Ken & Rochelle Monner collection of Shereen LaPlantz book structures, c. 1996-2001  PDF

Overview of the Collection

Title
Ken & Rochelle Monner collection of Shereen LaPlantz book structures
Dates
c. 1996-2001 (inclusive)
Quantity
4.7 linear feet, (8 letter-sized document boxes and 3 oversized boxes)
Collection Number
Mss.066
Summary
The Ken & Rochelle Monner collection of Shereen LaPlantz book structures features more than 100 artists' books created by Shereen LaPlantz (1947-2003), an internationally recognized artist, author, and teacher. Showcasing a myriad of book structures, from innovative modifications of classic bindings to her own creations, this collection contains many book structures shown as examples depicted in LaPlantz's instructive books about book arts.
Repository
University of Puget Sound, Archives & Special Collections
University of Puget Sound Archives & Special Collections
Collins Memorial Library
1500 N. Warner St.
CMB1021
Tacoma, WA
98416-1021
Telephone: 253-879-2669
archives@pugetsound.edu
Access Restrictions

Collection is open for research.

Languages
English
Sponsor
Puget Sound Book Artists


Biographical NoteReturn to Top

Shereen LaPlantz (1947-2003) was an internationally recognized book artist, basket weaver, author, and teacher. Born Shereen Buckland on February 9, 1947, in Glendale, California, she went on to attended California State University, Los Angeles where she studied textiles. After graduating in 1968, she continued to explore fabric design and weaving at the Cranbrook Academy of Art in Michigan. In 1970, she married artist David LaPlantz, a jeweler and metalsmith.

LaPlantz's early work focused on weaving and basketry as an art form. She authored two books on basketry, began a magazine dedicated to the craft, taught numerous workshops, and exhibited her work internationally. In the late 1980s, LaPlantz took a new direction, creating a series of baskets with small books integrated into the physical context of the work. This project marked her transition into the book arts.

Her recognition that book structures could be a combination of two- and three-dimensional formats and that the structures could tell their own story as well as provide information inspired her to write Cover to Cover: Creative Techniques for Making Beautiful Books, Journals, and Albums in 1995. It provides an overview of book structure and design, with chapters on binding, stitching, and presentation and it remains a standard work in book design. Many of the book structures in this collection are described in Cover to Cover.

LaPlantz is also well known for her books Innovative Bookbinding: Secret Compartments & Hidden Messages, published in 1997 and The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, published in 2001. In addition to her commercial books, LaPlantz created an average of twelve artists' books per year and was a committed educator, inspiring other book artists' through the hundreds of workshops she conducted. LaPlantz died on September 11, 2003. Her basketry and artists' books can be found in collections across the United States, including the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington D.C.

Content DescriptionReturn to Top

The Ken & Rochelle Monner collection of Shereen LaPlantz book structures features more than 100 artists' books created by Shereen LaPlantz, an internationally recognized artist, author, and teacher. The collection was donated to the University of Puget Sound in 2017 by Ken and Rochelle Monner of Tacoma, Washington. Rochelle Monner was a personal friend of Shereen LaPlantz and LaPlantz gifted the collection of book structures and other items to Monner prior to her death in 2003. Monner, one of the founding members of the Puget Sound Book Artists, used the collection as a foundation for many book arts classes.

Showcasing a myriad of book structures, from innovative modifications of classic bindings to her own creations, this collection contains many book structures shown as examples depicted in LaPlantz's instructive books about book arts, including The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, Cover to Cover: Creative Techniques for Making Beautiful Books, Journals, and Albums, and Innovative Bookbinding: Secret Compartments & Hidden Messages.

Each book has been assigned a three-digit ID code for easy identification. If the book was featured in one of LaPlantz's publications, there is a note with the corresponding book and page number.

Administrative InformationReturn to Top


Detailed Description of the CollectionReturn to Top

Series 1:  Coptic bindingsReturn to Top

A coptic binding can be sewn with a single needle or two. It creates a braided effect on the spine. This type of binding is often used to show the spine as it allows the artist to add their own variation by using different colored threads. This technique works well for either hard or soft covers and can be sewn through the cover (soft) or hard cover boards that expose the text block.

Container(s) Description
Box Folder
1 1
001: Basic coptic stitch with wire thread
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, page 63.
1 1
002: Coptic stitch envelope book
1 1
003: Stub book, simple coptic stitch
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, pages 98-101.
1 2
004: Coptic single needle, twisted coptic stitch
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, page 109.
1 2
005: Coptic single needle, elongated stitch
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, page 108.
1 3
006: Coptic stitch with modified origami pockets
1 3
007: Modified coptic stitch
1 4
008: Stub book, individually wrapped signatures with coptic stitch
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, pages 103-104.
1 4
009: Coptic single needle with hard cover
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, pages 105-107.
1 4
010: Coptic, individually wrapped signature, stub book
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, pages 103-104.
1 5
011: Coptic, photo prints mat book
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, pages 46-47.
1 5
012: Coptic, photo print mat book
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, pages 46-47.
2 1
013: Coptic binding with origami pocket folds
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, page 44.
2 1
014: Coptic binding with origami pocket folds and a hard cover
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, page 44.
2 2
015: Coptic binding with double slit concertina
2 2
016: Coptic binding with folded flaps

Series 2:  Concertina/Accordion Return to Top

A concertina book is created when single or multiple pieces of paper are folded into an accordion book; it is sometimes referred to as a zig-zag. Concertina forms can be added to a sewn binding to add more dimension to a book. The artist may sew pamphlet stitches into the folds of the concertina, or glue a folded piece of paper onto a flat side of the zig-zag. This binding is particularly useful for display purposes due to its dramatic effect.

Container(s) Description
Box Folder
2 3
017: Accordion interwoven slit with a flag pamphlet stitch
2 3
018: Envelope binding with box accordion
2 3
019: Honeycomb concertina
2 4
020: Concertina in a matchbox with text and a tassel
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, pages 25-26
2 4
021: Accordion fold with a paper case cover
2 4
022: Concertina interstate highway book. Single and double tunnel layers
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, pages 62-63
2 4
023: Accordion with pamphlet stitch
2 4
024: Interwoven slit accordion
2 4
025: Accordion with pamphlet stitched folios on head of the binding
2 4
026: Concertina with a textbook wrapper
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, page 24
2 4
027: Basic concertina
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, page 22
2 5
028: Concertina with pop-up panels
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, page 31
2 5
029: Basic accordion
2 5
030: Interwoven slit concertina
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, pages 40-41
2 5
031: Concertina fold with folios glued on
2 5
032: Concertina with folios glued on
2 5
033: Double-layer interwoven slit concertina
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, pages 45-47
2 5
034: Surfers and Seahorses
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, pages 41-42
2 5
035: Geometric Panels
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, pages 41-42
3 1
036: Basic slit concertina with covers
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, pages 38-39
3 1
037: Calligraphy model concertina with pop-out accordion
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, pages 32-33
3 1
038: Concertina pamphlet stitch with envelope pages, board covers
3 1
039: Inverted concertina and double inverted concertina
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, page 27
3 2
040: Concertina spine pamphlet stitched hardcover
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, pages 101-103
3 3
041: Concertina spine, pamphlet stitch, case binding cover
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, pages 101-103
3 3
085: Flutter book with hard cover, Japanese paper, and triangle design
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, page 91

Series 3:  Long Stitch Return to Top

A long stitch binding is where the thread runs along the spine of a book creating vertical lines. This technique can be sewn through the cover, or on leather strips. You can also manipulate the long thread into a pattern or knot them. Hard or soft covers can be used as well, but generally, the spine is left soft so the book may open.

Container(s) Description
Box Folder
3 4
042: Long stitch binding, pulling tapes outside the spine
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, page 57
3 4
043: Short long stitch bindings
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, page 57
3 5
044: Long stitch binding sewn over tapes
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, page 52
3 5
045: Long stitch binding, sewn over tapes, wrapped stitches in metal thread
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, page 64
4 1
046: Multi-signature nature tacket binding
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, page 87
4 1
047: Interwoven slit concertina with multi-pamphlet stitch
4 2
048: Soft-spine book with multi-signature. Tacketing. Substituting concertina with tapes
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, page 91
4 2
049: Modified long stitch binding with tube hinge
4 3
050: Long stitch binding sewn on tapes
4 3
051: Hinge long stitch binding with herringbone sewn pattern
4 3
052: Long stitch binding with stitch foredge clasp

Series 4:  Pamphlet Stitch Return to Top

The pamphlet stitch binding is quick and easy to create. In early years, it was used in the production of handmade pamphlets for mass distribution. It is typically a three-hole binding but the artist can make it more complex by creating any amount of odd numbered holes.

Container(s) Description
Box Folder
4 4
053: Sewing machine basic pamphlet stitch with 7 variations
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, page 51
5 1
054: Shereen LaPlantz Makes Books
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, page 71
5 1
055: Single pamphlet stitch with envelope enclosure
5 1
056: Single pamphlet stitch with envelope enclosure
5 1
057: Single pamphlet stitch with envelope enclosure
5 1
058: Single pamphlet stitch folded at an angle
5 1
059: Single pamphlet with modified enclosure
5 1
060: Multi-signature folding pamphlet stitch
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, page 31
5 1
061: Double pamphlet stitch
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, page 31
5 1
062: Basic codex, format models. sewing machine pamphlet stitch
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, pages 50-51
5 1
063: Basic codex, format models
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, pages 50-51
5 2
064: Pamphlet stitch with hard cover variation
5 2
065: Multi-signature pamphlet stitch, 2 examples
5 2
066: Single pamphlet stitch, 4 examples
5 2
067: Single pamphlet stitch with pocket
5 2
068: Pamphlet stitch, single pocket signatures
5 2
069: Window idea book. Windows with tip-ins. Pamphlet stitch

Series 5:  Ring BindingReturn to Top

This binding involves using circle hooks to create the book. You punch a hole in your paper and then add your circle hook to attach all your pages together.

Container(s) Description
Box Folder
5 3
070: Ring Bindings
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, pages 124-125
5 4
071: Ring Bindings
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, pages 124-125

Series 6:  Skewer VariationsReturn to Top

A skewer binding utilizes a skewer as the anchor for sewing or tying on. Adding the skewer adds bulk to the spine of the binding. The artist may also create a staggered skewer binding, meaning that they alternate between where the holes are on the spine of the book. This is also known as a piano hinge binding.

Container(s) Description
Box Folder
5 5
072: Multi-signature, staggered, skewer binding
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, page 117
5 5
073: Single signature recessed skewer binding
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, page 113
5 5
074: Skewer binding, two signature recessed with soft covers
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, page 116
5 6
075: Multi-skewer hinge accordion
5 6
076: single skewer hinge binding, two examples
5 6
077: Skewer binding, single signature recessed, with tunnel binding
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, page 118
5 6
078: Skewer binding, two signature recessed with soft cover
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, page 116
5 6
079: Multi-signature recessed skewer binding with a twisted coptic stitch
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, page 120

Series 7:  Case BindingReturn to Top

This binding has a cover that envelopes the entire text block. With hard covers, and a strong spine piece, this binding works well for a book that has the same thickness of pages throughout. Case bindings are how most commercial books are completed.

Container(s) Description
Box Folder
6 1
080: Case binding with varying folds

Series 8:  Explosion BookReturn to Top

This structure features an "explosion" of inward folds that reveal themselves as the spread is opened. The explosion fold adds a whimsical feature to the book. Explosion folds can be added anytime there are two or more text pages together or two or more heavy pages together. The artist can make this fold more complex by nesting smaller and smaller explosion folds within each other or varying the color and texture of the paper.

Container(s) Description
Box Folder
6 2
081: Explosion Book featuring multiple layers
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, page 78

Series 9:  Fluid Spine Return to Top

This binding features a collection of pamphlet stitched folios held together by sewing the cover of one folio to the cover of the adjoining folio. Because the sewing is only happening edge to edge on each adjoining folio, the spine of this binding hides most of the sewing, only allowing small peaks of thread between each folio.

Container(s) Description
Box Folder
6 3
082: Fluid spine binding also known as segmented binding
6 3
083: Fluid Spine Binding with template hole punch insert
6 3
084: Fluid Spine binding with envelope enclosure variations

Series 10:  Leaf BooksReturn to Top

This structure, which is similar in function to the concertina binding, features panels that are tied together via holes punched into the edges of each spread. Unlike other binding techniques where a single thread is used to bind the entire book together, each connecting point in a leaf binding is tied with a different piece of thread. This structure can be useful when working with materials that cannot be easily folded as no folding is involved.

Container(s) Description
Box Folder
6 4
086: Leaf book with braided ties
6 4
087: Leaf Book with knotted stitches

Series 11:  Looped BindingReturn to Top

Looped bindings feature a collection of folios in which thread has been looped around the fold of each folio and tied at the head and tail of the text block. This binding allows the spreads to lay flat when opened and does not puncture any of the pages of the spreads themselves.

Container(s) Description
Box Folder
6 5
088: Looped binding with soft cover
6 5
089: Looped binding with textured soft cover

Series 12:  Maze BooksReturn to Top

These books center on the concept of folding and cutting to allow a single sheet of paper to be folded into a book. These cuts and folds cause the pages to develop unusual patterns and formations that appear to be "maze-like" as the book is unfolded. This style typically does not include any sewing or gluing to create the text block, although with variations, these may be included.

Container(s) Description
Box Folder
7 1
090: Glazed bark paper maze book
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, page 95
7 1
091: Maze fold book with parchment paper
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, page 93
7 1
092: Maze fold book leaf paper
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, page 93
7 1
093: Maze fold book Mi Teintes
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, page 93
7 1
094: Maze book. Lavender rectangles on white paper
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, page 95

Series 13:  Modified Herringbone Return to Top

Like single cord bindings, herringbone bindings are traditionally found in leather bound books. The resulting stitching of this binding creates a braided herringbone like texture on the spine.

Container(s) Description
Box Folder
7 2
095: Modified Herringbone Stitch on ribbon with soft cover

Series 14:  OrigamiReturn to Top

These books are created using traditional origami folds. Due to the variations in origami folds, the structures these books create vary widely from more traditional book-like structures to works that fold in on themselves and reveal hidden areas. They can add a great surprise element to books.

Container(s) Description
Box Folder
7 3
096: Origami fold-out book
7 3
097: Origami book hidden message star
For more information about this book structure, see Innovative Bookbinding, pages 56-57.
7 3
098: Deep slit case for origami book (two examples)
7 3
099: Pamphlet cards
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, page 31

Series 15:  Pop-UpReturn to Top

Specific cuts and folds in these books allow three-dimensional shapes to "pop up" as the spread is opened.

Container(s) Description
Box Folder
7 4
100: Pop-Up
7 4
101: Pop-Up

Series 16:  Single CordReturn to Top

This structure is sewn all along the signature and looped around a cord. A single hole is punctured in the folio allowing the thread to be sewn around the exterior cord and back through the same hole. This traditional binding structure is typically in leather bindings where the raised cord can be seen on the spine of the book and is an extremely durable structure.

Container(s) Description
Box Folder
7 5
102: Sing cord sewing with ribbon wrap

Series 17:  Stab Stitch BindingsReturn to Top

Traditionally a Japanese binding, this binding style features a stack of single sheets instead of signatures, decoratively sewn together along one edge. The phrase "stab binding" comes from the holes stabbed along one edge of the text block which the thread is woven through. Because the stitching is visible in this binding, it allows for great variation in style depending on the pattern and detail applied to the stitching. This binding style is good for text weight papers as the spine does not allow the text block to open flat and thicker papers become stiff when the book is opened.

Container(s) Description
Box Folder
7 6
103: Non-Japanese Stab Binding
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, page 78
7 6
104: Stab binding with safety pins
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, pages 128-129 (paragraph 3)
7 6
105: Non-Japanese Stab Binding
7 6
106: Two Hole Pamphlet Stab Binding
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, page 77
7 6
107: Stab Binding with hard cover
7 6
108: Noble Stitch "Stab Stitch"
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, page 69
7 6
109: Non-Japanese Stab Binding
For more information about this book structure, see Cover to Cover, page 78
7 6
110: Two-Hole Pamphlet Stab Binding

Series 18:  Tassel BooksReturn to Top

A tassel binding is meant to showcase all pages in a book while either hanging or spread out on the table. It works well with thick paper, tunnel books, and lots of thread. The star arms are double layered, so the artist can add pop-ups into this binding. There is also thread, ribbon, or cord dangling down from the center of the book.

Container(s) Description
Box Folder
8 1
111: Tassel Book
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, pages 54-55
8 1
112: Tassel Book
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, pages 54-55
8 1
113: Tassel Book
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, pages 54-55
8 1
114: Six armed star tassel book

Series 19:  Tete A TeteReturn to Top

Tete-a-tete structures encompass books which have two different text bodies attached, back to back, to the same structure. This creates a book which has two front covers and a shared back cover. Because of this broad categorization, tete-a-tete books can use a wide range of sewn bindings. These books are most effective in showing dualistic themes or contents that should be viewed side by side.

Container(s) Description
Box Folder
8 2
115: Tete A Tete with seed grain paper
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, page 34
8 2
116: Tete A Tete with 5 signatures
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, page 34

Series 20:  Star Tunnel BooksReturn to Top

Container(s) Description
Box Folder
9 1
127: Four layer star tunnel book
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, page 53
9 1
126: Traditional Star Tunnel Book
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, pages 50-51
9
128: Star Tunnel Book
For more information about this book structure, see The Art & Craft of Handmade Books, pages 50-53

Series 21:  Purse BindingReturn to Top

Formed from molded and sewn paper, these books create a purse-like structure. Variations include pamphlet stitch bindings incorporated into the walls of the purses, and both opening and static structures.

Container(s) Description
Box
10
129: Purse binding with book inside
10
130: Purse Binding
11
131: Purse binding with pamphlet stitch books and yarn inside
11
132: Purse binding

Series 22:  Artist Books by Various Creators Return to Top

This series contains twelve completed artists books created by various artists and collected by Shereen LaPlantz. Many of these seem to be works created by her students.

Container(s) Description
Box Folder
8 3
117: Marilyn Monroe
Simple Foldedbook created by Elizabeth-Eleanor Ochs
8 3
118: Australian Aboriginal Art
Stab Binding created by Tricia Smout, 1999
8 3
119: The Land of Rubber Stamps
Cased in binding with hardcover created by Elizabeth Knotts, 1996
8 3
120: Pamphlet Stitch by Phyllis Kenyon
8 3
121: Pamphlet Stitch (4 Examples)
Two Alphabet Books by Amy Springer-Ochs, 1999 "Together we create something that we aren't when alone" and "Once there was two now there is one... can I learn to live with none?" by Nancy Springer-Ochs
8 4
123: Typefaces
Concertina binding with a hard cover by Diane Perin Hock, 2000
8 4
124: A Treasury of Tri-folds
Pamphlet stitch binding with pockets and inserts by Rebecca Krahula, 2000
8 4
122: Tea Talk
Pamphlet stitch binding with enclosure by Diane Perin Hock, 1999
8 4
125: Dream
Triangle with a medallion

Names and SubjectsReturn to Top

  • Subject Terms :
  • Artists' books