Russian Islands and Unalaska, Alaska photograph collection, circa 1880-1900  PDF

Overview of the Collection

Title
Russian Islands and Unalaska, Alaska photograph collection
Dates
circa 1880-1900 (inclusive)
Quantity
16 photographs (1 folder) ; sizes vary
Collection Number
PH0839
Summary
Photographs of Unalaska, Alaska in the Aleutian Islands and several Russian islands in the Bering Sea out from Alaska: Bering Island, Copper Island and Iturup Island
Repository
University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections
Special Collections
University of Washington Libraries
Box 352900
Seattle, WA
98195-2900
Telephone: 206-543-1929
Fax: 206-543-1931
speccoll@uw.edu
Access Restrictions

Entire collection can be viewed on the Libraries’ Digital Collections website. Permission of Visual Materials Curator required to view originals. Contact Special Collections for more information.

Languages
English


Historical BackgroundReturn to Top

Unalaska Island is situated in the Bering Sea and is part of the Aleutian Islands. It was first inhabited by the Unangan people, who named it “Ounalashka” meaning ‘Near the Peninsula’. Under the direction of Stepan Glotov the first Russian traders came to the island in 1759. At this point Unalaska and the Amaknak Islands contained 24 settlements with more than 1,000 Aleut inhabitants. There were a series of conflicts between the Aleuts and Russian Fur Traders. The Aleuts ultimately destroyed four ships and killed 175 Russians.

The Commander Islands, part of Russia, are also situated in the Bering Sea to the west of the Aleutian Islands. The largest of the Commander Islands is Bering Island and the second largest is Copper Island. In 1741 famed captain Vitus Bering was shipwrecked on Bering Island and died of scurvy there with 28 of his men. Due to their desolate terrain Bering was uninhabited until 1826 and Copper was uninhabited until the early 20th century. The settlements that formed on both islands were primarily made up of Aleuts who came from the neighboring islands. Today there is no longer a population that lives on Copper Island.

Iturup Island is part of the South Kuril Islands in the Sea of Okhotsk. Though it is presently controlled by Russia it is claimed both by Japan and Russia. The first recorded European to explore the area was the Dutch explorer Maarten Gerritsz Vries and it was initially settled by the Ainu, the indigenous people of Japan and Russia. The name Iturup comes from the Ainu word meaning "place possessing [many] capes." In November 1941 a Japanese carrier sailed from Hitokappu Bay on the eastern shore of Iturup to attack the American base Pearl Harbor. After Japan's defeat in World War II Iturup was occupied by the Soviet Union and the Japanese inhabitants were expelled to the mainland. Since World War II diplomatic relations between Russia and Japan have been strained in part due to the disputed status of Iturup and other islands.

Content DescriptionReturn to Top

Photographs of Unalaska, Alaska in the Aleutian Islands and several Russian islands in the Bering Sea out from Unalaska: Bering Island, Copper Island, and Iturup Island in the Kuril Chain. Includes waterfront and town views, and images of people in a field, in boats and with a dog team.

Use of the CollectionReturn to Top

Alternative Forms Available

View the digital version of the collection

Restrictions on Use

Restrictions may exist on reproduction, quotation, or publication. Contact Special Collections, University of Washington Libraries for details.

Administrative InformationReturn to Top


Detailed Description of the CollectionReturn to Top

 

Russian and Alaskan IslandsReturn to Top

Photographs of Unalaska, Alaska in the Aleutian Islands and several Russian islands in the Bering Sea near Unalaska: Bering Island, Copper Island, and Iturup Island in the Kuril Chain. Includes waterfront and town views, and images of people in a field, in boats and with a dog team.

Container(s) Description Dates
Bering Island, Russia
Folder item
1 1 circa 1880-1900
1 2 circa 1880-1900
1 3
 Rock formation at shore
Photograph #7 is attached to the back of this photograph.
circa 1880-1900
1 4
 Dogsled near bridge
Photograph #8 is attached to the back of photographs #4 and #5.
circa 1880-1900
1 5
 Native children in field
Photograph #8 is attached to the back of photographs #4 and #5.
circa 1880-1900
1 6
 Beach and rock formation
Photograph #14 is attached to the back of this photograph.
circa 1880-1900
Copper Island, Russia (Ostrov Mednyy)
Folder item
1 7
 Path going up hill from beach
Photograph #3 is attached to the back of this photograph.
circa 1880-1900
1 8
 Aerial view of town, Glinka
Photographs #4 and #5 are attached to the back of this photograph.
circa 1880-1900
1 9
 Waterfall and hillside
Photograph #13 is attached to the back of this photograph.
circa 1880-1900
Iturup Island (Ostrov Iturup), Russia/Japan (disputed)
Folder item
1 10 circa 1880-1900
1 11 circa 1880-1900
1 12 circa 1880-1900
Unalaska Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska
Folder item
1 13
 Photographer and camera on beach
Photograph #9 is attached to the back of this photograph.
circa 1880-1900
1 14
 Beach and mountain
Photograph #6 is attached to the back of this photograph.Same beach as #13.
circa 1880-1900
1 15 circa 1880-1900
1 16 circa 1880-1900

Names and SubjectsReturn to Top

  • Geographical Names :
  • Bering Island (Russia)
  • Copper Island (Russia)
  • Unalaska Island, Alaska
  • Form or Genre Terms :
  • Photographic prints

Names and SubjectsReturn to Top

  • Subject Terms :
  • Visual Materials Collections (University of Washington)