United Food and Commercial Workers, Local 81 photograph collection, 1900-2003  PDF

Overview of the Collection

Collector
United Food and Commercial Workers. Local 81 (Seattle, Wash.)
Title
United Food and Commercial Workers, Local 81 photograph collection
Dates
1900-2003 (inclusive)
Quantity
237 photographic prints (3 boxes, 5 folders) ; various sizes
Collection Number
PH1176
Summary
Photographs of members and officers and activities of the United Food and Commercial Workers, Local 81
Repository
University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections
Special Collections
University of Washington Libraries
Box 352900
Seattle, WA
98195-2900
Telephone: 206-543-1929
Fax: 206-543-1931
speccoll@uw.edu
Access Restrictions

The collection is open to the public.

Languages
English
Sponsor
Processed with funds from the Labor Archives Fund, Labor Archives of Washington


Historical NoteReturn to Top

The Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America (AMC & BW of NA), a labor union representing retail butchers and packinghouse workers, was chartered by the American Federation of Labor (AFL) in 1897, consolidating seven local unions in Chicago. The AMC & BW of NA was committed to craft unionism, with 56 departments representing various workers in the meat industry. Workers in each craft within a city had their own council, executive board, business agent and contract. In early 1900, nine Seattle butchers formed the Protective Union of Butchers, Local 81. This local was the first butcher trade union in Washington State, and would officially be chartered Local 81 of the Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America on April 2, 1900.

In the early days of the local, fines assessed to the union consumer for purchasing non-union goods and union seals worn by members were major organizing tools. The local’s first offices were housed at the Old Seattle Labor Temple on 6th and University. Early union meetings were a weekly social affair consisting of initiations, music, wine, cigars, speeches, and boxing matches between slaughterhouse and retail shop workers. By 1909, a fine was placed on members if they did not attend at least one meeting per month.

In 1902, Local 81 held its first strike in solidarity with non-union Frye-Bruhn Packinghouse workers. Although failing to organize the packinghouse, this strike set the stage for Local 81’s deep historical relationship with Packinghouse Union Local 186 (which would be formed three decades later). Local 81 and the packinghouse workers would strike again in 1917, winning some gains but again failing to organize the packinghouse. In 1904, Local 81 introduced one of its first benefits, the Amalgamated Sick and Death Benefit, which would last another 60 years. In 1906, the Amalgamated began printing celluloid Market Cards for proud display in union butcher shops.

During the 1920s, employers nationwide sought to undermine the power of organized labor by imposing the open shop under the auspices of the “American Plan”. Advocates of the plan promoted an anti-radical, anti-labor, pro-business agenda, justifying union busting and equating patriotism with unbridled capitalism. The Program’s genesis was the social context of the post-World War I United States. Many citizens felt an increased sense of nationalism in the wake of the war, and power of growing radicalism and labor strength embodied by the Russian Revolution of 1917 and the Seattle General Strike of 1919 inspired a conservative backlash during the First Red Scare (1919-1921). In the context of this rightward shift, advocates of the Plan branded organized labor “un-American” and “Bolshevik”. Under this cloud, Local 81 expanded into Olympia and Bremerton and was a politically active part of the Seattle Labor Council throughout this turbulent decade. The union was strong enough to force employers to use union labor for building maintenance and repair, and to boycott goods on the Labor Council’s “unfair” list. Political tensions arose in the mid-1920s between the Washington State Federation of Labor (WSFL) and the Seattle Central Labor Council (SCLC). One of the forces impelling reconciliation between these two groups of unions was the meat cutters’ politically self-motivated re-affiliation with the WSFL. According to Dembo (1983),

Similarly, Meat Cutters Union Local No. 81 re-affiliated with the WSFL. The Meat Cutters had successfully convinced the Seattle City Council to pass a health ordinance for butcher shops and were looking for support in the expected court battles. The Meat Cutters were trying to use the ordinance to restrict Japanese meat markets whose late hours ‘gives them a chance to smuggle in bad beef,’ and had sued one of the Japanese markets for violating the ordinance, vowing to carry the case to the highest courts if necessary. This was just one of the forces impelling reconciliation between the SCLC and WSFL unions. (pp. 416-417)

After its organizing campaign and growth of over 18% in 1926 and 1927, membership in the WSFL declined in 1928. Heading into 1929, a large issue confronting the SCLC was a wave of Filipino immigration.

Throughout the 1920s, immigration from the Philippine Islands increased. While Filipino immigration was relatively small compared with past influxes of newcomers from China, Japan, Mexico, and Eastern Europe in decades past, the labor community reacted harshly. Soon, the Federal Walsh bill (SB 13900) was proposed, with the goal of repealing legislation permitting Filipinos who had served in the United States military from becoming naturalized citizens. Both the SCLC and WSFL supported this anti-immigration legislation. The Seaman’s Union immediately demanded restrictions on Filipino employment from the WSFL. Conflict surrounding Filipino immigration came to a head during the Great Depression.

While many locals participated in scapegoating Filipino workers for the economic downturn, Local 81 showed its solidarity with all workers, and refused to join other unions in their anti-Filipino crusade. When reports came in that Filipino workers at Frye, a notoriously anti-union meat packing plant with a long battle history with Local 81, had participated in a strike with other workers against intolerable working conditions, Local 81 thanked these workers, acknowledging their contribution to the labor movement in Washington State. This more progressive mentality with regard to immigration put Local 81 at odds with the general labor movement in Washington State during the 1920s and 1930s, and pushed for more enlightened policies for the future. Dembo (1983)

In 1929, Local 81 helped to establish the Washington State Council of Butchers.

Despite the rise of grocery chains and the formation of the Food Dealers Association, the union managed to gain important ground during the Great Depression. While union membership shielded workers from the worst conditions associated with the Depression somewhat, membership in SCLC-affiliated unions declined by 35.47% from 1930 to 1934 and unemployment rose by 230%. Local 81 assessed members to provide unemployment benefits to out-of-work members to ease the effects of growing unemployment during the Depression. The union also continued to organize despite an unfavorable economic climate. In a display of militancy lacking in the labor movement for a number of years, Local 81 won an important four-year struggle with the Frye Meat Packing Company, longtime-open shop packinghouse employers, successfully forming Packinghouse Union Local 186 in the mid-1930s. Local 81’s long, bitter strike to organize packinghouse workers at Frye in the midst of the Depression and in light of their previous failed organizing attempts is indicative of the militant spirit of “The Fighting 81st” during the era. Local 81 was also successful in establishing a meat inspection program, ensuring that only licensed meat cutters could work in city markets. The program eventually spread to the rest of King County and served as a tool for controlling working conditions.

While Local 81 was on strike at Frye, the United Garment Workers Local 17 (which would merge with Local 81 in 1994) fought lockouts by A.V. Love Dry Goods Company. The company’s new owners, refusing to meet union demands, chose to lock out all union employees. When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected, the National Recovery Administration demanded wage and hour standards in the retail grocery industry, opening the door for Local 81 to temporarily establish an 8-hour workday.

Soon, other industries in the Puget Sound organized, representing dock workers packinghouse workers, transport workers, steel mill workers, and aircraft workers. This widespread organizing in the Puget Sound area shifted economic and political power in favor of trade unions like Local 81. World War II’s labor shortages brought female meat cutters and sausage workers into Local 81; the first female meat cutter was Francis Kennedy. Other results of the economic power shift resulting from war labor shortages included the introduction of time and a half overtime compensation and a manager’s premium.

The 1940s saw further Local 81 successes. In 1946, Local 81 became the first union local in Washington State to strike for a five-day, forty-hour workweek. After striking for just a week, they won both a five-day, forty-hour workweek and a second week of paid vacation annually. During the same year, Local 81 moved its offices into the new Labor Temple at 2800 1st Avenue. Meetings held in this space included weekly executive board meetings and bi-weekly union membership meetings. Members living within the city limits were required to attend at least one meeting per month, while those living outside Seattle were required to attend meetings at least once per quarter. Fines for missing meetings could be substituted for contributions to the Local’s blood bank. In September 1947, meat cutter Art Astmus guided the local into forming the Edison School, a union-sponsored apprenticeship school which would help the Local to define its jurisdiction and set apprenticeship and food safety standards. Later in the 1940s, Local 81 first defined its jurisdiction in its contract language as “the cutting and handling of all meat, fish, poultry, and rabbit products” to protect their bargaining unit work from being given to clerks. Female deli workers were unionized in 1950, ending Local 81 members’ prohibition from cutting and wrapping meat for self-service cases. The first female meat wrapper, Vivian Keeler, was paid on a lower scale than her male counterparts for working the same job at the same rank, a tradition that would last even after 1967’s non-discrimination contract clause. In 1955, under a newly elected slate of officers including Business Agent Freddie Frey, Assistant Business Agent Ed White and Recording Secretary Charlie Sandvidge, Local 81 established a Health & Welfare Trust and Plan with the Retail Dealers. They also joined with the national labor movement to defeat two right-to-work initiatives aimed at destroying the closed shop and undermining union power. In 1955, the Amalgamated merged with the International Fur and Leather Workers Union. The Fish Workers’ Union joined Local 81 in the 1950s, at the height of post-WWII power for the local. They were up two thousand members and won significant improvement in working conditions going into the 1960s.

Contract negotiations in fall 1959 were strong for Local 81, but they felt pressure from the weaker agreements the Retail Clerks Union was signing and increases in chain dominance and meat production technology. In 1960, the Amalgamated merged with the National Agriculture Workers Union. The 1960s saw internal tension within Local 81. Political tensions were evident in the 1962 election of Mel Roundhill to replace Ed White as Recording Secretary of the Local. Following the 1964 strike, a hotly contested election for chief executive officer resulted in a narrow victory for Conrad “Connie” Johnson over the incumbent Freddie Frey. Conrad Johnson had run many unsuccessful campaigns for office in Local 81 and was a fierce supporter of the apprenticeship program. In spite of the rise of Allied Employers, Inc. and the dominance of grocery chains during this time period, Local 81 defended and strengthened its contract. After a strike in 1964, Local 81 strengthened its contract by including company-wide seniority language and protections for the 40-hour workweek. In the same situation in 1967, Local 81 added journeyman-on-duty language to further protect its members from deteriorating working conditions under Allied Employers and grocery chains. Critical arbitrations also occurred in the late 1960s and early 1970s, namely the Peck (1966) and Gillingham (1970) arbitrations which strengthened the 40 hour guaranteed workweek and foundations for seniority language, respectively. In 1968, the Amalgamated merged with the United Packinghouse Workers of America, with whom they had been participating in coordinated bargaining against national meat packing companies since 1953.

In addition to problems caused by Allied Employers and grocery chain dominance, this period presented special challenges stemming from the rising power of the Retail Clerks Union. Because of their weaker contracts, Local 81 experienced pressures to adjust work agreements to their more liberal practices, especially regarding working hours and part-time vs. full-time employment. In addition to permitting part-time employment more readily in their contract language, the Retail Clerks required store-wide rather than company-wide seniority policies. These pressures, in addition to the devastating inflation of the 1970s and movement of packinghouse work to right-to-work states, were not enough to stop Local 81 from maintaining strong contracts.

The late 1970s were burdened with inflation, employers moving labor to right-to-work states, a conservative backlash against organized labor, and hard struggle with Allied Employers consisting of a series of short, successful strikes. Under these conditions, the Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America and the Retail Clerks International Union merged to become the United Food and Commercial Workers International Union, the largest union affiliated with the AFL-CIO. Significantly, Local 81 was the only Amalgamated local to vote against this merger. With the Retail Clerks’ contracts effectively working against the progress of Local 81 over the past decade, it is no surprise that Local 81 members were hesitant to join their ranks. The President of the new UFCW International Union was William H. Wynn, President of the Retail Clerks Union and one of the designers of the merger.

Ronald Reagan’s election in 1980 signified the dawn of an even more conservative and anti-labor era. Local 81 suffered losses of over three hundred members in jobbing house de-certifications. Taking advantage of palpable tensions between the meat cutters and retail clerks, employers settled negotiations with the clerks and attacked Local 81’s meat cutter contract. The resultant 1983 strike at Lucky Stores resulted in widespread lockouts at other Allied Employers companies and 71 bitter days on the picket line for Local 81 members. Lucky members were forced to return to work under threats of permanent replacement. The local came away from this strike demoralized, having lost their cost-of-living escalation clause, reductions in Sunday and holiday premiums and a smaller pension contribution rate than the retail clerks received. Beneficial meat production restrictions were lifted, and the meat cutters’ health plan was merged with the weaker retail clerks’ plan. Strike expenses nearly depleted Local 81’s assets.

In contrast, the UFCW International grew aggressively during the 1980s. They merged with the Barbers, Beauticians and Allied Industries International Association in 1980, the United Retail Workers Union in 1981, the Insurance Workers International Union in 1983, organized 136,000 workers between 1984 and 1985, the Canadian Brewery Workers Union in 1986, organized another 81,000 workers in 1986, almost 100,000 in 1987, and over 100,000 in 1988.

The grocery strike of 1989 yielded much better results for Local 81 than the strike at Lucky six years earlier; they altered their strategy to coordinate bargaining with other Puget Sound locals, teaming up against employers. In May, a strike at Food Giant resulted in lockouts in other King County Allied stores. Local 81 held their ground, and the strike lasted 81 days. In the end, Local 81 kept their Sunday wage increases, increased pension contributions, increased wages, and improved health and welfare benefits. The immense public support for Local 81’s picket lines sent a clear message to employers and ushered in a time of relative peace for labor unions during the 1990s.

After the 1989 strike, Local 81 President Anthony Abeyta led the Local to invest its hard-won surpluses successfully, allowing the local to purchase its own office space in Auburn. In 1992, 1995, and 1998, early contract settlements were reached by the Local with significant improvements to health and welfare benefits. In 1998, an early retirement program was put in place allowing members with 30 years of experience to retire with full benefits at age 55. In 1998, under the new leadership of President Michael Williams, Local 81 merged with the packinghouse union representing workers in the Associated Grocers centralized meat cutting plant in Tukwila, UFCW Local 554. Local 81 also took over contracts representing workers at the Safeway and Associated Grocers warehouses, Draper Valley Poultry, Lennons Casing Plant, Turner & Pease, and newly-merged garment factories Item House and C.C. Filson, Co. In 1999, a full-time organizer came on board to expand Local 81 in the discount grocery, food processing, and textile industries. Threats from the discount grocery industry and centralized meat cutting and prepackaging practices were addressed, and continued to be an important issue after the year 2000.

In 2003, 80,000 UFCW members nationally went on strike to protect their wages and benefits. In 2004, President Dority retired and the International Executive Board appointed the third International President of the UFCW, Joseph T. Hansen. In 2005, along with the Teamsters, SEIU, UNITE-HERE, Laborers, and the United Farm Workers and Carpenters, the UFCW left the AFL-CIO to form the Change to Win Federation. On August 8, 2013, the UFCW International re-affiliated with the AFL-CIO in a statement from its President, Joe Hansen.

On April 1, 2012, UFCW Local 81 merged into UFCW Local 21.

References:

Centennial celebration: Official program. Seattle, WA: Steve Conway.

Dembo, J. (1983). Unions and politics in Washington state: 1885-1935. New York: Garland Pub.

United Food and Commercial Workers Local 81 Records. (2000).

Local 81 Presidents
  • William Warren 1900-1908
  • Joe Hofmann 1909-1944
  • Harry Hansen 1945-1949
  • Al Jussett 1950-1954
  • Fred Frey 1954-1964
  • Konrad Johnson 1965-1975
  • Sid Casey 1976-1984
  • Esther Baxter 1985-1987
  • Anthony Abeyta 1988-1999
  • Michael Williams 2000-2012

Content DescriptionReturn to Top

Photographs collected by the Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America, Local 81, its successors, and affiliates.

Collection includes photographs of:

  • Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America, Local 81 union officers, apprenticeship programs, conventions, meat markets, and various workplace and celebrations
  • United Food and Commercial Workers International Union, Local 81 union officers, apprenticeship programs, meat cutters at work, activities of Carsten's Meat Products and Covey Brothers Markets, conventions, construction projects, picnics and parades, union meat markets, and strikes
  • Packinghouse Local 186 softball team, union members at work, and the activities of Carsten's Packinghouse and Frye & Co.
  • United Food and Commercial Workers International Union international conventions, President Joseph T. Hansen, and union meat markets
  • United Garment Workers of America union members at conventions and banquets

Use of the CollectionReturn to Top

Restrictions on Use

Restrictions may exist on reproduction, quotation, or publication. Contact Special Collections, University of Washington Libraries for details.

Administrative InformationReturn to Top


Detailed Description of the CollectionReturn to Top

 

Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America, Local 81Return to Top

Photographs of administrators, politicians with relationships to the union, and union members participating in conventions, celebrations, butcher and meatpacking work, and apprenticeship courses associated with the Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America, Local 81 (Seattle, Washington).

Container(s) Description Dates
Administration
Portraits
Box/Folder item
1/1 1 circa 1930
1/1 2a
 Frank Edwards next to a large globe
Written on photograph: To Alfred Jussett-to the Washington State Butchers. Best wishes, Frank Edwards, Mutual, 1951.
1951
1/1 2b
Frank Edwards
2b is a cropped version of 2a.
1951
1/1 3 1967
1/1 4
 Joseph T. Hansen, International President
Maurice Seymour, Chicago (photographer)
1967
1/1 5
 Joseph T. Hansen, International President
Maurice Seymour, Chicago (photographer)
1967
Meetings
Box/Folder item
1/2 6 circa 1900
1/2 7 1914-1915
1/2 8 circa 1930
1/2 9
 Union members around tables at the Dan's Meats Banquet
Roger Dudley, Seattle, Washington (photographer)
November 17, 1938
1/2 10 circa 1940-1954
1/2 11
 Local 81 members at banquet
Nonflash Banquet Photo Co. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
circa 1940
1/2 12 October 16-17, 1948
1/2 13 October 16-17, 1948
1/2 14
 People together at the Tri-State Butchers' Conference in Seattle, Washington
J.J. Kneisle. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
October 16-17, 1948
1/2 15
 Union members eating together
Art Forde and Fred Carter Seattle, Washington (photographer)
circa 1950
1/2 16
 Union members around tables at a conference
Batchelor-Plath Inc., Spokane, Washington (photographer)
circa 1950
1/2 17
 Health and Welfare Committee meeting
Ray Krantz. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
circa 1950
1/2 18
 Union officers meeting
Ray Krantz. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
circa 1950
1/2 19 circa 1970
Administrative Work
Box/Folder item
1/3 20 1916
1/3 21 1942
1/3 22 circa 1948
Apprenticeship
Edison School
Box/Folder item
1/4 23
 Men in front of a building at the University of Washington
Art Forde and Fred Carter. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
Written on verso: Tacoma "students" at Union Services Institute. August 8-12. Bottom row left to right: Corey, Wood Jack, Peterman. Top row Prof. Wollett, Prof. Gillingham, Charley Todd.
circa 1950
1/4 24 circa 1950
1/4 25 circa 1950
1/4 26
 Students and instructors from an apprenticeship program dining together
Ray Krantz, Seattle, Washington (photographer)
circa 1950
1/4 27
 A student receiving an award at an apprenticeship program event
Ray Krantz, Seattle, Washington (photographer)
circa 1950
1/4 28
 Meat displayed on table in a meat cutters' apprenticeship classroom
Ray Krantz, Seattle, Washington (photographer)
circa 1950
1/4 29 circa 1950
1/4 30 circa 1950
1/4 31 circa 1950
1/4 32 circa 1950
1/4 33
 Meat waste on table at the Apprentice Meatcutting School
Ray Krantz, Seattle, Washington (photographer)
circa 1950
1/4 34 July 23-28, 1950
Apprenticeship
Box/Folder item
1/5 35 1935
1/5 36 August 5-18, 1945
1/5 37
 Meat cutting apprentices and instructors in classroom
Ray Krantz, Seattle, Washington (photographer)
circa 1945
1/5 38
 Classroom of meat cutting apprentices listening to instructor
Ray Krantz, Seattle, Washington (photographer)
circa 1945
1/5 39
 Classroom of smiling meat cutting apprentices listening to instructor
Ray Krantz, Seattle, Washington (photographer)
circa 1945
1/5 40 August 31-September 13, 1947
1/5 41
 Class of the first Apprenticeship Meatcutting School behind table with sides of meat
At far left is instructor Art Astmus; at far right is instructor Tom Thank, Sr.
Van Ness Studio. Seattle Washington (photographer)
1946
1/5 42
 Class of the first Apprenticeship Meatcutting School behind table with sides of meat
Van Ness Studio. Seattle Washington (photographer)
Typed note on photo: 1946: 1st Apprentice Meatcutting School: Instructors L to R: Art Astmus, Tom Thank, Sr. and Walt Ford. L to R in white uniform [unknown], Ed Hawney, Warren Roundhill, [unknown] , John Wallace, Frank Luzny, Jim Allen, Mel Roundhill, Jim Hughes, [unknown] and Jack Priestman.
1946
Conventions and events
Conventions
Box/Folder item
1/6 43
 Delegates at the first Convention of the Washington State Butchers
Written on verso: L to R: HT Scully 81, McCanley Tacoma, (F) Martin Grey Spokane, (R) Joe Hofmann 81, JC Broulette Aberdeen, (F) H Burmeister 81, (R) Harry Dost 81.
July 1930
1/6 44
 Delegates at the first Convention of the Washington State Butchers
Written on verso: L to R: Jim Broulette Aberdeen, Martin Grey Spokane, Joe S. Hofmann 81, Harry C. Dost 81, Henry Burmeister 81, JC McCanley Tacoma, HT Scully 81.
July 1930
1/6 45
 Delegates at a convention in Everett
Written on verso: Delegates at a convention in Everett. Dad 2nd from left front row. Chas Ferrirs 3rd from right back row. Al Jessop 4th from right back row.
circa 1930
folder:oversize
M270 46
Delegates at the 5th Annual Convention of the Washington State Butchers in Everett, Washington
JuLeen Photo (photographer)
July 5, 1934
Box/Folder
1/6 47 1943
1/6 48 1943
1/6 49
 Delegates in chairs at the Washington Federation of Butchers Convention in Spokane, Washington
Art Lacey Photography. Spokane, Washington (photographer)
Written on verso: Front Row: Second from left Joe Hofmann; Third from left Al Jussett. Back Row: Second from left President of Local 186, Fourth from left Malone from Texas, Fifth from left International President Pat Gorman, Sixth from left Jimmerson San Francisco.
July 6-7, 1946
1/6 50
 Delegates at the Washington Federation of Butchers Convention in Spokane, Washington.
Art Lacey Photography. Spokane, Washington (photographer)
July 6-7, 1946
1/6 51a July 12-13, 1947
box:oversize
XH3 51b
Delegates at the 17th Annual Convention for the Washington Federation of Butchers in Seattle, Washington
J.J. Kneisle. 122 N. 81st St (photographer)
July 12-13, 1947
Box/Folder
1/6 52 circa 1939-circa 1949
1/6 53
 Signage and front desk area for the Amalgamated Meat Cutters Meat Cutting and Sheep Shearing Event
Fred Carter. 912-A Pine St, Seattle, Washington (photographer)
circa 1950
1/6 54
 Delegates at a convention
Sona Fide Photo Service, Los Angeles (photographer)
circa 1950
1/6 55
 Men at a meeting during the State Branch Convention in Tacoma, Washington
Written on verso: Fred Frey-End table. Al Jussett-with pen. Jimmerson, International Vice President from San Francisco-standing.
Ray Krantz, Seattle, Washington (photographer)
July 8-9, 1950
1/6 56 circa 1949-circa 1959
1/6 57 circa 1968
1/6 58 June 1960
50th Anniversary of Local 81
Box/Folder item
1/7 59 1950
1/7 60 1950
1/7 61 1950
1/7 62
 Two couples at the Local 81 50th Anniversary celebration
Mulholland Studios. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
1950
1/7 63
 People dancing at the Local 81 50th Anniversary celebration
Mulholland Studios. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
1950
1/7 64
 People dancing at the Local 81 50th Anniversary celebration.
Mulholland Studios. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
1950
1/7 65
 Man speaking at podium at the Local 81 50th Anniversary celebration
Mulholland Studios. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
1950
1/7 66
 Couple at the Local 81 50th Anniversary celebration
Mulholland Studios. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
1950
1/7 67
 Couple at the Local 81 50th Anniversary celebration
Mulholland Studios. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
1950
1/7 68
 Couple at the Local 81 50th Anniversary celebration
Mulholland Studios. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
1950
1/7 69
 Man at the Local 81 50th Anniversary celebration
Mulholland Studios. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
1950
1/8 70 1943
1/8 71
 A large banquet at a convention
Mulholland Studios. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
circa 1950
1/8 72
 Band playing at the Local 81 50-Year Anniversary celebration
Mulholland Studios. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
1950
1/8 73
Number not used
1/8 74
 Fred Frey giving a speech at the Local 81 50-Year Anniversary celebration
Mulholland Studios. , Seattle, Washington (photographer)
1950
1/8 75
 A man giving a speech at the Local 81 50-Year Anniversary celebration
Mulholland Studios. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
1950
1/8 76
 People eating dinner at the Local 81 50-Year Anniversary celebration
Mulholland Studios. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
1950
1/8 77 1950
1/8 78
 Union officers at the Local 81 50-Year Anniversary celebration
Mulholland Studios. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
1950
1/8 79 1950
1/8 80
 Man at podium at the Local 81 50-Year Anniversary celebration
Mulholland Studios. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
1950
1/8 81
 Fred Frey giving a speech at the Local 81 50-Year Anniversary celebration
Mulholland Studios. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
1950
1/8 82
Number not used
1/8 83
 Union officers at the Local 81 50-Year Anniversary celebration
Mulholland Studios. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
1950
1/8 84
 Union officer at the Local 81 50-Year Anniversary celebration
Mulholland Studios. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
1950
1/8 85
Number not used
1/8 86
 Officers awarding a man with a pin at the Local 81 50-Year Anniversary celebration
Mulholland Studios. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
1950
1/8 87
 Fred Frey at the Local 81 50-Year Anniversary celebration
Mulholland Studios. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
1950
1/8 88
Number not used
1/8 89
Number not used
1/8 90
 Man at podium at the Local 81 50-Year Anniversary celebration
Ray Krantz. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
1950
Picnics & Parades
Box/Folder item
1/9 91 circa 1910
1/9 92 September 4, 1911
1/9 93 August 2, 1914
1/9 94 July 4, 1917
1/9 95 July 4, 1917
1/9 96 September 3, 1917
1/9 97
 People in a park at Dan's Meats company picnic
Walter P. Miller. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
1937
1/9 98 1937
1/9 99 circa 1960-1970
Union Meat Markets
National Markets
box:oversize item
OS4 100
Meat cutters at the Armour Market in San Diego, California
Harry Dost is 3rd from left.
circa 1912
Box/Folder
1/10 101 1917
1/10 102 1928
1/10 103 1945
Markets in Seattle and other Washington Cities, 1900-1912
Box/Folder item
1/11 104 circa 1900
1/11 105 circa 1900
1/11 106 circa 1900
1/11 107 circa 1900
1/11 108 circa 1900
1/11 109 circa 1900
1/11 110 circa 1900
1/12 111 circa 1900
1/12 112 circa 1901
1/12 113
A group of men and a boy standing on a snowy sidewalk in Port Angeles, Washington
Paul Gaumitz is third from right.
1907
1/12 114
 Meat cutters working at Carstens Pack's Royal Market at 319 Pike Street in Seattle, Washington
Dingman, Seattle (photographer)
Left to Right: Joe Hilke, Wm. Walters, Harry Dost, Mrs. Carpenter, and fish clerks Gus and George.
1907
1/12 115 1908
1/12 116 1910
1/12 117
 Meat cutters working at the Fulton Meat Market on 3rd and Madison during Christmas
Mulholland Studio. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
1912
XD3 118
Workers standing outside the Palace Fish Market in Seattle, Washington
circa 1928
Markets in Seattle and other Washington Cities, 1913-1920
Box/Folder item
2/1 119 March 1913
2/1 120
 Meat cutters at the James Henry Market at 972 Western Avenue in Seattle, Washington
Writing on photograph reads: Left to Right: Tom Sather, Nels Lindquist, George Holleman, Wm. Crippner, Harry Dost & James Baker.
1913
2/1 121
 Meat cutters and customers at the James Henry Market on Western Avenue and Marion Street in Seattle, Washington
Typed note on photo: Ed White, Harry Dost and Bill Lucker worked here.
1913-1914
2/1 122 1915
2/1 123 1920
2/1 124 circa 1920
2/1 125 undated
Markets in Seattle, 1922-1936
Box/Folder item
2/2 126 1922
2/2 127 1927
2/2 128 1927
2/2 129 1927
2/2 130 circa 1930s
2/2 131
 Drivers next to delivery trucks for Serv-U-Meat Co.
Dexter. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
circa 1930-1950
2/2 132
 Meat cutters behind counter at Meaker's Market
Left to Right: Ed Vallice, Jack Meaker, Fred Dixie, George Stesson, Truck Driver, Joe Albert, Clarence Welsh and George Shelhart.
May 1931
2/2 133
 Meat cutters at Palace Meats at the Pike Place Market in Seattle, Washington
Left to Right: James Damery, Norman Richardson, Rex Cordingly, and George Shemald.
1932
2/2 134 circa 1932
2/2 135
 Meat cutters standing behind the counter at Dan's Meats at the Pike Place Market in Seattle, Washington
Rounds & Reef Commercial Photo Studio. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
Left to Right: Ernie Osborn, Joe Brand, Willie Ristodi, Dan Zido, Tommy Sandal, Unknown, Pete Cooper.
1935
2/2 136 1935
2/2 137
 Meat cutters standing in front of The Pork House at the Sanitary Market in Seattle, Washington
Written on photo: Left to Right: Ray Joyce, Bob Montgomery, H.B. Prince, Norm Richardson, Steve Goodrich & Don Sharff.
circa 1934-1936
Markets in Seattle, 1939-1958
Box/Folder item
2/3 138
 Staff of Oliver's Faultless Meats standing behind the sales counter
Roy McPeek Photography.Seattle, Washington (photographer)
Left to Right: Chris Sheloas, Norman Richardson, Jerry Lindsay, Harry Varon, Jack Bartley, Jr., George Deutsch, Oliver Borgford, Roland Bjornsen, and Bill Durgan.
1939
2/3 139 1940
2/3 140
 Meat cutters and a customer at a meat market in Bremerton, Washington
Market was on Callon Avenue. Gordon G. at center.
circa 1950
2/3 141
 Staff of Dan's Market standing behind the sales counter
Writing on photograph reads: Left to Right: Lou Carrosino, Walt Allen, Leon Kenny, Lionel Whetam, George White, Walt Mueller, Joe Kuzaro (owner), Gene Zolinski (Bookkeeper), Jim Schearer, Cookie-Louraine (cashier), Don Kuzaro, Joe Darby, Tom Sandal (owner).
1958
2/3 142 1958
Covey Brothers Meat Market, Renton, Washington
Box/Folder item
2/4 143 circa 1930
2/4 144 1953
2/4 145 1953
2/4 146 1953
2/4 147 1953
2/4 148 1953
2/4 149 1953
2/4 150 1953
2/4 151 1953
2/4 152
 Butchers at Covey Brothers Market in Renton, Washington with New Zealand beef
Note attached to photo identifies Vick Julienne, Vern Jansing, George Fanning, Zack Zackerson.
1953
Union Employees at Work
Meat Cutters at Work
Box/Folder item
2/5 153 undated
2/5 154 circa 1945
2/5 155 circa 1945
Fishermen at Work
Box/Folder item
2/6 156 circa 1949
2/6 157
 Men taking a break on a boat in Bay Center, Washington
Ray Krantz. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
Written on verso: Jussett, Woolrich, Shadle.
1949
2/6 158
 Men on dock next to boat Majesticon the Bornstein Dock in Bellingham, Washington
Ray Krantz. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
Written on verso: Sr. & Jr. Abrahamsen, Mabbott, Jussett.
October 1949
Various Subjects
Box/Folder item
2/7 159 circa 1920
2/7 160 circa 1920
2/7 161 circa 1920
2/7 162 circa 1920
2/8 163 circa 1917
2/8 164 circa 1917
2/8 165 circa 1917
2/8 166 circa 1920
2/8 167 circa 1930

Series II: Packinghouse Local 186Return to Top

Photographs of packinghouse workers in local 186 in Seattle, Washington. Workers are primarily employees of Carsten's Packinghouse and Frye Packing Company.

Container(s) Description Dates
Packinghouse Workers
Box/Folder item
2/9 168 May 15, 1941
2/10 169 circa 1940
2/10 170
 Group of union members wearing suits inside a packinghouse
Dexter.Seattle, Washington (photographer)
circa 1947
Carsten's Packinghouse
folder:oversize item
M270 171
Large group of employees outside of Carsten's Packing Company in Tacoma, Washington
Miller. Tacoma, Washington (photographer)
June 14, 1930
Box/Folder
2/11 172 circa 1917
2/11 173 circa 1920
2/11 174a 1935
2/11 174b
Large horse-drawn float with Carsten's banners
undated
2/11 175 circa 1950
2/11 176 circa 1950
box-folder:oversize
XH3 177
Personnel of Carsten's Hygrade in front of a building in Tacoma, Washington
Richards, Tacoma (photographer)
1959
Frye Packing Company
box:oversize item
OS4 178
Employees outside of Frye & Company in Seattle, Washington
August 1, 1935
folder:oversize
M270 179
Employees outside of Frye & Co
Writing on photograph reads: Back row, right of the telephone pole obscuring the "A" in "Company": Hogslaughterers Art Erwine and Harry Corbert, uncles of Lilian J. Friar (Leschutta), wife of union member Jerr Friar of A & J meats.
circa 1940
Box/Folder
2/9 180
Wreckage at the Frye Packing Plant after the crash of a Boeing B-29 prototype Superfortress bomber during a test flight
Writing on the back of the photograph misrepresents the date of the crash as 1942, and the plane as a B17. Historical sources confirm that the crash occurred on February 18, 1943 and involved a top-secret Boeing B-29 prototype Superfortress bomber. The plane caught fire 20 minutes after takeoff from Boeing Field and crashed into the Frye Packing Plant. Test pilot Eddie Allen and 10 crewmen perished, along with 19 Local 186 members working at the plant. The identity of the aircraft type (which dropped the first atomic bombs on Japan) was not revealed to the public until the end of World War II.
1943

United Garment Workers of America Conventions and BanquetsReturn to Top

Photographs of banquets and conventions held by the United Garment Workers of America.

Container(s) Description Dates
box:oversize item
OS4 181
Local 17 members eating dinner in the Windsor Room at the New Washington Hotel in Seattle, Washington
Olympic Hotel Northwest Photography. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
October 8, 1941
XH3 182
Delegates at a Garment Workers Union Convention
Roger Dudley. Seattle, Washington (photographer)
circa 1941
XH3 183
Participants in the 23rd Convention of the United Garment Workers of America in front of a building in Michigan City, Indiana
August 10, 1942
OS4 184
Workers in an office
Avery & Potter (photographer)
circa 1900

Series IV: United Food and Commercial Workers International UnionReturn to Top

Photographs of administrators, politicians with relationships to the union, conventions, and related events for the United Food and Commercial Workers.

Container(s) Description Dates
Administration
Portraits
Box/Folder item
2/12 185a undated
2/12 185b
Sid Casey at his desk
185b is a cropped version of 185a.
undated
2/12 186
 Esther Baxter
Olan Mills Photography (photographer)
1989
2/12 187a November 12, 1994
2/12 187b
Konrad A. Johnson at home in Seattle
187b is a cropped version of 187a.
November 12, 1994
Meetings
Box/Folder item
2/13 188
 Union officers meeting at the Kilowatt Restaurant
Left to Right: Mel Savage, Stewart Earl, Sid Casey, Esther Baxter, Steve Anderson.
1979
2/13 189
Number not used
Meat Cutters at Work
Box/Folder item
2/13 190 circa 2014
box:oversize
XH3 191
A group of workers standing outside a grocery store
circa 2000
Conventions
Box/Folder item
2/14 192
 Delegates at the UFCW International Convention.
Identified in photograph: Esther Baxter, Mike Williams, Tony Abeyta.
circa 1990
2/14 193 1993
2/14 194 1993
2/14 195
 Delegates at the UFCW International Convention in Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Bill Burke, Page One Photography, Inc. Landover, Maryland (photographer)
1993
2/14 196 July 28-August 1, 2003
Box/Folder
2/14 197 July 28-August 1, 2003
box:oversize
OS4 198
Officers at the United Food and Commercial Workers International Convention
1980
folder:oversize
M270 199
Guests, delegates, and alternates standing at the UFCW 5th Regular Convention in San Francisco, California
Panoramic Visions International. Herndon, Virginia (photographer)
July 28-August 1, 2003
Strikes
Box/Folder item
2/15 200 September 20, 1983
2/15 201 September 20, 1983
2/15 202
 Picket signs leaning against wall at strike unity meeting
Written on verso: Sign by Ray Heeren.
September 20, 1983
2/15 203 September 20, 1983
2/15 204 September 20, 1983
2/15 205 1983
2/15 206 1983
2/15 207 1983
2/15 208
 Clerks at Lucky Stores parking lot sweeping and painting lines in Seattle, Washington
Written on verso: 145th and 15th Avenue NE. Wednesday 5:30 PM. one clerk sweeping stripes, the other painting them. Business is a little slow.
1983
2/15 209 1983
2/15 210 1983
2/15 211 1983
2/16 212 1983
2/16 213 1983
2/16 214 1983
2/16 215 1983
2/16 216 1983
2/16 217 1983
2/16 218 1983
2/16 219 1983
2/16 220 1983
2/16 221 1983
2/16 222 1983
2/16 223 1983
2/16 224 1983
2/17 225 1983
2/17 226 1983
2/17 227 1983
2/17 228 1983
2/17 229 1983
2/17 230 1983
2/17 231 1983
2/17 232 1983
2/17 233 1983
2/17 234 1983
2/17 235 1983
2/17 236 1983
2/17 237 1983

Names and SubjectsReturn to Top

  • Subject Terms :
  • Butchers--Labor unions--Washington (State)--Seattle
  • Labor Unions--Washington (State)
  • Labor Unions--Washington (State)--Seattle
  • Labor--Washington (State)
  • Visual Materials Collections (University of Washington)
  • Personal Names :
  • Abeyta, Anthony
  • Baxter, Esther
  • Casey, Sid
  • Conway, Steve
  • Frey, Fred
  • Hofmann, Joe
  • Johnson, Konrad
  • Jussett, Al
  • Williams, Michael
  • Corporate Names :
  • AFL-CIO. Washington State Labor Council
  • Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America. Local 81 (Seattle, Wash.)
  • United Food and Commercial Workers International Union. Local 81 (Seattle, Wash.)
  • Geographical Names :
  • Washington (State)--Photographs
  • Form or Genre Terms :
  • Photographic prints
  • Other Creators :
    • Corporate Names :
    • Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America. Local 81 (Seattle, Wash.) (creator)