Olson & Winge Marine Works photographs and scrapbook, 1914-1970  PDF

Overview of the Collection

Creator
Olson & Winge Marine Works
Title
Olson & Winge Marine Works photographs and scrapbook
Dates
1914-1970 (inclusive)
1940-1944 (bulk)
Quantity
.45 cubic feet, (1 box and 1 oversize folder)
Collection Number
1972.5503 (collection)
Summary
Photographs and clippings from a Seattle shipbuilding company, primarily concerning the construction, repair and adaptation of ships for use by the government in World War II.
Repository
Museum of History & Industry, Sophie Frye Bass Library
Sophie Frye Bass Library
Museum of History & Industry
P.O. Box 80816
Seattle, WA
98108
Telephone: 206-324-1126
Fax: 206-780-1533
library@mohai.org
Access Restrictions

The collection is open to the public by appointment.

Languages
English.


Historical NoteReturn to Top

Oscar E. Olson and Carl B. Winge first met in 1910, at the King & Winge shipyard in West Seattle near Luna Park. Opened in 1899 and owned by Carl's uncle Albert Winge with partner Thomas J. King, the King & Winge yard constructed fishing vessels and operated a codfish and, later, halibut fishing fleet. Carl Winge worked as Secretary Treasurer and purchasing agent for King & Winge, and Oscar Olson was the machinist foreman. When the yard built the famous schooner the King & Winge in 1914, Olson designed and built the winch (the first power winch on the Pacific coast for halibut schooners), and installed the machinery, and Carl Winge purchased all the materials that went into the building of the ship.

Carl Winge came from a family of shipbuilders in Norway, where Albert Winge's father was known for his carvings of figureheads for early sailing vessels. Carl worked at King & Winge until around 1917, when he left to work for the Elliott Bay Shipbuilding Company as a purchasing agent; later, he worked at Elliott Bay Yacht & Engine Company and Olson & Sunde Marine Works. In 1925 Winge, whose father was a musician, left the shipbuilding trade for California, to try his hand in the songwriting and publishing profession in Los Angeles, San Francisco and later, New York. After about fifteen years, Winge returned to Seattle, and to shipbuilding.

Oscar Olson learned the trade of machinist working for Vulcan Iron Works in Seattle beginning in 1903, and later (1907) at Seattle Iron Works, before becoming the foreman of the workshop at King & Winge in 1910. Later, Olson partnered with Norman C. Sunde in the shipbuilding firm Olson & Sunde until Sunde's retirement, afterwards forming a new partnership with Carl Winge in 1941.

Olson & Winge Marine Works was located on the Lake Washington Ship Canal at the foot of 8th Avenue Northwest, at 4125 Burns Avenue Northwest. From around 1941 to 1944, the Olson & Winge yard devoted its production facilities completely to the war effort, primarily converting, adapting and repairing ships for military use, but also producing new vessels, such as several wooden lighters. The first shipyard in the Northwest to begin a full program of Army-Navy repair and adaption work, Olson & Winge was one of many Pacific Coast yards doing repair, adaption and new construction of government ships as part of the war effort. Adaptions included added accommodations, different use of stowage space, and placing of armament. In 1941, Olson & Winge converted 15 halibut and purse seiners for Navy use as supply ships, forerunners of the YP ("Yippee") boats. Subsequently, the yard converted eight assorted private craft to supply or "Q" boats. New wartime construction by Olson & Winge included four 50 foot patrol boats for the Coast Guard, and fifteen cargo lighters and four degaussing barges for the Navy. The yard also performed extensive outfitting of uncompleted high-powered aircraft rescue boats and repaired other rescue boats.

After the war, Olson & Winge returned to commercial boatbuilding. City directory listings for Olson & Winge Marine Works end in the late 1940s.

Content DescriptionReturn to Top

The collection includes photographs of the Olson & Winge Marine Works yard, including yard buildings, ways, and marine railway; and photographs of ships built, repaired or converted by the shipyard. The latter include some fishing boats but largely consist of images of boats adapted, repaired or built for use by the government during World War II. One series of photographs depicts the fishing schooner King & Winge made by the King & Winge shipyard and converted for war use by the Coast Guard. The collection also include clippings and scrapbook pages about the Olson & Winge yard and various boats produced or converted by the yard.

Use of the CollectionReturn to Top

Alternative Forms Available

View selections from the collection in digital format by clicking on the camera icons in the inventory below.

Restrictions on Use

The Museum of History & Industry is the owner of the materials in the Sophie Frye Bass Library and makes available reproductions for research, publication, and other uses. Written permission must be obtained from MOHAI before any reproduction use. The museum does not necessarily hold copyright to all of the materials in the collections. In some cases, permission for use may require seeking additional authorization from the copyright owners.

Preferred Citation

Olson & Winge Marine Works photographs and scrapbook, Museum of History & Industry, Seattle

Administrative InformationReturn to Top


Detailed Description of the CollectionReturn to Top

The following section contains a detailed listing of the materials in the collection.

PhotographsReturn to Top

Container(s) Description Dates
Yard and improvements
Folder
1
1-8:  Yard views
Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
Early images of the Olson & Winge yard depict the drydock, sheds and other buildings, boats under construction, views from the canal, and a view of boats at dock with the Ballard district in the background.
1940-1941
2
9-16: Installation of marine railway
Photographs depict the marine railway under construction and completed, depicting a pile driver in the water, partially completed railway on land and in water, and an image of divers and a diving boat.
circa 1940
Docks and buildings
Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
1943
Folder
3
17: Dock No. 1 with raised railway bridge in background
1943
3 1943
3
19: Sidetracking
1943
3
20: Caulker shop
1943
3
21: Blacksmith's shop
1943
3
22: Yard buildings
1943
Fishing boats
Folder
4
23: Fishing boat Tiny Boy in water
undated
5
24-25: Fishing boat Seal on ways
undated
6
26: Fishing boat Heron in water
undated
7
27: Fishing boat Zarembo II
Possibly built by Olson & Sunde Marine Works
circa 1939
War production
Navy YP boats converted from fishing vessels
10 photographs
Numbers 30-37: Ray Krantz (photographer)
Navy YP (or "Yippee") boats of World War II were wooden fishing vessels--usually purse seiners or cannery tenders--converted for use as patrol craft, as well as armed vessels. With ironbark sheathing on their hulls, the YPs ranged up and down the Pacific Coast, from the Panama Canal to the Aleutians and into the Bering Sea.
1941
Folder
8
28: YP-72 in water
The YP-72 was converted from the refrigerated fish carrier and purse seiner Cavalcade and was the flagship of the "Alaska patrol."
1941
8
29: YP-74 in water
Converted from the purse seiner Endeavor.
1941
8
30-31:  YP-85 in water, broadside and quartering views
Converted from fishing vessel Nick C II.
1941
8
32-34: YP-86 in water, broadside and quartering views
Converted from Pacific Fisher
1941
8
35-37: YP-95 in water, broadside and quartering views
Converted from fishing vessel Nordic Pride.
1941
Folder
9
38-40:  U.S. Army small boat J-258 under way with 3 men aboard
Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
circa 1940
10
41: Motor tug YMT-22 under way
Marine Salon Photo Shop , Seattle (photographer)
circa 1941
11
42-43: Tug Reliance under way and in drydock
Number 42: Marine Salon Photo Shop , Seattle (photographer)
Number 43: Graphic Photo Company , Seattle (photographer)
circa 1941
12
44-50: Degaussing scow constructed for U.S. Navy
7 photographs
Photographs depict the degaussing scow under construction in shed, on the marine railway, and in the water.
1941
13
51-57:  "Q" boats converted for U.S. Army
7 photographs
Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
Photographs of the Q-43, Q-45, Q-46, Q-47 and Q-49.
These boats were former utility and pleasure craft purchased and converted by the Army. The Q-46 was formerly the state fisheries vessel Gov. Elisha P. Ferry and the Q-45 was the Miss Elizabeth.
1941
Boats converted for U.S. Army
circa 1941
Folder
14
58:  U.S. Army boat Major Walter Board
Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
circa 1941
14
59: U.S. Army boat Major Clements W. Legge
Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
circa 1941
14
60: U.S. Army boat Major Rueben L. Fain
Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
circa 1941
14
61-62: U.S. Army harbor tug ST-216 at dock and under way
Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
circa 1941
Folder
14
63: U.S. Army cargo barge BCL-1329 in water
This barge may be the Army BCL vessel that was converted by Olson & Winge into a floating marine repair shop.
circa 1941
14
64-67: Ships in drydock, probably U.S. Army boats undergoing conversion
circa 1941
15
68-70:  CG-7214 under way
Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
circa 1941
16 circa 1942
17
76-79: Boats J-810, YP-401 and a barge in drydock
Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
1943
17
80: Ferry Beeline undergoing conversion to a net tender
Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
circa 1943
18
81-84:  U.S. Navy covered wooden lighters under construction
Number 84: Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
1943
18
85-86:  Covered wooden lighter YF-471 in water, end and broadside views
Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
1943 June 24
19 circa 1943
19
90: Unidentified ship in drydock
circa 1943
Launching of Navy lighter YC-842
Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
The YC-842 was a 250-ton capacity, 110' x 30' open lighter.
1943 October 20-21
Folder
20 1943 October 20
20
93-94: Yard worker Ragner Salldin dressed as "Miss Veronica Bilgewater" with bottle for launch of YC-842
1943 October 20
20
95: YC-842 on ways before launch, with yard workers watching
1943 October 20
21 1943 October 21
Folder
22
99-100: Completed Navy lighter YF-834, end-on and broadside views
Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
The YF-834 was a wooden, non-self-propelled, covered lighter, 110' x 30'
1944 June 29
22
101-102:  Yard workers and band at launching of Navy covered wooden lighters
Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
1944 June
23
103-108:  Five U.S. Army patrol rescue boats and Navy minesweeper YMS-127 at dock near the Olson & Winge Marine Works yard
Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
Includes patrol rescue boats P-510, P-511, P-512 and P-518
circa 1944
24
109a:  Five U.S. Army patrol rescue boats and Navy minesweeper YMS-127 at dock near the Olson & Winge Marine Works yard
Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
Includes patrol rescue boats P-510, P-511, P-512 and P-518
2 copies
circa 1944
folder:oversize
OS 1
109b-d: Five U.S. Army patrol rescue boats and Navy minesweeper YMS-127 at the Olson & Winge Marine Works dock
Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
Includes patrol rescue boats P-510, P-511, P-512 and P-518. These images are different versions from the same negative or negatives. The panorama prints may have been created from two negatives. Number 109b consists of two prints taped together to create a panorama.
circa 1944
Folder
25
110-113: Individual U.S. Army patrol boats under way
Signal Corps, U.S. Army (photographer)
Two images depict the P-512 and one depicts the P-518
circa 1944
26
114-116: Military and civilian personnel on deck of U.S. Army patrol boat (Eleventh Rescue Squadron)
Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
circa 1944
27
117-120: U.S. Army patrol boats (Eleventh Rescue Squadron) in water at yard
Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
1944 June
28
121-122: U.S. Army Air Corps 110-foot crash boat P-752 in under way
Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
circa 1944
28
123: U.S. Army Air Corps captain at helm of 110-foot crash boat
Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
circa 1944
29 1944 August
30
129-130: YMS-122 and YMS-134 at dock near yard
Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
circa 1944
King & Winge
Designed by firm partner Albert Winge, the King & Winge was built by the King & Winge shipyard, intended as the biggest and best halibut schooner on the coast. However, shortly before its launch date in the spring of 1914, the firm of Hibbard and Swenson chartered the King & Winge for an Arctic expedition. Sheathed in ironbark as protection against the ice, the King & Winge brought in the firm's catch of furs from the north, after its own schooner was caught in the ice. After returning to Nome with the furs, the King & Winge prepared to leave on a walrus-hunting expedition, but was diverted in an attempt to rescue the men of the Karluk, the ship of Arctic explorer Vilhjalmur Stefansson which was trapped in the ice at Hershel Island. Though the Karluk sank and four men died, the King & Winge succeeded in picking up the remaining survivors on Wrangel Island. Hibbard & Swenson did not charter the craft again, but its ironbark sheathing recommended it for work in Alaska rather than halibut fishing, and she was charted by the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey for two seasons.
The King & Winge finally began work as a halibut boat in 1916. In 1918 the ship participated in the attempted rescue of the Princess Sophia, which eventually sank with all 343 passengers on board. Within a few years, the King & Winge was sold to the National Independent Fisheries Company, and then in 1921, chartered from them by the Cape Flattery pilots, who intended to use it for safe conduct of vessels in and out of the Strait of Juan de Fuca. From 1922-1924, its history is obscure, but the ship was probably owned by run runners in the Prohibition era.
The King & Winge, under the new name Columbia, returned to pilot service in 1924, this time on the Columbia River. Captained continuously by Captain Frank E. Craig from 1924-1958, it guided vessels across the "graveyard of the Columbia," the most difficult river bar on the coast. In 1944, the Columbia returned to the Olson & Winge Marine Works shipyard, where many of the same men who built it were still employed. The ship was adapted and repaired for war service as the CGR-2469, in the service of the Coast Guard.
In 1958, Clyde Parlova of Astoria, Oregon bought the schooner from the Columbia Bar Pilots' Association, intending to restore it as a sailing ship. In 1962, the ship was purchased by Jack Elsbree, a retired airline pilot who intended to restore it as his home.
The King & Winge sank in waters near St. Paul Island in the Pribolofs, Alaska, on February 22, 1994.
1914, 1
Folder
31
131:  Schooner King & Winge in arctic ice
This image shows the King & Winge, probably en route to the rescue of Steffanson's Karluk, signaling distress by flying its flag upside down.
1914
32
132: Oscar E. Olson, Captain Frank E. Craig and Carl B. Winge inspecting a winch on the Columbia (formerly the King & Winge)
Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
Craig was captain of the pilot boat Columbia, formerly the King & Winge, and crossed the Columbia River Bar in the ship over 50,000 times over 34 years as its captain. Oscar Olson designed and built the winch shown in the photograph.
circa 1944
33
133-134: Oscar Olson, Carl Winge, Captain Craig and others on deck of the Columbia ( King & Winge)
Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
Also depicted: Olson & Winge machinists Frank Smith, Homer Pricket and Axel Olson, and first mate Leback.
1944
32
135:  Machinists Frank Smith, Homer Pricket and Axel Olson on deck of the Columbia ( King & Winge)
Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
Smith, Pricket and Olson were working at the King & Winge shipyard when the King & Winge was built in 1914
1944
33 1944
Equipment manufactured by Olson & Winge Marine Works
Equipment probably produced for U.S. Army use
Folder
34
144-149: Towing winch (anchor windlass)
Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
circa 1942
35
150: 500-ton marine railway winch
Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
circa 1942
36
151-152: Steel manifolds
Ray Krantz , Seattle (photographer)
1942 October 13
37
153-155: Anchor windlass installed on ship deck
circa 1942
Other shipyards
Folder
38
156-160: Maritime Boat and Engine Works plant at 1710 W. Spokane Street, Seattle
Five 2" x 3" photographs mounted on black scrapbook page.
1919-1920
39
161:  Elliott Bay Shipbuilding Company album
1 album with 17 linen-backed photographs
Carl B. Winge worked for the Elliott Bay Shipbuilding Company as purchasing agent for a brief period beginning around 1917.
This promotional album describes the capabilities of the shipyard and illustrates the type of work done. The first three pages of the album consist of a typewritten description of the Elliott Bay Shipbuilding Company, a 15-acre plant on the Duwamish waterway in Seattle. The narrative describes the plant shops, the administrative personnel and the company's contract terms. The album includes 17 photographs: 6 photographs of the plant and ships under construction, taken by Webster & Stevens; and 11 photographs of ship plans. Typewritten descriptions of different types of ships built by the yard are interspersed throughout the album.
circa 1918-1919

Scrapbook, circa 1941-1970Return to Top

Container(s) Description Dates
Folder
40-45
162-167: Olson & Winge Marine Works scrapbook and clippings
Pages have been removed from scrapbook and foldered, probably during previous processing. Loose clippings and a folder of correspondence are included with the scrapbook materials, though it is not known whether or not these were originally included in the scrapbook
The album and clippings include stories about the King & Winge, particularly about its return to the shipyard as a pilot boat in 1944; biographical information about Oscar E. Olson, Carl B. Winge and Albert Winge; newspaper advertisements for the shipyard; clippings about boat shows featuring Olson & Winge vessels; articles featuring boats which were produced or adapted by the shipyard during and after the war; and a 1944 editorial by Ed Winge about the importance of shipyards' participation in the war effort. The scrapbook also includes a plan of Olson & Winge Marine Works shipyard from October 1944.The 3 items in the correspondence folder comprise holiday greetings from Navy personnel and the National Bank of Commerce Ballard Branch.
circa 1941-1970

Names and SubjectsReturn to Top

  • Subject Terms :
  • Shipbuilding--Washington (State)--Seattle
  • Ships--Reconstruction--Washington (State)--Seattle
  • Shipyards--Washington (State)--Seattle
  • Personal Names :
  • Olson, Oscar E.
  • Winge, Albert
  • Winge, Carl B.
  • Corporate Names :
  • King & Winge Shipyard
  • Elliott Bay Shipbuilding Company
  • Geographical Names :
  • Seattle (Wash.)
  • Form or Genre Terms :
  • Photographic prints
  • Scrapbooks
  • Other Creators :
    • Personal Names :
    • Krantz, Ray (photographer)
    • Corporate Names :
    • Webster & Stevens (photographer)