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Belding H. Scribner papers, 1949-2005

Overview of the Collection

Creator
Scribner, Belding H., 1921-
Title
Belding H. Scribner papers
Dates
1949-2005 (inclusive)
Quantity
51.29 cubic feet (59 boxes and 1 film reel)
Collection Number
3301
Summary
Former Professor of Medicine at the University of Washington
Repository
University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections.
Special Collections
University of Washington Libraries
Box 352900
Seattle, WA
98195-2900
Telephone: 206-543-1929
Fax: 206-543-1931
speccoll@uw.edu
Access Restrictions

Open to all users, but access to portions of the papers restricted. Contact Special Collecdtions for details.

Languages
English


Biographical NoteReturn to Top

Belding H. Scribner was born in Chicago, Illinois in 1921. He received his M.D. degree from Stanford University in 1945 and prior to that, his M.S. degree from the University of Minnesota and his A.B. degree from the University of California Berkeley. Scribner joined the University of Washington faculty in 1951 and served as a professor of medicine and chair of the Nephrology Division (1958-1982) in Department of Medicine. His research focused on hemodialysis techniques, and he and co-workers established the first hemodialysis for chronic kidney failure and development of the arteriovenus shunt. Belding also served as chair of the Medical Advisory Committee of the Seattle Artificial Kidney Center from 1961 to 1964. Dr. Scribner died on June 19, 2003.

Dr. Scribner developed an interest in fluid balance and nephritis or end-stage glomerular nephritis, while working at Stanford. Later he went to the Mayo clinic and while there he attended a lecture by John Merrill of Harvard on the artificial kidney. (The rotating drum artificial kidney was invented in 1945.) Dr. Scribner was interested in this - not to save lives or to do therapy with a donor; but he saw its potential as a research tool for being able to manipulate sodium, potassium, and bicarbonate.

After Mayo’s showing a lack of support for and the rejection of his desire for developing a dialysis machine and finding a great deal of prejudice towards his ideas for research by the physiologists there, Dr. Scribner left Mayo. He took his family to California to visit a grandparent and while there asked around about possibilities for doing research in fluid balance. He was given no hope there but was advised about a new medical school just opened in Seattle, Washington. He flew up and was interviewed by Robert Williams, head of the department of Internal Medicine; but his greatest chance came when he visited a former instructor at Stanford, Robert Evans, who had just been made head of the new VA Hospital in Seattle. Evans conferred with Dr. Williams and Dr. Scribner was invited to become a member of the Faculty of the University of Washington Medical School in 1951.

Dr. Scribner worked in the research program with the artificial kidney, a research tool worth something according to him. He chose a non-conventional dialyzer, the Skeggs-Leonard dialyzer from Cleveland, actually devised to extract some substances to deal with hypertension. He did not want to use the rotating drum dialyzer because of problems of blood volume and control, so that he built a mobile unit and went to various hospitals in the night in order to dialyze patients to study fluid imbalance. In the late 1950’s he changed to a Kolff’s twin coil with a disposable unit which really worked. He also began working with Ph v. potassium and potassium acid base and developed bedside tests for potassium and urea. The bedside kit measured salts in the blood to control the patient’s electrolyte level (fluid balance).

In 1960, Dr. Scribner won the Markle fellowship and moved from the VA Hospital to the new University Hospital. The fellowship then allowed him to go to England, where he worked with Malcolm Milne at the Post-Graduate Medical School in Hammersmith doing basic research in non-ionic diffusion. During this time Dr. Milne wrote the definitive work, Non-Ionic Diffusion, which, was edited by Dr. Scribner.

Also, he developed an interest in wine while in England which led to illegal wine collecting, when he returned to Washington State; his cellar was raided by the WA State Liquor Board, and he and others were arrested and jailed. But after his and others’ protests, WA State law was Changed, and the state’s wine industry was legalized and flourished. There is also a discussion of his wife, his family, and his marriage.

The Scribner Shunt was developed around March of 1960. He had a patient arrive from Spokane with all the critical symptoms of renal failure, including heart failure. Dr. Scribner took off fluid with a dialyzer and the patient recovered enough to get up and walk around. He then became anuric (no urine was produced by the kidney), and on renal biopsy it was found that the patient had glomerulo-nephritis and all glomeruli were fibrosed. With no chance of survival he was sent home and died in three weeks. This case led Dr. Scribner to work harder on the concept of dialysis; and he tried putting a tube in an artery and in the vein then pulling off a shunt and putting on a dialyzer. The shunt that Dr. Scribner used was made of teflon. This came through the advice of Dr. Wintershott, who was using it in the dog lab and found that it was a non-reactive substance that did not cause inflammation. Thus, the shunt stayed open with no clotting, because teflon is so slippery. The first patient to get this treatment was Clyde Shields who lived for eleven years without kidneys.

Ca. 1958-59, Dr. Thomas Mar of Spokane demonstrated a Gastric Dialysis and presented a paper to the American Society for Artificial Internal Organs, which was published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation. This brought to Dr. Mar and Dr. Scribner an invitation to join the society. By 1960 it was decided that the Artificial Kidney technic of continuous flow of hemo-dialysis became ideal for chronic care, especially when he discovered how to bend teflon to make the shunt. At a meeting in Chicago he presented the only two patients he had for the above work. From this presentation came his Citation Classic Paper (a paper cited so many times that it becomes a classic), i.e., the breakthrough “Commutations of Blood Vessels” the first paper quoted about blood dialysis written by Quinton, Dillard, and Scribner. In 1963, Nephrology became the definitive term for this kind of work.

At University Hospital, Dr. Scribner had to work against the antipathy of other physicians; he had no money and no kidney center. The NIH was very unsympathetic to his cause and felt that Scribner’s work threatened that of physiologists already supported, until Lou Welt positively overrode the decision of a study committee. Dr. Aagaard, the Dean of the Medical School also gave $3500. However, Associate Dean John Hogness proved very unsupportive, and they fought bitterly over a patient of Dr. Scribner, Jim Albers, who was treated by him and as his longest surviving patient went on to become President of Western Washington University. Actually, the first patient to be treated in University Hospital was John Myers, according to Dr. Blagg.

Dr. Scribner was later given the Seattle Artificial Kidney Center through the efforts and funding of C.P. Roy, Head of the A&P Stores with a gift of $300,000. At the time Dr. Scribner’s committee became well known to everybody, though it remained notorious in the Medical Society.

As for the Seattle Life and Death Committee and the Issue of Selection of Patients for Dialysis, interest in this topic began with a paper given at the Federation Meetings in Atlantic City, 1962, where was Dr. Scibnner’s first contact with the press occurred: The New York Times and The Herald Tribune . Afterward, Life Magazine sent Shana Alexander to do an article on the Seattle Committee, i.e., how patients were selected for dialysis and who was worthy. Flaws in reasoning became an issue of hot debate in legal literature. This was diminished by 1970 with state funding for dialysis and ended in 1972 with Medicare funding. Also, the efficacy of dialysis was being questioned, although Seattle was more successful at keeping patients alive longer. Later it was mentioned by Dr. Blagg that this was largely because there was no real transplant program in Seattle, so that the people here worked harder to make the dialysis program successful.

New dialysis techniques also played a part in the success of the program: The Middle Molecule idea, allowing home dialysis, played a large part in dealing with the two kinds of toxins, small and large, causing uremia problems and alleviating that. Molecule hypothesis had an enormous impact on the development of new membranes. For example: new dialysis techniques and new definitions of the adequacy of dialysis as a whole series of experiments were designed to demonstrate that this was so. Peritoneal dialysis saved patients who were dying even with the artificial kidney shunt. There was a great danger of peritonitis, but if a catheter was inserted each time, so that fluid was flushed in and out of the area cleansing blood in the peritoneum, this danger was diminished.

The Tenckhoff Catheter designed by Russell Palmer, and Quinton developed tunneling under the peritoneum, and made it possible to have permanent access to the peritoneum. Two cuffs were hooked on to the peritoneal catheter, which gave access to the peritoneum and became the standard access to this day. Peritoneal dialysis invented by Fred Boone took off with Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis created by Popovich, a student of L. Babb in the department of Nuclear Engineering CAPD, allowed peritoneal permeability. It used the peritoneal membrane to introduce fluid in each, 6 hours 7 days a week or fewer days depending on the patient’s size and activities. Even though Seattle was successful with dialysis, other cities and medicinal centers were not, and the establishment did not accept Seattle’s, being afraid of the cost. But the prevention of kidney disease would continue to be underfunded, and no one has yet discovered the identity of the toxic substance, which causes the kidney disease itself.

Other interests of Dr. Scribner: The growing importance of catheter use, which occurred with the Artificial Gut or home parenteral nutrition using the Broliac catheter (1969) (People with serious bowel disease have ruined blood vessels in the gut as in Krohn’s disease). Those patients died of starvation; but with the Artificial Gut a lumen catheter is firmly planted in the chest, and fluid with protein, salts, and sugars are pumped into the chest. This was a successful procedure by 1975, though there was disapproval and non-acceptance by the department of Gastroenterology. In Oncology triple lumen catheters are inserted with drugs, nutrition, and one for sampling. These are used at the Fred Hutchinson Center. Patients who lose their bowel function are dependent upon these catheters.

Transplantation was introduced in Seattle, but the shortage of donors was acute, and thus the dialysis program prospered here.

Death with Dignity is another issue with which Dr. Scribner is concerned, especially with terminating the care for those patients who no longer want to carry on. He apparently has spent much time trying to deal sympathetically with this issue. Henry Jackson, and Senators Hill and Long were influential in these crucial problems, both with whom shall be given dialysis and whoever shall be allowed to die who wants to do so. Also, a movie, “Who Shall Die?” was made concerning the issue of nursing homes keeping patients alive against their will in order to receive remuneration for doing so.

Dr. Scribner received many awards, the most important, he feels, being the Markle Award. Another was being chosen as one of the eight Fellows of the Hammersmith Post-Graduate Medical School, where he had worked many years before. During a talk given at the dedication, he was asked to demonstrate to the Queen on how to mold by hand the Teflon shunt used in the artificial kidney machine. Added to the awards, $1,000,000 has been given for a Scribner Chair in the UWMC, which he hopes (in 1986) will be dedicated to clinical investigation. Also, nearly one-half million people have benefited from dialysis of which the shunt was the beginning; but there are many problems still caused by dialysis that need to be addressed, such as dialysis arthritis. Dr. Scribner firmly admits that Kidney dialysis is in need of better equipment still.

Content DescriptionReturn to Top

Charts, media, conferences and conventions, writings, correspondence, reports, medical records, newsletters, clippings, subject series, photographs.

Use of the CollectionReturn to Top

Restrictions on Use

Some restrictions exist on copying, quotation or publication. Contact Special Collections for details.

Administrative InformationReturn to Top


Detailed Description of the CollectionReturn to Top

Accession No. 3301-001: Belding Scribner papers, 1949-1980 (bulk 1960-1972)Return to Top

8 cubic feet (8 boxes)

Scope and Content: Correspondence, legislative, subject files, grant and contract records, 1950-1978 (bulk 1960-1969).

Restrictions on Access: Open to all users, but access to portions of the papers restricted. Contact repository for details.

Acquisition Info: Donor: Belding Scribner, May 31, 1982

Description Dates
Biographical Items
1961-1963
General Correspondence
With Patients
1961-1963
Dialysis Correspondence, General
1960-1961
General Correspondence (Alphabetical)
Advanced Instruments, Inc.
1959-1963
American Hospital Supply Corporation
1961-1962
American Sterilizer Company
1962-1964
Annals of Internal Medicine
1972
Dawborn, John
1967
Dreyfus Medical Foundation
1975
Geisinger Artificial Kidney Center
1962-1965
Goenka, R.N.
1965
Innova
1969
King County Hospital System
1960-1963
Mayo Clinic
1963
Medical Television Productions
1964
Medifacts
1972
National Dialysis Committee
1966
National Kidney Disease Foundation
1966
National Kidney Research Foundation, England
1971
New England Journal of Medicine
1977
Pacific Northwest Kidney Center
1963
Rochester Products Compnay
1951-1962
Sacred Heart Hospital, Spokane
1963-1965
San Francisco Foundation
1965-1966
Seattle Artificial Kidney Center
1961-1963
Shaldon, Stanley
1964
Srinivasan, Souri
1961-1964
Stanford Research Institute
1964-1966
Sweden Freezer Manufacturing Company
1962-1964
Tally Register Corporation
1960-1962
Technicon
1962-1964
U.S. Health, Education and Welfare Department
1971-1972
U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
1978
Western Association of Physicians
1972
Western Gear Corporation
1962-1967
Western Gear Corporation
1962-1967
Reports, Annual
U.W. Medicine Department
1967-1972
U.W. Nephrology Department
1968-1970
U.W. . Nephrology Division
1968-1970
W.U. Hospital, Nursing Services
1967-1968
Research Notes
Artificial Gut (Restricted) Includes Patient Files, Subject Files (11 Folders)
Dialysis Treatment Research (20 Folders)
1963-1972
Subject Series
General
Acid-Base Study
Artificial Kidney (Human Technics)
Blood Pressure Survey
Chronic Dialysis Program
Chronic Uremia
Clinical Research Center Summary
Cobe Plan
Cross-Circulation
Electrolyte Movie
Ethics
Euthanasia
Gottschalls Report
Health Staff Seminar
Hemodialysis Centers
Home Dialysis
Home vs. Center
Human Subjects Experimentation
Jaundice Survey
Markle Foundation
National Typing Plan
Patient Selection
Peritoneal Dialysis
Peritoneal Dialysis Community Center
Physio Control Patent
Professional Fees
Regional Centers
Regional Organization of NKDF
Research Protocols
Self-Service Dialysis Concept
Site Visit
Sodium
Space
Transplant Policy
Transplant Kidney Program
Transplantation
Veterans Administration Dialysis
Urine Chloride Method
Urine Sugar
Ward Physician
Ward Procedure
Legislation (Includes Testimony, Correspondence files re: national medical care and kidney disease control.) 20 Folders
Grants, Contracts, Funding (File titles are by subject or granting agency, but in received random order)
Publications (Correspondence, Drafts of papers, Chapters, Articles, Syllabii)
Conferences and Conventions (Arranged in Received Order)
Patient Files
Robin Rady
Clyde Shields
Artificial Kidney (Various Patients)
Helm Report (Various Patients)
Subgroups
American Federation for Clinical Research
1955
Seattle Artificial Kidney Center (5 Folders, Committee, Advisory Board Records, BHS was chair/medical Advisory Committee)
1961-1964
Washington/Alaska Regional Medical Program (2 Folders)
1971-1972
U.W. Conjoint Course 446-447 (5 Folders, Correspondence, Reports, BHS was chair)
1950-1962
U.W. Hospital Chronic Care Coordinating Committee (2 Folders)
1967-1968
U.W. Hospital Clinical Research Center (2 Folders)
1964-1972
U.W. Journal Club

Accession No. 3301-002: Belding H. Scribner papers, undatedReturn to Top

7 cubic feet (7 boxes)

Scope and Content: Dr. Belding Scribner's Renal Patient's Charts: Clyde Shields (Hard copy, vols. 1-23, 00-36-98); Harvey Gentry (Hard Copy , vols. 1-25, 00-10-12); Rolin Heming (Hard Copy, vols. 1-21, 00-58-79); Joanne Davidson (Hard copy, vols. 2-9, 03-09-51); James Albers (Micrf., vols. 1-3, 00-00-68); Frank Capeloto (Micrf., vols. 1-3, 00-69-52); James Rivera (Micrf., vols. 1-6, 01-97-25)

Restrictions on Access: Access restricted: For terms of access contact repository

Acquisition Info: Donor: Eugenia Terry, July 12, 1982.

Accession No. 3301-003: Belding H. Scribner film, circa 1975Return to Top

0.21 cubic feet (1 box)
1 film reel (16 mm)

Scope and Content: Film: "Hemodialysis in the treatment of chronic uremia" (artificial kidney), n.d.

Restrictions on Use: Public Records (public disclosure laws may restrict access to some files).

Acquisition Info: Transferred from Instructional Media Services, September 16, 1982.

Accession No. 3301-004: Belding H. Scribner papers, 1960-1988Return to Top

0.21 cubic feet (1 box)
1 videocassette (VHS)

Scope and Content: Videocassette: "Grandad on T.V." VHS

Restrictions on Access: Open to all users.

Acquisition Info: Donor: Belding Scribner, August 22, 1991.

Accession No. 3301-005: Belding H. Scribner papers, 1960-1986Return to Top

4 cubic feet (5 boxes)

Scope and Content: Box 1-2: Writings. Box 3-5, References and Notes by Topic

Restrictions on Access: Open to all users.

Acquisition Info: Donor: Belding Scribner, August 29, 1991.

Accession No. 3301-006: Belding H. Scribner papers, 1957-1983Return to Top

4 cubic feet (4 boxes)

Scope and Content: Conferences and conventions, writings of Scribner, writings of others, 1957-1983.

Restrictions on Access: Open to all users.

Acquisition Info: Donor: Petra Erwin, July 14, 1992.

Accession No. 3301-007: Belding H. Scribner papers, 1955-1983Return to Top

6.42 cubic feet (7 boxes)

Scope and Content: Correspondence, reports, autopsy reports, medical records, annual reports, statistics, newsletters, clippings, subject series, 1955-1982.

Restrictions on Access: Access restricted: For terms of access contact repository.

Acquisition Info: Donor: Petra Erwin, March 17 and August 2, 1993.

Accession No. 3301-008: Shunted cannulation of blood vessels, 1960Return to Top

0.17 cubic feet (1 16 mm film reel)
Motion Picture Film

Scope and Content: 16mm film showing surgical installation of the shunt which enabled kidney dialysis; 1960.

Restrictions on Access: Open to all users.

Acquisition Info: Donor: Belding Scribner, September 8, 1997.

Accession No. 3301-009: Videotapes, 1965-1982Return to Top

0.42 cubic feet (1 box)
5 videocassettes

Scope and Content: Videocassettes include a closed-circuit television program for physicians, produced by Duke University in 1965, featuring John P. Merrill, David Hume, Belding Scribner, and Eugene Stead, moderator. The Schmechel videocassettes apparently were dubbed from a long interview by Christopher Blagg, director of the Northwest Kidney Center, 1982. Don Schmechel arranged for the dubbing; his planning notes are included. Span dates of this accession are 1965-1982.

Restrictions on Access: Open to all users, but access to portions of the papers restricted. Contact repository for details.

Description Dates
Tape I
Scope and Content: The tape begins with a long biographical sketch of Dr. Scribner.Part I: A Demonstration of the workings of a 1951 rotating drum kidney dialysis with a patient (artificial kidney use). It shows a cut-down procedure to obtain the radial artery for insertion of a tube from the drum, in order to use the machine as an artificial ventricle during surgery. The tube will enter a vein after, blood is pumped by a compressor through the tube on the rotating drum (venous return). There follows a discussion of drugs used, e.g., Heparin for non-clotting and others for prevention of products in blood which are normally excreted in kidneys and can cause untoward symptoms and death. Drugs are added to keep a normal percentage of electrolytes and a normal Ph level. This constitutes the use of dialyzing tubing wrapped around a drum through which blood flows from the radial artery and is cleansed before the venous return.This 1951 demonstration is given by John P. Merrill, Instructor and Associate of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston presented by the Surgery Film Library of Davis and Gelk, Inc., Brooklyn, NY.Part II: Colleagues in Close-Up II. A panel discussion led by Eugene Stead, M.D., of Duke University Medical School with David Hume, M.D., John P. Merrill, M.D., of Harvard Medical School, with a special report from Seattle, Washington by Belding H. Scribner, M.D., of the University of WA.The discussion begins with Dr. Scribner’s showing a film of the first patient to have received hemo-dialysis leading a normal life. He avers that the artificial kidney in-stage kidney release can replace the life-sustaining functions of the human kidney. There were fifteen other patients (research patients only) on dialysis in WA state at the time. Dr. Scribner gives a review of new technics, which prevent problems during dialysis evolving to automatic dialysis with no changes in fluids given and no nurse present. He admits, however, to problems arising with dialysis: Anemia, Gout, Neuropathy (degeneration of nerves) and Psychiatric problems due to inadequate dialysis.Drs. Merrill and Hume discuss kidney transplants with the difficulties involved: rejection, the types of donors available (related, unrelated, or cadavers) and the success of the procedure.Because of the expense of the procedures both physicians state that they can do better with more conservative treatments. However, Dr. Scribner supports the use of hemo-dialysis as a successful treatment for renal insufficiency diseases.
1951
Tape II
Scope and Content: The first part of Tape II is a discussion of the politics and practices at Hammersmith Postgraduate Medical School of which Dr. Scribner disapproved. He was very critical of the treatment of some of the patients there.The interview returns to Dr. Scribner’s career in the treatment of renal failure. Three men had preceded him: Alvahl in Sweden, MacNeill in Toronto, and Kolff, who perfected his twin coil machine under Nazi occupation. The development of this Artificial Kidney machine was used to solve problems of acute renal failure of victims of World War II until the kidney healed. It was a temporary but vital sustaining of kidney function during this critical illness. An Artificial Kidney device removes toxins through a membrane in the artery; the membrane has tiny holes through which poisons flow out of blood, but that membrane in the artery keeps back red cells and plasma. This is a molecular separator function of the normal kidney.Next on the tape, there follows a report of the three patients who survived and the question of the treatment of malignant hypertension. Dr. Scribner had cured the first patient by treating him with dialysis and pulling the fluid out of his patient with dialysis. However, others were certain that salt aided in the treatment of hypertension, especially an English physician, Dr. Pickering, after his work with hypertension and salt-intake in Welsh miners.
no date
Tape III
Scope and Content: The Seattle Life and Death Committee and the Issue of Selection of Patients for Dialysis.
No Date
Tape IV
Scope and Content: Dr. Scribner reminisces about the use of the teaching bedside kits for dialysis “on the go” in the early years of dialysis and the fluid electrolyte field in use then.Discussing problems in medicine as a whole, i.e., profit making, political problems prevents his suggesting with any enthusiasm that anyone go into medicine at this time. Industry makes huge profits from inventions in medicine but does not give it back for further research. For example: Dr. Robert Bruce’s invention of the treadmill from which he has received no profit, whatsoever. There is a problem also with the difference in care given in the home and that in the hospital; the former get much less care than those who are hospitalized. Also, chronic care nursing homes’ patients who do not want extra care get it anyway, because the nursing homes make money by keeping them alive.There is also some discussion of foreigners trained by Dr. Scribner. One of these was a patient of his, Dr. Robert Eady, a well-known Dermatologist in London, who is still receiving dialysis, as well as a young Philippine man who treated President Marcos.
No Date

Accession No. 3301-010: Belding H. Scribner Papers, 1949-1980Return to Top

1.34 cubic ft. (2 boxes)
videocassettes
photographs

Scope and Content: Clippings, books, videotapes, photographs; 1949-1980.

Includes a LIFE article (1962) concerned with the Seattle Artificial Kidney Center's Admissions and Policy Committee, the Center's Medical Advisory Committee, and the Center's kidney dialysis machine. Several books document Professor's Scribner's contributions to the early field of kidney dialysis, in particular his creation of the arteriovenous shunt in 1960. Also includes early recordings of lectures, interviews, and presentations, as well as prints and negatives of Dr. Scribner and the early dialysis machines.

Restrictions on Access: Open to all users.

Acquisition Info: Received July 8, 2004.

Container(s) Description Dates
Box
1
3/4" Videocassettes
Box
1
Copy of "Artificial Kidney Kampen"
1949
1
"Who Shall Live?" - NBC News with Edwin Newman
1965
1
"Old Kinescopes" / "Shunted Cannulation of Blood Vessels" / "John P. Merrill" / "Colleagues in Close Up II - Part 3"
1951-1964
box:oversize
2
Clippings
Box
2
Seattle Artificial Kidney Center Admissions and Policy Committee
Scope and Content: A copy of the November 9, 1962 issue of Life that contains an article on the Seattle committee and their efforts to select candidates for treatment with the Center's kidney dialysis machine.
1962
2
Books
Box
2
Genesis of the Artificial Kidney, by Patrick T. McBride
1979
2
Giving Medications, edited by Richard Samuel West
1980
2
Photographs
Box
2
Dr. Belding Scribner
Scope and Content: One 16 x 20 b/w print of Dr. Belding Scribner.
n.d.
2
Early Dialysis Machines
Scope and Content: One 16 x 20 b/w print of early dialysis machines.
n.d.
2
Negatives
Scope and Content: Six negative images used to create the two 16 x 20 prints of Dr. Belding Scribner and the early dialysis machines.
n.d.
Biographical Items
1961-1963
General Correspondence
With Patients
1961-1963
Dialysis Correspondence, General
1960-1961
General Correspondence (Alphabetical)
Advanced Instruments, Inc.
1959-1963
Amerian Hospital Supply Corporation
1961-1962
American Sterilizer Company
1962-1964
Annals of Internal Medicine
1972
Dawborn, John
1967
Dreyfus Medical Foundation
1975
Geisinger Artificial Kidney Center
1962-1965
Goenka, R.N.
1965
Innova
1969
King County Hospital System
1960-1963
Mayo Clinic
1963
Medical Television Productions
1964
Medifacts
1972
National Dialysis Committee
1966
National Kidney Disease Foundation
1966
National Kidney Research Foundation, England
1971
New England Journal of Medicine
1977
Pacific Northwest Kidney Center
1963
Rochester Products Compnay
1951-1962
Sacred Heart Hospital, Spokane
1963-1965
San Francisco Foundation
1965-1966
Seattle Artificial Kidney Center
1961-1963

Accession No. 3301-011: Belding Scribner papers circa 1962 - circa 2002, Return to Top

5.75 cubic feet (6 boxes)

Scope and Content: Correspondence, publications, news clippings, awards, photographs.

Restrictions on Access: Access restricted: For terms of access contact Special Collections

Acquisition Info: Donor: Elizabeth Scribner, September 28, 2012.

Container(s) Description
Box
1
Book, science news, misc. clippings
2
ChraFax, Dialysis history
3
Chair/Lasker prize and awards
4
Correspondence; committee papers
5
Personal papers
6
Clippings

Accession No. 3301-012: Belding Scribner papers 1960 - 2005, Return to Top

12.77 cubic feet (16 boxes)

Scope and Content: Documents, photos, plaques, awards, and certificates related to Belding Scribner's studies and life.

Restrictions on Access: Access restricted: For terms of access contact Special Collections

Acquisition Info: Donor: Elizabeth Scribner, 2012.

Container(s) Description
Box
1
letters, clippings
2
letter, videotapes
3
correspondence, articles, clippings
4
photographs and documents
5
Correspondence, notes, photographs
6
personal notes (restricted)
7
photographs
8
books, papers, correspondence, clippings
9
plaques and awards
box:oversize
10
scrapbooks and photograph albums
11
plaque and photographs
Box
12
photographs
13
photographs
14
photographs
15
photographs
folder:oversize
16
"thank you" documentation and oversize card

Accession No. 3301-013: Belding H. Scribner videotapes, 1951-2003, undatedReturn to Top

1 cubic foot (1 box)
26 VHS videocassettes, 3 beta videocassettes, 1 audiocassette

Scope and Content: Video and sound cassettes relating to the history of kidney dialysis and Dr. Scribner.

Custodial History: Tapes were originally owned by Belding Scribner, and were later given to Christopher Blagg.

Restrictions on Access: Open to all users.

Acquisition Info: Donor: Christopher Blagg, April 19, 2013.