The records focus on the last two years of the Model Cities Program. Administrative information is available through the manager's correspondence; and information on the last year and half of the task forces. correspondents include: Clayton Herrell, Isaac Banks, and Charles Ehlert.
Box/Folder
1/1
East Branch Manager: Correspondence
1971-1972
1/2
East Branch Manager: Correspondence
1972
1/3
Reports
1973
1/4
Staff Meeting Minutes
1972-1973
1/5
Advisory Council
1972-1974
1/6
Advisory Council: Fifth Year Planning
1973
1/7
Citizen Participation Task Force: Correspondence
1973-1974
1/8
Citizen Participation Task Force: Intern Project
1973
1/9
Education Task Force: Correspondence
1973-1974
1/10
Education Task Force: Reports
1973
1/11
Education Task Force: Attendance
1972
1/12
Employment Task Force: Correspondence
1973
1/13
Health Task Force: Correspondence
1973-1974
1/14
Health Task Force: Correspondence - Isaac Banks
1973
2/1
Housing Task Force: Relocation
1971-1973
2/2
Housing and Physical Planning Task Force: I 90
1973
2/3
Housing and Physical Planning
1973
2/4
Law and Justice Task Force
1973
2/5
Law and Justice Attendance
1972-1973
2/6
Welfare Task Force
1973
5403-02: North Branch Model Cities Office Files, 1971-1973
8 cubic ft.
One of the branch offices created through the Model Cities Planned Variations grant, the North Branch Model Neighborhood consisted of Ballard, Adams, Fremont, West Woodland, and North Greenwood. The branch manager was John Mitsules. The North Branch was located at 1139 NW Market Street and opened in November 1971; it closed in June 1973. Records in the North Branch office files include manager's correspondence, proposals and correspondence from each of the North Branch Task Forces. There is overlap with the Task Force Records (5402-04) and the Task Force Minutes (5402-03).
Box/Folder
1/1
Manager: Correspondence
1971
1/2
Manager: Correspondence January-June
1972
1/3
Manager: Correspondence July-December
1972
1/4
Manager: Correspondence
1973
1/5
Advisory Council
1971-1973
1/6
Proposals
1971-1972
1/7
Staff Meeting Minutes
1972
1/8
Steering Committee
1972
2/1
Weekly Reports January - June
1972
2/2
Weekly Reports July - August
1972
2/3
Weekly Reports September - December
1972
2/4
Weekly Reports
1972
2/5
Citizen Participation: Correspondence
1971-1972
2/6
Education, Arts and Culture: Correspondence
1971-1972
2/7
Education Task Force: Proposals
1971-1972
2/8
Employment: Economic Development Proposals
1971-1972
2/9
Health Task Force: Correspondence
1971-1972
2/10
Health: Proposals
1971-1972
2/11
Law and Justice: Proposals
1971
2/12
Legal Services Proposal
1971
2/13
Legal Services Monitoring Report
1973
3/1
Physical Planning and Housing: Environmental Protection Proposals
1971
3/2
Physical Planning and Housing: Transportation Proposals
1971-1972
3/3
Physical Planning and Housing: Housing Proposal
1971
3/4
Physical Planning: Community Facilities Proposal
1971
3/5
Recreation and Culture: Proposals
1971
3/6
Social Services and Welfare: Proposals
1971-1972
3/7
Social Services and Welfare: Correspondence
1971-1972
3/8
Flyers and Newsletters
1971-1973
5403-03: Southeast Branch Model Neighborhood Office Records, 1971-1973
5.25 cubic ft.
The Southeast Branch included the neighborhoods of North Beacon Hill, Columbia and Brighton, making it one of the most ethnically diverse neighborhoods in the Model Cities Program. The branch manager was John Ybarra, Jr. The Southeast Branch Office Records provide information about projects and activity in the Southeast Branch Office from 1971 to 1973. The records are organized into three subseries: Branch Office Administrative Records, Task Force Records, and Weekly Reports. Included in the administrative records are correspondence between the manager and Walter Hundley, community organizations, and other Model Cities staff, manager weekly reports and Department of Community Development (DCD) SMCP weekly reports. The DCD reports are helpful for information on the working relationships between SMCP and City departments. Branch Task Force records include task force correspondence and attendance. The Odessa Brown Clinic and El Centro de la Raza were two projects within the Southeast neighborhood. Correspondents include John Ybarra, Jr., Roberto Maestas, Elden Rodgers, and Primo Velenzuela. Researchers should also consult Model City Task Force Minutes (5402-03) for overlapping records and Task Force Files (5402-04) for task force records from 1968-1971. The Citizen Participation records (5402-01) also include task force minutes and attendance records arranged by branch office which overlap to some degree with this series.
Administrative Records
Box/Folder
1/1
Bylaws
1972
1/2
Branch Manager Correspondence
1971-1972
1/3
Branch Manager Correspondence
1972-1973
1/4
Branch Manager: Weekly Reports
1972
1/5
Branch Manager: Weekly Reports
1973
1/6
Advisory Council: Correspondence
1972-1973
1/7
Advisory Council: Minutes and Memos
1972-1973
1/8
Advisory Council Attendance
1971-1972
1/9
Steering Committee of the Whole
1972
1/10
Administrative Complaint
1972
2/1
Academic Year Intern (includes intern analysis)
1972
2/2
Summer Intern Program
1971-1972
2/3-4
Department of Community Development Office of Neighborhood Improvement: Weekly Reports
1973
2/5
Meeting Schedules / Flyers
1971-1972
2/6
Community Organizations
1973
2/7
Project Monitoring
1972-1973
2/8
Citizen Participation: Correspondence
1971-1972
2/9
Citizen Participation: Budget
1972
2/10
Citizen Participation: Monthly Statistical Reports
1972
2/11
Recruiting Reports: Door-to-Door
1972
3/1
Community Facilities: Project Correspondence
1971-1972
Task Force Records
Box/Folder
3/2
Education Task Force: Proposals
1971-1972
3/3
Education Task Force: Attendance
1972
3/4
Employment Task Force: Proposals
1971-1972
3/5
Employment Task Force: Correspondence
1972
3/6
Employment Task Force: Manpower Services Project
1972-1973
3/7
Employment Task Force: Attendance
1971-1973
3/8
Health Task Force: Proposals
1971-1972
3/9
Health Task Force: Correspondence
1972-1973
3/10
Health Task Force: Health Advisory Board
1971-1973
3/11
Health Task Force: Monitoring Reports
1972-1973
3/12
Health Task Force: Attendance
1971-1972
4/1
Housing and Physical Planning Task Force: Proposals
1971-1972
4/2
Housing and Physical Planning Task Force: Correspondence
1971-1972
4/3
Housing and Physical Planning Task Force: Environmental Protection Proposals
1971-1972
4/4
Housing and Physical Planning Task Force: Utilities Upgrading
1973
4/5
Housing and Physical Planning Task Force: Attendance
1971-1973
4/6
Law and Justice Task Force: Proposals
1971
4/7
Law and Justice Task Force: Proposals and Ratings
1971
4/8
Law and Justice Task Force: Project Correspondence
1971-1973
4/9
Law and Justice Task Force: Attendance
1971-1973
4/10
Recreation: Proposals
1971
4/11
Recreation: Project Correspondence
1971-1972
4/12
Social Services Task Force: Proposals
1971-1972
4/13
Social Services Task Force: Day Care Subcommittee
1972
4/14
Social Services Task Force: Attendance
1971-1973
4/15
Social Services Task Force: Transportation Correspondence
1971
5/1
Social Services Task Force: Community Facilities Proposals
1971
5/2
Social Services Task Force: Elderly - Attendance
1972-1973
5/3
Youth, Education, Recreation, Arts, Culture (YERAC) Task Force: Attendance
1971-1973
5/4
Youth, Education, Recreation, Arts, Culture (YERAC) Task Force: Youth Workshop
1972
5/5
Youth, Education, Recreation, Arts, Culture (YERAC) Task Force: Education - Correspondence and Proposals
1971-1972
Weekly Reports
Box/Folder
5/6
January-June
1972
5/7
July-August
1972
5/8
September-October
1972
5/9
November-December
1972
6/1
January-February
1973
6/2
March-April
1973
6/3
May-June
1973
5403-04: : Southwest Branch Model Cities Neighborhood Office Files, 1971-1973
.8 cubic ft.
The Southwest Model Neighborhood included Delridge, High Point, Georgetown, Riverview, Highland Park and South Park. A predominantly white neighborhood, the branch manager was Jim Hurd, until January 1973; George Clark became Acting Manager. Some of the projects to come out of the Southwest Branch were elderly services, medical-dental services, and child care. As with other branch office records, the Southwest Branch records primarily document the years 1971 to 1973. The records are arranged into four subseries: Community Profile Notebooks, Branch Administration, Task Forces, and Weekly Reports. The files contain information on efforts to involve citizens, coordinate projects with other SMCP offices, and insight into success and obstacles for projects of the Southwest Branch.
Community Profile Notebooks
Box/Folder
1/1
Staff and Maps
1973
1/2
Organizations
1973
1/3
Status Reports: Employment/Manpower/Economic Development
1973
1/4
Status Reports: Housing, Education and Recreation
1973
1/5
Status Reports: Health and Social Services
1973
Branch Administration
Box/Folder
1/6
Staff Meeting Minutes
1972
1/7
Advisory Council
1971-1972
1/8
Correspondence
1972
Task Forces
Box/Folder
1/9
Education, Youth, Recreation: Proposals
1971
1/10
Education, Youth, Recreation: Minutes
1972
1/11
Employment: Minutes
1972
1/12
Employment: Multi Service Center
1972
1/13
Employment: Proposals
1971
1/14
Health: Minutes
1971-1973
1/15
Health: Proposals
1971
1/16
Health: Medical Dental Services
1972
1/17
Housing and Physical Planning: Proposals
1971
1/18
Housing and Physical Planning: Minutes
1971-1973
2/1
Law and Justice: Proposals
1971
2/2
Law and Justice: Minutes
1971-1972
2/3
Law and Justice: Reports and Correspondence
1972
2/4
Social Services / Welfare: Minutes
1971-1973
2/5
Social Services / Welfare: Proposals
1971
2/6
Schedules and Flyers
1972
Weekly Reports
Box/Folder
2/7
Weekly Reports January-July
1972
2/8
Weekly Reports August-September
1972
2/9
Weekly Reports October-December
1972
2/10
Weekly Reports
1973
5403-05: Citywide Programs and Proposals, 1971-1973
1.2 cubic ft.
Proposals and correspondence, 1971-1973, related to SMCP programs involving two or more branches. Projects cover all task force areas, as well as some additional areas, such as community facilities. The records are arranged alphabetically. There is overlap between this series and Seattle Model Cities Program Central Administration Files (5400-03).
Box/Folder
1/1
Advisory Council (includes transcript of 3/31/1972 meeting)
1972
1/2
Advisory Council: Citizen Participation Committee - Reports and Correspondence
1972-1973
1/3
Citizen Participation: Reports and Correspondence
1972-1973
1/4
Citizen Participation: Citizen Complaints
1971-1972
1/5
Community Facilities
1971
1/6
Community Profile Project
1973
1/7
Economic and Business Development
1971
1/8
Education: Planner - Correspondence (Sue Corwin)
1972-1973
1/9
Education: Planner - Reports (Dan Dingfield)
1972-1973
1/10
Education: Proposals
1971
2/1
Education: Special Elementary Education for the Disadvantaged (SEED)
1972
2/2
Education: Veterans
1972
2/3
Employment / Manpower: Planner - Correspondence (Clayton Harrell)
1972-1973
2/4
Environmental Protection: Proposals
1971
2/5
Health: Proposals
1971
2/6
Health: Planner - Correspondence and Reports (Isaac Banks)
1972
2/7
Health: Family Health Centers
1972
2/8
Health: Mental Health
1971
2/9
Housing / Physical Environment: DCD Office of Neighborhood Improvement SMCP Weekly Reports January- June
1972
2/10
Housing / Physical Environment: DCD Office of Neighborhood Improvement SMCP Weekly Reports July - December
1972
3/1
Housing / Physical Environment: DCD Office of Neighborhood Improvement SMCP Weekly Reports January- July
1973
3/2
Housing: Proposals
1971
3/3
Law and Justice: Proposals
1971
3/4
Law and Justice: Planner - Correspondence (Charles Ehlert)
1972
3/5
Law and Justice: Legal Services
1972
3/6
Law and Justice: Legal Education Project
1972
3/7
Social Services: Proposals
1971
3/8
Social Services and Welfare: Planner - Reports and Correspondence (Sandra Bettis)
1972
3/9
Recreation / Youth: Proposals
1971
3/10
Relocation: Planner (Ruth Hughes)
1971
3/11
Transportation: Proposals
1971
5405-01: The Administrative Commission, 1972-1975
.8 cubic ft.
The Administrative Commission was created in 1972 under Ordinance 100495. It was authorized by the Washington State Legislature to assist with the administration of the Model Cities Program. The Administrative Commission was meant to facilitate the flexibility and efficiency in administering the SMCP grant monies. The Administrative Commission (TAC) consisted of three unpaid commissioners; the internal administration and monitoring of Commission projects was done by one paid staff. The Commissioners were: Caroline MacColl, William Anderson and Donald K. Smith. Symone Scales was the staff person. Monthly meetings were held, open to the public. The SMCP Citizens Advisory Council provided citizen review and public accountability. TAC was dissolved in May 1975. The records of TAC date from 1972 to 1975. The Corporation Charter, Commissioner correspondence, financial records and project correspondence comprise the bulk of the records. TAC records record the working relationship between TAC and the Office of Economic Development and Seattle Housing Development. Information about TAC projects in the files include property acquisition, of which the most prominent was purchase of the City Loan Building in Pioneer Square (206 First Avenue South), proposals from the Skid Road Community Council for a food and shelter facility, demolition of deteriorated vacant houses in the East Model Neighborhood, and an accounting system for SMCP.
Box/Folder
1/1
Charter
1972-1975
1/2
Reports
1972-1973
1/3
Minutes: Regular Meetings
1972-1974
1/4
Minutes: Executive Sessions
1972-1974
1/5
Citizens' Advisory Council
1972-1973
1/6
Correspondence
1971-1972
1/7
Correspondence
1972-1973
1/8
Correspondence
1974-1975
1/9
Contracts
1971-1973
2/1
City Loan Building
1972-1974
2/2
City Loan Building: Appraisal
1972
2/3
Minor Home Repair - Revolving Fund
1973
2/4
Skid Road Community Council
1973
2/5
University Information Systems / Andrew Branch: Contract and Reports
1972-1973
2/6
University Information Systems / Andrew Branch: Accounting and Procedure Manual
1974
2/7
Financial: Monthly Financial Reports
1973-1974
2/8
Financial: Correspondence
1972-1973
2/9
Financial: Accounting
1973
2/10
Financial: Journal Book
1973
5408-01: Financial Reports, 1969-1973
.6 cubic foot
Financial reports, audits, examinations of contract costs and financial statements, and accounting reviews for various Model Cities programs, such as the Seattle Treatment Center, Unicenter, SEEK, SCOPE, and many others.
Box/Folder
1/1
SMCP Audit of Lease and Service Contracts
1973
1/1
Report on Examination of Contract Costs of SMCP Afro/American Arts Project
1971-1972
1/1
Report on Examination of Contract Costs of SMCP Alcoholism Screening, Dry-out, Detoxification, and Referral Project
1972
1/1
Seattle Model Cities Program Budget Administration Policy
1972
1/1
SMCP Central Seattle Community Council Report on Examination of Contract Costs
1970-1971
1/1
SMCP Central Area Federal Credit Union Leschi Neighborhood Development Program Repair Service Project Accounting Review
1970-1971
1/2
SMCP Central Area Group Homes Program Report on Examination of Contract Costs
1971-1972
1/2
SMCP Central Area School Council Audit
1970-1972
1/2
SMCP Central Area School Council Accounting Review
1971
1/2
SMCP Child Care Project Accounting Review
1972
1/2
SMCP Child Care Program Report on Examination of Contract Costs
1970
1/2
SMCP Child Care Program Report on Examination of Contract Costs
1972
1/2
SMCP Cinematography Project Report on Examination of Contract Costs
1970-1972
1/2
SMCP Comprehensive Services for the Elderly Accounting Review
1972
1/2
SMCP Construction Industry Development Combined Statement of Funds, Assets and Liabilities
1970-1971
1/2
SMCP Construction Industry Development Program Report on Examination of Contract Costs
1970
1/1
SMCP Review of Lease and Service Contracts
1973
1/1
SMCP Afro/American Arts Project - Report on Examination of Contract Costs
1971-1972
1/1
SMCP Alcoholism Screening, Dry Out, Detoxification, and Referral Project - Report on Examination of Contract Costs and Letter on Internal Control
1972
1/1
SMCP Budget Administration System
-
1/1
SMCP Central Seattle Community Council - Report on Examination of Contract Costs and Letter on Internal Control
1970-1971
1/1
SMCP Central Area Federal Credit Union Leschi Neighborhood Development Program Repair Service Project Accounting Review
1970-1971
1/2
SMCP Central Area Group Homes Program - Report on Examination of Contract Costs and Letter on Internal Control
1971-1972
1/2
SMCP Central Area School Council Audit
1970-1972
1/2
SMCP Central Area School Council Accounting Review
1971
1/2
SMCP Child Care Project Accounting Review
1972
1/2
SMCP Child Care Program - Report on Examination of Contract Costs and Letter on Internal Control
1970
1/2
SMCP Child Care Program - Report on Examination of Contract Costs
1972
1/2
SMCP Cinematography Project - Report on Examination of Contract Costs
1970-1972
1/2
SMCP Construction Industry Development - Combined Statement of Funds, Assets and Liabilities and Schedule of Program Costs and Additional Information
1970-1971
1/2
SMCP Construction Industry Development Program - Report on Examination of Contract Costs and Letter on Internal Control
1970
1/3
SMCP Creative - Scott ( A Joint Venture ) Report on Examination of Balance Sheet and Letter on Contract Performance
1971-1972
1/3
SMCP Demonstration Schools Program - Report on Examination of Contract Costs
1970-1971
1/3
SMCP Economic Development Program - Report on Examination of Contract Costs and Letter on Internal Control
1969-1970
1/3
SMCP Extended Services Program - Report on Examination of Contract Costs
1971
1/3
SMCP Extended Services Program - Report on Examination of Contract Costs
1970-1971
1/3
SMCP Halfway House Program - Report on Examination of Contract Costs
1971-1972
1/4
SMCP Halfway House Program - Report on Examination of Contract Costs and Letter on Internal Control
1970-1971
1/4
SMCP Harborview Mental Health Center - Report on Examination of Program Costs
1971
1/4
SMCP Harrison Early Childhood Education Program - Report on Examination of Contract Costs
1971
1/4
SMCP Report on Examination of Financial Statements and Additional Information and Letter of Recommendations
1969
1/4
SMCP Home Repair Services Project - Report on Examination of Contract Costs
1971-1972
1/4
SMCP Audit of Leschi Neighborhood Development Program and Home Repair Services Revolving Funds by Central Area Federal Credit Union
1972
1/4
SMCP Letter of Internal Control for Projects Administered by Central Area Citizen's Committee of Seattle, Inc.
1971-1972
1/4
SMCP Report on Review of Madrona Bathhouse Project Costs
1970-1972
1/4
SMCP Middle School Planning Program
1970-1971
1/4
SMCP Mini - Tran Community Transportation System Accounting Review
1972
1/5
SMCP Model Neighborhood ADC Parents Project - Report on Examination of Contract Costs and Letter of Internal Control
1970-1971
1/5
SMCP Model Neighborhood Beautification Program - Report on Examination of Program Costs
1971-1972
1/5
SMCP Neighborhood Social Service Center - Cherry Hill Services Project - Report on Examination of Contract Costs
1971-1972
1/5
SMCP Model Neighborhood Middle School Program - Report on Examination of Contract Costs
1971
1/5
SMCP Neighborhood Social Service Centers - Letter on Internal Control
1971
1/5
SMCP Neighborhood Social Service Centers - Schedule of Program Costs Reported to the U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development (unaudited)
1970-1971
1/5
SMCP Odessa Brown Neighborhood Health Station - Report on Examination of Contract Costs and Letter on Internal Control
1970-1971
1/5
SMCP Occupational Skills Program - Report on Examination of Contract Costs
1971
1/5
SMCP Occupational Skills Program - Report on Examination of Contract Costs
1970-1971
1/5
SMCP Oscar Productions, Inc. Accounting Review
1971
1/5
SMCP Performing Arts Project - Report on Examination of Contract Costs and Letter on Internal Control
1969-1971
1/5
SMCP Report on Review of Powell Barnett Park Project Costs
1970-1972
1/5
SMCP Public Defender Association Accounting Review
1971
1/5
SMCP Public Defender Program - Report on Examination of Program Costs
1970-1971
1/5
SMCP Repair Service Project - Report on Examination of Contract Costs and Letter on Internal Control
1970-1971
2/1
SMCP Public Defender Program - Report on Examination of Contract Costs and Letter on Internal Control
1969-1970
2/1
SMCP Seattle Career Opportunity Program - Education (Scope) - Report on Examination of Contract Costs
1971
2/1
SMCP Seattle Career Opportunity Program - Employment (Scope) - Report on Examination of Contract Costs
1970-1971
2/1
SMCP Seattle Central Area Industries Accounting Review
1971
2/1
SMCP Audit of Seattle Central Area Industries, Inc. Final Report - Program Breakdown Structure #32304
1971-1972
2/1
SMCP Seattle - King County New Careers Project, Inc. Accounting Review
1972
2/2
SMCP Seattle Treatment Center Program Accounting Review
1971
2/2
Audit of SMCP Seattle Opportunities Industrialization Center - Skills Center - Final Report - Program Breakdown Structure #32305
1971-1972
2/2
SMCP Report on Performance of Accounting Services - Seattle Treatment Center - Contract #3120910 - ASV1 - 3
1971-1972
2/2
SMCP Letter of Comments on Programs Administered by Seattle School District No. 1
1972
2/3
SMCP Seek Program (Seattle Emphasis on Education and Knowledge) Report on Examination of Contract Costs and Letter on Internal Control
1969-1970
2/3
SMCP Special Counseling and Continuation School / Onward Bound - Report on Examination of Contract Costs and Letter on Internal Control
1970-1972
2/3
SMCP Special Counseling and Continuation School - Report on Examination of Contract Costs and Letter on Internal Control
1970
2/3
SMCP Tenant Organization Project - Report on Examination of Contract Costs and Letter on Internal Control
1970-1971
2/3
SMCP Seek Program (Seattle Emphasis on Education and Knowledge) Report on Examination of Contract Costs and Letter on Internal Control
1969-1970
2/3
SMCP Synergistic Services, Inc. Mini - Tran Accounting Review
1971
2/3
SMCP Tenant Organization Project Audit
1971
2/4
SMCP Joint Manpower Board Unicenter Audit
1970-1971
2/4
SMCP Report on Examination of Financial Statements and Additional Information and Letter of Recommendations
1969
2/4
SMCP Report on Examination of Financial Statements and Additional Information and Letter of Recommendations
1969

Project and Program Monitoring FilesReturn to Top

47 cubic ft.

The records of individual projects are organized in ninety records series arranged by the fourteen program areas created by the Model Cities Program. Each project file is described as an individual records series. The project files typically include correspondence, contracts, monthly and quarterly reports, yearly operating plans, grant applications, job evaluations, accounting information, and termination audits. Description is only available at the records series (project) level; ninety projects are listed in the description. Among them are the Odessa Brown Children's Clinic, the Early Childhood Education Center, the Skid Road Shelter and Food Center, and El Centro de la Raza.

The Seattle Model Cities Program project areas include:

· Recreation/Culture/Youth

· Health

· Law and Justice

· Social Services

· Education

· Economic and Business Development

· Manpower and Job Development

· Housing

· Transportation and Communications

· Community Facilities

· Relocation

· Environmental Protection and Development

· Evaluation and Information

· Citizen Participation

Description
5411-01 : Afro-American Arts, 1969-1974
0.8 cubic foot
Model Cities funding was directed to Black Arts/West, a program of the Central Area Motivation Program (CAMP), to enhance its performing arts program. The specific purpose was to expand theater activities and provide community exposure to drama. Funding supported a children's theater, the professional training of actors, and the production of plays of local and regional interest. By the final year of Model Cities funding, Black Arts/West productions drew audiences totalling over 12,000, and had gained exposure nationally. CAMP continued administration of the theater program after termination of the Model Cities funding.
5411-02 : Swimming and Water Safety Education Project, 1970-1973
0.2 cubic foot
The project was initiated in July 1971 to provide children and adults in the Model Neighborhood with swimming lessons and water-based exercise classes. The YMCA operated the project. During the summers of 1971 and 1972, over 200 pre-teens received swim lessons. In 1972, the program expanded to include weekly "swim and trim" classes for adults; and in 1973, funding provided portal to portal transport for 50 youth who enrolled in water skiing classes. Due to a reduction in Fifth Action Year (1974) funds, the SMCP terminated the project.
5411-03 : Cinematography Project, 1970-1974
0.4 cubic foot
The Cinematography Project provided training for high school and college students in cinematography, still photography, film production and directing, film and videotape editing, television news photography, and screen writing. It also provided career counseling and job placement. During its first year, the project was administered by the Seattle School District #1. However, the project focused more on community based activities and local television stations and did not aligned with the existing curriculum of the school district. In 1970, the project was taken over by Oscar Productions, a non-profit corporation founded a year earlier. During its existence, the Cinematography Project trained 105 students in cinema arts, created 16 films, produced 200 episodes of Action Inner-City on KOMO-TV, and conducted 18 community workshops. Oscar Productions continued activities on a reduced scale following the discontinuation of Model Cities funding.
5411-04 : Black Academy of Music, 1973-1974
0.2 cubic foot
The Black Academy of Music was established as a community orchestra in 1970 to provide residents with instruction in Black music, composition, and arranging, and to prepare talented students for music careers. SMCP refused to fund the project because it felt there was little chance the Academy could secure permanent funding. The Department of Housing and Urban Development also had a policy against funding independent entities that had no track record of management and fiscal success. However, in 1973, the City Council overruled SMCP recommendations and funded the project under the auspices of the Central Area Motivation Program. The Academy provided instruction to 385 students, supported an orchestra of 45, and performed for an estimated 20,000 residents.
5411-05 : City-Wide Recreation Project, 1972-1974
0.4 cubic foot
This project, administered through the Department of Parks and Recreation, was designed to create a centralized resource for comprehensively planning, programming, and promoting recreational opportunities. The goal was to develop model information and a planning resource system using computer technology that could coordinate recreation activities city-wide. At completion of the project, the Parks Department implemented the program and analytical tools at the Ballard and Loyal Heights Community Recreation Center. Included in the records series are project monitoring files for the Southeast, Southwest, and North Recreation Projects.
5411-06 : Youth Services Project, 1969-1974
1.2 cubic foot
This project was funded to create a comprehensive youth recreation program for approximately 15,000 model neighborhood youth with an emphasis on the older teen population. The project grew in scope in 1971 to include efforts to form a consortium of youth serving agencies to coordinate city-wide planning for all youth programs and to support youth advocacy. SMCP funds provided support for planning and administrative staff as well as thirty special projects operated by youth service agencies. Funded activities included ecological study programs, printing newsletters, teen drop-in centers, summer sack lunches, youth counseling, employment referrals, recreational and cultural programs. Many local agencies had independent funding and chose not to be integrated into the overall plan. This, and a reduction in Fifth Action Year funding from HUD, lead SMCP to terminate the program in 1974. Certain aspects of the project, however, were continued by the City's Department of Human Services.
5411-07 : Model Neighborhood Camp, 1969-1973
0.4 cubic foot
This project was developed to provide model neighborhood children the opportunity to enjoy a summer outdoor educational/recreational camping experience in a rural setting. A farm, 30 miles outside of Seattle, was leased in 1969 and purchased a year later with HUD and State of Washington funding. The program was administered by the Seattle School District for two years and served 1800 children each summer. During 1971 and 1972, the camp, known as the Red Barn Ranch, came under the management of the Parks Department and was closed for renovation. The Department operated day camps with SMCP funding until the Ranch was reopened in 1973. In that year, children from all four model neighborhoods attended 10 one-week camp sessions. Following the termination of Model Cities funding, the Parks Department continued operation of the facility on a year-round basis.
5412-01 : Prepaid Health Care Project, 1970-1974
0.8 cubic foot
Part of a nation-wide demonstration project, Prepaid Health Care was intended to provide subsidized health care to low income families through different delivery systems. The project was administered by the Community Health Board of Seattle. SMCP funding paid for enrollment and monthly dues for Group Health enrollees and the salaries for the outreach component of the project. The U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW) funded support for Blue Cross/Blue Shield enrollees. An annual average of 4,000 individuals were enrolled during the life of the project. HEW continued funding for a brief time following the close-out of the Model Cities Program.
5412-02 : Odessa Brown Children's Clinic, 1969-1974
0.8 cubic foot
The Odessa Brown Clinic was operated by Children's Orthopedic Hospital and focuses primarily on children's health needs. Medical services included diagnosis, treatment, simple lab tests, and follow-up treatment with more difficult cases referred to Children's Hospital. The clinic also offered dental care and dental hygiene education. At the close of SMCP funding, the clinic had recorded 18,247 medical patient visits and 13,095 dental patient visits. Approximately 70 percent of patients were from families whose income was below federal poverty levels. The Clinic services were continued by Children's Hospital after completion of the Model Cities funding ended.
5412-03 : Environmental Health Project, 1969-1974
0.8 cubic foot
This project was a campaign to remove junk and garbage, raze unsafe buildings, clear vacant lots, eliminate rodents and vector problems, and extend environmental health education in the model neighborhoods. This highly visible program removed 700 abandoned vehicles from model neighborhoods, razed 332 structures and 95 buildings, removed 6,000 tons of rubbish, and cleared 152 vacant lots. The project was operated by the Central Area Motivation Program until the advent of the Planned Variation when it was transferred to the Seattle/King County Health Department and services were expanded to include the new model neighborhoods.
5412-04 : Developmental Comprehensive Health Care Project, 1968-1970
0.2 cubic foot
Funded by the SMCP and HEW (U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare), the Developmental Comprehensive Health Care Project was the first project implemented in the Health category. The University of Washington Division of Heath Sciences planned a health care system and wrote grants to fund its implementation; the outcome of this project was the Prepaid Health Project, and other projects such as the Odessa Brown Clinic and Seattle Treatment Center also had their roots in this initial program. Throughout the project, Model Neighborhood citizen involvement remained a priority.
5412-05 : Community Mental Health Services Project, 1969-1974
0.8 cubic foot
The project provided comprehensive mental health services in the model neighborhood around Harborview Hospital, including inpatient and outpatient care, emergency care, and consultation to schools and community agencies. It was administered by Harborview with service and management provide by the University of Washington Medical School and Department of Psychiatry. The Center was designated one of twelve national model programs attempting to integrate mental and physical health services. The project received long-term funding from the National Institute of Mental Health that lasted beyond the period of SMCP funding.
5412-06 : Pioneer Square Neighborhood Health Station, 1970-1974
0.6 cubic ft.
The Health Station was an outpatient facility operated by Harborview Hospital for the residents of the Pioneer Square and International District areas. The population was largely made up of older males characterized by physical disabilities, alcoholism, drug dependency, physical trauma, chronic illness, and/or mental health problems. The station provided health care and preventive practices services to the transient population in Pioneer Square and the International District. Operated by Harborview Medical Center. Patient visits increased from 200 in March 1972 to 1,300 in September 1973 with a total of nearly 39,000 during the life of the project. The Health Station was one of the first in the region to use nurse practitioners to meet medical needs.
5412-07 : Food and Nutrition Project, 1970-1971
0.1 cubic foot
This short-term project was established to relieve the suffering of Skid Road indigents and transients due to the severely cold winter of 1970-1971. Funding was primarily from the State Department of Social and Health Services, although the SMCP contributed heavily toward the purchase of food and shelter. The project set the precedent for the City to include a Winter Food and Shelter allocation in its General Fund budget.
5412-08 : Treatment for the Indigent Alcoholic Project, 1970-1973
0.8 cubic foot
With its higher-than-average rate of alcoholism, Seattle faced a problem with "drunk-in-public" indigent alcoholics. The SMCP's treatment program sought to remove indigent alcoholics from the criminal justice system by providing less punitive treatment. Patients were fed, given a place to sleep, and monitored in the first stage (dry out), then were administered medical treatment and given referrals to further treatment during the second stage (detoxification). Although a variety of treatment and assistance facilities had been available prior to the SMCP's involvement, its Central Alcoholism Agency, formed in 1972, coordinated the efforts of those services. The Seattle Treatment Center, which provided services to the county, served 190 patients per month at the time of its termination (due to administrative problems) in 1973. Other facilities created by the Central Alcoholism Agency continued to assist patients. In 1975, public drunkenness was decriminalized.
5412-09 : Neighborhood Health Services Project, 1971-1973
1.0 cubic foot
Planned Variation allowed for the expansion of SMCP sponsored health clinics into the three new model neighborhoods. Two dental clinics and a medical clinic in the Southwest MN served Georgetown and South Park and recorded 2,574 patients in a little under a year-and-a-half. The Southeast MN had medical clinics at the Holly Park and Rainier Vista Public Housing projects and included an Indian Health Board clinic and a clinic that focuses on Chicano health issues. Nearly 3,500 patients were served in a year-and-a-quarter. The North Model Neighborhood project experienced very low resident utilization and suffered from some administrative difficulties. It operated for only ten months.
5412-10 : Center for Addiction Services, 1972-1974
0.1 cubic foot
The Center was established to provide medical treatment, counseling and referral for non-alcohol drug abusers. SMCP funds were used to help provide local matching funds for the creation of the Center. From 1973, the continued operation of the Center was carried out with funds from the National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA). SMCP funds were used specifically for staff salaries until the NIDA funds began flowing on a regular basis.
5412-11 : Odessa Brown Neighborhood Health Complex, 1969-1974
0.4 cubic foot
The Odessa Brown Clinic was operated by Children's Orthopedic Hospital and focused primarily on children's health needs. Medical services included diagnosis, treatment, simple lab tests, and follow-up treatment, with more difficult cases referred to Children's Hospital. The clinic also offered dental care and dental hygiene education. At the close of SMCP funding, the clinic had recorded 18,247 medical patient visits and 13,095 dental patient visits. Approximately 70 percent of patients were from families whose income was below federal poverty levels. The Clinic services were continued by Children's Hospital after Model Cities funding ended.
5413-01 : Legal Services Project, 1972-1973
0.2 cubic foot
Legal Services, run by the Seattle-King County Legal Aid Bureau, was an existing organization that received SMCP assistance to enhance its services. SMCP funds made possible the opening of two new Legal Services offices in the Southeast and North Model Neighborhoods. The organization provided legal advice, drafting of documents, and education programs concerning the legal system for its lower-income clients. Legal Services attorneys also represented clients in court trials and in appeals. Legal Services received a high volume of new clients after the opening of the new offices.
5413-02 : Community Service Officers, 1971-1974
0.6 cubic foot
The Seattle Police Department began hiring Model Neighborhood residents as Community Service Officers (CSOs) in 1972. The program was intended to improve relations between Model Neighborhood residents and the Seattle Police Department, to reduce juvenile crime, to provide police with a better understanding of minority individuals, and to increase the percentage of minority employees on the police force. Although CSOs did not carry weapons and could not make arrests, finding lost children, helping people find food and shelter, and counseling young adults were some of their duties. Although both the SPD and the Model Neighborhood residents were at first skeptical, the program was so successful that by 1975, its funding had been taken over by the City General Fund. The addition of 26 full-time employees enabled the program to serve all of Seattle.
5413-03 : Community Based Residential Treatment (Group Homes) Project, 1969-1974
1.6 cubic ft.
This project intended to reduce the number of institutionalized delinquent youth by providing a group home living situation, career advice and educational assistance, and a variety of counseling options for youth who would otherwise have been institutionalized. A variety of groups -- including local police, Community Service Officers, and the Juvenile Court system -- participated in the program. Successes of the project included reduction in police encounters, improved grades, and a high rate of success in returning troubled youth to a family situation. The cost of the project was also significantly lower than that of institutionalization.
5413-04 : Public Defender Program, 1969-1974
1.2 cubic ft.
SMCP sponsored the development of the Defender Association, a private non-profit corporation which administers the Seattle-King County Public Defender program. The objective of the agency is to provide quality legal services to indigent defendants. Prior to its creation, indigents and the working poor accused of felonies were assigned attorneys by the court and those accused of misdemeanors generally had no counsel. The project began with five staff in 1969, but by 1975, the Public Defender's office included 70 full-time staff employing 34 attorneys.
5413-05 : Chance Halfway House, 1970-1974
0.8 cubic foot
This project provided employment skills training and job placement services to adult offenders after release from prison. The halfway house provided a living environment to its clients, and education focused not only on job skills, but also on personal relations, self-image, and motivation. The job placement service found jobs for graduates of the program as well as other former offenders. Nearly sixty per cent of clients graduated from the program, and those graduates had fewer encounters with the criminal justice system and an improved employment record. The importance of personal support services beyond the provision of jobs was stressed.
5413-07 : Group Legal Services, 1969-1974
0.4 cubic foot
This project intended to establish a membership-fee-based non-profit legal assistance corporation which would provide low-cost legal services to Model Neighborhood residents who did not qualify for free legal assistance. The project had two parts: the first was an initial review of residents' legal needs, which would be followed by the planning and creation of a group legal services plan. However, in 1969, revisions in the code of ethics of the American and Washington State Bar Associations put a hold on the implementation of the project. Although the Bar Association's Board of Governors recommended a policy on group legal services which would have allowed the project to go forward, the recommendation also had to pass muster with the State Supreme Court. Because the review process lasted five years, the SMCP project could not be implemented.
5414-01 : Comprehensive Services for the Aged, 1969-1974
1.6 cubic ft.
This project intended to improve the effectiveness of services provided to the elderly. The SMCP gave funding to or through different agencies to assist them in planning services for elderly clients. Agencies such as Senior Services and Centers, Inc., Legal Services Bureau, Meals on Wheels, the Visiting Nurse Service, and the Seattle Police department provided services including health care, counseling, legal services, home maintenance, and meals for those unable to leave their homes. Some elderly clients were employed as crossing guards or day care workers, and social and community activities were provided. Most of these services continued after SMCP's involvement ended.
5414-02 : Special Counseling and Continuation School, 1969-1973
0.4 cubic foot
A program for assistance to teenage mothers, originally operated by the YWCA with assistance from the Seattle-King County Health Department and Seattle Public Schools, was expanded with help from the SMCP Welfare Task Force. The expanded program provided classroom instruction health services, counseling, and child care for pregnant teenagers and teenage mothers. In 1970, Seattle Public Schools revised their policy on suspending pregnant students, allowing young women to continue their high school education. In 1973, the program became a part of the Seattle Public School system.
5414-03 : Neighborhood Social Service Center Network, 1968-1974
2.4 cubic ft.
A network of social service centers, comprising the Cherry Hill Neighborhood Facility, International District Neighborhood Resource Center, Seattle Indian Center, and Yesler Neighborhood Social Service Center (Langston Hughes Center), was established to provide recreational activities and cultural opportunities to neighborhood residents. Some centers primarily served a particular population group (Seattle's Indian population was served by the Seattle Indian Center, while the International District Center primarily served the Asian population). Each center remained in existence after SMCP's funding ended.
5414-04 : Neighborhood Multi-Service Centers, 1972-1974
0.2 cubic foot
This project created neighborhood centers which provided a variety of social services -- available from public and private agencies -- as required by specific Model Neighborhood needs. Centers in Ballard-Fremont, Rainier Valley, West Seattle, and the University District were known as "Little City Halls," enabling many City departments and agencies to better serve their patrons. The program received strong support from neighborhood residents, and after SMCP funding ended, the program was renamed the Community Service Center Program and funded by the General Fund.
5414-05 : Skid Road Shelter and Food Project, 1969-1974
0.4 cubic foot
This project operated a shelter, meal service, and social service center in the Morrison Hotel in the Pioneer Square/Skid Road neighborhood. In addition to food and shelter, the program also provided counseling, referrals, and health services.
5414-06 : Child Care Services Project, 1969-1974
2.0 cubic ft.
This project provided child care for low-income and welfare families, emphasizing education, health care, and nutrition. In 1969, less than 800 children were receiving regular child care in the Model Neighborhood area; by the end of the project in June 1974, 5,000 children had been placed in day care. Planned Variations neighborhoods were analyzed and services were provided accordingly. SMCP operated several day care facilities of its own while contracting with many others. The project continued after the termination of SMCP's funding, and the need for organized child care was brought to the attention of both the city and the state.
5414-07 : Aid to Dependent Children (ADC) Mothers' Council Project, 1969-1971
0.2 cubic foot
At the initiation of this project, 8,000 Seattle residents were on welfare. Beginning in 1969, the SMCP provided funding to the ADC Motivated Mothers Council project, which had been formed in the 1960s as a local chapter of the National Welfare Rights Organization. The Council's mission was to facilitate communication between welfare recipients and welfare system offices, to encourage residents to initiate change in the system, and to give recipients a sense of involvement and power in their dealings with the welfare system. The SMCP's funding enabled expansion of the project's staff and resources. These resources went toward improving the welfare system and providing services for recipients, including health services and legal assistance. Although an initial lack of organizational leadership meant that few of the Council's goals were obtained, the project was later reorganized and received funding from HUD.
5415-01 : Early Childhood Education Center, 1971-1973
0.2 cubic foot
The project, implemented at Seattle School District #1 and staffed by Seattle Public School teachers, had goals of providing individualized instruction with attention to learning styles and speeds; using the non-graded continuous progress method of teaching; emphasizing individual instruction in the home as well as at school; and maintaining both racial and socioeconomic diversity. Students at the new Harrison School showed improved test scores, and families attracted by the school's success began to move into the neighborhood. This resulted in a change in the diversity of the school's student body: fewer minority and lower-income students attended as the neighborhood became more middle-class.
5415-02 : Seattle Career Opportunity Program-Education (SCOPE), 1970-1973
0.4 cubic foot
This project encouraged Model Neighborhood residents to seek employment in the Seattle Public School system; by doing so, it hoped to create a group of racially and culturally diverse teachers and administrators who could better serve the needs of their students. SCOPE members received scholarships to pay living expenses while training as teacher's aides, and a scale of advancement based on college coursework was waived in favor of more practical competence evaluations. Trainees also received scholarships to fund bachelor's degrees in education, and received career counseling. The program allowed SCOPE students to experience both academic classes and practical teaching experience.
5415-03 : Occupational Skills Development, 1970-1972
0.4 cubic foot
This program, designed for students not planning to attend college, provided training in fourteen vocational areas, including child care, barbering, auto mechanics, food services, carpentry, and clothing design and creation. Skilled workers in each occupation provided instruction. By 1972, over half of the Garfield High School student body was enrolled, and community businesses (such as a day care, a section of the school's cafeteria, and a clothing boutique) allowed students to apply their new vocational skills.
5415-04 : Extended Services Program, 1969-1974
0.8 cubic foot
The program was designed to serve middle-school-aged dropouts and suspended students by providing an alternative school environment. The target students were often from low-income families and had serious medical and personal needs; furthermore, many students were behind in school, lacking even basic academic skills. The project hoped to return students to a traditional school setting if possible, but also provided continuing education and occupational skills. Improvement of test scores was another important goal. A health care program was also created, providing medical examinations as well as educating students about nutrition, drugs and alcohol, and sex. A majority of students enrolled in the program were able to return to a traditional school environment.
5415-05 : Model Neighborhood Middle Schools Project, 1969-1973
0.8 cubic foot
The SMCP provided funding to assist in the planning and implementation of the Seattle School District's Middle School program. The program, created in 1971, hoped to improve students' academic achievement by adding new material and using continuous progress and individualized teaching styles. Teachers were provided with special training in relations between ethnic groups and in the workings of the continuous progress teaching method. Desegregation of schools was an important issue in the planning of the program: the "4-4-4" redistribution of students into elementary, middle, and high school groups facilitated desegregation and required that students be bussed to other neighborhoods. Despite opposition from many residents, students were bussed to the new middle schools in 1971.
5415-06 : Central Area School Council, 1972-1974
0.067 cubic foot
This purpose of the Central Area School Council was to promote community involvement with schools and to foster better relations between parents and school district administration. Issues such as school violence and the desegregation plan were of particular importance. Through the Council, the community could be involved in the creation of policies affecting Model Neighborhood students (regardless of whether the students attended school in the Model Neighborhood). The Council resulted in a change in the way decisions were made and served as the inspiration for other councils in the area. Although the Central Area School Council had to be consulted before any major policy decisions were made, other councils did not have the same authority.
5415-07 : Central Area Motivation Program--Educational Talent Search, 1972-1973
0.067 cubic foot
This project was designed to train Model Neighborhood residents as college counselors. Once trained, the eleven counselors contacted nearly 800 Model Neighborhood students, arranging campus visits and providing counseling. Seventy-five of these students received financial aid to attend colleges or universities, while others were further assisted by other programs such as New Careers.
5415-08 : Campi Preschool Transportation Project, 1970-1974
0.067 cubic foot
The CAMPI Satellite Preschools operated a daily preschool program for 270 students in the Central Area. With assistance from the SMCP, Seattle Public Schools contracted with Seattle King County Economic Opportunity Board to provide twelve busses and drivers. The project was intended to improve school attendance, facilitate desegregation, and help parents become more actively involved. One parent from each of the nine preschools participated in the Satellite Parent Advisory Committee.
5415-09 : Educational Development Program, 1969-1974
0.4 cubic foot
Based on proposals from Model Neighborhood citizens, the SMCP began work with the Seattle Public Schools to improve teachers' relations with students and parents from varied ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds, as well as to facilitate communication between school officials and students and parents. Diversity of learning styles was also an important consideration. The Seattle Public Schools' Building Task Forces (one for each of the nine participating schools) included teachers, parents, and students. Their intent was to determine students' needs and create and implement a program to meet those needs. Program Development Committee members included representatives from the schools as well as from various task forces. This group would recommend changes based on data from each school. This plan, however, was changed because of time limitations, and the project instead focused on creating specific programs in categories such as Basic Skills, Multi-Ethnic, and Community Resources. The goals of curriculum expansion and diverse teaching methods were met. Strong citizen involvement with School District planning and policymaking was considered an important outcome of the project.
5415-10 : English as a Second Language Program, 1972-1973
0.4 cubic foot
Because many Asian-American residents of the Model Neighborhoods did not speak or write English well, the SMCP encouraged Seattle Public Schools and local community colleges to create programs to serve their needs; the goal of the project was to help students reach a level of competency with English that would enable them to function in school, at work, and in the community. Furthermore, another goal was to assist students in resolving their cultural identities. With the advice of the Greater Seattle Asian American Council (GSAAC), the Seattle Public schools created an ESL project. This differed in several ways from their already-existent TESOL program, which was not endorsed by the GSAAC or the SMCP. The new ESL program allowed instructors to speak in both English and the native language, while TESOL had allowed instructors to speak only English. Other features of the new ESL program included teachers of Asian background, classes for each language group (as opposed to TESOL's policy of placing students from many language groups in one class), and allowing both adults and children to attend. Students in the program showed improved scores on language tests, and, by 1976, the Seattle School District was spending $1 million per year on ESL programs.
5416-01 : Economic Resource Development Project, 1969-1974
1.2 cubic ft.
The Economic Resource Development (ERD) project was designed to assist Model Neighborhood business owners by providing fee-based services such as loan packaging, loan guarantees, and counseling in the areas of management and accounting. The project was slow to start and the number of clients quite low; to offset this, SMCP also helped to fund the Minority Enterprise Small Business Investment Corporation (MESBIC). Because SMCP funds were reduced in the final Action Year, funding for ERD and MESBIC did not continue.
5416-02 : Construction Industry Development Project, 1968-1974
0.4 cubic foot
This project was designed to assist and strengthen Model Neighborhood contractors while also increasing jobs for other Model Neighborhood residents; services included assisting contractors in becoming bondable and facilitating their interactions with the Associated General Contractors and with labor unions. Loans and loan guarantees were made to twenty contractors in the Model Neighborhood; this funding was provided to help contractors become bondable and to help them purchase materials. Although the contractors received several million dollars' worth of business, problems with financial and management issues often prevented work from going ahead.
5416-03 : City Economic Development Program (Office of Economic Development), 1972-1973
0.4 cubic foot
In 1971, Seattle was immersed in its worst-ever recession as a result of the "Boeing Bust." In that year, Planned Variation money was used to create the Office of Economic Development. This organization's goals were to promote the development of new and existing industries in the Seattle area, as well as to reduce Model Neighborhood and Seattle unemployment and to assist existing businesspeople in the Model Neighborhoods. Activities such as research and data analysis, information dissemination, promotional activities, small business assistance, and development and preservation of businesses were some OED functions. Some of its goals were achieved when a Japanese chemical company decided to build a facility in Seattle, generating hundreds of construction and other jobs. Seattle was also promoted as a production location for movies and television; this provided jobs, put money into the local economy, and had a positive effect on tourism. An improved relationship between city government and the business community was another important outcome of the project. After SMCP funding ended, OED remained in the Department of Community Development for one year.
5417-01 : Contract and Employee Compliance Project, 1969-1974
0.6 cubic foot
The SMCP helped to fund staff and operational costs of the Contract Compliance Division of the Human Rights Department. The division's responsibility was to enforce Ordinance 98386, which was intended to increase the proportion of minority employees in construction work. The Contract Compliance Division worked to promote affirmative action by vendors by attending pre-contract award conferences, dealing with complaints, and investigating the progress of the city in implementing affirmative action. By 1972, minority employees in construction projects equaled 20% of the total number of employees. After a 1973 evaluation of the program's effectiveness, the Contract Compliance Division was funded by the City General Fund the following year.
5417-02 : Seattle Model Cities Intern Project, 1969-1973
0.2 cubic foot
This project provided entry-level employment for Model Neighborhood residents through internships in neighborhood planning, administrative and management positions, and other positions including planning interns, clerks, and secretaries with the SMCP. This program was intended to enlarge and improve the pool of community members with planning, management, and administrative skills. Interns received on-the-job training under the supervision of SMCP staff, and some attended college while participating in the program. The SMCP provided special training sessions on topics such as budgeting, community relations, and governmental processes. The majority of interns felt the program was a positive and helpful experience.
5417-03 : Employment Unicenter Project, 1969-1974
0.8 cubic foot
Although many agencies provided job training and employment referral services in the Model Neighborhood, the lack of coordination between these agencies resulted in frustration and service gaps for job-seeking clients. The Mayor and Governor created the Joint Manpower Board (JMB) which facilitated joint discussion and planning among agencies. The SMCP funded the Unicenter, an administrative staff unit serving the JMB. Difficulties occurred because no one could force an agency to follow new policies or participate in plans created by the JMB; furthermore, the program was plagued by conflict between the agencies on the board and the Unicenter staff. These conflicts were beginning to be resolved when the project ended. The Unicenter, however, succeeded in facilitating some client services, and its work with the Manpower Area Planning Council set the stage for a more cooperative and consortial way of providing manpower services.
5417-04 : Public Service Careers Program, 1970-1973
0.4 cubic foot
The Public Service Careers program was designed to provide job training and marketable skills for residents of the Model Neighborhood; a supplementary goal was to increase the number of minorities in the work force. The program focused on getting residents out of dead-end jobs by giving them further training, as well as on training residents for jobs with long-term opportunities. SMCP funds assisted the program in training minority employees as fire fighters in the Seattle Fire Department.
5417-05 : Seattle Opportunities Industrialization Center Skills Center, 1971-1974
0.4 cubic foot
SMCP's funding and federal grants helped to build the Skills Center for the private, non-profit Seattle Opportunities Industrialization Center; previously, the program had been located in two separate facilities. The construction plan involved heavy participation of Model Neighborhood contractors and construction workers; the construction bid mandated a certain ratio of experienced workers to minority trainees. The SOIC Skills Center and the Medgar Evers Pool were the only major facilities constructed in and for the Model Neighborhood during the Model Cities Program.
5417-06 : Scholarship Project, 1970-1974
0.8 cubic foot
Between 1970 and 1974, the SMCP Scholarship Project granted 477 scholarships to Model Neighborhood residents who would otherwise have been unable to attend college or university. The Scholarship Committee worked with the Washington State Financial Aid Association, and a Model Cities representative sat on the Washington State Higher Education Authority Committee, which approved loan applications for Washington students. Scholarships were awarded to residents in the East Branch Model Neighborhood; residents of other areas who had been active in Model Neighborhood activities were eligible as well. Scholarship recipients were required to donate three hours of time per month to working with SMCP Planning Task Forces.
5417-07 : United Construction Workers Association Project, 1969-1973
0.2 cubic foot
This project was designed to increase minority employment in the construction industry through affirmative action, manpower services, and aid to government agencies responsible for contract compliance. The United Construction Workers Association facilitated minority workers' membership in construction trade unions by assisting contract compliance officers, developing training and apprenticeship programs, and advocated for minority membership in publicly funded construction programs. The UWCA also assisted in increasing minority membership in local trade unions to meet minimum requirements. Their efforts were not limited to unions; the UWCA also facilitated the hiring of minority workers at Seattle City Light.
5417-08 : Manpower Services Project, 1972-1973
0.4 cubic foot
The Manpower Services Project was designed specifically to benefit the Planned Variation neighborhood of Southeast Seattle. The project had two major parts: first, employment counseling and referral services were provided at the North Branch Office and later at the North Multi-Service Center. Part two of the plan was the Southeast Manpower Opportunity Center, which sought to remedy the high unemployment rate among Asian-American residents of the neighborhood. The Center was run by the Employment Opportunities Center, a group of Asian community and business leaders. Career counseling, support, and job referral services were provided. The staff was multi-lingual, and their translation services soon became a major draw to those needing assistance in filling out forms. In 1975, the Employment Opportunities Center managed the Vietnamese Resettlement Program.
5417-09 : Industrial Workshop/Social Service Complex, 1969-1973
0.4 cubic foot
The Seattle Central Area Industrial Workshop was a light metal machine shop which served as a job skills training area for unemployed Model Neighborhood residents. Despite contracts with Boeing and the Parks Department, the workshop struggled with absenteeism and keeping workers in the program, and SMCP funding was terminated in 1973. The board of directors went on to change the workshop's focus; rather than serving the unemployed, it served developmentally disabled individuals, receiving grants and loans from other agencies.
5417-10 : Management Intern Program, 1970-1973
0.2 cubic foot
The Management Intern Program, or TOP-IT (Technical, Organizational, Professional Intern Training), as it was more commonly known, intended to increase employment opportunities and incomes for Model Neighborhood residents. Twenty-one interns were placed with employers committed to the project and to affirmative action, such as the Bon Marche and Kenworth Motors; the program subsidized one-half of the employee's pay if the employer requested it, and interns were given time during the work week to attend classes. TOP-IT also assisted interns in buying books and paying tuition and developed supplemental training in connection with employers.
5417-11 : Consumer Protection Project, 1970-1974
0.2 cubic foot
This project was intended to study the feasibility of creating an office for consumer affairs in City government and to secure grant funding. Lack of knowledge regarding money management, tenant-landlord relationships, and comparative buying practices, as well as a desire to reduce fraudulent activity by businesspeople, were cited as reasons for creating a consumer protection office. This office would attempt to reduce fraudulent business practices, educate and represent Model Neighborhood consumers, and support legislative reform. A Consumer Protection Unit of the Seattle Police Department was also proposed. Consumer protection became an important issue at the city and state levels.
5418-01 : Seattle Housing Development Corporation, 1969-1974
1.0 cubic foot
The Seattle Housing Development Corporation (SHD) was created to increase the number of available low and moderate income housing units in the Model Neighborhood and to provide housing planning. Although it did not provide housing directly, SHD coordinated the efforts of other housing projects and provided counseling. Because the city itself did not have the legal authority to provide financing to help residents secure housing or to make improvements to existing housing, SMCP worked with the city to pass a state law that allowed the creation of public corporations which could perform these activities, and through which city policies could be carried out. SHD was the first of these corporations.
5418-02 : Home Repair Service Project, 1970-1973
0.4 cubic foot
The purpose of this program was to train Model Neighborhood residents in the skills necessary to make minor repairs to their homes, as well as to provide financial assistance for these repairs. The program was designed to improve the quality of neighborhood structures. The high cost of materials and the extent of damages to homes limited the program's ability to provide services to all who requested them. The project later served the Planned Variation neighborhoods as well.
5418-03 : Housing Demonstration Project, 1969-1973
2.0 cubic feet
This project was intended to develop new housing in the Model Neighborhood. In 1969, funds were committed for the building of twelve new housing units; however, the project came to a halt when HUD froze 235 housing funds. In 1973, the project assisted in the purchase of the Texada Apartment Building, which was renovated to serve as housing for low-income elderly Model Neighborhood residents. Records include correspondence with FHA.
5418-04 : Leased Housing Project, 1969-1972
0.2 cubic foot
The SMCP worked with the Seattle Housing Authority to provide low-income Model Neighborhood residents eligible for public housing with the opportunity to live in single-family dwellings. Rental fees over and above the SHA's fees were subsidized using funds from HUD, and 155 houses were rented in 1969 and 1970; 525 residents had received housing by the time the project ended in 1972. The SHA also provided counseling and assistance in housing-related matters.
5418-05 : Tenant Organization Project, 1969-1971
0.2 cubic foot
Project to organize East Model Neighborhood tenants, to provide legal counsel in addressing tenant-landlord problems, and to advocate for changes in landlord-tenant legislation. Although a tenants' organization was formed, it was later abandoned. However, a landlord-tenant bill was passed in 1973, in part due to the efforts of SMCP's Legal Services.
5418-06 : Holly Park Redevelopment Project, 1972-1974
0.1 cubic foot
The Holly Park Redevelopment Project planned to help the Seattle Housing Authority (SHA) renovate and revitalize a 1940s public housing complex in the Southeast Model Neighborhood. This project received Planned Variations funding. A plan was developed for modernizing and renovating the complex, and a tenant organization in the complex was formed to involve residents in the process. The plan was in line with the SMCP's policy of renovating existing buildings rather than building new ones. Although the redevelopment plans were made, funds ran out and the construction could not be completed.
5418-07 : High Point Redevelopment Project, 1972-1974
0.1 cubic foot
The High Point Redevelopment Project planned to help the Seattle Housing Authority (SHA) renovate and revitalize a 1940s public housing complex in the Southwest Model Neighborhood. This project received Planned Variations funding. A plan was developed for modernizing and renovating the complex, and a tenant organization in the complex was formed to involve residents in the process. The plan was in line with the SMCP's policy of renovating existing buildings rather than building new ones. Although the redevelopment plans were made, funds ran out and the construction could not be completed.
5419-01 : Relocation Program, 1969-1974
0.4 cubic foot
This program was designed to assist in relocation of Model Neighborhood residents and businesses displaced by SMCP or other public action. Its goal was to help residents find appropriate and affordable housing, to assist businesses in moving to new locations that were economically viable, and to ensure that families and businesses received the maximum relocation reimbursement. The program was operated by the Department of Community Development, and a Relocation Advisory Committee included SMCP staff, staff from other involved agencies, and Model Neighborhood residents.
5420-01 : Mini-Tran Project, 1969-1974
0.4 cubic foot
This project made Model Neighborhood activity and service centers more accessible through convenient and inexpensive public transportation which did not duplicate the existing Seattle Transit routes. Although Seattle Transit did serve the Model Neighborhood area, the level of service did not suffice during busy times, and transfers were difficult. Many social and health service agencies cited clients' lack of transportation as a major obstacle in providing their services. By the project's end, SMCP's Mini-Tran service transported 1,300 passengers per day in their ten 12-passenger Econoline vans, which operated six days per week on four routes. Surveys indicated that residents used Mini-Tran more frequently than Seattle Transit for several purposes, the most important among them being social and health services. Although rider response was positive, the program was not cost-effective and was terminated in 1973.
5420-02 : Bus Shelters Project, 1971-1974
0.1 cubic foot
SMCP funds were used to build five bus stop shelters in the East Model Neighborhood. Lack of safe and dry shelters had been identified as a problem in the neighborhoods. The shelters were planned with the input of residents and METRO transit; the project was part of the Utilities Upgrade program.
5420-03 : Special Transportation Services Project, 1972-1974
0.1 cubic foot
Planned Variation saw the development of two special transportation services. The first of these was the Center Park bus, a vehicle equipped for handicapped, especially wheelchair, access. The SMCP funded driver training and bus purchase, and the Seattle Housing Authority funded the bus operation. The second service provided door-to-door van transportation to elderly passengers at a charge of fifty cents per ride; this program became part of the Comprehensive Services for the Elderly Project.
5420-04 : Transportation Study, 1969-1974
0.4 cubic foot
A study of public transportation in the East Model Neighborhood was intended to assess transportation needs, problems, and solutions for residents. The study was conducted by Alan M. Voorhees and Associates. The report describes the methods of the study and its findings, including socioeconomic conditions, transportation needs, and existing services. Recommendations included modification and continuation of the Mini-Tran service, improvement of other existing services, subsidization of transportation, improved options for riders with special needs (such as the elderly or handicapped), and the suggestion that the SMCP assist Model Neighborhood residents in purchasing cars of their own. Special attention was given to developing alternatives for the proposed I-90 freeway route.
5421-01 : Parks Development - East, 1969-1974
0.8 cubic foot
This project upgraded East Model Neighborhood parks and recreational facilities as well as constructing new ones; six new parks were built, while four existing parks and many other recreational areas were rehabilitated. The Madrona Bathhouse and Pioneer Square Park are important examples of this rehabilitation project. The Medgar Evers pool, which later became a separate project, began as part of the Parks Development - East project. It was the first Forward Thrust pool in Seattle, and its completion had a positive effect on community perceptions of the project.
5421-02 : Parks Development - Southeast, 1971-1973
0.05 cubic foot
This project redeveloped the Brighton and Van Asselt playfields, installing lighting, building ballfields, improving play equipment, and landscaping. The shelter house at Brighton Playfield was also remodeled.
5421-03 : Parks Development - Southwest, 1971-1973
0.05 cubic foot
Delridge Playfield, Highland Park Playfield, South Park Playfield, and the South Park Fieldhouse were redeveloped and renovated with SMCP and Forward Thrust funding.
5421-04 : West Seattle Reservoir Land Acquisition, 1971-1973
0.05 cubic foot
The objective of this project was to acquire the 78-acre West Seattle Reservoir property. In 1968, the Forward Thrust Bond Issue authorized the area's development as a park and urban open space. Although funds were set aside for development, no money was available for the property's purchase at the time. SMCP funds were used to finance the property's purchase by the Parks Department from the Water Department.
5421-05 : Parks Development - North, 1971-1973
0.05 cubic foot
The B.F. Day and Ross playgrounds and the Ballard and Gilman playfields were upgraded; upgrades included lighting, play area improvement, and drainage improvement. Four new tennis courts were also constructed.
5421-06 : El Centro de la Raza, 1971-1974
0.4 cubic foot
SMCP funds provided the opportunity to remodel an old school and hire a staff to provide a variety of services to Spanish-speaking Model Neighborhood residents. El Centro de la Raza (The Center of the People) continues to provide cultural, social, and public health services.
5422-01 : Program Management System Project, 1970-1973
0.8 cubic foot
This project, managed by the Office of Management and Budget, designed, developed, and implemented a city-wide computer-based program planning, budgeting, and management information system. A complicated Program Management System computer program had been written in 1969, but difficulties in using this system necessitated the development of a new and more efficient replacement. The new program was successful, allowing for more efficient and structured program planning by SMCP staff. A similar system was implemented by City Light shortly thereafter. SMCP was also innovative in creating written work programs for its projects, enabling monitoring of the programs.
5422-02 : Office of Executive Policy, 1972-1973
0.2 cubic foot
This project created an office which coordinated city-wide planning and policy development, reviewed and directed priorities, and strengthened interdepartmental relations. The Office of Policy Planning (OPP) was created using Planned Variation funds and staffed by personnel from city departments; by 1973, it was run by the Deputy Mayor, and its original staff of 12 was expanded to a staff of 41 in 1974. With this expansion in staff came expanded responsibilities, and the OPP began to deal with land use, energy conservation, housing, human resources, and many other issues.
5422-03 : Information and Evaluation Project, 1969-1974
0.4 cubic foot
Evaluation was considered an important component of each Model Cities program. Evaluations could be conducted by SMCP staff or by contract with other agencies or firms; a combination of the two approaches might also be used. The evaluation project intended to build upon existing evaluation techniques utilized by other City agencies. Information was disseminated by the Public Information Unit through press releases in and news articles in the SMCP's publications and in local Model Neighborhood publications, and a variety of information resources were made available at the SMCP's library and Central Files. Project Monitoring Files also included important statistics and reports regarding each project.
5423-01 : Neighborhood Renewal and Housing Rehabilitation Project, 1970-1974
1.2 cubic feet
The project helped to fund a variety of programs and agencies with the goal of enhancing the environmental quality of Model Neighborhoods through improvement and development projects, including housing rehabilitation. The program hoped to foster a sense of neighborhood pride in residents, and several projects contributed to the effort. The Federally Assisted Code Enforcement Program (FACE) was a three-year program which planned to bring a group of structures in the Jefferson Neighborhood up to City Building Code standard. Loans and grants were made available to homeowners, and beautification programs were also created. Although the project was more expensive than had been anticipated, every building within a nine-block radius was up to code or was on its way by 1974. The Urban Services Center, home of the Seattle Urban League and other social service agencies, was partially funded by the SMCP, and the Unity 71 project improved a Model Neighborhood Park by building a housing development and creating a park.
5423-02 : Pioneer Square Upgrading, 1972-1974
0.2 cubic foot
This project was designed to improve and upgrade the Pioneer Square area by landscaping, paving, lighting, and developing the area in ways consistent with historic preservation criteria for the district. SMCP money was used to match contributions from federal and local agencies as well as private donors; local businesses began to invest in improvements of the area as well. Improvements included alley cobbling, a landscaped median strip, street lights with historic motifs, and a pedestrian mall near Occidental Park.
5423-03 : Utilities Upgrading - Southeast, 1972-1974
0.067 cubic foot
This project improved street lighting in a busy portion of the Southeast Model Neighborhood; elderly residents had been particularly affected by the poor lighting in the neighborhood, which heightened danger both from criminal activity and from traffic. At first financed by SMCP, the new lights and energy costs were then added to the city budget.
5423-04 : Utilities Upgrading - Southwest, 1972-1974
0.067 cubic foot
The lack of a sanitary sewer system in the Southwest Model Neighborhood affected more than just health and sanitation; the neighborhood's reliance on septic tanks also meant that the Health Department was less likely approve new housing developments and that the city was reluctant to pave streets in the area. SMCP and other city funds were used to begin the city's plan of eliminating septic tanks in the neighborhood by 1979; by the end of 1973, 100 houses were connected to the new sewer system.
5423-05 : Utilities Upgrading - North, 1971-1974
0.067 cubic foot
This project intended to build a new storm drainage system for the North Greenwood area; its lack of proper drainage created a problem with stagnant water, and no improvements had been made to streets or sidewalks. The SMCP, Neighborhood Improvement Program, and Neighborhood Development Program contributed funds for a storm drainage system. which was to be designed and built by the Seattle Engineering Department. The project was finished in 1973.
5423-06 : Street and Safety Improvement Project, 1971-1973
0.067 cubic foot
Street improvements were an important safety concern in both the Southeast and Southwest Model Neighborhoods. The Pioneer Square area was also in need of lighting improvement. The SMCP funded sidewalk construction, installation, and replacement in the Southeast neighborhood; sidewalks and crosswalk signals in the Southwest neighborhood; and improvement of street lights in Pioneer Square.
5423-07 : Greenbelt Acquisition, 1972-1973
0.067 cubic foot
This project assisted in the acquisition of three greenbelts in the Southwest Model Neighborhood. The greenbelts were intended to serve as "buffer zones" between industrial and residential areas in the area.
5423-08 : Residential Traffic Diverter System, 1972-1973
0.067 cubic foot
This project placed landscaped traffic diverters in the Stevens Neighborhood with the intention of increasing safety as well as the neighborhood's attractiveness. With the previous street layout, cars often passed through the area at volumes and speeds unsafe for pedestrians. The diverters slowed and managed traffic in the area.
5423-09 : Model Neighborhood Land Use Planning Project, 1969-1974
1.8 cubic feet
This project contracted with two firms to analyze the land-use patterns in the East Model Neighborhood and provide recommendations for improvements to housing, commercial, and recreational land-use. The review and recommendations would be completed with citizen participation. A draft land-use plan was written in 1971, and the final plan, with citizen review, was finished in 1973. The Model Cities Land-Use Review Board (MCLURB) was created in 1969; its seven members included SMCP officials, an architect, and urban planner, and representatives from the Housing and Physical Environment Task Force and Planning Committee of the Central Seattle Community Council. MCLURB dealt with applications for rezoning, conditional use, special variances, and planned unit development; these applications were forwarded to MCLURB by the City Planning Commission, and MCLURB's recommendations were followed by the board and City Council on 85% to 90% of applications. MCLURB could consider social criteria when making decisions, and its recommendations were also important in the final land-use plan created for the neighborhood.
5423-10 : Utilities Upgrading - East, 1969-1974
0.8 cubic foot
This project was designed to improve the attractiveness and stability of the neighborhood, foster neighborhood pride, and further the area's reputation as a safe and comfortable residential neighborhood. The East Model Neighborhood utilities upgrades included utilities undergrounding (in the Leschi area), sidewalk improvements, landscaping and tree planting, lighting improvements (in streets and alleys and in the International District), construction of bus shelters, and the construction of a traffic barrier.
5424-01 : Neighborhood Development Program - Project Area Council, 1971-1973
0.1 cubic foot
Citizens of the Leschi neighborhood became involved in its Neighborhood Development Program through the Leschi Project Area Council. The aims of the Council were to involve citizens in "property maintenance, law enforcement, public order, social services, and public relations." The Council created committees to deal with specific issues, organized events and activities, and published a monthly newsletter. The program itself was a renewal and restoration project focusing on housing rehabilitation and improvements.
5424-02 : Citizen Training Program, 1971-1972
0.1 cubic foot
The Model Cities Program contracted with the Washington State Planning and Community Affairs Agency for the latter to provide orientation for the staff and instructors of the SMCP and citizen task force training committee, as well as for citizen task force trainees. Initial sessions covered SMCP history, goals, objectives, and training program procedures. A curriculum of training sessions was also created, focusing on government, education, economics, and the family; these sessions involved a combination of lecture, demonstration, and role playing.
5424-03 : Citizen Participation Project, 1968-1974
0.8 cubic foot
This project developed means for Model Neighborhood residents' involvement in planning, monitoring, and directing public service activities in the neighborhoods. It was intended to give citizens skills and experience in working with various agencies and to allow training by and interaction with SMCP and City staff. Citizen participation options included task forces and planning committees, which could be set up by citizens to discuss any topic of interest and to make recommendations. These recommendations went to the Branch Advisory Councils (each Model Neighborhood had its own), which consisted of representatives from organizations in the neighborhood. This council reviewed the planning committees' recommendations. Overseeing it all was the Combined Citizens Advisory Council, which consisted of representatives from each Branch Advisory Council.
5424-04 : Washington State Citizen Participation Project, 1972-1973
0.2 cubic foot
This project, funded by SMCP and the State Department of Planning Community Affairs, trained Model Neighborhood residents in leadership and management skills required for effective work on Citizen Participation Task Forces and Advisory Councils. The objectives of the program were to improve career mobility for trainees, to provide formal courses and practical training, and to involve trainees in recruiting Model Neighborhood residents to participate in SMCP planning committees and councils. A similar program was also created for college-age interns. Interns and trainees participated in management and planning activities, including data collection, evaluation, and monitoring of programs. Training sessions for "meaningful citizen participation" were also provided to Model Neighborhood residents in the interest of educating citizens about the structure of government and about the workings of the Model Cities Program.

Names and SubjectsReturn to Top

  • Subject Terms :
  • Children--Health and hygiene--Washington (State)--Seattle
  • City planning--Washington (State)--Seattle
  • Community health services--Washington (State)--Seattle
  • Community life--Washington (State)--Seattle
  • Community development--Washington (State)--Seattle
  • Community leadership--Washington (State)--Seattle
  • Economic development--Washington (State)--Seattle
  • Education, Preschool--Washington (State)--Seattle
  • Education--Washington (State)--Seattle
  • Greenbelts--Washington (State)--Seattle
  • Health services accessibility--Washington (State)--Seattle
  • High school students--Services for--Washington (State)--Seattle
  • Housing rehabilitation--Washington (State)--Seattle
  • Housing--Washington (State)--Seattle
  • Legal aid--Washington (State)--Seattle
  • Middle school students--Services for--Washington (State)--Seattle
  • Music--Instruction and study--Washington (State)--Seattle
  • Neighborhood--Washington (State)--Seattle
  • Occupational training--Washington (State)--Seattle
  • Parks--Washington (State)--Seattle
  • Playgrounds--Washington (State)--Seattle
  • Urban renewal--Washington (State)--Seattle
  • Corporate Names :
  • Seattle Model City Program
  • United States. Model Cities Administration
  • Geographical Names :
  • Seattle (Wash.)--Politics and government
  • Seattle (Wash.)--Economic conditions
  • Other Creators :
    • Personal Names :
    • Clark, George (Seattle Model Cities Program branch manager) (creator)
    • Hollingsworth, Dorothy, 1920- (creator)
    • Horwood, Rosemary (creator)
    • Hundley, Walter (creator)
    • Hurd, Jim (Seattle Model Cities Program branch manager) (creator)
    • Mitsules, John (creator)
    • Warner, Louis C. (creator)
    • Ybarra, John, Jr. (creator)